12 Burst results for "Lewis Boone"

"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:22 min | 12 hrs ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

"There And then the beguiled starring eastwood. Dirty harry don siegel in this. Yet don siegel again. I think they they pulled this off a little more successful with the beguiled. Of course. I saw this the first time in advance of sofia. Coppola really good remake of it so and just real quickly to fend off all the the people. Just see the net me. My top fifteen rounded out by french connection at eleven clute at twelve last picture show at thirteen sweet sweet backs bad as song at fourteen and then herald that maud at fifteen. I'm sure there are people who are still quite angry. That a number of those including possible you add are not higher. I do appreciate them there. In my top fifteen of the year a really really strong year. Yeah no that doesn't cut it. Sorry top five material josh. You missed it. I have a second tier here. You as usual were more dutiful than me. You're a stronger man than me. You rank them. I had a hard enough time ranking my top five. I definitely wasn't going to be able to rank the seven or eight movies that were in the second tier contending for the six ten. I'll just mention them by name. You had three of them on your list. Your top five shaft. A new leaf mccabe and mrs miller. Another movie that you just mentioned lots of listeners. Did in the poll the last picture show and then i'm gonna mention three movies josh. Maybe four if you count it based on when it came out you can make the case. It's seventy one movie though. Most considerate a seventy movie. These four movies. That just remind me. How much franker is that. An actual word movies were in the seventies about sex then films in two thousand twenty one. Are those movies. Being mike nichols carnal knowledge allen poku clute nicholas rogues walkabout and the movie that again might be seventy film. Technically though ebert had it on his top. Ten of seventy-one lewis. Boone wells tr- astana starring katherine. Dean of those movies are in my second tier all fighting for a spot in my top. Ten films of nineteen seventy-one again. Those are our favorites from seventy-one we'd love to hear your picks or any other comments about the show email us feedback at film spotting dot net..

Dirty harry don siegel don siegel eastwood Coppola mrs miller sofia josh mccabe allen poku clute nicholas mike nichols Boone wells astana starring katherine ebert lewis Dean
"lewis boone" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Here & Now

"The tree. And then there is Jesse. Eisenberg's other film the various. Yikes Jesse an image imports. Play Tom and Jemma and increasingly uncomfortable house. Hunting couple shown a home in a neighborhood. Where all the homes? Look just the same little green boxes. And then there's that realtor Martin played by Jonathan Aris. The living room a room to live memories will be made the ample spaces between these walls element of the hugh laughing now but soon they're trapped inside that home with a child not there's someone who's increasingly what feral did. We mention Bavarian means animal enclosure. Maybe just what you need in this time of twelve quarantine. Someone who's worse off than you are again. There's a Stinson. Bavarian are out on digital and video on demand. This Friday and Jesse Eisenberg joins US now by skype. Just a you know how weird volume is. It's really kind of fever dream of a movie where you know these characters that are wanting to do kind of all the normal modern middle-class things by a house get married have a child you know and live in the suburbs Wind up in the worst nightmare version of all of this stuff. And you know it's funny. We were making a movie at a time of time. Really any other time than this and Just thinking if it is this kind of nightmarish fever dream but of course it has some very strange residents right now. Where this kind of insidious things seemed to be attacking you and you're stuck inside your house and you know and there's no one around and so Yeah the movie. Just as movies often do take on different residents when they finally come out. Well as I said. It's either going to be exactly what people need to really get into the feelings that they're having of not getting out of the House and decomposing you know their hair and their clothes or is it your worst nightmare. That people might say the last thing I want to see is people trapped in a house depends on their particular situations if you have a case of Shoddy Freida. You probably would enjoy watching somebody as you said he was worse off than you but if you want to get your mind set up. Sure there's a million other You know things on your queue. Well what I want to compliment because someone said to me. Oh It's a horror film and they know that I'm not really drawn to horror films but I didn't see a horror film. I saw more as a twilight zone. That's what I call it. I call it kind of more. Like a cross between Lewis Boone. Well and Black Mirror twilight zone kind of thing where it takes like these real world symbols but skews them in a way to create this kind of terror in the characters. But it's not in any way kind of traditional hart movie with scares and stuff like that. No it's like the Truman show only really really really dark. Your yes exactly. And then there's resistance now. This tells about a chapter in the life of the Great French Mime Marcel. Marceau we read you the grandchild of Holocaust survivors. That's the springboard for this story. You know in the beginning we see Kristallnacht and a family dragged off horrifying. Did that has nothing to do with your decision to make this film or somebody unusual coincidences between you. Know this movie. And my life My mother is a birthday party clown growing up to my mother. Put on basically the same Makeup as Marceau and performed for children and the way that he is performing Of course different circumstances obviously and Coincidentally my family is from a very close to where Marceau's family comes from southern Poland. And then what? I really love most about the story is that it's really about this artist. Who was kind of a reluctant hero because he prizes his art so specifically he thinks of himself as this pure artists in that art should only be done for. Its own sake. And then as the war kind of heats up and he's asked to come and entertain kids. Initially he realizes that he can use his art for the benefit of others and so he kind of becomes like a hero reluctantly. Well it makes you love Marcel Marceau even more if you know him but want to hold that thought for a second because hold on your mother was a birthday party clown is that I mean. Clowns to some people are scary. I mean what was that. Like to see mom view transformed. Go off are you seeing a therapist or was that a good thing. Well yes but for reasons but My my mom was a clown. My Dad taught social psychology. And so she kind of was able to help tap into what scared kids and avoid those things so for example. Big Shoes scared kids. 'cause they're shoe level they're small and those are scary. The fake like knows that scare kids so I guess with my dad's expertise in a group. Thank and my mom's ability to entertain the created kind of a clown that was not scary and then in terms of like its impact on me every weekend growing up I would wake up to the sound of my mom tuning her tar and even though she was performing this kind of very silly Performance you know. She took it so seriously and I wake up to her meticulously tuning a guitar. And so I think in some way unconsciously at least taught me that regardless of what kind of performance you're doing take it seriously and it's kind of silly comedy movie whatever you take it as seriously as you would take any drummer so fascinating and so here. You are playing Marcel Marceau. Some of US can conjure up the image of the man who often wore the sort of the white bodysuit with maybe the buttons on it and used his hands to indicate that he was in a box that he couldn't get out of nothing. There you now have to have that same physicality and you do. I mean is that something. Did you have to take lessons for that movement lessons? How did you come to that? Yeah I mean. I studied mime for about nine months with this wonderful teacher. Lauren Eric Psalm. And he's just a fantastic teacher but not only a fantastic teacher and disciple of Marceau but also kind of chronicler of Marcel. Marceau's life and of mine in general history of moments so I had this unbelievable lengthy nine-month lesson not only in my routines that I had to learn from the movie which were choreographed by Lauren. But also I learned the history of Miami and got to appreciate the ideas of this kind of more abstract performance. That is you know it's not the kind of literal performances that I'm used to either writing or acting so to films one terrifying an S. for volume one also terrifying but very sweet a true story of the chapter of Marcel. Marceau's life told in resistance to movies coming out and no-one going movie theaters and you can't fly on airplanes to promote it. And where do you do that? It's so surreal. I mean and I don't have a sense of this. People are kind of wanting to watch movies. It feels kind of strange to talk about it. You know as shields kind of like oh talking about something petty in the context of something much bigger and especially if like you know. I'm in the kind of like public conversation once every year and a half committed to do interviews and so you don't want to be doing the time really feel like irresponsible talking about anything other than washing your hands and so it's a little strange but People at some point are going to want to engage in some kind of normal activity. Even if you're doing it from your couch rather than in a movie theater and these movies as you kind of emphasized have kind of very different approaches to entertainment at this particular moment one is kind of emphasizing the horrors of this surreal suburban world and the other one is kind of an uplifting movie of heroism during the war. Both not blind to the towers of the world and I mentioned people want to engage in some kind of. I don't know normal activity. It seems inevitable that seems to be the default. Isn't it? Well I also think you could just make believe you know okay. No He's GonNa go see my movies. I'm going to go right and I think they will see your movies. But you've written four plays short stories. Do you find yourself thinking or maybe fellow writers thinking pandemic and presidential election. That's taken I have. I mean that's you know it's so funny you know when when the world is thinking about one thing you know when you're thinking about writing something like yeah there's no original thought that I can have about it. That hasn't already been thought of by somebody more talented and so yeah and also what is my take on it. The difference. Oh Yeah so. Unfortunately in this moment where everybody is thinking. The same thing puts a little damper on your own originality. We'll just see burke again. The two new films resistance and Bavarian both coming out on digital and video on demand Friday. Jesse thanks so much in best to you. Thank you so much for doing this yet. And STAY SAFE. Thank you well. While a pandemic presidential campaign has already been taken Jesse Eisenberg has been writing his piece an immodest proposal before my actor Richard Kind is part of the twenty four hour plays viral monologues will link you up here now. Dot Org and is countries around the world tackle corona virus. We're GONNA to spend a few minutes now talking about what's working. Cases have declined in who province China where the pandemic originated Chinese authorities? Now say that they will lift a lockdown on most of the region and loosened some restrictions in Wuhan the World Health Organization is also praised the efforts of some of China's neighbors. Here's WHO head of emergencies. Mike Ryan at a press conference yesterday. We've seen examples in.

Marcel Marceau Jesse Eisenberg Richard Kind US Lauren Eric Psalm hugh Jonathan Aris China Tom Martin Lewis Boone Jemma Truman Shoddy Freida hart World Health Organization Poland Mike Ryan
"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

"In top hat and the camera starts by just following their feet as they glide out onto the dance floor pulling back to reveal their full figures and again just lets them go and I was watching it again today. Josh and I never really understood why Tuxedos. Why men's formal dress needed to include tales? And now I do it so we can watch them spin when someone like Fred astaire moves. The women like Ginger Rogers. Every time they twirl their address goes up in the air. And it's this wonderfully graceful elegant maneuver and you get that same elegance and grace with Astaire when. His Tales are spinning along with his body. Every time this movie has come up over the years on the show. It's come a few times. I feel obliged to mention the Pro Rosa Cairo Mia Farrow Cecilia escaping the depression by going to the theater and indulging in this carefree luxury and the gracefulness of Fred and ginger. And you know what you couldn't go see this movie right now in a movie house even if it was playing unfortunately but I would say there are few better ways to escape from your couch than watching top APP. You can do that on. Google play Amazon Prime Itunes and other platforms. Yeah if you're looking for a little distraction a little escape. I don't know that every movie on our list from the thirties is going to serve that function but definitely he's musicals will and great pick they are fringe injure our genre unto themselves at point so they're also going to be represented on my just a little bit later at number three though. I have the rules of the game from Nineteen thirty nine director. Jean Renoir he also marked this decade though from across the Atlantic with the rules of the game and grand delusion as well as some notable films that I haven't seen Lushan Madame Bovery and Labatt humane rules of the game. Here's another top twenty of all time for me. A comedy of manners social satire a treatise on the human condition basically follows a bunch of aristocrats who gather for a weekend of games and hunting on a country estate renoir. He directed but also co-stars he also wrote and he does play one of the sillier guests. I think you can say so. I had seen this Adam before. We did our Lewis Boone. Well Marathon and thinking about it now and watching some scenes after that it strikes me that rules of the game is sort of. Flake. Boone well with heart it certainly class satire but it also has a lot of empathy for these fools and the tone is closer to something like Pedroia Almodovar. I think that maybe what Boone while brings to most of the movies we saw. It's also rules of the game is so formerly exciting. Even today Renoir beat Orson Welles and citizen Kane by a couple of years with his use of deep focus cinematography there some fluid tracking shots during this metaphorical rabbit hunt and a really grand tracking. Shot along ballroom near the end. That encapsulates all of the characters. So the rules of the game. That's going to be my renoir representative. It's pretty widely available via streaming actually criterion channel Amazon prime canopy. If you WANNA go through your library that way and also youtube movies definitely one. I considered for my list. His grand illusion from thirty seven is probably still my all time. Biggest blind spot. It's a revered movie does appear on a lot of those sight and sound type lists and I still need to see it maybe sometime over the next few weeks. I will get a chance. My number three also comes from nineteen thirty nine. It's Howard. Hawks is only angels have wings may became just in passing during our Fifteenth Anniversary Celebration at the music box as we discussed Rio Bravo after watching it with listeners. But you've got to have a good action adventure film from the Thirties on this list. And of course you could go with something like Michael critise Errol Flynn in captain. Blood or even Shanghai Express which we talked about during our Dietrich von Sternberg Marathon but this is the one for me that I think offers the most thrills and you will also see in addition to watching cary grant in the film and watching Jean Arthur and that great pairing Rita Hayworth is in it in a breakout role. And it's actually only one of three hawks films that's currently on the criterion collection at least by my count. His girl Friday and Red River are the other two. There's an essay that's included with the disc for only angels have wings from Michael Schrager. And he says this angels is a precursor to a Robert Altman film. And it's bursts of rapid fire overlapping dialogue. And it's off handed tragicomedy an improvisational snap in place of plot hawks in his favorite screenwriter. Jules I mean set up a succession of comic and dramatic situations that pop with laughs thrills and Free San's and I should say something about that plot as it is. It's set in a fictional south. American town called BARRANCA. It's a port town. Jean Arthur is a traveler. She's an entertainer. She ends up meeting. Jeff Carter played by grant. Who is a pilot with a penchant for dangerous missions? He basically runs an airmail company. Thomas Mitchell is in the film as his best friend and business partner who is called the kid and I thought that was interesting. Schrager comments because I would have never thought about. The film is a precursor to an altman movie. But I absolutely get it but the most important part is what he said about what you get in place of plot for hawks and we did talk about this to an extent in looking at Rio Bravo plot and character are all about action for Howard Hawks. What does a man or a woman do when confronted with different scenarios the different tests whether it's romantic or professional or both and when those two conflict with each other as they so often do through those actions their true characters are revealed? And I just think hawks take on romance on. Relationships between men and women is so fascinating. This movie has one of my all time favorite proclamations of love from Jean Arthur. You don't have to be afraid of me anymore and I tried to tell you. I don't WanNa plan. I want to look ahead. I don't want you to change anything enough hitching. There's nothing about it. I just love you. I feel the same way about to the kid. Best Anything News. All right with me is he doesn't ask you for anything. Get Any way above your drives me nuts. I was thinking about this great scene in relation to Rio Bravo because we talked about how scared John t chance. John Wayne seems of feathers and that fear really of any kind of domesticity in addition to a few other fears is definitely played there but her saying Jeff. I'm not trying to tie you down. I'm not trying to change you in any way I just love you. That's all and I suppose it's tempting to hear that and go. What a fantastic version of love for a man right having a woman just say you can be whoever you want to be and I will. Just be here for honestly. I'm more struck by hawks. Acknowledging that love between men and women is really the same thing the only difference being that. He doesn't sweep the kid up in his arms and kissed him. Which is what he does with Jean Arthur but otherwise she says it she has the exact same feelings for him that the kid does and grand does get a good joke in there which is to say yeah and he drives me crazy as she's probably going to do as well. There are some great aerial scenes in this film. In fact it did make my top five movie flight scenes a lot of ground breaking special effects for nineteen thirty nine. It also made years ago a top five. We did breaking up the boys club. Jean Arthur obviously the character doing that in this great film which is available on the criterion channel but Amazon Prime Itunes and Voodoo as. Well can I add another one to this category adventure so you mentioned? Errol Flynn in captain. Blood which is just fantastic. I have always loved him in adventures of Robin Hood and I can remember. This was when I was really young. But those who grew up around Chicago maybe recall. I think it was on. Wgn there would be family classics and they were usually Sunday afternoons. I believe which is when we were often my grandparents house so a lot of times family classics will be put on. We'd plop in front and frequently. It seems to Me Adventures of Rob. No kidding playing and I got to watch errol Flynn in those sword fights and some great action scenes and obviously all the charm as well so yeah really strong genre in the nineteen thirties action and adventure all right so number two well. Charlie Chaplin kind of had to be on this list because the nineteen thirties held two of his greatest features modern times and city lights. Modern Times is in my top ten of all time. So that's going to have to be my pick the movies. Enduring Relevance is why I value modern times so much this story of Chaplin's little tramp and this was his last screen appearances. The tramp just watching this figure being gobbled up by the societal the economic and the technological forces of Labor certainly spoke to the years right after the Great Depression but every time I watch it whether it was twenty five years ago or you know shortly after the two thousand eight recession or now in the tumult of today it just seems to ring even truer. It's like. Oh the movies about now. It was made then. But it's about now and plus this has some of Chaplin's all-time Great Visual gags which never get old. The tramp frantically trying to keep up with an assembly line That moment where he's stuck in a factory machines giant gears or even when he's trying to survive a meal via that monstrous feeding machine that keeps stuff in his face. So this is all brilliant comic material and set pieces as I said really still applies today and modern times is streaming on the Criterion Channel. Amazon prime and you can find it via canopy so some overlap for us at number two. I Have Charlie Chaplin as well but I am going with his other masterpiece at least one more from the period city lights. Nineteen thirty one. It was his prior film to Modern Times. There was a five year gap between the two. But what they back to back set of movies. I think about this movie coming off of human bondage again. Talk about it here in a little bit on the show. But it's the uplifting counter to human bondage and that you've gotta character the TRAMP who falls in love with this blind girl and kind of becomes obsessed with trying to help her. He finds out that she's going to be and even though he doesn't have any money himself. He tries to scrape together. Whatever he can eventually does come into some cash so that he can try to help them and maybe improve their lives now. I have a confession. I haven't seen modern times or city. Light's since nineteen ninety eight. I can't actually tell you which one I think is the better film. I'm going with city lights here because of my memories of it especially that ending and I'm not going to rehash my essays. I wrote back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. When I took a class on silent comedy there compared films Chaplin and Keaton. Like it do it. We could get into the place of sentimentality in silent comedies. Like this and whether or not it truly belongs. I mean that is the key distinction really between Chaplin and Keaton. Is that use of sentimentality? And I think it's why for time and maybe we're still in that time. It's become way more fashionable to prefer Keaton to chaplain because the sentimentality seems a little. Bit Overdone. Perhaps or a little bit schmaltzy and also maple. It's easy to do. You could argue that. When you pull at the heartstrings. A little bit anybody is going to fall for that whereas Keaton was more inventive and be more ambitious. That might be the case. But when you've got that perfect blend as I think you here in city lights and in modern times of Pathos in comedy then that's Chaplain at his pinnacle and of course there's also that great element here as it is in modern times of social commentary. I mentioned the really famous ending of this movie..

Charlie Chaplin Modern Times Jean Arthur Amazon Hawks Errol Flynn Thirties Howard Hawks Fred astaire Keaton Jean Renoir Robert Altman Lewis Boone Ginger Rogers Jeff Carter Rosa Cairo Mia Farrow Cecilia criterion collection Google Josh Adam
"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Sam Van Haldeman. The whole show was presented by our friends at Mugabe curated streaming service showing exceptional films from around the globe every day. Movie premieres new film whether it's a timeless classic cult favorite orna claim masterpiece. Movie You've been dying to see or one you've never heard of before there's always something new to discover with mobile each and every film is hand selected. So you'll never spend more time looking for something great to watch than actually watching something great. It's like your own personal film streaming anytime anywhere try moby free for thirty days at movie. Dot Com slash film spotting. That's M. U. B. I. dot com slash film spotting for a whole month of great cinema for free. During the live event we talked. About how the fifteen years of doing the show has been really about the thrill of discovery for us. And there's maybe not a more exciting movie platform then movie when it comes to discovering films two premiers coming up this weekend over at movie they have a streaming premiere of Louis garrels twenty eighteen film a faithful man. You may know Gorell as professor bear in Greta Gerwig little women. It was co written by frequent Lewis. Boone well collaborator. Jean-claude carry a and the movie playfully shifts between drama and Comedy Subtle Murder Mystery and love story. Mu Be also has Luca Guadagnino latest film. You may remember him from. Call me by your name. And most recently superior this one straight from can twenty nineteen the staggering girl. It's a short film made. In collaboration with Valentino's creative director Pierpaolo Pinole stars Julianne Moore Mia Goth Kyle mclachlan and Kiki Lane movie says the staggering girl unfolds with the mysterious -ness of a dream sumptuous and elusive again. You can check out both of those films and more over at 'EM UB I dot com slash film spotting. Let's go ahead and share the audio of our evening at the music box josh. We're going to start with our Rio Bravo setup and.

"lewis boone" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Broken Record

"I taught the song to the guys us and everybody was kind of enjoying they knew where I was coming from in some of these things The get a guys didn't care about Lou. Lewis Boone well or anything but I did and so anyway they they took the ride on it and as we were getting into it we kinda smiling to one another like that verse that Carmen and the Devil verse you know. That's pretty cool. And then all this thing and then it has like a conclusion that ties it together. Something like a movie would all of these things. I'm just a been a movie bug in so long so anyway I was making a little movie and And then we record the song and I have no idea except we got through. The whole song didn't make a mistake. Felt pretty good. We went and listen to it and I thought Holy Moly. That's a thing as a thing right there. That's a sound that's I. I haven't heard that before you know and all of those things then add up for you inside you know. Can you put your finger on what was so unique about that sound or is it just a kind of gestalt thing that no. That's part of the great holy mystery that you really. I don't know and if you think you do then you're not ready for a good surprise you know going in and I say guards wanted you play Piano Pinot on this and Richard you play Oregon and then when we get to this part of the song. Why don't we do this and wait? And then you come in and then you come in and then you come in together and then you know then that folds over on top of itself and all of these ideas no yeah no idea. Where if they were good ideas? I thought you know is enough to make you WANNA do something. Then we got the song I say. You don't want On this second last verse Rick. Why don't you take over the lead vocal on that? It just seemed like a good idea at the time and once again it wasn't until we went in that control room heard it over those speakers that garth playing the piano on that really made sense that leave on drums with these big tuned down. Tom Com that. I asked him if he'd be okay doing and his vocal. I wasn't even sure is the key I wrote it in. I don't know if it's a good key for you to sing it in. And he's like yeah no I think it's okay so all of these things are way up in the air in the idea really and then when you hear it all come together and those pieces of the puzzle actually fit. That's when you say I knew all along we'll be back with more from Robbie Robertson after the break we're back with more from Robbie Robertson. The band eventually broke up with one final concert. In nineteen seventy six it was filmed by. Martin Scorsese at least as the last waltz. It's become a legendary concert in kicked off a decades long working relationship between Robbie and Scorsese starting with raging bull. Robbie's down the music for almost all of the Scorsese films including his most recent. The Irishman not too long ago rick discovered a piece of music that he absolutely loved loved when he found out it was from a scorsese movie he had asked Robbie about his involvement. I let's hear some of the music..

Robbie Robertson Martin Scorsese rick Richard Lewis Boone Lou Tom Com Carmen garth Oregon
"lewis boone" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Broken Record

"That? We just played louder and they hated it more and and I thought if Bob can handle is we can handle this you know and so we just kept going and going and it was hurtful and then there was a point in this tour because sometimes sometimes they would tape. This shows you on reel to reel tape it and see how that sound man would see how it was sounding because it was like. Maybe it's a sound for all fault so there was a point in that are where we have one one of these tapes and after the show were sitting in the hotel room listening to this tape and I said to the other guys and Bob. They're wrong they're wrong. This is good this is really good and the world is wrong and were right and and it wasn't because I was sure of that it was because because if you didn't say that it would be like this is an were in a terrible situation in just gave you the feistiest the strength to say we're doing something here and if you don't get it it's your fault you had to take take that attitude and we laid all over the world and ended up with people booing is allowed as ever and we're playing at Albert Hall in London and the Beatles are there and the stones or there in the who were there and everybody's there you're in the audience is booing US and they're all watching this and that is that's really awkward when there's people people musicians that you want to impress and everybody's doing you think how do you possibly think we're any good when everybody's booing us. Those guys like it though did to disown Beatles. The Beatles said don't pay any attention to that they're wrong. This was really good so I I was Kinda like say but leave on. Didn't like that. He didn't like that. Nobody likes being booed and people throwing stuff at you You know I'm I'm. I'm quite convinced of that but leave on. Didn't like the music he didn't like. Bob Dylan's music. He didn't like any of this and didn't want to be playing with him at all. Leave on laughed. Then we all moved to woodstock and we have big pink. We Call Leon and said okay. Hey it's time to come back. and He came back in. Bob Was a different guy. He looked completely different. He was writing songs things and he was. You know it was just great and leave on came back and loved it. All love being back with his brothers and and loved Bob And came around on the music understood something. He had time to understand that plus plus the songs that I was starting to right he was like. Oh that's who we are. You know so the pieces were coming together other and he came back into the fold bigger and stronger than ever. When did you know you had or was there a particular song in that when you finished you said okay? This is our sound. I think I'm getting it. was there one moment or one song that kind of gave you the idea for what the ban Dan could be. No I didn't know we were just experimenting and in a discovery process. I didn't I didn't know it and still we were recording. It and I was playing something for Rick the other day. So that we recorded something and And it was breaking all kinds of rules in the way you record Lord and what you do and what. You're not supposed to do and everything and we were trying this and it was. It was discouraging. Edging what they were telling us going into it but we were doing what we knew how to do. And we recorded it and then we went in and heard it and I said that's it. That's what who we are. That's what we sound like and was unlike anybody the else or anything and and still at the time you think and that's either a good thing or a bad thing. That song was what well there was two songs that I played for him. One Song was called tears of rage. which was the first song that we recorded on the album and and it's the first song on the album and then we recorded a song called the weight and then when we recorded recorded these songs it was like okay? Can you tell me a little bit about writing the weight because it's just such an unusual saul by how it came to you or sure. Well I was saying this was a song is was a spare song. This was a song that I had that. If if something else didn't work out we could use it so we had to put it together mostly right there in the studio I played it for the guys before and everybody thought yeah cool you know but nobody was like Whoa. That's it that's that said you know none of us knew and then when I was writing this song I was drawing. Hang on these influences from when I was sixteen years old and went from Canada down to the Mississippi Delta some of those characters so some of those images were you know I have now pulled them out of my trunk of imagination and I was incorporating corporative them into a music gallery and in the stories and I was also very much which I've you know I've I've said this before or that I was very much into Lewis Boone wells films and there was there was something there. There was something in his a thematic thread in some of his movies that I couldn't get over and it was really about people trying to be good really trying to do the right thing and then something comes along and something I think turns it upside down on its head right and so this was a story about a guy who comes into this town. It's called Nazareth. And it's because that's where the guitar companies from. I look at my guitar. And it says Nazereth Arres Pennsylvania right so I look in there and I say I pulled into Nazareth right and I start writing this story story and is about a guy who goes somewhere and everybody that he runs into. It's like he's just trying to be of goodwill goodwill he's just trying to do the right thing and it turns into is like the old saying it depends hands on who. You run into an story. Tally you're going along. You think you've got an idea but it depends on who you run into rights point and so I'm thinking of all of these characters and some of them are based on characters that I imagined agenda or I met when I went down to the Mississippi Delta and I'm thinking what would be really cool for leave on I knew his instrument really well l. his his voice and everything and And I thought I thought I was doing a Lewis Boone. Well thing I wasn't but I thought I was right and I thought I was and I when when I wrote the song I thought there's this I never heard that song before. Maybe that's good you know but it was unfamiliar and so with that you think. Jeez I don't know is that is that good or bad. Is that different. Or just obscure you know like the record producers have to consider when they're making music and so.

Bob Beatles Mississippi Delta Lewis Boone Bob And Bob Dylan Albert Hall Nazareth US woodstock London Leon Nazereth Arres Pennsylvania Dan Rick Canada
"lewis boone" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on World Cafe

"One of the Great Concert experiences and still just absolutely amazing hearing the work that went into it from less than a month's worth of planning correct. Yeah it it had to come together very quickly and underground underground completely because Martin process see who directed at which shooting another movie. And they don't like it when you go and make a movie on the on the side. When you're shooting a big Hollywood movie so complaint? Anyway we we had to keep it on the down low and we did it over the Thanksgiving giving weekend when everybody was taking a break and we snuck it in under the radar. Yeah that's really really impressive. And those who have not seen the last waltz worth going back and revisiting it will absolutely blow your mind. How many incredible musicians and up on stage throughout the night of that concert we're talking to Robbie Robertson World Cafe? His new album is cinematic. you did a very cool re released version of the weight featuring Ringo Starr Lukas Nelson Marcus King and a whole litany of incredibly talented worldwide musicians. It's it's absolutely beautiful. Can you please tell oh me how this came to be. Yeah these I you know. I've known about these people for a while and I've seen their work before it's an organization. Association called playing for Change. And they've done videos before that was incredible combination of the people playing music in different places and they put it together and then my son. Sebastian said I WANNA do one with plank for change. I WANNA do one on the weight and they went ahead and they got these people his people from all over the world countries all global. That have come together on this song and turned out so great. And I'm so proud of it and I'm so thankful to Sebastian for even thinking of this so It's just one more thing that I'm you know. I'm feeling very proud of these days. Yeah you should be I I. I'm not joking there were there were a few not dry is as we were sitting around watching that It's it's really incredible and I guess the the thing about the weight that I'm curious is after after fifty one years has the meaning of that song changed for you at all And if so what does it mean for you today well you. You've you've brought up something interesting. I've never known the meaning of that Song I wrote it and I thought I don't know that's you know that's one way to go about it It it did connect it did connect to certain things for me personally a that I was going through a period and I was. There's a classic movie director by the name of Louis Poon well and and there was a thematic thematic thing in this song that I would see in Lewis Boone well movies as well and then it was reminiscent to me of when I first went from Canada down to the Mississippi Delta in these characters these characters were right out of incredible southern novel just were everywhere and that had such a strong influence on my sixteen eighteen year old imagination at the time that I carried all this around with me and it kind of leaked out in when I was writing this song song. It's it is. It is a masterpiece through through. A lot of people are familiar with the band's version but I think in in light of this very cool Awesome new endeavor playing for Change we'd love to play The weight of that version. The brand new want to close out this interview. If that's okay with you Robbie that is a wonderful idea beautiful. Let's listen to it playing for change. The band's it's a classic way but performed with.

Ringo Starr Lukas Nelson Marcu Robbie Robertson Sebastian Louis Poon Martin Hollywood Canada Mississippi Delta Lewis Boone
"lewis boone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"This is the globalist on monocle twenty four with me, Georgina Godwin, the time now is seven thirty four and I'm joined by Lewis Boone, Jones, sitting up very straight, and we'll come to that. Very important. But let I took about posturing Vic. Very nice. Front front pages. Full of, well, you know what this is the story that the British broadsheet, papers absolutely live for as acres of coverage is, of course, the rice to be the next conservative party leader, the next prime minister of the UK, and the headlines are glorious times to see battle for number ten. The guardian it's Johnson verse his hunt, but was the result fixed just a course. We all know that, if a question is being ost in a newspaper headline, the answer's almost always, no, but anyway, on the daddy, telegraph Boris exact his revenge as g-o-v is squeezed out. So this in case you don't know his Boris Johnson is leading the way he got one hundred sixty votes from MP's and into the final two goes Jeremy hunt with seventy seven votes from his fellow MP's, which is only two votes more than Michael g-o-v. So the intrigue here is with that result. So close wasn't going to be go was. Going to be hunt. Was it in some way fixed, and the reasons the papers, the front page of the guardian especially the time doing it as well. Is that a number of MP's came out and said they were newly go into bat Boris Johnson, at least four, but only abortions increased is number votes by three. So if all those MP's and did vote for onto means some voters paps, who had though to Boris Johnson. Switch their vote to Jeremy hunt, because Johnson's camp would rather go into the runoff against Jeremy hunt rather than Michael go now why would they rather that while one because Jeremy hunt voted remain last time, so they think that's easier to fight against him. But also course because couple of years ago. Michael go came out was a supporter Boris Johnson and stopped him in the back is the phrase. And so this is about Boris Johnson's camp exacting his revenge on Michael go. So the drama is there we are. Set to go. So no. I mean, we were talking yesterday about restricts, and how how the voting seem to work against him to. Yes. Answer on such of it with the other was who she expecting a better runs Java beginning of the year was kind of one of the favorites. But the votes didn't his campaign was a bit lacklustre Rory Stewart who no one really heard before this did himself, no Hama tall. But now we going onto the final two and they will go the final to go around the country now for hustings, which is that speech conservative party members to see what they explored questioning their issues and wanna call us, the main issues will be Brexit. I'm how they do with it on the fascinating thing for the rest of the country, who on conceived party members here is what's their plan for Brexit. And both of them, basically are saying that they will go back and try on renegotiate with Brussels, something that Brussels has explicitly said it. Will not do this is just going to jog on. Let's, let's move on to, to the US. Now, this is a story we briefly touched on earlier today. And this is a the very old military attack that seemed to have been called off on Iran. Exactly. New York Times it was their exclusive. I guess they just want to give them a bit of credit just a couple of details. Interesting headline Trump approve strikes on Iran, but then abruptly pulls back. So it's fascinating because saying that the military was ready to strike right up until seven pm American time yesterday. Diplomatic officials were expecting a strike ships were ready planes in the air. Then the order came to stand down, not go ahead. I think the plan had been to strike things like radar missile batteries things like that before dawn. So the would using any potential casualties the operation was underway, and then cooled off an close..

Boris Johnson Jeremy hunt Michael g-o-v MP Iran Georgina Godwin Rory Stewart prime minister Lewis Boone New York Times Brexit Brussels US UK Trump Jones
"lewis boone" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"You wouldn't hurt me after all her married. Considered the divorce. We hope you enjoy the ride. Welcome to the projection booth. I'm your host Mike white joining me is Mr. rob Saint Mary. I'm just here for the ego trip, also back in the booth this week as Mr. Jedidiah airs at the party. We're kicking off back to back discussions of Philip k dick adaptations, with a look at nineteen nineties, total recall, directed by Paul Verhoeven the film's spent years in turn around until Arnold Schwarzenegger was attached. And got this thing made we've actually been talking about total recall since the very first episode of the projection booth way back when we talked to Richard rush who was one of the first directors attached to the project. It's the story of identity sanity, freedom fighting, and more, of course, we're gonna beginning spoilers galore on this episode. So please be warrant. Rob win was the first time you saw total recall. And what did you think I was twelve when this came out so nineteen ninety twelve so that do math, you can figure? How old I am. I believe I either saw in the theater, or when it was on VHS, I can't remember which, but I do remember seeing it not too long after it came out if that was the case and at the time, I didn't really know what I was looking at if definitely had tone to it in a style to it that I'm gonna talk a little bit more about later that I thought was really interesting, and the whole sort of question of what's reality and what's memory or dream, you know, this may be where now that I think of it, where I came to like the films of take drink Lewis, Boone. Well, because there's a lot of that you don't know if you're in reality, or in a dream kind of logic, and I think this may have been the first place that I remember seeing something like that when I was a kid. So in the years since I've seen it over and over again many times it's one. Of my favorites of their Hoving American films, obviously, is the best. One for me is always rebel capos go back to that one. But there's always something about a pallbearer Hoven film, even if it's a failure, quote unquote, it's still more interesting than half the other stuff that's out there. How about you Jedidiah? I saw it on video. It was new video, of course was aware of it. I was very interested in movies. But I was not allowed to see movies and so my, my buddy, and I, we would have been probably fourteen when it came out, and you baby fifteen when I saw it on video. But yeah, we used to go up to this video store that we his parents had a, a membership at, and we found that they would rent us movies, you know, r rated movies and things like that wouldn't wouldn't give soon shit about it. So we'd go up there and we'd rent a movie. And then come back his place. And he wasn't really allowed to watch movies either..

Mr. rob Saint Mary Mr. Jedidiah Arnold Schwarzenegger Paul Verhoeven Mike white Richard rush Philip Lewis Boone
"lewis boone" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"Yeah. And also given that it seems that Dolly isn't necessarily that interested in sex. But he's interested in like, he seems to be interested in a more as a transactional thing in regards to the hottest Marissa Federica for one explanation of that you made him saying that Federico was kind of quite quite right. How he does. Seasonable. Yeah. It almost seems like six as consummation of the like Archie connection, rob them, boom sex as a physical acting dome itself, which makes sense given the dollar doesn't seem to be declared interested in now. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think it's a valuable point the meaningful thing about sex for Dolly here is not the physical act. And so the fact that they don't actually have the physical act is not really significant because they still have this sexual interaction. Yeah. I would agree in nineteen twenty six Federico. Indeed, write a poem cold or to Salvador Dali. Okay. Bavasi majority of the poem is really just about how Dolly is. Right. Austin? Great man, and it's very impressive. How does is very good. But I am going to read you one from it which goes, but above all, I sing shed thought that joins us in the dark, and the golden Alice it is not art. This Lightfoot lines is rather it is love friendship, the clashing of odds. Jason. That's not going. Whereas Jason went given what we were saying moment to go about that kind of like autistic consummation of their relationship. It's interesting that I suppose that in the poem. He says, it's not just Arctic's love friendship. Yeah. The clashing of soul last once. I don't say solids is in frankly, I made it to some extent. I think the clashing of sewage there is just that kind of like intellectual debate of passionate conversation. I guess. Stuff like pot of literary circle together. Yeah. Yeah. To me. That's probably what the clashing of sources about. I'm not going to discount your rating by reading by which you mean by like, emotional, lofta, dully and federate cards maintained this kind of intensity of relationship from what I can say like opinions on this differ, there definitely still friends up until sort of nineteen twenty nine, but the intensity of the admiration they have for HR, the begins to wane in the sort of nineteen twenty seven on woods years in nineteen twenty seven federici published a book of poetry which called gypsy songs, which was inspired by the FARC music of rural. Spain particularly of the people in abolitio he came from and the version of Spain that he presented in this book was very kind of this like rural idealized past Spain. And it didn't sit well with Dolly's interest in Madonna T. So what Dali says he's criticism of this book, he writes to Federica your songs Granada without trolleys and even without airplanes. They are an old Granada with natural purely popular constant elements that are far from today. He feels that Federico car us not engaging with current world in the way that he thinks off should. And so I saw his admiration for Federico fades at this point Victor Fernandez who collected the few lessons between Federica and Dolly which exists says of them. There was no break just drift in the gap left, by the diminishing friendship. You might remember Lewis Boone will. Yes, he was here before he writes, a bash gay people for fun. The apparently earned the engaged in that Toby briefly. I'm still perturbed gives them just sent that in the sentence and then left. Yeah. Sure. But regardless he's back, regardless. He's back this time. He's closeness with Dolly is increasing Boone wells questions with Dolly. Yes. Okay. Who knew L becomes close to Delhi went previously..

Dolly Federico Marissa Federica Lewis Boone Granada Jason Salvador Dali Spain Archie FARC Lightfoot Bavasi Austin Dali Victor Fernandez Delhi Toby abolitio
"lewis boone" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on The Film Vault

"Knows time crimes fucking great movie i think that more is time travel movie unless the spanish speaking film but it's definitely spanish speaking film devil's backbone which is gary modell corals earlier work and then i wasn't confident enough to have it on my list because the five adami list or so strong and i can abide by them but lewis boone well he's definitely a maverick making movies and pushing the envelope one movies we're still in their infant stage he's definitely worth looking into if you consider yourself sinophile or you'd like to be one or you're just interested in like some of the forefathers of cinematic universe lewis men well he's done some amazing stuff and did a bunch of movies with dali and salvador el salvador dali and he was really going okay so we can you know show these moving pictures to audiences let's fuck with them and you know he was doing horrific imagery back in the thirties manipulating yes louis poodle is definitely worth checking out would've loved doc about city god but that is portuguese yeah you can't go brazilian films a couple of quick story before we wrap up here my very good friend you know you're talking about with it on this show or the patriot on my friends who are too smart for their own good accessible talk about it yeah my one friend who's smart enough for his own good and he actually did okay he's a lawyer and derek seattle now he lives out here in malibu with his law firm and he had a cleaning crew that when he lived in seattle and he loves speaking spanish to him because he took a bunch of spanish when he was a high school and college and after about probably two years of speaking spanish and he thought it was really weird because he thought spanish was good but they can understand him and he's like it must be rusty and when he found out that there from brazil and they speak portuguese.

derek seattle malibu brazil gary modell lewis boone salvador el salvador dali two years
"lewis boone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"lewis boone" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Hits 23 minutes past the tough the you're listening to the globalist with me georgina godwin and it's time for this morning's newspapers i'm joined by lewis boone jones present if itv news thanks for coming on your money so the salient stories keep presenting themselves again and again because the coasties are huge stories and they all being covered absolutely everywhere but for example jeff sessions just chechen donald trump this are gone ford opinion piece on page eleven of the new york times and hold onto your hat it is richest so i'll just quickly quote the opening couple of lines he describes trump's actions with regard to sessions like this is as it is a multitiered tower of political idiocy a sublime monument to the moronic a gordy gleaming ozzie mandian folly and then which is a fantastic sentence for anything but he then goes on to list that kind of few reasons of outage chinese exactly why trump's attacks on sessions are so idiotic christiana policy level we've already touched on the fact that sessions supports lots of trump's policy on the kind of institutional level his obviously trump is under investigation by senate republicans and these their support not to alienate them and and he showing a level of dishonesty and this loyalty the men in in the woods here should send same people running from trump's service and it could hurt him with his base so you've got four massive reasons why this is simply politically idiotic anti any kind of sums it up at the end by saying so it's basically madness all the way to the top.

donald trump new york times trump georgina godwin lewis boone jones itv ford senate 23 minutes