20 Burst results for "Lexicon Valley"

On the Origin of English

Lexicon Valley

13:10 min | 2 d ago

On the Origin of English

"So here is the basic story. The idea is that germanic goes back to some original language. We call it proto germanic. We can't know what it speakers would've called it. There was this original language that became german and english and swedish et cetera and that would have been spoken probably in that little neck of denmark or maybe a little southwards of that in. Let's say about five hundred bc. So that's where proto germanic would have started in the meantime there's a thesis that that language was profoundly impacted by invading or at least imposing people from the near east people from way down where there is today lebanon and syria and israel specifically it would be the phoenicians. The phoenicians were one of many people in that region and they would have spoken a semitic language. I e a language related to what we know today as hebrew and arabic and if we wanna go. Further afield aramaic and cross the red sea. And it's i'm hurric- in ethiopia. But they spoke of semitic language and we know what they spoke because they wrote it down because they actually were the first people who grabbed the alphabet when it was very quietly and scrap invented probably by mercenary soldiers in egypt. The finishes took it and made into something that they use. Basically to write down business related things they want writing epochs. They weren't writing the grapes of wrath. But they were writing and so the phoenicians are the ones who end up spreading the alphabet throughout the world. In any case more to the point the phoenicians were big travelers. they did not like to stay home. The phoenicians started ruling the roost. They were probably in about eleven hundred bc and they didn't just stay there they sailed. They traded they got themselves around what was then considered by people like them the world throughout the mediterranean they keep on going westward and of course once you get out to where there's no more land while you might start going up into like spain and they kind of around the coast they traded. They brought things back. They were great intermediaries now in the middle east. They had their cities like like tire and blows or carthage. That you hear so much about on the north coast of africa that is phoenician or punic territory but they sailed and you know there is evidence that they sailed not only to roughly spain and portugal. Which is what we have absolutely concrete evidence for them doing but as evidence that they kept going and they went all the way up to northern europe and past. What's now germany. And they actually would have gone all the way to that part of denmark. One little piece of evidence is that they got people. Amber got some amber in greece. If you've got some amber and what is today lebanon. While the amber as often as not from up in that baltic northern european region they had a lot of amber amber is pretty. I think amber is preserving bits of dinosaur tales and insects and things like that but also just gorgeous you kind of want to bite it. Big amber trade. Well they always seem to have it. We'll have they get it. Well it would seem that. They had some sort of connection to northern europe. That in itself doesn't mean that they sailed all the way up there and got it because there were ways of trading amber just a cross the european continent but the fact that they had so much amber is one of a great many things. It's like the spokes in a wheel. An argument is about various things that all seem to point in the same direction. What about that amber. But more to the point it's about the language what is wrong with manic. Why is it so odd. Well what is this case that these people came from the near east and sailed all the way up around your understand. What the thesis is. The idea is that speakers of phoenician settled in somewhere in this part of denmark and there was long-term settlement where speakers of this phoenician and speakers of this thing we called proto germanic mixed to the point that many people were basically speaking proto germanic in phoenician to an extent this is what we linguists call language contact theory. The idea being that proto germanic ended up being really stamped by this other way of being a language because there would have been these settlements where venetians ruled the roost and their language seemed to be the cool one and it was the one that people switch to so the proto germanic ended up being profoundly affected it kind of wanted to be cool and became more like venetian. What's the evidence that that happened given that. There is no archaeological evidence. Partly because what would have been the shore back then has since become underwater. So we can't really dig up wear. The settlements probably would have been well. One of the things is words. So as i said so many words in germanic languages don't trace back. They just pop up all of a sudden it's about one in three and that's a conservative estimate. Now some of the experts. Just don't give a damn about that. And they have other things to do. They have bigger fish to fry in that as perfectly understandable. Sometimes you just don't give a damn you know what i don't care about. For example i do not care about outer space. I remember when there was the apollo landing and everybody was so excited and they actually rolled in a little black and white. Tv into my classroom. We were supposed to watch. I didn't care. I'm more interested in what's going on here astrophysics. I respect it. But i do not care about saturn

Denmark Lebanon Spain Red Sea Syria Ethiopia Carthage Europe Egypt Israel Mediterranean Portugal Middle East Baltic Amber Greece Africa Germany European
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

07:07 min | 3 months ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley. . A podcast about language I'm John Mc, , water and this week you know what I'm going to do frankly what I usually do, , which is just bring you in what was I thinking about over the past week or two? ? And it was a bunch of things but I happened to be revising an academic paper that I'm writing and that paper happens to be about black English I don't usually do those but I mean exception with this one because it's a topic that really grabs me and you know when deciding what to do the show about I thought you know I'm going to do what I'm thinking about I. . Don't WanNa, , do it about Comma Harris or something like that I'm not. . Sure. . What I could get out of that I wanNA do me and so I'm gonNA share with you some stuff about the always fascinating dialect of American English black. . English. . It's called by academics usually. . African American vernacular English but I have a hard time saying that so we're just going to call it black English and we're GONNA, look , at it from various angles that I have been sitting around laying around still in semi quarantine these days and one of the things is. . GonNa be the lost. . Am That's what my papers about, , and this is something that I've brought up on this show before, , and that is the question as to whether actual black. . American people ever as linguists call it over generalized an in two persons and numbers beyond where it would go and standard English and so for example, , I'll tell you I am a person but in characters of black speech back in the day, , the idea was that black people used am with all. . Pronouns, , and so you am this he am that we and the other thing that's something associated with minstrel shows and comic strips, , and you would think you would quite reasonably think that that's something that white performers made up as a way of making fun of black people. . That's what I thought for a very long time. . But after a while various indications seem to suggest to me that actually wait a minute black people did once us am in a different way than mainstream. . English does, , and of course, it , wasn't all black people but there have always been different ways of speaking even here in America and it seemed to me that well, , you know as I'm always telling all of you language always changes and black English is no exception and so it seemed to me maybe actually the minstrels overdid it they were characterizing but maybe there was that different usage of an because all these things seemed indicated and in a show that I did. Probably . back in about nineteen forty seven remember when I used to be sponsored by kraft macaroni and cheese way back. . Then I said that one evidence of this is that there are vernacular British dialects. . The US am in just that way you am we am the black country in Britain is sometimes called the people who are the Yam yams and what they mean by that is that they say you am saw gave you some evidence of that but that was that was. Back . right after the Second World War and so what about newer evidence? Well, ? , first of all, , what do I mean by this as you might call it over generalized am well, , here is one of the latest examples of it in pop culture. . This is a highly insignificant. . Hollywood. . Cartoon from the studio that gave us such indelible characterizations as Casper, , the friendly ghost and Herman and Catnip who were about the closest thing in real life to itchy and scratchy on the simpsons in. . Any case, one , of their other indelible characters was buzzy the Crow Buzzy. The . Crow was supposed to clearly supposed to be this this black American little character remember the Dumbo crows while Buzzy was <hes>, , an extension of that, , and so buzzy uses reflections of the old minstrel dialect. . This is a cartoon called no IFS ands or buts, , but spelled with two t's it's about smoking and this is what buzzy says about a cat who seems to have a smoking addiction listened closely. . Tobacco smoking. . To know. . That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. . Okay. . So that's the character. . But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. . We're we're circling in. . We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. . That I've found. So . for example, , there is a novel written by a Black Man, , very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, , ninety, , nine it's called imperium in Imperio, , and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. . So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, , he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, , the speech of. . People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. . We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and , this is a black. . Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, , his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, , granddaddy arteries after so. . Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. . His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. . Arteries. . granddaddy. . What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. . So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. . Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. . That is that the best they can do of course, , not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. . After, , because, , after can become after. . After that is the way many people in for example, , Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, , which has

Buzzy Comma Harris New York City John Mc Lexicon Valley US America Casper Hollywood Britain Herman
This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

Lexicon Valley

07:07 min | 3 months ago

This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley. A podcast about language I'm John Mc, water and this week you know what I'm going to do frankly what I usually do, which is just bring you in what was I thinking about over the past week or two? And it was a bunch of things but I happened to be revising an academic paper that I'm writing and that paper happens to be about black English I don't usually do those but I mean exception with this one because it's a topic that really grabs me and you know when deciding what to do the show about I thought you know I'm going to do what I'm thinking about I. Don't WanNa, do it about Comma Harris or something like that I'm not. Sure. What I could get out of that I wanNA do me and so I'm gonNA share with you some stuff about the always fascinating dialect of American English black. English. It's called by academics usually. African American vernacular English but I have a hard time saying that so we're just going to call it black English and we're GONNA, look at it from various angles that I have been sitting around laying around still in semi quarantine these days and one of the things is. GonNa be the lost. Am That's what my papers about, and this is something that I've brought up on this show before, and that is the question as to whether actual black. American people ever as linguists call it over generalized an in two persons and numbers beyond where it would go and standard English and so for example, I'll tell you I am a person but in characters of black speech back in the day, the idea was that black people used am with all. Pronouns, and so you am this he am that we and the other thing that's something associated with minstrel shows and comic strips, and you would think you would quite reasonably think that that's something that white performers made up as a way of making fun of black people. That's what I thought for a very long time. But after a while various indications seem to suggest to me that actually wait a minute black people did once us am in a different way than mainstream. English does, and of course, it wasn't all black people but there have always been different ways of speaking even here in America and it seemed to me that well, you know as I'm always telling all of you language always changes and black English is no exception and so it seemed to me maybe actually the minstrels overdid it they were characterizing but maybe there was that different usage of an because all these things seemed indicated and in a show that I did. Probably back in about nineteen forty seven remember when I used to be sponsored by kraft macaroni and cheese way back. Then I said that one evidence of this is that there are vernacular British dialects. The US am in just that way you am we am the black country in Britain is sometimes called the people who are the Yam yams and what they mean by that is that they say you am saw gave you some evidence of that but that was that was. Back right after the Second World War and so what about newer evidence? Well, first of all, what do I mean by this as you might call it over generalized am well, here is one of the latest examples of it in pop culture. This is a highly insignificant. Hollywood. Cartoon from the studio that gave us such indelible characterizations as Casper, the friendly ghost and Herman and Catnip who were about the closest thing in real life to itchy and scratchy on the simpsons in. Any case, one of their other indelible characters was buzzy the Crow Buzzy. The Crow was supposed to clearly supposed to be this this black American little character remember the Dumbo crows while Buzzy was an extension of that, and so buzzy uses reflections of the old minstrel dialect. This is a cartoon called no IFS ands or buts, but spelled with two t's it's about smoking and this is what buzzy says about a cat who seems to have a smoking addiction listened closely. Tobacco smoking. To know. That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. Okay. So that's the character. But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. We're we're circling in. We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. That I've found. So for example, there is a novel written by a Black Man, very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, ninety, nine it's called imperium in Imperio, and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, the speech of. People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and this is a black. Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, granddaddy arteries after so. Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. Arteries. granddaddy. What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. That is that the best they can do of course, not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. After, because, after can become after. After that is the way many people in for example, Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, which has

Jill Belton Piedmont Buzzy Sutton Griggs New York City Jack Comma Harris Georgia John Mc Lexicon Valley Piedmont United States America Hollywood Casper Yorkshire Imperio Britain
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

06:33 min | 9 months ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"The way it goes is arrive son. Late Moscow home food ones. Dust food mud. Stu can play with but not can eat em. That's all and what this shows you. It's funny reading old Chinese. I like the implication that I sit in a chair sipping Bourbon Riedel Chinese on purpose but reading all Chinese is interesting because you know nobody talked like that. It's just that they don't indicate they didn't see it as necessary to indicate on the page a lot of what we now know where certain prefixes suffixes they were almost definitely using. The language was richer than dust. Food Mud's do can play with but not any eat Nobody talks like that. But you never know. There's so much that we don't actually write out where we just think of something that you wouldn't put on the page where people in the future might think that we are quite insane. So for example. I'll say something like you know we could try this just us. You know you know we could try this K- you know now. Here is a clip of Ray saying those same. Two words on the Marvelous Archer listened to him. Saying you know. We've trained for this Cyril. On God's we need cover on it. Krieger spool up. Hyperspace drive spooling Cheryl get to your fighter Bray. You're still useless. So this is that you know. Lana says it a lot on the show too. You know and that you know means. I'm getting really tired of being abused this way. I'm really thinking about just pulling away from all of this completely. So there's my you know you know then there's no now then last week remember. Radio Comedian Ed. Wynn and his you know market you. Please play again where he's making the little joke about chickens philly. I barely do thing high up you know. And she brought tonight on the head of a of a sundress yet at the head up. Let's go to the second day of plenty the chicken neck. I love that of you. Don't want to get in trouble. You better lay off so you know has a completely different connotation than here is the honeymooners. Here's Ralph Kramden yelling at Alice. You know that I know well. That's a different you know. Listen to this excuse. Europe rate coming in excuse a hyun on and I know you don't know what goes on here all day fooling around so noticed that intonation is everything there's my you know there's raise you know the. Who Wins you know? And there's Ralph Kramden to you know all of them are completely different and has nothing to do with the tones of all of those voices. Why don't we write that sort of thing we could but it's a matter of where you draw the line and we draw on one side of all of these things linguists call for example pragmatics by the way that line thing where you draw the line. That is the way you can get into any conversation. I guarantee you if you are watching people talk about something and you don't quite know where to jump in. You can't quite do like black girls jumping in when they double Dutch jump rope. You can't quite you don't know where to get in the way that you get into any conversation whether you know anything about it or not. Is that when there's a lull? You say well it just depends on where you draw the line. Somebody will always turn around and say well yes of course and then either you keep going or you. Let them keep going. Because you don't really know anything about it but then you're in the conversation and you look like you know what you're talking about. That is your advice for this week since we're talking about old Chinese this final musical clip is from the nineteen forty eight Hugh Martin musical. Look Ma I'm dancing and this is one of the early songs in it. It's called God dance. Not The one that you're familiar with from singing in the rain but a different one and this. Harold Lang singing. My Mother didn't Razor Board Dancer. That was not her father. Hoped I'd be engineer up in Ansi ads. What he was wishing. So I'm afraid that they could never love me with my arms above me and the physician but I'm a guy who's got a dance. They'll know exactly. It's me that's bad. Isn't that a great verse? Just that verse part might play that again. Just just the first and then keep it going the craft of just the beginning of. It's not really about anything important. I just love the way he gets the words and the tune together so nicely Razor Dancer. That was not her mission. Be Engineer up in and see that what he was wishing so. I'm afraid that they good. Nah Ella me with my arms above me and the physician guy who's got a dance don't know exactly it and I'm I'm anyway. You can reach us. Let'S VALLEY AT SLATE DOT com. That's Lexicon Valley at slate. Dot Com to listen to pass shows subscriber just to reach out go to slate. Dot Com Slash Lexicon Valley. By the way Hugh Martin had a minor hit in London. It was called love from Judy. If you WANNA big up stuff from that I recommend a song called a touch of. It's about sex. Might Volvo is as always the editor and I am John Dance At one knows me knows who God.

Food Mud Hugh Martin Ralph Kramden Lexicon Valley Wynn Bourbon Riedel Chinese engineer Lana Stu Moscow Judy Europe Harold Lang Cheryl Volvo Ray Ed philly John Dance London
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"By the way folks if you WanNa know what Fra Batch and obese have in common. Well you know you've got to get slate. Plus for a nominal fee you can not only hear little ending segments. It's like a tag on an old sitcom ending segments where I talk about often things quite unrelated to the topic of the show. But just things that tickled my fancy here that and you don't have to hear me or anybody else do any ads. You just get the show plus the extra thing and the money doesn't just line my pockets. The money is to pay not only for Lexicon Valley but for all of the other superior podcast slate does its money for that. It's a nominal fee. You get extra bits including with the other podcasts. And you don't have to listen to any commercials. Creole's are also really mixed languages. So for example. You're in South America. You're in Suriname a country. That's on the northern coast of South America America. It is a tropical nation. There was plantation slavery. There there were. Slaves brought their speaking many languages to work sugar plantations. It was the English who were the overlords at first. And well. You know you're adult slave. Nobody's terribly interested in learning language. You are not terribly interested in embracing the language of these violent oppressors. And yet you gotTa talk sometimes to them. Sometimes to these other Africans who speak languages that you've never heard of so what you end up getting is a collection of a few hundred English words and you come up with a grammar to put them together with based on shreds and shards of the languages languages that you and the other slaves speak and next thing you know you have a new thing in Surinam. That new thing was called shrine on Swan on is a real language. You go to Paramaribo the capital of Suriname. You find that people of all colors communicate familiarly in this language front on which we almost never hear anything about in the United States. It's one of my favorite creoles for that and many reasons but here is an example of it. There was a Guy Henry Franz Frans deal he went by the name. TRYPHOSA TRYPHOSA was is Suriname's most famous poet. He's not alive anymore but he is one of many people who demonstrated in straighted that creoles are real languages in that for example you can write beautiful poetry in them and so here. I'm GONNA play you one of his most famous famous poems sung by a person. She's doing it under me now and let's hear this line that she sings..

Suriname South America TRYPHOSA TRYPHOSA Swan Creole Lexicon Valley Henry Franz Frans Paramaribo United States
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"A Mrs Garrett. WHO's a little more more uptight as a class issue? That doesn't translate into American but all of a sudden Mrs Slocombe says something about Pussy and I had to rewind because I thought did that person on that show just use that word in reference not to a cat and in fact it was a running joke on. Are you being served that Mrs Slocombe would make these references to do that and they always made it clear right after that. She was talking about her cat but the double entendre was clear. And each one of those lines still gives me belly less. Here's a a quick little montage of the sort of thing which was playing on British television for ordinary people in the seventies. One Minute late. You're lucky to have me at all Captain Peacock Nipple see up with Laura. I can't. Mr Voted likes nowhere. You're well the central into heating group down to the of the node not proceed to spend an evening in this club. They'll have to be accommodation. For My. The Mr Humphries leave my pussy This group of six night Busey Goes Matt. I'm laughing like I actually just heard the clips. It's it's not true. We don't use the clips lips during the taping of the show. I'm just doing my version of acting. That's giving you a sense of how the sausage is made. I haven't heard it in a week but in any case I'm going to do that again. That clip which I just heard here in the booth that is so funny. Just imagine a show made at the same time. Mary Tyler Moore. Can you imagine anybody you by saying anything about Pussy on that show even if it was technically about a cat can you mentioned Suen nevins saying something to Lou grant you know where she gets a cat and pats the cat and make some remark mark. They will be no way that would have gotten by standards even in the Post Watergate. Let it all hang out. Everybody's on the pill even men Seventies. There's no way so in Britain that word has a slightly different place or at least did in the seventies than it does now. You never know how these things are going to go. Because I consider her at my duty to treat you two important facts that one ought to know such as that Franklin Pierce's wife was named Jane or that Jello makes a peach variety. You should know the poet Edna St. Vincent Malay- had husband. Eugene Boisseau vein and Eugene Boisseau Vein referred to that that part that we're talking about not as a pussy but as a kitty just thought you might WanNa know that it's in the letters that he wrote to her. That is a very important fact. You're supposed to read Finnegans wake and you're supposed to know that he called it a kitty this song. I think so. Close US out today. This is I say shall because it's British Noel Coward. This song is called Chase Me Charlie. It's about a cat. No one seems to like this put me. I have tried to use it in various parts of my life and people are always very very polite. No one thinks this is cute but maybe I like it. This is Christine Ebersol singing about frankly a horny cat and you can reach us at Lexicon Valley at slate dot com. That's LEXICON VALLEY AT SLEEP DOT com. I promise you folks next week squeaky clean. We're going to have a book roundup and I promise you that will be more interesting than it sounds to listen to past. Susan subscribe to reach out. GO TO SLATE DOT COM Slash Lexicon Valley and I hope you won't hate me for having to wait a bit before I can give actual answers. Most of the time might Vullo is. There's always the editor and I am John. Chase me Charlie Chase Ricciardi. This is my the cat off the garden..

Mrs Slocombe Eugene Boisseau Vein Suen nevins US Mrs Garrett Christine Ebersol Mr Voted Charlie Chase Ricciardi Mary Tyler Moore Noel Coward Mr Humphries Edna St. Vincent Malay Lexicon Valley Laura editor Vullo Busey Susan Finnegans wake Britain
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley podcast about language I'm John Mc water And this week well you know Halloween is coming and so I guess I'm supposed to do a Halloween episode and so okay I can etymology sets from key Congo that's a an African language a Bantu language of the Niger Congo family spoken in Angola and some other countries and the word originally was Zombie and it was brought here by slaves actually so technically Zombie is a black thing Zombie. these are of course the living dead you know the stuff that we keep by extension for no reason like I have nine hundred CDs I'm not getting rid of them I have about four hundred DVD's I thought those were really it permanent the streaming thing I'm trying I still have a bro tractor I am just now realizing I no longer need a cable box in any case Zombie things actually permeate language as well and look at it on various levels an awful lot of what we use as language and think of as communication is Zombie material Oriole so that can be our Halloween theme this episode of Lexicon Valley is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy peer collaborations with sleet studios dairypure believes that the world will be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent and ourselves and each other that's what host Mallory cast and floors and how to raise a parent throughout the series she talks to parents and experts about how our kids can teach us to shift our perspectives conqueror fears and become more opened all the exciting things the world has to offer make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts the truth is I didn't start out planning this episode thinking about Halloween what really got me going was one of those things where you learn something long past your childhood it's something that you think you know everything about I actually don't know every word in the English language or I don't know the things that I should know about them because I just found out this week That vittles is not short for visuals visuals apparently doesn't exist you're not supposed to ever say it that way always figured vittles was something that you heard people saying in old westerns and that these were people who had the word visuals take the direction that it naturally would if it weren't used in writing but actually when you see the word visuals on a page no matter who is consuming these visuals it's supposed to be Vittles I had no idea Peter Sokolski I learned that from tweet of years sitting on the train and this whole episode ended up springing into my head of next five minutes I was just so surprised so it's one of those words that's like actually I've never seen this discuss but chitlins the intestines of pigs that up not eating watching my parents who were not Albanian black eating them and enjoying them very much and it was called Chitlins they don't smell Oh good when cooked apparently they tastes better when eaten one day I may find out but very late in life I realized that there's something written as Chitter Ling's which is the Chitlins everybody refers to and as far as I know I don't think anybody ever says Chitter Ling's not in any circumstances anybody who says it has to say Chit win that is the word well apparently vittles is like that and you know this reminds me of you guessed it but it's actually something all of you will like on some level Broadway song and it actually comes from something that had decayed in my memory this jellies last jam and I used to listen to the album all the time then for some reason I stopped and I thought there was a line in one of my favorite cuts in it where somebody says affectionately that woman who says affectionately I thought she said now I'm only GonNa say this once I off the line was Chitlins eaten bitches and I've been singing it that way in my head Ed for twenty years but actually it's Gumbo eaten and so anyway this is Michigan Water Blues and it's one of the most talking numbers in this show I I love this cut the death sometimes when I've had a bit to drink a marauding home on the train I'll just play this because somehow it seems to fit this can water meal.

New York City Lexicon Valley John Mc five minutes twenty years
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"This episode of Lexicon Valley is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy peer collaboration with slate late studios dairy pure believes that the world will be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent and ourselves each other. That's what how to raise. A parent is all about learning how to shift your perspective as a parent to reconnect with the imagination and openness to come so naturally to kids join host. Mallory casten as she talks to parents and experts about what makes kids so fearless creative and good at making friends and what we as adults can learn from them. The podcast explores the fun messy confusing and delightful aspects of being a parent through personal stories and broader insights from relevant experts. Make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise apparent wherever you get your podcasts. The idea was that English seem to want to keep things clean and detailed and persnickety and over explicit right but then it didn't an English started becoming the kind of language that we are now so for for example. You takes over like some kind of virus. It's really the oddest thing the way it's supposed to be is singular is thou how and then the plural is you. That's the way languages are supposed to work to do was altered or in German do as as opposed e- that's the way languages are supposed to work. You're supposed to have I you he she it then we y'all and they but no in English you jumped the rails and used to be used for singular persons. That's not the way it's supposed to be one way. We know is that remember knbr couple shows ago. We talked about how Fresian that language spoken over across the sea from England in the Netherlands. That's the closest language to English well. Freezing looks is like English in many ways but infusion. What you have is due for second person singular? They still have their reflects of thou and you know their word for they is hear so they're still dealing with the but the U. ends up taking over and it means that we're this strange language where we have the same word for second person person singular and plural now. Actually you can see it happening on paper. We can't resuscitate anybody in ask. Why did you do this but it's clear that you came to be processed as a respectful way of referring to a single person by implying for example that they were to entire people which can noted a certain distance and you can see within the same letter for example people wrote letters in sixteen twenty four a mother to a son how she switches between the Dow forms and the U. Forms according to what she's saying so for example. This is an actual letter from sixteen twenty four my good goodchild the Lord Bless Thee Evermore in thy goings out and I coming in so that's that's intimate. She has wiped his but then she says I was very glad to hear by your first letter that you were so safely arrived at your wished port so a letter is his kind of formal. It's kind of distant. It's something else it's outside of the context and so now she's referring to him as you and she's also referring to him out in the world being a respectable person so lord bless the but I was very glad to hear by your first letter that you were so safely arrived at your wish deport you know the spelling in this is just delightful and I'm leaving that because I want her to sound like normal person but it's actually things like you're. I let you wear so safely arrived. It's cute but that's not how she thought she was sounding so at your wish port but more glad to read the loving promises so when we're back to the loving the diapers at center then it's the Dow so more glad to Revi- loving promises which I hope she'll always were down to chiefly. Good wish my mother had ever talked talk to me like that. I could wish that you would settle yourself to certain hours tasks every day you rise so now. She's scolding him a little bit. She wants. I'm to brush his teeth. Medieval did brush their teeth and so certainly in sixteen twenty four some of this would have had to do the things like toothbrushes but I wish he would settle yourself certain hours tasks every day you rise this. I thought good to put the in mind of now she's being nice patting him on his dirty air believing believing thou wilt do this for my sake but more chiefly for dying owned. That's how it went so there was a time when you could balance between the two. I could have given you a Shakespeare example but I enjoy this more it. It reminds me of Familia Member Familia that serial. It seems to me that it's only given now two babies the very elderly and somebody who's got some sort of stomach trouble. It's actually still good. I am not a baby. I hope I'm not elderly must talk is fine fine but I eat familia because it tastes like roughly powerlessness in one thousand nine hundred seventy when there was never a cloudy day and when I was five Familia and this switching between Thou and you or something else we used to have a say ob- last Bunuel Pronoun we used to have a way of saying one speaks Spanish. You used MON FOR THAT NOT MON but month we had mom and mom was the way that Oh you did that. A normal GERMANIC language has an impersonal Pronoun and therefore so did we so. There's a little bit of advice. This is one of the lighter examples of old English a great shame. If you don't WanNa be what you are the way that was said in old English was missiles great shame Mitchell scond if manoogin that that is so you knew Brian. If you don't want to be new is not want that's Willy Nilly want karate nearly so Mitchell scanned a great shame if my newly beyond that that is if you don't WanNa be that that one is so you have a mon- and gradually just flakes away. I get shorter becomes then after a while. Nobody's using it and you. You gets yanked into that such a shame. If you don't WanNa be what you are. Wouldn't it be better if we had a nice impersonal because if we did then when the wonderful may barnes sang this song on her nineteen fifty eight album that I'm the only person world who has then they rated the joint would would be that joint. That's the last I'm I'm doing. That voice unsubsidized anyway. This is the wonderful may burns. She is not Dinah Washington. She's made hey burns. I like her almost better. This is one of my favorite songs I this is called. They raided the joint. Frankly I don't know who wrote it who cares but it's hurting. Este rated the joint to everybody down with me. I was O'Connor as as they would drink a GIN and whiskey drinking mighty fast good. I've got a break but I couldn't fine of bags. Join to everybody it down but said you just as I could be. Pesky here host of the gist usually on my podcast the gist we talk about politics. We talk about comedy. We talk about the arts but this week. It's all about the comedy. The just have been taken over by Comedians and writers were twelve on every facet of the business that is funny training all week to hear discussions discussions on how to kill without being cancelled when you're a stand up comic the state of late night TV and the comedy flick and weather podcasts repeating Improv as the place place to start a comedy career just wear here all week. Try to be this continues unused today this kind of quest for what you might call the economical in English although sometimes it's a charming vagueness with the new they and it's exciting to me to see this new usage they were you can say my girlfriend is in the hospital and they got a shampoo from people who work there and you're thinking of a bunch of people all getting shampoos and then you realize that the person means the girlfriend. The one person at the hospital rose isn't feeling well. L. and they decided to stay home. That's the new they meaning that you can use a in the singular even if you're referring to a specific person so it used to be tell every student that they can hand in their paper whenever they want to. That's generic but now it's specific multi girlfriend betty and who I have been seeing for seventeen seventeen years is in the hospital and they wished to have a shampoo applied to their singular botanical head. That's the new Vais Hey but that means that we've got they in third person singular a in third person plural and then you up there sitting there in the singular color where it doesn't belong and you in the plural so we only have our number distinction with I and we what a fascinating per nominal system but frankly that's very rare in the world. I we you you they they and they I am aware off the top of my head of a single language language that has that kind of grit. It's a language spoken on the island of New Guinea and it is called Berek and embarrassed you have I we we and then you you and they they don't make that difference but in Barrick the pronouns happen to take really light but everything else you can barely believe it's a language It's so complicated. It's one of my favorites in terms of just what can't help it seem weird from the perspective of English. When you call it conjugate a verb in Barrick? You have to specify the time of day and it is an optional. It's something that you have to include whether you want to or not and all sorts of things and you can just cram so much into one word so for example barrick for gives three things to a man in the sunlight his Kito Tobon just those four syllables that means gives three big things to a man in the sunlight. If you WANNA say we'll give one large objects to a woman in the dark then then it's gold beefy this is about giving the object is large and it's about whether you're doing it to a man or a woman and what the meteorological go conditions are like Kito Bona and gold beefy and if you're wondering what is the element that means to give it's very complicated but both awesome have a book in them. That's one thing or this one. I really like put a big thing down low nearby that can you imagine a language where there's one word for that but put a big thing down low nearby where on Tena K. put a big thing up highway over there.

Barrick Mitchell scond Mallory casten Lexicon Valley Kito Bona barrick New Guinea Dinah Washington Kito Tobon Tena K. Willy Nilly Este barnes England Revi O'Connor Berek karate betty
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From new york city. This is lexicon tally a podcast about language. I'm john mccain order. What are we gonna do today. Well a lot of seem to have enjoyed the show that i did about about a word that i'll just describe as being spelled f. u. C. k. along those lines. I thought we might look at a few other bad words and some of the things that they can teach us because a lot of the bad words have stories to tell us that are both educational and entertaining. I never ever cease to be amazed at the lights that you find in just looking at the etymology of some of the words that many of us us more than we might like to admit you know what one of those words is that has an interesting at darn of all things not damn but darn the word that we use when we want to avoid saying damn and it's not the same word as darn as in darning socks. It has a completely completely different story that does not get talked about enough. It's an interesting story in that. It shows you all sorts of things that you might learn about in an introduction to linguistics class. You've got euphemism. Erosion sound change blending analogy denuclearization. All of those things happening to create gate this spicy little word darn. This episode of lexicon valley is sponsored by how to arrays apparent a new podcast from dairy pure in collaboration with sleet studios dairy pure believes that the world will be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent in ourselves and each other that's what host mallory cast and explores how to raise a parent throughout the series she talks to parents and experts about how our kids can teach us to the shift off respective conqueror fears and become more open to all the exciting things the world has to offer make sure listening subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts believe.

lexicon valley new york city john mccain sleet studios mallory f. u. C.
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From new york city. This is lexicon conduct a podcast about language. I'm john mccain order and our topic. This time is going to be something that i've always assumed. I didn't episode assode about but apparently i haven't. It's something that i think any of you who like this podcast would like to know and probably need to know. We need to explore floor. The whole concept of dialect people often ask what is the difference between a language and a dialect and it's a very messy question question to which there really is no answer. It's one of those things nevertheless we all have certain folk conceptions of what distinguishes a language from a dialect including linguists linguists. I certainly have a sense of what a dialect is as opposed to a language despite that i know formally that the whole question is ultimately meaningless but from what we're taught the world has a whole bunch of languages and then also a whole bunch of dialects and we have a sense that there are dialects of a language but where do you draw the line what are talking about. What is the technical truth. This episode of lexicon valley is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy peer collaboration with slate studios dairy pure believe that the world will be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent and ourselves and and each other that's what host mallory cast and explores in how to raise a parent throughout the series she talks to parents and experts about how our kids can teach us to shift our perspectives conquer our fears and become more open to all the exciting things the world has to offer make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts <music>.

lexicon valley new york city john mccain slate studios mallory
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Is. Only slide less than wonderful. He'll body Boras on. Buying you make. To try on the ground all wrap around view went. He used late. Elemental forces. Are you? All. Must I read grad. Guide me as his. Politely. One. One. He was a big hit. It ran for year that men hit back then it toward the country for a year successfully. So that's Waller wrote this show this show was a mainstream show there were a few black characters. But most of them were white doing the dumb things that people did in most musicals at that time. But it was a big hit fats Waller died and the material just basically scattered to the winds. I have spent the past seven years trying to gather together the score too early to bed because the few songs that have been available are very good. They were fourteen songs I had managed to gather together. Ten with the help of some people who came into this before me such as the musicals tonight people in New York, anyway, just this week somebody who read an article I wrote about early to bed found one of the missing for songs. And so for the first time in seventy six years. One of those songs is now available. This is so exciting that I decided I could get hit by a bus tomorrow. I will never have a pulpit like this. Again, I am asking any of you out there who are musicians who have addicts. Or who would for any reason had some stash of material do you by any chance have one of the three still missing songs from fats Waller's hit musical early to bed though, songs are called this the girl who doesn't ripple when she bins me, and my old world charm supple couple, if you find these songs than I promise, you fame and fortune and a great many boxes of peach jello had to put it out there. Anyway, we're going to go out on this Billy Joel song. This is nineteen eighty four. This is from an innocent man an album that had various hits this one was never a huge hit. But it was released as a single on a forty five which I still have. This is leave a tender moment alone. I don't think the song for quite gotten. It's due. I thought it was a good job. No the moment. Book. But. That. You can reach us at lexicon valley. It's late dot com. That's lexicon valley at slate dot com. That's a nice song. Isn't it for those of you who remember it? Nobody liked this one. Everybody always liked uptown girl to listen to pass shows and subscribe or just to reach out go to slate dot com slash lexicon valley, a girl who doesn't ripple when she bends me, and my old world charm supple couple that was what they were. Mike bolo is always the editor. And I am John. Zeus game when the. That's not.

Waller Boras lexicon valley Billy Joel Mike bolo New York editor John seventy six years seven years
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Hi, I'm Sarah. Every now, I know I'm not the voice that you're used to hearing at the beginning of lexicon valley. But I'm here to bring you something special inept sewed of life affects a podcast about health from Kevin pharmaceuticals and slate studios at times, the health care industry can feel aloof this season, we're focusing on what's really important the people by exploring all kinds of health conditions through the lens of the patient will give our listeners of firsthand look at what healthcare can do when it puts people. First today's episode is all about chronic illness by zeroing in type two diabetes. We can reframe the discussion on chronic disease focusing on spending time talking with the patients who struggle with it and the communities that are impacted by it if you like what you hear today, you can subscribe or listen, anywhere. You get your podcasts. This paid podcast is produced by slate studios and ten. Uh-huh. Pharmaceuticals. From slate studios in Teva pharmaceuticals. This is life affects podcast about health. I'm your host Sarah every in this season, we explore health conditions and insights through the lens of the patient. We look at what they experienced now man so many times in my family. We just assume that it's in our blood, but that is not type two diabetes. That's not how it works. You don't inherit it like that. And we bring researchers into the conversation who can map out what the future might hold. We actually need to spend time talking with the patients who have the diseases talking with the communities that we're trying to change to identify what it's going to take. So that everybody is invested in the positive change today. We're talking about chronic illness, and how to prevent it resembling in type two diabetes. There's a generation of young adults actively trying to prevent. Diagnosis of type two diabetes for a lot of these people it hits close to home. It's something that affects older generations within their own families. Gabriel Cortez is one of those people. So when he was Gabriel court says, I'm twenty eight years old. My mama, I generation moved to this country. So I'm first generation born here and moved around a lot growing up one of the places. I've lived the longest was an Aberdeen Maryland. And that's where my grandfather lived, and my mom lived, and my grandma and my uncle. Yeah. You know, it's a pretty full house. We have family reunions, my grandpa had this basement. And I remember in that room, we had aunties and uncles and cousins that will come through every once in a while, we just dance. And I didn't know how to dance because I didn't understand the music and odd and speak Spanish. So I remember being like this light skinned boy, schilling in the corner watching my family, you know, just really be jubilee. It was I mean, I love the. So my grandfather he's from from Emma, my grandpa used to always ask me if I love him. And I'd say, of course, of course, I love you grandpa, and he'd say if you love your grandpa, give me a cookie. So I would I would have run into the kitchen, and there was a little cabinet where we had a jar full of cookies, and I'd always grab him one. Sometimes grab one for myself. You'll be kind of like, I love you too moment. I think we've we've always foods been close to how we show each other love. And thinking about when you've got such an healthy food that gets thrown into the mix in kind of becomes a part of our family traditions. How dangerous that can be. I always remember opening up. The refrigerator there's always bologna. There was always this little slices cheese. But then we always had these. Yeah. Drinks. You know, there are always full. So we had like sunny delight we had like, Tom PICO? We had Dr Pepper in these boxes. I don't know if you know, the ones we can tear away the corners, and then they just kind of like rotate towards you and a constant flow. And when they weren't in the refrigerator cooling, we had more in the pantry. It's it's funny thinking about them seeing them next to some of the stuff that my grandparents would make and how they work their way into the mix. My grandmother and my grandfather grew up eating rice and peas and chicken every meal, but then the soda with the sugar sweetened beverages. It became kind of like a Mark of pride of like my Americanist. I'd like oh I can afford this. So we're we're always going to have this available not necessarily thinking about what the long term health impacts of that are. I think in a lotta ways is reflected kind of what it was like to be this first generation in the United States. The way that we've survived in. This place has been so closely tied to how we've learned to hustle and just like get stuff for the cheap and sodas cheap. Of course, that's not coincidental. Either the ways in which sugar sweetened beverage companies target with their advertising and try to work their ways into family traditions, like the choices and the options that you have really at your disposal. Are so determined by the environment in which you're living in?

slate studios Kevin pharmaceuticals Gabriel Cortez lexicon valley Teva pharmaceuticals Aberdeen United States Sarah Maryland schilling Emma Tom PICO Dr Pepper twenty eight years
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From New York City. This is lexicon valley podcast about language. I'm John mcquarters. And today we are going to do something a little bit different member. How back in the old days? I used to only do interview sows, and then that kind of gradually imperceptibly change while it's not that. I'm never going to do interviews again, especially when I get to do an interview with my friend lane green, Robert lane Greene to some of you. And he has a new book out about language that we simply have to talk about it's called talk on the wild side. I don't know why I can never come up with titles like that. But everybody else can talk on the wild side. Why language can't be tained? And it's a book that you really should get because it teaches lessons about language that I try to teach on this show. So that's why you said get it. And that is why I like it. Now, of course in bringing in the music, if it's going to be a book called talk on the wild side. Then of course. We have to have a bit of Lou Reed. I remember the song when I was in college. We used to play it, and frankly, indulge in various activities, quite deeply. I'm glad I picked an easy major. But here it is. You're all waiting for walk on the wild side. And so here is a bit of it. And then we'll pull it down. We'll begin with lane. Holly. Holly from Bill. Hitch across. On the way shave their legs. And he was she says he. Take a walk in the wild side. Honey, take a welcome. Lane. Welcome to lexicon valley. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. It's a pleasure. So you've got a new book out, and it teaches us all kinds of lessons such as that were often told that language is robust organic and evolving as you put it, but then you add that actually language in its true. Self is incomplete redundant and illogical, which it certainly isn't. So my first question to you is if language is incomplete, redundant and illogical, then shouldn't it be the quest of people like you and people like me to try to fix that? I think part of the point is that it's way to toughen ridiculous for us to ever be able to fix if we were able to fix it. If it was going to submit to command management, some clever person would figure that out by now, and they just haven't done it. So there's the academy says that tries to do this for French in the reality the meat Hispaniola for Spanish, and they just don't seem to have. Any effect on the real language at all? And they try they pick some of the greatest writers linguists and thoughtful people about the language, but in the end, they just don't have any effect on the way the language is actually used because it's just distributed among millions of people. I compare it to an economy. It's just too hard to command the decisions of millions of people in the Connie is much easier to just let them get on with it and let the market set prices and supplies and things like that. But we haven't cured the common cold yet. And that doesn't mean that we shouldn't keep trying right? That's what people are wondering. Right. If their actual problems like the common cold, we should try to stop them cancer or something more serious -absolutely. If it were polio. I would definitely be favor. Fixing say the split infinitive, but the split infinitive is not polio in so letting people make their own linguistic decisions turns out to create a much more. If you wanna keep his biological metaphor creates a more healthy and robust organism than doing. It. By top down management, the smartest person in the world can create an organism as robust as the human being or. Or the wolf or the amoeba which was shaped by Volusia by time by trial and error, and by community of in the case of language users in the case of ecology organisms themselves. Yeah. Okay. But let's face it, the analogy between language and the evolution of flora and fauna is intriguing, but perhaps incomplete, and so let's say that language is fit. It's quite clear that no language ever gone to the dogs. I've always wondered whether people actually think there's been documented some language that just fell apart. But I think most of us can even into it that that's never happened. So every line which basically does its job. But who are you to say lane, you know, just taking the part of the sort of people who both of us often, personally know, and just general who are you to say that we shouldn't try to make language the best that it can be even if under ordinary conditions at ends up being fit. But why can't we make it better? Why can't we make the language per? Tidy perfectly logical because dammit, I get annoyed listening to people talk. I good question. What I do as an editor every day take lots of pros from various writers. And I do try to make it better lane. Tell them where you at it at I'm both editor at the economist magazine. So I ended our daily app. So I lost right now. I'm editing. Lots of short things coming at me. And then most of the language columnists every two weeks. I also have something to say about language itself. When I write a column, so I both write and edit, and I've never seen a piece of writing that couldn't use some hand by editor. I really believe that's true. So is not that language can't be improved. But I think it can be improved at the individual level, the individual performer, the writer, the speaker should absolutely do everything they can to write the best or speak the best that they possibly can. And the editor's job in my case is to make that even better still what we're talking about engineering, the whole language system. Trying to make better words or make the grammar more logical or clear. Well, you know, the greatest writers and speakers in the English language are doing a fantastic job with a clapped-out illogical weird redundant incomplete. Grammar? I mean, you know, there are so many flaws in English language you've been over the many times in your show. And we know that we find the same things in every other language, we look at there's just not a perfect language out there, and yet there are nearly perfectly mystic performances. The great writers the great speakers. So I'm saying use your language as well as you can buy God. Definitely. But the language itself, the English language, the French-Language this while he language does not need our management that thing will take care of it self.

editor Robert lane Greene polio New York City John mcquarters Lou Reed lexicon valley Volusia Holly Bill economist magazine writer cancer two weeks
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"And that's because it spoken by native. Speakers of six hundred million billion other languages so naturally gets easier. I find it impossible to imagine that there won't be Mandarin. Dialects like this in cities pretty soon because of people coming from far away in speaking, very different dialects of Mandarin languages tend to get easier. A little easier in situations like that. So a lot of the few hundred languages that are left will in their spoken form be somewhat easier. Very hard stuff that hangs around at the edge of a language. A lot of that will be gotten rid of in the way, the languages spoken that doesn't mean that there won't still be a written standard. There won't be a standard used in certain formal situations. But there will be more of what are called by. We point he had people multi Ethno, let's multi-ethnic like the sorts of things that are happening in European cities in some African cities that's going to happen in more parts of the world most likely so that means that language is going to to an extent. In addition to being used more casually in more aspects of the public sphere in general. It's going to let itself go like Ginger Rogers singing Irving Berlin song in nineteen thirty six in follow the fleet ginger. Rogers was interesting because she didn't really have much of a voice it's hard to believe that she had actually started on stage singing Anapa fide over orchestras. But because her voice is so approximate and sounds so real somehow she speaks to us across eighty plus years in a way that most people in the thirties on film, now, frankly, just don't and this is also a very good song Irving. Berlin was good at jazzing in a minor key. Here is let yourself go. I wanna do a little if I may plug for something that I did once you're finished with this. Please go take a look at a podcast called a million little gods. And the reason that I have a personal interest in you taking listen to it is because there's going to be an episode on it actually, a group of episodes called get this linguistic title, article smackdown. And know, what this is, you know, how I'm always Yama ring on about this battle between me and certain other people who study Creole languages about whether Creoles kind of language, well, it's me and one of them and he does his bit. And then I do my bit. And then he does his bit. And I do my bit again and the million little God's people have a wonderful preview episode where you can get a sense of the flavor of it. So go look at a million little gods dot com, and you can listen to linguistic type logical smackdown. Boy, I wish I had come up with that title wall. We're on the subject. Of eighties hits which we weren't. But I just I feel kind of like style just interrupts. I wanna go back to if this is it, and we're going to have the wonderful wailing plans and guitar solo in the middle. This is so L E. It just sounds like time that maybe you're happy, you let go, but still wouldn't it be nice to go? Visit here is just the weeping solo in the middle of what was supposed to be just this popcorn song. You can reach us at lexicon valley. It's late dot com. That's lexicon valley. It's late dot com. Listen to pass shows and subscriber just to reach out go to slate dot com slash lexicon valley, the show was edited as always by Mike Wollo, and I'm John mcwhirter on demolish John goes back to Yohannes. And that's from your HANA. Joe God on on his gracious. You'll Ana now you hound us up become just yawn. John. And then some booed stuck the H back in just because they thought that you have to have the H because there have been an H in your HANA. So the silent ages just stupid it's like walking around with a tail anyway back to the eighties.

Ginger Rogers lexicon valley HANA John mcwhirter Berlin Joe God Mike Wollo Yohannes
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Rain they life had been nine right when i walk in one is parrots poets invented in the twenties i guess i dunno novelty or something like that anyway there's a reason i'm bringing this up before we end you know how it can be really funny to listen to the final line of a joke like it's actually funnier probably than the joke itself like somebody says so he ate it and you don't even want to know what the joke was i remember way back i heard somebody telling jokes that had all of us laughing so hard that on some other level in some other dimension we're still laughing now this was decades ago and i only remember the very last line and it was a parrot it was something about a ship sinks and a parrot flies over and says swam swim that was the end of the joke the little act wissel i'm just putting that in because that's how mel blanc used to parents but what was the choke hive mind and notice i said that way because so many of you have noticed that i said it that way before mine have you heard that joke about the parrot it's been driving me crazy since the reagan administration what was the joke that ends with the parrot saying swim motherfucker smith if any of you remember please let me know and of course so proposed go back finney price thinking about breakfast in any case you can reach us and lexicon valley it's late dot com that's let's khan valley at slate dot com to listen to pass subscriber just to reach out to slate dot com slash let's valley this show is that it is always by mike vollmer's fucker scenes like it would start in something like nineteen twenty six but actually it traces back to the nineteenth century and i am as always john mccarter the one

mel blanc reagan administration lexicon valley khan valley mike vollmer john mccarter
John McWhorter discusses softeners in the English language

Lexicon Valley

02:07 min | 2 years ago

John McWhorter discusses softeners in the English language

New York
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Sister. That soulread. Yes, there were gloves. Yes, this called on slightly among people who didn't have enough to do and no, it never quite worked, but Seoul, race, soul was definitely and imaginative attempt to create a universal language and it's a pretty ID and remember you could sing it. You could whistle it. You could play it on instruments. Imagine people doing it in the dark. As a matter of fact, imagine what I just accidentally alluded to. That is a rather interesting notion of language. But in the meantime, we're just with banana white, banana sausage. English. That's all we've got. Sara, you were right. We do need more spinners. And so I'm sure you hear the vamp in the background. This is this week's very best song ever written. It reminds me of being in the back seat of a car that was too big and use too much gas Chevrolet caprice. And this would come on the radio, and I just knew that everything was right with the world. This is gains. People can't get. I don't know how we're. Win. Memories. In any case, you can reach us at lexicon valley. It's late dot com. That's valley. It's sleet dot com to listen to pass shows and subscriber just to reach out, go to sleep dot com. Slash lexicon valley. The show was edited as always by Mike Foale and I am John Yanni MC water in fifty years. Nobody'll know what that means. Then again, they won't be listening to this. That's good by in Seoul, fix. Oh, okay. I'll stop. Anna, Fowler she wasn't. I guess. Peace of mind time. Today. Get away away. Two. This. Game speed day, just. What.

lexicon valley Seoul Mike Foale Fowler Sara John Yanni Anna fifty years
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Time. It's all about the beat. That was the title of my very worst and leased selling book. It's the one that I never take out and look at. Don't you look at it either anyway, for example, irregardless, let's put fucking into irregardless. So you imagine we'll maybe you take the the prefix and then you take the the word, the root, and so it's gonna be ear fucking regardless. No, that's not native English. Think about it. It's era fucking guardless Bligh because you have that beat era and the row is part of that beat era fucking guardless. Think about 'em believable. It's the same thing now you can make it the prefix and then the rude you could have it be unfunny believable. But notice that I'm Bafokeng leave -able for many of you will sound better if anything, it's a little Whittier to my ear and certainly possible because the book could be seen as part of that on unbe leave -able I'm before. Fucking leave. -able. It's a better beat. If you were going to to this, you'd probably rather dance to fucking leave -able than unfunny believable. Notice how there you just want to sit down with your third, gin and tonic, and you know, not dance for a while, especially if you don't think the marriage is gonna last, that sort of thing. And so and it's not just fucking there are all sorts of insertions of this kind for many of you. You might be thinking of my fair lady, isn't that what all of us are thinking of at times like this? And so wouldn't it be lovely. My fair lady original cast album, which I actually never particularly liked, but the purest are going to say that I should play it from that. And so this is wouldn't it be lovely and listen to how blooming is used. Blooming Lutely still not apps blooming, the doesn't at blooming -solutely that wouldn't have scanned in the song. And I presume nobody in the context would say it that way apps the blooming Lutely and so you've got to keep the beep going. Remember I said that it was going to be about, yes, sex and rhythm. We've gotten all of that in. And yes, of course, was just the beginning. Now we've reached the letters section and I want to say that you know, especially over the past few weeks, the amount of mail that we get here in the valley has been quite gratifying. But as I said before, it has gotten to the point I'm gratified that it's seems like it's gonna stay that way. I can't answer everybody anymore. I used to answer every message, but I just can't do it. So please know that we do read all of it and no also that there is no, he, it's me and I really do read every one of them, but it's at the point where if I answered everybody then. I could neither put together new episodes nor raise children nor read books nor sleep. And so I am very happy to be Mr. linguist in terms of answering questions that a lot of you have because quite honestly the questions, keep my mind sharp. They give me ideas not only about shows but about by own research. It really helps me get a sense of how to interact with the public linguist to know the sorts of things that actually interest. You. Very interesting for me to get the questions. However, I need to ask given current circumstances that if you'd like to ask me a question, I will do my best, but I need you to only ask me one. Some of you have an admirable, enthusiasm. I can imagine on the other end of it being the same way, you'll send me seven and eight questions or even like three or four. I just I can't do that anymore. And so please one question at a time, and I will do my very best. In any case, it's all about the beat, which means that, of course, we have to go out on the final song from the one Broadway musical that I actually went and saw eight times this is hairspray. It's, it was about nothing in its way, but for some reason, it just lifted me out of my seat. It got to the point where they had George went in it. I mean, it just got worse year and I kept going and this is you can't stop the beat, which is one of the most delightful, nothing songs. This is really the end. You can reach us at lexicon valley. It's late dot com. That's lexicon valley. It's late dot com to listen to pass shows and subscriber just to reach out or say to ask. One question, go to slate dot com. Slash what's valley showed editor was, of course, might Wollo and I am John.

lexicon valley -able guardless Bligh Lutely editor George Wollo John
"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Using the word nigger i think it's oversimplified i think that when we come to a general societal decision about this if we can we have to understand that words meanings change in that includes the words that make us the most uncomfortable it's a matter of being in between and because this is not a happy subject i cannot help but play something from lerner and lows least famous musical paint your waggin it's a song called in between not even a good song but it's a nice way to go out oh i'm younger and panic rang was the wishing amy i'm older than up hunk of seventeen prime horror and then a lung long and less so sao in between you can reach us at lexicon valley it's like dot com that's lexicon valley at slate dot com to listen to past shows and subscribe or just to who gel go to slight dot com slash lexicon selling this show was edited by mike wollo and it was performed by yours truly sweeney i can so government moreover iowa whisky then the men but there's still another binge drinking meaning down and lying baz a lover i be way ahead of many but there's many who are way ahead of me and so in we'll know when the man he ended up in ordinary marie so why not be loud sports but hate the incessant blather of sports talk radio in the pointless never ending arguments of sports tv debate shows then you should check out hang up and listen i'll weekly conversation about our favorite games the athletes who play them and what sports can teach us about society host josh levin and stephane fats as recently interviewed mahmoud abdulrauf the nba player who protested the national anthem decades before colin kaepernick and they talked to ice cuba about his love of the los angeles lakers download and subscribe with your podcast app of choice to get a new episode every monday.

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"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"lexicon valley" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Lexicon valley is brought to you by heads space download the head space apt to train your mind for a happier healthier life learn more at had space dot com slash lexicon from new york city this is lexicon valley a podcast about language i'm john the quarter at columbia university i teach linguistics among other things my latest book sir talking back talking black and words on the move why english can't and won't sit still like literally today what i wanna talk about something that i think concerns us all and that i think there are ways of looking at that don't necessarily occur to us what i mean can be exemplified by the simple fact that in nineteen twenty two there was established a society called the international society for the welfare of cripples that's what it was called in that was considered progressive in completely okay now in nineteen sixty as you might imagine the name of this place was change to the international society for the rehabilitation of the disabled not the welfare of cripples but that exemplifies a phenomenon that were all familiar with and that in some ways frustrates us which is that a term that's considered perfectly okay today for some reason after fifteen or twenty years often it can seem for some reason ends up being processed as a slur and i don't think any of us are wishing that there were something called a society for the welfare of cripples now but when we experienced this in the here and now we can all feel like there's something that can be called and has been called by stephen painter who needs no introduction the euphemism treadmill the idea being that to be at least a relatively enlightened person is to get used to having to renew various turns especially for things that are rather sensitive were prickly to the extent that you can start wondering where you stand and why we have to keep having new terms for what can seem after all to be the same thing.

Lexicon valley columbia university stephen painter new york twenty years