35 Burst results for "Lewis"

USPS ready for holiday crush after influx of mail-in ballots

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

USPS ready for holiday crush after influx of mail-in ballots

"The U.S. Postal Service says it's ready for the holiday crush outer to the influx of mail in ballots I Norman hall Postal service officials say there was a solid performance in delivering mail in ballots for the midterm elections and now the postal service is ready to dive into the crush of holiday deliveries both master general Lewis DeJoy said 11.3 billion pieces of mail and 567 million packages were delivered last month and he said the postal service has stabilized its workforce and is ready for the next challenge of delivering holiday cards and parcels to joy said the postal service still faces challenges he said the new budget includes nearly $3 billion in retirement costs at 1.5 billion inflation costs that are above what was planned while mail volume is declining at a rate of about 3% per year Norman hall Washington

Norman Hall Postal Service Lewis Dejoy U.S. Postal Service Postal Service Norman Hall Washington
Luke Combs tops CMA Awards; Loretta Lynn, Lewis honored

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Luke Combs tops CMA Awards; Loretta Lynn, Lewis honored

"Luke combs keeps the entertainer of the year title for a second year at the country music association awards I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest Luke comes one entertainer and album of the year at the CMAs on ABC and he says life's pretty good Country sounded more country than it has in a long time tonight Laney Wilson won the awards for female vocalist and new artist she says her trophy is a triumph This right here is for everybody who has believed in me and a little bit for the ones who even didn't Chris Stapleton won the male vocalist award but his real moment of the night was his performance with patty loveless who had the audience spellbound

Luke Combs Country Music Association Laney Wilson Archie Luke ABC Chris Stapleton Patty Loveless
Farewell to the Late, Great, And Scandalous Jerry Lee Lewis

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Farewell to the Late, Great, And Scandalous Jerry Lee Lewis

"Jerry Lee Lewis, who died not too long ago. Was known as the killer. And that wasn't just a casual nickname, a schoolmate called him that after he tried to strangle a teacher, he also once shot his base player in the chest just about all his 7 wives, including one who was a child, said he beat them, and there's a strong suspicion that he murdered wife number 5. Jerry Lee Lewis was the very model of a high functioning sociopath and someone defied hard living, drug and alcohol abuse and a bunch of serious health problems, but he still made it well into his 9th decade. It was a pianist. He was a singer, he was a showman, he was also one of the three or four people who decisively ushered in The Rock and roll era, and utterly personified an unbridled and dangerous part of the music. He died at 87 years old and not for nothing after the death of Little Richard back in 2020, he was the last man standing from the dawn of rock and roll.

Jerry Lee Lewis Little Richard
Jerry Lee Lewis, outrageous rock ‘n’ roll star, dies at 87

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Jerry Lee Lewis, outrageous rock ‘n’ roll star, dies at 87

"Musician Jerry Lee Lewis was one of the creators of rock and roll I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest According to the legend that is Jerry Lee Lewis he would kick his stool over and put his foot on the piano because he was unable to dance on stage like guitar players could Lewis was known as the killer with songs like Greek balls of fire and whole lot of shaking going on Lewis married 7 times including famously to his 13 year old cousin he said in a 1996 AP interview he was proud of his wives and his music but mostly one thing in particular In my body most proud of that

Jerry Lee Lewis Archie Lewis
Dinesh D'Souza: Election Denialism Runs Rampant on the Left

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:46 min | Last month

Dinesh D'Souza: Election Denialism Runs Rampant on the Left

"Frankly, you've been over the target. I know they've come after you with a vengeance. There's been all kinds of controversy that want to shut down anybody who dares to speak to the issue of election integrity, but they sure don't want to be reminded of how all the Democrats claimed that Donald Trump wasn't the legitimately elected president in 2016. Dinesh every last one of them. I played a Montage over and over. Hillary, John Lewis, Stephen Jimmy Carter. They all said that the 2016 election was rigged, but don't you let dinesh d'souza produce 2000 mules. We got to shut that sucker down. I mean, the Democrats said that in 2004, in the bush Carey race, they said that in 2000, it was Bush who was quote selected and not elected over Al Gore. The last time the Democrats essentially conceded an election that they lost was 1988. This would be George H. W. Bush's victory over dukakis. So election denialism runs rampant on the left. That's true. What I find a little disturbing is people like Bill Barr, who tried to kind of guff on discredit 2000 mules by saying that cell phone geo tracking is not accurate and can not pinpoint mules a mule is kind of a delivery man who's delivering these fraudulent ballots to drop boxes. You can't find them by cell phone geo tracking, even though Bill Barr was head of the Justice Department, which uses cell phone geo tracking every day. The bus cases around the country. They're using it with January 6th. They use it in many other contexts. In fact, the FBI needed cell phone geo tracking to intercept Mike lindell in the drive in hardee's. He was there if they weren't tracking his phone.

Stephen Jimmy Carter Bill Barr Bush Carey Dinesh Donald Trump John Lewis Souza Hillary George H. W. Bush Dukakis Al Gore Bush Justice Department Mike Lindell FBI Hardee
Jerry Lee Lewis, Keith Whitley join the Country Hall of Fame

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Jerry Lee Lewis, Keith Whitley join the Country Hall of Fame

"Keith whitley and Jerry Lee Lewis were inducted into the country music Hall of Fame in Nashville Tennessee on Sunday With the latest Nikki guyton Alabama and Kenny Chesney were among the performers at the country music Hall of Fame inductions Lori Morgan tearfully accepted the induction on behalf of her late husband Keith whitley Performed in tribute to Jerry Lee Lewis who stayed home for health reasons Hank Williams junior says if Lewis had been there everyone would know it Jerry Lee doesn't ask for your attention he demands it He doesn't take the stage he commands it Music executive Joe galante also was inducted

Keith Whitley Country Music Hall Of Fame Jerry Lee Lewis Nikki Guyton Lori Morgan Kenny Chesney Nashville Tennessee Alabama Hank Williams Jerry Lee Lewis Joe Galante
From witness stand, Kevin Spacey denies sex abuse claims

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

From witness stand, Kevin Spacey denies sex abuse claims

"Actor Kevin Spacey has denied making a sexual advance at actor Anthony rapp decades ago during testimony in a New York courtroom on Monday I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest Kevin Spacey says the allegations made by Anthony rapp are not true Rap is suing Spacey claiming he was 14 in 1986 when Spacey picked him up after a party threw him on a bed and got on top of him while both were fully clothed Spacey reveals he has been private about his personal life in part because his father was a white supremacist and a neo Nazi something he has never talked about publicly Earlier in the day judge Lewis Kaplan threw up rap's claim of intentional infliction of emotional distress saying it duplicated his claim of assault and battery

Anthony Rapp Kevin Spacey Spacey Archie New York Lewis Kaplan
Gabe Eltaeb: The Importance of Hero Storytelling

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:03 min | Last month

Gabe Eltaeb: The Importance of Hero Storytelling

"Was that like for you, Gabe? I mean, you know, getting that job and being able to illustrate and tell the stories of those heroes that you grew up with. It was amazing. It's like imagine we all wanted to be a ballplayer where a little, but two dreams for me were defensive ends for the Denver Broncos or comic book artists. I got one of them. I'm a big guy. I'm 6 foot four, played a lot of football coach for a lot of it. But imagine you go on your favorite team, Todd, and not only do you get to your favorite team, your favorite player is the one that picks you. That's what happened for me. Generally personally hired me. My favorite artist from when I was 12 to work in his studio and joined DC Comics. So that's what it felt like. It felt like a humbling blessing. It was so amazing. Comic books are an original American art form. There have been invented about a hundred years ago in this country. And so I took a lot of pride in that. I take a, this is our cultural heritage. And stories about heroes are so important. And identity politics are ruining everything. Someone told me a great CF Lewis quote that we don't tell children fairytale to tell them the dragons are real. Children no dragons are real. We tell children fairytales to tell them dragons can be slain. And when you see Superman in Batman and Luke Skywalker in Indiana Jones and all the classic heroes of yesteryear overcoming their own fear, standing up to evil, even though they could be killed in prison, ruined whatever, they still stand up and win and that tells all of us, we can stand up. So that's what I did. They started getting a little woke 2013 14, a little more a little more and I kept my head down. I'm like, well, it's not the comics I'm working on. Kind of weird, and it was a quarter of our books, half the books. And now they've gone nitro crazy. It's all the books are just identity politics. I am Mexican and Libyan. My father escaped Gaddafi's socialist regime. They murdered my dad's Friends and my grandfather, he got hit by a car by accident because my dad was speaking out against Gaddafi. I do not come from cowards. But we stand up to these people that want to silence and cancel. And we canceled a chance lose. And we always follow the law, but

Cf Lewis Gabe Denver Broncos Todd Football Luke Skywalker Indiana Jones Batman Gaddafi Libyan
Raymond Arroyo: Meeting Jerry Lewis for the First Time

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:53 sec | Last month

Raymond Arroyo: Meeting Jerry Lewis for the First Time

"Great work in your career. And every time I see your face on Fox News, I light up a little bit because you have a warmth and a contagious personality. You really do. And I mean, and Laura doesn't like a lot of people, but I'm glad she likes you. Well, look, to every rain, a little light must shine. Yeah, so there you go. No, no, we're friends for a long time. It's like Jerry and I. The first time I met Jerry, there was no, you know, there was no build up. I walked in, I met him, and we instantly clicked. That was sort of the way Laura and I met. I went on her show like, I'm coming here to talk about a project and I stayed for one segment and another segment. The chemistry was just there at the beginning. So we've just kind of rolled that into TV. But it's either there or not. And a lot of people on TV fake it, we don't have to. That's nice. No, no. Well,

Laura Jerry Fox News
Ginni and Clarence Thomas Must Have a Sad Marriage

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:58 sec | Last month

Ginni and Clarence Thomas Must Have a Sad Marriage

"You retweeted Ginny Thomas read an opening statement to the committee according to a source. I can guarantee that my husband has never spoken with me about pending cases at the court. It's an ironclad rule here in our home. She said clarence Thomas is uninterested in politics, and you just said that did the committee just start laughing hysterically. But, I mean, here we have a sitting Supreme Court Justice's wife saying yes, the election was stolen. And no, I've never talked to my husband about anything. And you know what, every single biography of every single Supreme Court Justice talks about how they discussed cases with their families. Yeah. I mean, you know, we know that was it Lewis Powell, who wrote roe V wade. We know he discussed it with his family. What he was going to do in that decision. We just know this. And it's just like, it's sitting there going, wow, you must have a really crappy marriage. If you can't talk about work at all with each other, I mean, I hope the sex is good.

Ginny Thomas Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Lewis Powell Roe V Wade
Congressman Jason Lewis Talks Trump-Hating Republicans

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Congressman Jason Lewis Talks Trump-Hating Republicans

"Explain to me. Again, talk about revisionist history or just changing history. I don't care what you call it. But how can you have, quote, and I'm tired of looking at this, you go on MSNBC, CNN, and sometimes even Fox or in others. And you see these Republican consultants who have not worked for criticized president Trump every day of the week. They criticize Republicans. They, I mean, they work against what is considered, you know, many of us consider conservative, but yet the mainstream media out there is because here's Republican consultants. No, those are not Republicans anymore. Let's at least move them to independent. Let's do something to say, they're not where the Republican voters are today. And if they were, they'd be out there being hired, but they just don't reflect it. That's the part where the media tries to make by using labels. Everybody look the same and that try to isolate those who are pointing out the deficiencies in their argument. It is hard to overestimate the falsity of Steve Schmidt or Rick Wilson ever be considered a Republican. And this whole notion of and this is I'm glad you brought this up because everybody thinks it's Trump's abrasive personality. And let's be honest, it's a different kind of politician. You and I both know that. Not afraid to say that. But different times call for different leaders. But it wasn't that buggy. I mean, oh, he's not humble enough. I think Barack Obama was humbled, Bill Clinton. It was the issues Trump was threatening them with. The end of globalism, the controlling the border, all of these issues that they were advising their Republicans on you. You really ought to come out with a climate platform. You really just need to do that. And don't alienate the Human Rights Campaign by being a traditionalist, you can't do that. And so Trump was threatening that status quo issue wise, and I think that's why they turned on him. That's why they didn't like him. And now from Bill crystal to Schmidt, Wilson, they are venomous in their hatred.

President Trump Msnbc CNN Donald Trump Steve Schmidt Rick Wilson FOX Bill Clinton Barack Obama Bill Crystal Schmidt Wilson
Why Congressman Jason Lewis Wrote Political Book 'Party Animal'

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Why Congressman Jason Lewis Wrote Political Book 'Party Animal'

"What brought you to write the book and what are you trying to communicate in? Well, you're on judiciary, ranking members. So you know all about how we weaponize the bottles of the bureaucracy. And that hit me between the eyes in the 115th. I started thinking about this. And then just the craziness that was happening with the Trump, starting with the inauguration, and you were talking about people protesting. I had protesters on my front lawn. You and I were being demagogue over the American healthcare act, which was a good piece of legislation. And I thought, this is getting out of control. And I'm afraid that if you let the left right history, you're never going to learn from. And that's what was happening already with CNN going after every Republican and it was getting out of hand. But I think the epiphany for me was, you know, if you're not on the intelligence committee, you don't get to see the Intel until they say, okay, members can come over and view this. And it was when we did that and trudged over to the capitol visitor center and looked at this stuff and all I remember Doug is sitting there going, is this all there is. Is this? And we were consumed for two years. It was thwarting our ability to move legislation. The media were Gaga over this line. Just absolute line. Trump is going to be indicted tomorrow. He's a Russian asset. Now there was a Trump Tower meeting. All of which proved to be a lie. And I thought, okay, I'm going to start taking a journal. And so I started writing a journal. And what happened was that started to continue through three campaign cycles, 16, 18, and 20. Well, then 20 came around, I'm the Senate nominee, and we are locked down except for a rioters in Minneapolis. The third precinct was broke was burnt to the ground, talking about destroying government property, right? And it was so orwellian, I continued with these journals, and so now, in 2021, at this all these journals and you know what it's like to write a book, you got to put it in readable fashion. So I found a cabin in the Minnesota northwoods and for a year and a half, I just hunkered down and wrote basically a history of how we got to the point where we'd weaponize the government on behalf of one party.

Intelligence Committee Capitol Visitor Center CNN Trump Tower Intel Doug Donald Trump Minneapolis Senate Minnesota
Doug Sits Down With Former Congressman Jason Lewis of Minnesota

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:12 min | 2 months ago

Doug Sits Down With Former Congressman Jason Lewis of Minnesota

"Us a little bit about your background and then what, you know, what staircase you fell down to say, I need to run for Congress, you know? Well, you do, I was in the airport the other day and somebody came up to me, and said, I know you, then you used to fill in for Russia and you were in Congress for a while and I said, yep, that's me and they said, whatever happened to you anyway. We all get those. Well, look, I grew up in a small business family. My mom was from north Minneapolis. My dad was from Iowa. We settled in the Hawkeye state, but Minnesota was the second home. So when I fell into talk radio after graduate school, I had an opportunity to go home to Minneapolis and St. Paul, I did. And that was in the early 90s and raised my two daughters here for 30 years. Loved it. Got into radio. It was fortunate enough to hit the timing was good, telling them for rush and had my own syndicated show for a while. But at some point, Doug, you know what it's like, you can be a commentator so long, but after a while, you got to put your money where your mouth is and you want to get on the field and play. Because the only way to really change things is to vote for them. So I thought, in most, by the way, most commentators won't talk most talk show hosts don't do that because they can demagogue your previous comments like Supreme Court Justices. And I knew that would happen with me and it did with CNN and all the rest. But I didn't really care. I just said, look, I want to do something. And I was fortunate to come into Congress with a new president when we really had an opportunity to do things and we did. But it was really just more of an angst about, look, you can talk all day long, but at some point, you know, suit up, get in the game. And so I did do that and served. I thought in one of the more consequential terms of Congress, and then I ran for the U.S. Senate alongside the president here in Minnesota, and two years ago and October, we were neck and neck with Tina Smith, who was the Democrat, I would say from Minnesota, but really she represents Planned Parenthood. Her former employer. But I felt that we were going to win Minnesota. I really felt the president went. And we did great. I collected more votes than any other statewide candidate in Minnesota history. We outperformed the top of the ticket by two points, but we had 1.9 million absentee ballots at 60% of the total Minnesota vote gained by mail.

Congress North Minneapolis Minnesota St. Paul Russia Minneapolis Iowa Doug Tina Smith CNN Supreme Court U.S. Senate
What's Up Next for 'Socrates in the City'?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 2 months ago

What's Up Next for 'Socrates in the City'?

"Was the Socrates in the city event with Andrew clavin? What is coming up next for Socrates in the city? Man, that's a cream puff question. I don't have to think very hard on that. Andrew clavin, it was so good that in the, we have a patrons dinner afterward. We're, you know, people who help support Socrates come to a dinner. And we usually do Q&A with the guest with Andrew Cleveland. So we did that. And what he said there, like I was annoyed as I often am when people say stuff that's so great, I'm like, you're wasting it on 30 people. This should be filmed and so I had the idea of doing another event with Andrew clavin. Maybe in Philadelphia or someplace else because there's so much more, so it was so wonderful. Look, he is a gift. I want to tell you folks. He's an amazing gift. His book, the great good thing, where he talks about how he came to faith, and then his most recent book, which was very literary, he is, he is an astonishing human being and a genius. And I enjoyed it, you know, to say that I enjoyed it, is saying a lot, because sometimes it's just kind of, you know, it feels a little bit like work. I enjoy it, but there's a lot going on and stuff. I actually felt, I just enjoyed it. What can I tell you? I enjoyed it. It was wonderful, and we will get the video up as soon as possible. And folks, I want to tell you, by the way, tomorrow on southeast and city, we are airing my Socrates and city interview part two with Walter hooper. One of the greatest interviews I've ever done in my life, we aired part one a week or two ago. We're going to air part two tomorrow. And then we'll probably air part three another time. He's the man who knew C. S. Lewis and when you hear the whole story, you'll get it. But that's tomorrow on this program. Okay,

Andrew Clavin Socrates Andrew Cleveland Philadelphia Walter Hooper C. S. Lewis
Nefarious: Steve Deace's Fictional Story That Turned Into Prophecy

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Nefarious: Steve Deace's Fictional Story That Turned Into Prophecy

"I know you're going to be very interested in as a C. S. Lewis guy. Is in 2016, I wrote a book that I thought was fiction. And 6 years later has turned out, unfortunately, to be prophecy. And I based it off of the screwtape letters, and I decided to take it to a more global scale. Instead of the temptation of individuals, what about a deception of an entire culture? And so I created a character named lord nefarious, a high lord of hell, who was tasked by the devil with the destruction of the United States of America. And in this book, he connects everybody names names. He list movements that he started co opted, why they did it, and he put it all in writing so that the fact we will ignore it. We will not turn away. We will not accept it. We'll think it's fantasy or conspiracy theory. That's how he'll convince his master, the devil, that it was that his plan is irrevocable and successful. Well, we are just about finished brother with the movie version of that. The production team that did unplanned a few years ago, the excellent Planned Parenthood whistleblower style. This is their next movie is the feature film based on this story. And we cast Sean Patrick Flannery as nefarious. I watched the rough cut about 6 weeks ago. And I'm just telling you, I mean, his performance, it was like Nicholson in The Shining kind of stuff, how good it was. And I think, I think it's possible we might have made the most compelling Christian movie since the passion. I think it's going to wreck people, nefarious is going to preach and teach to this culture, but it's going to be from the other side of the looking glass.

C. S. Lewis United States Of America Sean Patrick Flannery Nicholson
Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

"When you first came to Oxford, I remember story that you went to maybe it was the bob land. I'm guessing, and you asked for anything by Lewis, but the term you used was Lewis, Louisiana. Can you do you remember that story? I don't think it's exactly as I told it. I may have asked for Louisiana, but I think together we worked it out. I worked so long in the bodleian over 50 years. And I was always working on Louis. So people who worked there called the readers by not by name, but by the name of the person they're researching. So I've called mister C is Lewis when I'm there. And I know a man who is Civil War Robert E. Lee and Hitler. Mister Adolf Hitler. You're kidding. Well, actually, one of the things about Hitler's. Is that the people that I work with have work with for years, these Curtis Brown, agents, literary agents and London. Well, they were Hitler's literary agents. And they have you're not kidding. No, I'm not. Curtis Brown where Hitler's literary agents. Some have they inherited they have the rights to they control the rights to mein kampf. But and all the children's stories that he wrote. Well, I understand that the royalties of mein kampf have been around for 50 years, and they built up quite a lot.

Bob Land Lewis Louisiana Hitler Mister Adolf Hitler Curtis Brown Oxford Robert E. Lee Louis London
Eric and the Late Walter Hooper Discuss Burning Significant Documents

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Eric and the Late Walter Hooper Discuss Burning Significant Documents

"Wanted to ask you yesterday we were talking about how warning major Lewis was burning things. Many things significant things. And I know that he'd written you some letters. And I was wondering, did you bring those letters to burn here today? I did, yeah. Yeah, I did. Well, we'll end things on a bang. We'll burn warn these letters. It's an amazing story, and I don't know that I'll ever get over it to get the details of how it was that he was actually burning things that we now think of as treasures. We spoke yesterday about the dark tower and all kinds of other things. Were there poems that would have been burned? I think so. I think he was scooping up a great many things, but something I, because I had been C. S. Lewis, it sent me to Cambridge. This is before the burning. Had sent me to Cambridge to clear up his affairs because he didn't go. He wasn't fit to go back. So this was in 63 when you were 63. In July in August and in August, he sent me over there to deal with his cell various books. And he said, whatever papers you find appropriate to your own use or else destroy.

Lewis Cambridge C. S. Lewis
Walter Hooper and Eric Reflect on C.S. Lewis' Way With Words

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:28 min | 2 months ago

Walter Hooper and Eric Reflect on C.S. Lewis' Way With Words

"With Michael ward the other day about Reaper cheap at the end of the dawn treader getting into this little coracle and rowing away nobly beautifully up up the standing wave. And into Aslan's country. One of the most beautiful literary images in the history of literature, I think. And given to a mouse, a noble man. Another one. I did all these names I could just talk for days about the names, read the cheap. Where did he get the name Reaper cheap? I think it just sounds exactly right from this noble and martial mouse. So I mean, he must have just come up with something that some exact right. Well, because read the cheap, we think of PEEP, the way mice, PEEP, but the only person I can think of who does the same kind of thing is, of course, Lewis is very dear friend Tolkien. Yeah. Masterful, and it also has something to do with the idea that both of them had a very deep sense of language and etymology, the idea that Tolkien even invented a language that that's very interesting to me that words the roots of words were more important to them.

Michael Ward Aslan Rowing Tolkien Lewis
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Then, you can hear more interviews like the one you just heard on talk easy with Sam forgot. Some of my personal favorite episodes are with George Saunders, Steven Soderbergh, Edward Norton, Laura Dern, Noam Chomsky, Dave eggers, Nicky Giovanni, and Gloria Steinem. You can find all of those and more on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also find us on top, easy pod dot com or on Instagram and Twitter at talk easy pod. Special thanks today to Caitlyn dryden, Andre Lynn, Caroline Reebok, and of course. Michael Lewis. I'd also like to thank the team at push can industries, Justin Richmond, Heather fain, meal a bell, magy Taylor, Nicole marano, Maya Koenig, Carly makeore, Jason gambrell, Jacob weisberg, and Malcolm gladwell. I'm San Francisco. Thanks for listening. Brought to you by discover..

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Film <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> big fish. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you ever heard a joke <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so many times you've forgotten <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> why it's funny? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And then you hear <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it again and suddenly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> new. <Speech_Music_Male> You <Speech_Music_Male> remember why you loved it in <Speech_Music_Male> the first place? <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Music_Female> we said he'll fight the <Speech_Music_Female> Jack for 50 <Speech_Music_Female> feet tall. <Speech_Music_Male> No way. <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> right. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pretty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> See? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So we live a car. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my father's final joke, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I guess. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The man tells <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his story so many <Speech_Music_Male> times. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> And he becomes <Speech_Music_Male> the stories. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> They live <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on after him. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And in that way, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he becomes <Speech_Music_Male> immortal. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> So maybe <SpeakerChange> to your <Speech_Male> distress, I'm here <Speech_Music_Male> in still alive. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm alive. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> I'm not dead yet. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> When I saw that movie, <Speech_Male> I thought <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> going to be what my funeral <Speech_Male> is like. And I tell <Speech_Male> you why. <Speech_Male> Because I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> wonder the world that <Speech_Male> I meet these characters <Speech_Male> and I get to write about them <Speech_Male> and people never believe <Speech_Male> they're as good as <Speech_Male> they are on the page, <Speech_Male> but they are. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> when they meet them, <Silence> it's like, wow. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah, Billy bean is <Speech_Male> like that. Or <Speech_Male> charity dean is like <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> And the kids in <Speech_Male> that story, they father <Speech_Male> was a traveling salesman <Speech_Male> and he'd come home and <Speech_Male> tell me stories about <Speech_Male> having met a giant <Speech_Male> or a Siamese twins <Speech_Male> or whatever <Speech_Male> it was. <Speech_Male> And they thought it was just <Speech_Male> they believed <Speech_Male> him when they were little and <Speech_Male> then when they got old they didn't <Speech_Male> believe him and they thought it was <Speech_Male> all an act and then <Speech_Male> when they all of a <Speech_Male> sudden all these people actually <Speech_Male> show up at his funeral. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I do feel that <Speech_Male> if <Silence> ever you <Speech_Male> got <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> all these <Silence> people I have written <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> in a room, <Silence> you'd <Speech_Male> say, <Speech_Male> wow, Michael <Speech_Music_Male> didn't actually have to work that <Speech_Music_Male> hard. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This was easy. <SpeakerChange> He <Speech_Male> just found these people. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> very much <Speech_Male> glad <SpeakerChange> you are <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> alive, by the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> way. Thank you <Speech_Male> very much. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's a good <Speech_Male> start for a <Speech_Music_Male> friendship. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> And of the work. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Are <Silence> you proud of <SpeakerChange> it? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Very. <Speech_Male> Very. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> put it out there unless I'm <Speech_Male> proud of it. <Speech_Male> And I don't think less <Speech_Male> of it because of what happens <Speech_Male> to it out in the <Speech_Male> world. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah, I <Speech_Male> really like what I do. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> my own things <Speech_Male> interest me up <Speech_Male> to the point where they're published. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And it's been <Speech_Male> a sheer <Speech_Male> delight that <Speech_Male> other people <SpeakerChange> are willing <Speech_Male> to kind of go along for that <Speech_Male> ride. Well, I <Speech_Male> thank you for going along <Speech_Male> on this ride with <Speech_Male> me for the show. It <Speech_Music_Male> was a surprising but <Speech_Music_Male> a fun one. <Speech_Music_Male> Michael Lewis, <SpeakerChange> thank <Speech_Music_Male> you very much. Thanks, <Music> Sam. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> There it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That was Michael Lewis and I <Speech_Music_Male> in conversation. <Speech_Music_Male> Michael's <Speech_Music_Male> new audiobook <Speech_Music_Male> edition of liars <Speech_Music_Male> poker <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will be available in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> year against the rules <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> feed. This <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> February. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Until

Billy bean Michael Michael Lewis
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Those editors, the best editors I've had are exactly like Billy Fitzgerald. They know when to get pissed at me, they know when to walk out and talk to me and they know when to leave me alone. And star Lawrence, my editor at Norton, Hans coach, the little book I wrote Billy fish about Billy Fitzgerald to people when he says he wants people to understand who I am. And he instinctively is managed me as a writer just as that coach managed me as a player. Do you think you best understand people upon putting them down on the page? Yes. Otherwise, I'm too lazy. It forces me to grapple with my understanding of them. So in a funny way, I know charity dean better than I know my best friend. Because I haven't grappled with him in words. In another way, knowing in some sense is the ability to predict. I probably better able to predict what my best friend will do than what charity dean will do. But, but not by much. And the act of the act of reducing people to character on a page leads you to higher understanding of the person. You're resistance to being understood. That line in the poem, he throws to be a moment misunderstood. Yet not too much, not Aaron, Aaron, wild. But every seeming aberration willed. That seems to be some understanding of you. There's some truth to that. Absolutely. Absolutely this trick to that. That's funny. The moment we get into psychoanalysis, you start talking less. Well, you seem to enjoy it so much. I thought I'd give you the mic. Trust me, no one wants to hear me analyze you. Yeah, it's like a therapy session with a therapist just talks. You go back to Princeton. In 2012. And you give a speech on the role of luck. And so many people look at your career and they think incredibly successful prodigious talent, prolific, all these things. And yet in front of these graduating kids who are finishing this great school and are going on to start their lives in some way. You say, don't be deceived by life's outcomes. Life's outcomes, while not entirely random, have a huge amount of luck baked into them. Above all, recognize that if you had success, you've also had luck. And with luck comes obligation. You owe a debt and not just to your gods. You owe a debt to the unlucky. I was sitting with that today and I wondered, how have you paid that debt? It's a great question. I think about this all the time. And the answer I haven't. I haven't finished paying that debt. I've got a lot of work to do. But what I try to do is, in my daily life, I try to remember that. And I tried to look for situations where I can do things for people without them knowing I'm doing it. Because when you do it and they know it, you create a kind of debt in them. And sometimes you can't avoid it, right? Every year the end of the year, I make my resolutions. And I try to resolve once a month to do something that's life-changing for someone. And I never get there, but I like remind myself as a goal. And so that's kind of one way. The second is, I try to direct my work in useful directions, where it isn't just aesthetics. This is actually requires effort for me because really left to my own devices. I just tell fart jokes and funny stories. So I try to.

Billy Fitzgerald Billy fish dean Aaron Norton Lawrence Princeton
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Even if true is not that damning because I understand my subjects pretty damn well. But it's a, this is fair. This is fair. And I tell you why you were close to a nerve. That Billy bean and I have in our makeup and our kind of psychology, a lot in common. And I don't know, I just and I recognized it pretty quickly. And Billy bean was the toughest not to crack. You talked about these drives to Modesto. The reason they ended up being important was that afterwards, it was dark on the way home. And in the darkness of the car, he would say things about in answers to questions that he would never speak of if it were there was light. It was like he had to be a feel alone to say these things. And I completely related to that. I completely related to his resistance to any kind of cycle and analysis and, you know, or even character analysis. And you know what it is? It's his resistance to being understood. Because once you're understood, you're in a box. Once you're understood you're in a corner and what Billy being the character trait that I recognized in him that I have is a kind of claustrophobia. We're terrified of being trapped. And so we're always kind of looking for where the exit is. And this expressed itself in the way he managed his baseball team and it expresses himself in the way he manages his life. And his friendships. And I'm a bit that way. The minute I feel like a box is closing in on me, I get an axe and I hack off one side of it. I don't spend a lot of time trying to understand myself. At the risk of trying to understand you, there's one character you've come back to many times and other Billy, Billy Fitzgerald. He was your demanding tough as nails, high school, baseball coach..

Billy bean Modesto Billy baseball Billy Fitzgerald
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"And it is one way it's like how you get someone to trust you, but that sounds sinister. When I'm trying to really do, because I don't want them to trust me if they don't trust me. I don't want to trick them into trusting me because that will vanish. What I'm hoping to establish is that they can get to know me. I'm going to let them get to know me and in getting to know me they will genuinely trust me. So it's just a trick of how you let someone get to know you because the last thing I can be with to the extent that I'm asking them to let me participate in their lives, there's no way that's going to happen if I'm just this black box. This is not going to happen. They need to understand what interests me, then you understand how my mind works. What I'm kind of thinking about things, how I move through the world, all that's really important. So it's less like an artificial journalist subject relation chip than it is just like a an ordinary relationship. I'm going on a trip to somebody. A total stranger, and I'm going to get to know them in the bargain. Now, in 2012, when you embark on doing a 6 month piece on Obama. Are you ever concerned at some point, he may not like me very much. Yeah, you know, well, with Obama, I'd say it's so funny. The first encounter I had with him was in the Oval Office and like the first question, he asked me what he was saying how much he liked the movie of the big short. And he said, did you have anything to do with that? And I said, no, he said, I thought not. I thought it was all out of McKay. He was always giving me shit. I mean, he was like, from the get go, given me shit..

Obama Oval Office McKay
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Jobs to fill, like holiday lighting installer. Advanced snowmaker or no beard Santa, a clean shaven man who wears a synthetic beard, Ho Ho Ho. So if you need to hire for one of these festive roles or any others, there's only one place you should go. Zip recruiter dot com slash rules. After all, if zipper cooter can fill an advanced snowmaker or no beard Santa role, they can most likely help with your hiring needs. How does zip recruiter do it? Well, zip recorder uses powerful technology to find and match the right candidates up with your job. Then it proactively presents these candidates to you. You can easily review these recommended candidates and invite your top choices to apply for your job, which encourages them to apply faster..

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"By the way, no one's ever described their thesis project as I bet people who were close to me then detected the how transported I was by the experience. I had never written for school newspapers. I didn't have any like since I want to see my name in print any of that. I had never been encouraged by any teacher to be a writer. No one ever in my entire life. It said, Michael, wow, you have a way of turning a phrase. Nothing. What did they say about you? Pay attention, Michael. Or the truth is that I had moments as a student, but it was more, while that was original. That was what I would get. When things were going good with a teacher, when there was an a on the top of the paper, it was like, this is an original piece of work. And so that I had a little of that, but so I sit down and write this book. The thesis is not as trivial thing. If I showed it to you, it's a book. It's a 50,000 word book. And what it is was total immersion in a subject, where I felt, however, bizarrely irrationally, that I was saying something totally original that was important. And I immersed myself in it, and so the mistake I made coming out of it was first thinking, oh, this means I'm supposed to be an art historian. And my thesis adviser, who was fabulous, said, you can't be an art historian. Basically, because there aren't going to be any. This is a dying industry. And I would not wish it upon my worst enemy. So taught me out of that. And then he says, at the defense, this was very funny moment. This is how I knew. I woke up to the idea of writing. I wanted to hear how well written my thesis was. I didn't want just a good grade. I wanted him saying, I wouldn't say this is beautifully written. And so he didn't say that. So I asked, I said, so what did you think of the.

Michael
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Do as little as possible and that unwillingly, for it is better to receive a slight reprimand than to perform an arduous task. Now, hold on a second. It was about age 19 when I discovered he just made that up. And just said it and just get vast. That tells you something about actually where I come from that I have a father who made that up. And deep down he doesn't think that. What I've got is a father who's got a great sense of irony. And that's a different thing from being a father who's wedded to the idea of doing nothing. You once said about growing up in New Orleans. I grew up in a world that I loved and it was a world that was outside of American culture. One that American culture was clearly hostile towards. I could see that my father's way of life was unsustainable. It was unsustainable not to care very much about what you did for a living. It was not a success culture. It makes you question success when something you feel is very successful. On a very deep, emotional level are by the standards of the world a failure. Yes, I said that. I haven't changed my mind. I mean, it was, it's always been, I think, a source of strength for me as a writer. It's certainly been a useful tool that though I'm writing often about arenas of American ambition. I'm not really of those arenas. I'm from a place where really is like who your mama was. That people judged you to they sent the judge to judge too strong a word. They knew you by your family. And they were all a web of intricate family relations that defined you. And the idea that you would break free of those definitions by something you did is something you achieved. It was inconceivable..

New Orleans
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"You're dealing with fragments and partials. And you're dealing with them necessarily in that it's not an option to just say, oh, I'll just wait until the fall clears. Because if you've waited until the fog clears, you're overrun. So the nature of the uncertainty is different. And so the degree of nerve, it takes to make the decision is also different. I mean, I love car counters. Some of my best Friends are card counters. That's gonna be the headline of this podcast. Michael Lewis. Some of his best friends are card counters. It's absolutely true. Some of my best Friends are card counters. But the nerve is sort of like getting the nerve to summing the nerve to possibly get your knees chopped off by the casino. The actual act of counting the cards and all that, it's not that it's automatic in a way that the decisions charity has to make are not. And the stakes, the stakes are the card counter loses money. If charity is wrong, people die. And if she's really wrong, maybe she dies. So the stakes are way, way up there, and it really did feel. I know it sounds melodramatic. I felt like I was watching a soldier at war, watching her do. We kind of retracing steps that she had where she had been when she was serving as a local public health officer. Now this is a woman for context who's 5 foot 6, very slender when she is working in a field mostly dominated by men. They are often shocked by her by her presence by her persistence. In part because of how she looks and she says, the inside doesn't match the outside. Men think my spirit animal is a bunny and it's a fucking dragon. Yeah, she didn't say it as calmly as you just said it. I can do it more frantically if you want. No, you have to do it. Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games and you're more or less get the tone. There's no chance I'm gonna be like Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games. Anyway, in any way. So this is right in the places where medicine met public policy, that it was a very male place. And she was constantly in a room with people who knew less than she did about something. Say, how to control tuberculosis. And those people were constantly explaining to her things that, in spite of that, that she was constantly being condescended to by her inferiors. And that's an irritating situation. Have you ever been condescended to by your inferiors? You know that feeling? I think she lived with it. I think she I think where you know this person actually does not know anything like what I know about this subject and they're trying to explain it to me. And in the bargain that she was almost always the bravest person in the room, like the person who's most likely to turn to the person to her right and say, come on, grow a pair. And so the combination led to as you can imagine, some conflict. Lots of conflict. Yes. The thing she says, though, that I want to kind of pinpoint is that the inside doesn't match the outside and something you've often said about yourself is I don't look the way I'm wired. And it struck me that in describing charity, I was reminded of you and how you must wade through the world, not as a 5 foot 6 slender woman. But I have that's what's inside me..

Jennifer Lawrence Michael Lewis tuberculosis
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Homeowners. Now that starts to change the demeanor of the institution. And it becomes more politically sensitive. More risk averse. Now there are a lot of other things going on in the culture. It push it in that direction, but I think that's the start of the story in Italy. It's the beginning of an answer a question if it's this way now. How did it ever get the reputation of being able to control disease? And the answer is it changed that it was once one thing and it's now kind of another thing. It's funny when people talk about our handling of H one N one. They refer to it as being handled fairly well. Can you walk us through your understanding of what happened in 2009? The poor Obama administration. The guy rolls into The White House he's got a financial crisis in two wars and it's a mess and that someone walks in Carter measure walks into the Oval Office and says we have a pandemic too. And rahm Emanuel, his chief of staff looks up and says, what's next, locusts? But it was a very peculiar situation because the national strategy was flu happens somewhere else in the world, virus occurs somewhere else in the world, and we have a week or two before it's here. What happened in this case was outbreak in Mexico where people are dying in the ICU and the same strain is identified in Southern California. It's already here. And the question is what to do? And the question of what to do is tied to how transmissible and how lethal, right? And the question of lethality was just virtually impossible to answer. It looked through one lens that looked terrifying. There's reports from ICUs in Mexico and in Argentina. It sounded like, oh my God, this thing is ripping through the population and killing people. But of course, an ICU in a country like that funnel. It funnels a lot of the badness is funneled. So you may be getting a distorted picture. It's not like you have the luxury of waiting months that if the thing is going to be that bad, you better act. So on the one hand, they were getting advice from, well, one of the main characters in my book that we should close schools for a couple of weeks. So we know until we know what we're dealing with because we know schools are especially efficient at transmitting virus. So just to slow it down. And the CDC made a decision that no this isn't so bad. And they were right. But their advice was all geared towards like not making a commotion. And in the end, what happens is we actually people probably kind of even forget this. We had a pandemic. A huge number of Americans. Many tens of millions of Americans were infected with the swine flu that year. That new strain. It just wasn't very lethal. And what one of my character says to Obama, at the end of it was it wasn't that we dodged a bullet. It's that nature shot us with a BB gun..

Obama administration rahm Emanuel Oval Office Mexico Italy White House Carter ICU flu Southern California Argentina CDC Obama
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"I'd written a book the 5th risk about the potential consequences of the mismanagement of the federal government. And asking the question, what happens if something bad happens? And then something bad happens. And then you see it. It's like, yeah, I should be writing a book about this. I lucked out in that, yes. I should be writing a book about this. It ended up being a very different book than what I would have guessed. What did you guess? I guess that I was going to have to move my family to Washington and write a kind of pathology of the Trump administration that the story I would be telling would be one of kind of how the instruments of the federal government got busted. And what we're going to do about it there. And instead, the characters who landed in my lab led me to a different story, and it wasn't. It wasn't an ideologically driven story in that they were basically doctors. I mean, these characters. And their politics are actually kind of such as they are all over the map. Hard to classify. But they had all had lived experience. Before the Trump administration, that it suggested that if this kind of thing happens, the result is going to be bad. That you didn't need Trump for it to be bad. It all said Trump made it worse, but that Trump to make Trump the center of the story would have been a big mistake. It would have been a falseness about it. And so it was a bigger, more systematic problem of which Trump was mostly symptom a little bit cause. The central question of your new book seems to be around why, despite having the most money, gifted minds, a robust public health infrastructure. Did the United States fail so miserably at handling the pandemic? Could you walk us through a kind of truncated version of your answers to this? Yes. The first thing to establish is that we did handle it badly. And it's got roughly 4% of the world's population in roughly 20% of the deaths. With so many resources that before the pandemic, we were ranked by a panel of experts to be best prepared for one. The lancet, the British medical journal, made the point that if we had just performed as well as the average of the G 7 countries, they'd be almost 200,000 American lives today. Americans alive today who aren't. The answer as to why it was bad. First, the way health is communicable disease is controlled in this country. It's actually a very local thing. It's local, public health officers. The CDC does not have control of the local public health authorities. There's any kind of direct way. It has weird sort of indirect influences. But it isn't like we have a system. What we have is several thousand disconnected nodes who are under resourced for a couple of generations. And not wired up together. So they don't form an army. It's like several thousand individual soldiers. So the mechanism for a unified response is already kind of not there. Because we don't have a national public health system. Second, the institution that is meant to lead the response is sort of corral these people. The CDC has steadily drifted from being essentially diseased battlefield command as its name suggests, which once upon a time, I think it probably did do well. I mean, in eradicated smallpox back in the 60s and 70s. But has become for some pretty specific reasons, I think. More of an academic institution. Less interested than engaging.

Trump administration federal government Trump Washington British medical journal The lancet communicable disease CDC United States army smallpox
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Thank you for being here. I think it's a pleasure. You're uncertain. Well, how can I know? But we'll revisit this subject in about an hour. Okay, great. To set up your new book, I thought we would go back to a kind of premonition you had in June of 2019 on the Ezra Klein show. This is what you said of the Trump presidency. But most importantly, how we may go about restoring faith in our institutions. And what may need to happen in order for them to change. Do you mind if we play this clip? I have no idea what you're about to play, but yes. Go ahead. Okay. The longer he's there and the more he pushes, or pays no attention. Or puts people who are actively dismantling their enterprises. The more likely something really bad will happen. The only way you had in another direction is to have a real catastrophe. It takes a great depression to start building new institutions from. That's what worries me is that it's going to take a lot more pain. It's going to take 10 million people dying in some pandemic. It's going to take whatever it is. Things have to get really dark before they get better. What did you make of that? Well, that guy's depressing. I don't want to listen to that guy anymore. He upsets me. Can we get some other guest? So that's the first thought. The second thought is the number I picked out of thin air. 10 million. One thought I have now, as horrible as it is, is perhaps we haven't suffered sufficient pain. I don't know. I don't know, but when I imagined a calamity that would biff the country in another direction, I imagine something that affected everybody kind of equally. And that you couldn't hide from it if you were privileged. You couldn't hide from it if you were rich. You couldn't hide from it if you were young. And that it would create a fear that would motivate people to see what they needed to see about the government, about the tools we have to manage existential risk that are the only tools. And there's been some of that fear created. I just don't know if it's enough and I think kind of hard right now to see. Clearly this society's moving, I just can't tell how permanent and how fast the movement is. How much of that kind of premonition in 2019 played a role into this new book of yours? Well, it created a sense of obligation in a funny way, which is not a good way to start a book. I mean, I would not recommend anybody have the motives that I have at the start of this thing. Normally my motives are kind of pure in the sense that like I've stumbled onto something new. It doesn't have a whole lot to do with what I've already written. And my interest is so great, it propels me. In this.

Ezra Klein depression
"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Pushkin brought to you by discover. At discover they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why we discover, card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S. day or night. 24/7 they can also get help by using the discover app. Or messaging them on their website. Because having the option to connect with a real live person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online, or connect with them on the app..

"lewis" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"That was another joke that needs to do initially have go from the showed up mousy. It was germans the mouse years. That is not yet you see. I'm not doing g. Show so the mouse years like a gateway attraction on ajello of i if you have to get a tattoo and i know you're a huge year covered with tattoos. If you had to get one what would it be. Have you ever thought about that. No brother great idea. Which was is idea was which i thought was. The best friends had the lacoste alligator right above the network. And then you have shirt the wherever is on the thank your guess and then you would rip out a whole there and be wearing cost shirt. That's really funny. That's really funny I think that'd be good for people to who have a lot of tattoos. That'd be good. Because i think if you get a certain enough tattoos at a certain point you just start doing for shits and giggles. It's you just get started getting joke ones. I never thought having Alright What's your favorite fruit loop probably berries blackberries strawberries. The strawberries really need to be not those shit. Ask one's good. Yeah isn't right. Wounds tastes like paper you know blackberries the Those those those those are the ones. I'm not a major fruit guy Who is yet there's nothing like a ripe strawberry. We have a lot of wild ones. But they're so tiny. Some of them are like this. They're just this little little burst of flavor. Who would you want to play you in the lewis black bio pic in lewis black story. You love it you know you have the could cheap would never get.

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"lewis" Discussed on Recovery Survey

Recovery Survey

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Recovery Survey

"Good fight anything wrong with me. And i spent the next twenty eight years on eighty thousand bills that i swallowed and total for schizophrenia. Front row bible and all this stuff. My guest today is named craig lewis..

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"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Dna and then he pulls out he puts it on his chip and he finds o lo and behold. Oh my god. These bo is have this other thing in them. They both have this other thing in them. That could quite possibly be causing incredible illness. It's an edina virus in my biology is shaky but it's a virus that he says is an ancestor of a bola. It's got a bowl in it. It's kind of a curious thing. He said it's actually been detected in dinosaurs so stat old a virus so then he asked to prove that this is. What's killing the bowers. And the way you prove that a virus as at chris creating the disease is you get a healthy animal and you inject it with the virus. So he distills the virus and he goes with three post. Docs into san francisco is getting absurd. I know but this against better did a san francisco aquarium when he's tell us says you know how you inject a snake with the virus and i know says well you after inject them in the heart because the veins either don't exist they're hard to find and the heart. The problem with the snakes is it moves up and down the body. So you need a doppler radar. You need one post. Doc holding the doppler radar other ones holding the snake which isn't happy and someone else did plunge the needle into the snakes heart so they do this with pythons and with bows and sure enough. The bo is get ill and died. Just as they're they're doing around the world but the pythons survive even though they've got signs of the virus in the money. I tested them. Well that's where it gets really interesting because he now tells zoo zoo directors when you get a new beau you've got to isolate them and testing for this virus but the question is why are these pythons surviving their older species and has the idea that oh my god. They're surviving this thing. That's very like a bola. We've never found the reservoir species of a bola in the way that the like covert has a reservoir species of bats in the reservoir species. The species in which the thing replicates doesn't kill so it it happily survive. He says they've they've they've exported. You know zoos of animals out of africa and tested them for a bowl to see if they can find this species. That's.

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"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Pushkin the future driving is electric. And it's coming fast. That's why general motors. Ev go are adding more than twenty seven hundred new fast chargers across the country through two thousand twenty five for the benefit of electric vehicle drivers on the road and best of all. These stations will be one hundred percent powered by renewable electricity. It's all part of our commitment to make convenient fast charging accessible for everyone learn more about how gm is developing an all electric future at g. m dot com. Everybody in this is a metaphor for your business joining. Sometimes it feels like the world is throwing everything at has.