35 Burst results for "Levitt"

No sea serpents, mobsters but Tahoe trash divers strike gold

AP News Radio

01:13 min | Last week

No sea serpents, mobsters but Tahoe trash divers strike gold

"Scuba scuba scuba scuba divers divers divers divers have have have have completed completed completed completed an an an an unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented year year year year long long long long effort effort effort effort to to to to remove remove remove remove litter litter litter litter from from from from the the the the shores shores shores shores and and and and waters waters waters waters of of of of Lake Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with a a a a closer closer closer closer look look look look bring bring bring by by by snow snow snow capped capped capped mountains mountains mountains Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe has has has seventy seventy seventy two two two miles miles miles of of of shoreline shoreline shoreline Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe fund fund fund CEO CEO CEO Amy Amy Amy berry berry berry says says says it's it's it's hard hard hard to to to find find find a a a place place place is is is gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous the the the size size size of of of it it it the the the clarity clarity clarity I I I mean mean mean the the the blue blue blue of of of Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe but but but as as as with with with many many many bodies bodies bodies of of of water water water it's it's it's had had had a a a trash trash trash problem problem problem Dr Dr Dr calling calling calling west west west founded founded founded clean clean clean up up up the the the lake lake lake to to to tackle tackle tackle to to to fight fight fight back back back against against against plastic plastic plastic and and and all all all forms forms forms of of of pollution pollution pollution both both both above above above and and and below below below the the the surface surface surface Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe blue blue blue vodka vodka vodka CEO CEO CEO Matt Matt Matt Levitt Levitt Levitt both both both helped helped helped fund fund fund the the the effort effort effort and and and took took took part part part we we we polled polled polled twenty twenty twenty five five five thousand thousand thousand pounds pounds pounds of of of trash trash trash and and and debris debris debris out out out of of of the the the lake lake lake he he he calls calls calls that that that game game game changing changing changing a a a relatively relatively relatively few few few people people people made made made this this this giant giant giant impact impact impact I I I mean mean mean we've we've we've undone undone undone forty forty forty or or or fifty fifty fifty years years years the the the few few few men men men impact impact impact on on on Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe in in in one one one year year year west west west says says says the the the effort effort effort will will will expand expand expand to to to other other other lakes lakes lakes in in in the the the Sierra Sierra Sierra Nevadas Nevadas Nevadas this this this summer summer summer your your your neighbors neighbors neighbors down down down in in in mammoth mammoth mammoth lakes lakes lakes go go go say say say hello hello hello down down down south south south and and and I I I clean clean clean up up up if if if you you you like like like I'm I'm I'm Brian Brian Brian Tong Tong Tong

Lake Lake Lake Lake Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Taho Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Lake Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe Tah Mountains Mountains Mountains Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe Fund Fund Fu Amy Amy Amy Berry Berry Berry Dr Dr Dr West West West Tahoe Tahoe Tahoe Matt Matt Matt Levitt Levitt Levitt West West Sierra Sierra Sierra Nevadas N Mammoth Mammoth Mammoth Lakes Brian Brian Brian Tong Tong Tong
Emails Show NIH's Collins Worked to Discredit the Great Barrington Declaration

The Larry Elder Show

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Emails Show NIH's Collins Worked to Discredit the Great Barrington Declaration

"Is being suppressed. Particularly anything I say about the election of 2020 if I express any kind of skepticism or if I express any kind of skepticism about how the government under this administration has been going about how to deal with COVID. So information is being suppressed and that's exactly what Fauci and Collins did with the great Barrington declaration. They suppressed it. And Francis Collins was interviewed about this. And he doubled down. Doctor Collins, we always here follow the science and you know sciences. Now, this is on Fox News with Bret baier. Observation description experimentation and explanation. But it seems that a lot of health policy makers have been trying to silence opposing views. In a newly released set of emails, received from freedom of information act between you and Doctor Fauci in October of 2020, you referenced the great Barrington declaration. That was a group of epidemiologists and public health scientists who wrote quote, we have grave concerns about the damaging physical and mental health impacts of prevailing COVID-19 policies continuing current lockdown policies are producing devastating effects on short and long-term public health. In this email to Doctor Fauci and cliff lane at NHL nah, you write quote hi Tony and cliff, C and you connect to the great Barrington declaration link. This proposal from three fringe, epidemiologists who met with the secretary seems to be getting a lot of attention, and even a co signature from a Nobel Prize winner Michael levitt at Stanford. There needs to be a quick and devastating public takedown of its premises. I don't see anything like that online yet. Is it underway, Francis? Did you write that? I did write that, and I want to stand by that. Let me explain. What was being proposed there was basically saying, let's not worry about mitigation. Let's just let this virus rip. This of course. Now, nowhere in the declaration does it say let's just let this virus rip. He's doing the same thing that M shift does. Take something put in his own words and attribute it to them.

Covid Doctor Fauci Doctor Collins Fauci Francis Collins Bret Baier Cliff Lane Collins Fox News Michael Levitt NHL Cliff Tony Stanford Francis
"levitt" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

07:46 min | 9 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on /Film Daily

"I wanted to share a conversation. I had not too long ago. With joseph gordon levitt an actor whose credits you know certainly inception brick the dark high rises. I mean the list goes on. You know him. He has been a major force in the world of entertainment ever since he was a kid and he's sort of broke out on the tv show third rock from the sun. Now he is returning to television with a show called mr cormon. That is on apple. Tv plus i believe four episodes of the show will have aired by the time. You're listening to this and just gordon limit. Is the writer producer director star of the show. He plays a character named josh cornyn. Who is kind of loosely kind of sort of based on him but not really basically a thirty something year old guy who used to be in a creative field used to be a musician not quite a rockstar but definitely a fulltime musician and now he finds himself teaching fifth grade an elementary school in the valley. The san fernando valley outside of la and the show is sort of about this character grappling with. What the vision that he had for his life versus what is like has turned out to be and there are a lot of big themes explored in the show but this character has some pretty serious anxiety and that seems to be one of the driving forces for the series as well just love it just sort of working through what it means to be a character who is constantly sort of on edge and and that experience translates really fascinating way to the small screen so back in twenty thirteen. Just gordon levitt directed a wrote and directed a feature film called don john which not a lot of people have seen but the sort of an interesting creative experiment so during this conversation i asked him if he learned any lessons from that that he sort of was able to apply. To making mr cormon anti our our conversation was a little wide ranging but the touches on a bunch of different aspects of the show. And like i said i think episode five airs this friday by the time. You're listening to this. So yes here. Is my conversation with joseph gordon levitt. Alright joanne. i'm well thanks. How're you doing. I'm doing great. So there are a lot of dialogue scenes in the show that take place in long continuous shots and i'm wondering how much of the series was born from looking at the way that things are typically done purposefully deciding to do things differently. Well i hope i wasn't doing them. Just be contrary but you did notice something that i notice a lot when i watch a lot of moves and shows nowadays. There's a lot of editing and in for my taste. It sometimes feels like too much feels like out. I wanna feel closer to the actual performance of the actors are giving. I don't need you to like cut every line And and so yeah. That was definitely an intentional choice. Kind of trying to put the rhythm back into the hands of the actors which was really gratifying. Speaking as an actor. And then of course as a director in the editing room later on i could be kicking myself sometimes but But i you know. Sometimes i found it actually. A lot of people who've seen the show have asked me like was there. There are a lot of improvisation and Answers actually no. There wasn't really a lot. But i think it feels like that partially just because there are fewer cuts so yeah it feels a bit more like you really there in the room with with people. Were there any lessons that you learned from making don john. You applied here on the show. Yeah that's a good question I think i got a lot more collaborative with don john. I think because there's my first time ever getting to direct something. I was pretty dead. Set on like the thing that's in my head is what i wanna do and with mr cormon it was it was much more collaborative like i. I wrote a couple of scripts before apple gives the green light to hire writers. But then i hired. We hired port great writers who made the scripts so much better than they ever would have been if i were the only one working on them and same goes for those another director. Directing episodes aurora guerrero And and all the actors. I think i was really really focused on trying to encourage them to take liberties and embellishing and find things. And i mentioned a second ago. We didn't exactly improvise on the day of shooting. Because we didn't have time to but we would rehearse and we would we would improvise a lot on days of rehearsal and we would take down notes like let's do this. Instead of that. In a really wanted you know the actress to bring bring their own selves to it and and so Yeah so. I feel like the older i get the more i want to be collaborative and i know it sounds weird. People people been asking me like what you did so much on this show. It's like you're the writer and the director in the blah blah blah blah blah and. I liked to try to remind folks. I open this is not just me at all. Highly highly collaborative effort yet. There are some big philosophical questions that are presented in a show in one of the things i found really interesting was the through line where several characters claim that. There's only one thing that matters one person says it's family and other person says is the moment that we're in right now and another person says it's whether or not somebody likes you so i'm just wondering if you a little bit about that idea. And about maybe more. Broadly using the show as a canvas to explore big ideas like that. This is a thrilling moment. Man i get so excited when someone notices something that i didn't really notice i'd never put that connection together that you're saying that he writes. I know the exact three lines you're talking about and you're absolutely right. There's there's like a through line here of people saying hey only one thing matters i swear to god. I never thought of that as only just goes to show like watching. Something is a creative process. I don't think audiences taken credit for how much they bring to their own experience of of watching a movie or a show or whatever it is so bravo to you sir. That's great really. So but yeah you know it's funny there. It reminds me of. You're talking about the thing that really matters is Is being present. That that's also a theme that connor recurs throughout his in various different ways. That idea is brought up. Like how do you be present in the moment and sometimes it's it's spoken in whether it's actually pretty dismissive but i personally tend to believe that that's a really healthy thing to try to focus on is how can you be present in the moment and it's something that i think. The character josh has a lot of trouble. Doing and i also personally often have trouble. Doing mind. tends to Fixate on the past or the future go run circles in as much as i try to stop it. It doesn't always listen to me and That's maybe something. I have in common with character and so yeah that that's something that you know that. By the end of the season he you see him in his playing music in and he he has a moment like that where you hopefully you can kinda tell like. Oh is there now and That's that's the little baby. Step growth that we get from from season one. Yeah there's the underlying current of anxiety in the show that that is represented by this meteor in this ominous dana sound I was wondering if you ever worried a little bit about leading to hard so hard on that that you actually were giving people anxiety pie while you're watching show..

mr cormon joseph gordon levitt don john josh cornyn gordon levitt san fernando valley apple gordon joanne la bravo connor josh dana
"levitt" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

05:52 min | 10 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I'd like to talk to you a little bit about your company but we can do that after it was go but approaching so so. This is more personal mr cormon but but what i wanna know because you know. I've been pitching show. That looks like is going to go somewhere where at least we're gonna write a script so i just like watching that show outside of like i'm joseph gordon levitt and you know me. I'm a known quantity that that has a certain audience outside of that. What's the pitch for that show. I i don't know if there was a ton of a pitch for that show because you're right. It is pretty slice of life. It's a picture of a human being right so they have to pitch it. They had to deal with apple. Today i had written a spec script and read it and they liked it. And i didn't have a deal with apple for that. But does he liked it they say. Where's this gonna go. What's this about they did they. We i came on for what they call a development deal where i wrote a second script and you wrote a quote unquote bible like sort of outlining telling them about what i thought. The rest of the season was gonna do before They green lit so okay. And you know how how how far down the road does that bible go. How many seasons went into some amount of detail in the first season and then broad strokes for follow rises. It's odd. there's there's i just watched a movie by that That woman zoe lister jones. She's an actress but she made this little film called how it ends and it's really just a a walk with what's in the middle of covert. She shot it and it's sort of a walk through what looks to be. Most we silverlake in los feel as these abandoned streets and it's supposed to be taking place on the last day of the planet earth because there's an asteroid heading towards earth but everyone knows about and it's going to be over but it's also like it's also how you characterize your panic attacks in mr burning ball in the sky you don't mention you assume because of one of the animated cut aways that you know it is an asteroid heading towards earth. Yup yup. But i think as a means to to sort of make people understand what panic is and what panic feels like. It was a good device hanging flaming and the air. Well that that actually came from someone. I'm close to who You know the the anxiety and or panic. That the protagonist with the show josh experiences is sort of an amalgamation of feelings. I've feelings of other people. I'm close to that. I'm you know that i've sort of experienced. Its second hand through being with them. And and also a several of the other writers in our in our writer's room had it seems like everyone has either firsthand or secondhand experience with these kinds of feelings. It's extremely normal and In general or currently well it's a good question right. You know the they say that the numbers are up. And i could see that especially with given where we were talking about a second ago social media do think that it's an anxiety generator i think. That's part of what drives the advertising business model. And i could see that the advent of social media could make anxiety rise but i also think probably people always experienced these feelings. They're just becoming a bit more willing to talk about it now than they used to in prior generation. And i and i think that also like you know you're able to sort of hit all these kind of these These marks You know throughout the the episodes. I was how many six ten six it ten yet ten. So the funerals to one right No that's the sixth episode. I'm strongly march six You got i. But that's all i got. They probably didn't say well. We just probably just just finished the last couple. So maybe They will link yet. Okay well we'll see you wanna see them. We can watch him later. But what but what sort of interesting is that. You tight you touch on like it's not just social media. I mean i'm trying to figure out like anybody else's you know where we're headed culturally. You know environmentally and otherwise in that. We're all sort of coming out of cove it. It's still a reality here. So there's going to be a bunch of entertainment and art product. You know that is going to reflect on this time now somehow or another. I don't know when you shot this There is a sense of dread and darkness and overbearing anxiety. That's out of our control. That kind of runs through this. I mean i just saw the movie pig. There's a there's a lot of darkness in there. And then this other thing. I just saw but i don't know when you made this but it seems maybe social media everything else contribute to anxiety but literally what seems to be the end of the world as we know it on a few different levels is is a reality to too many people. Yeah you're a hundred percent ryan. It's your question of when we made this and it's funny. The only saw the first six episodes. 'cause we started shooting and three weeks in lockdown arrived and we had to shut down our show of course like everybody else i episode We were we were almost done with shooting three episodes with having right okay out of the ten and we had to stop we.

mr cormon joseph gordon levitt zoe lister jones los feel apple josh ryan
"levitt" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:51 min | 10 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I left my house the other day without my phone. And i go back for it. That's right hero. That's right brave. That's right the unknown folks to be in that car for what was going to be a probably an hour errand about twenty minutes to twenty minutes back twenty in the middle doing the thing no phone and i i felt a little vulnerable. I felt a little naked. I felt a little disconnected. I felt a little Like crazy like you know. Like when i can do my friend. Where's my friend. What am i going to do in that. Let me to believe that. Maybe i need to break up with my phone. I don't know. I don't know if that's possible. I don't think it is possible but it did show me that. I could leave at home more and then the other night i left house left the house with my phone but no wallet a different type of Like feeling like a little untethered but the wall of fear is really just about like. If i get mangled in my car drives off a cliff or i get into a head on collision and i'm nothing but mush and i got my wallet with me. This cannot be easy to find me. I say well that's not true. Just fine my license point. Oh good i just found a way to comfort myself. The next time. I in my car and i forgot my wallet. Is that like. Hey if they need to. Id you remains. They can just pull your info off the plate. Who thank god. Need to be myself up about that. Next time i just need to know. I'll be okay when i'm dead if i don't have my wallet. 'cause this pull it off the plate pull that net get that info. Yeah but the. The phone thing was real. I i did. I tried an experiment. I took a walk on purpose the other day without my phone on purpose because dude. The reality is mundane. The reality is slow. You know what paces your true reality. How much are you putting in your head. That's making you crazy all this all these so eighty five. Ninety percent of the assumptions were making are not have nothing to do with our life. They have nothing to do with how we are. They have nothing to do with how we treat other people. If you're only relationship is with your phone. How often do people factor in. Are you saying thank you. Are you opening the door. Are you asking people they are. Are you having moments. You sit with people. Sit with people. We're all right stop. The fire stopped the fire in your brain. Take some time off. Take a little time off from the machine. Okay so joseph. Gordon levitt has been working in show business. Since he was six years old. His grandfather was a director He was in popular movies as a kid. Like angels in the outfield and the long running sitcom third rock from the sun. He was in movies like five hundred days of summer the dark knight rises inception brick looper and a bunch of other movies but now he's created this amazing show. He's he's written directed and stars in this new apple. Tv plus series called mr cormon I watched six episodes thought. I watched the whole thing. But i hadn't he sets me straight and It's just about a guy it's about a teacher. i think he's a fifth grade teacher. But it's not what he wanted to do but there's not much what he wanted to be a musician but there's not much more to the pitch than that but there's something about the intensity of this guy's way of seeing things and being it's very familiar and I i liked it. He's an intense guy and this very human kind of show. It's on apple. Tv plus and it premiers. Friday friday august sixth. Okay this is me talking to Joseph gordon levitt mike. That's that's on the marc maron podcasts. I'm not gonna go through some fucking future speaker. Michael very odd.

Gordon levitt mr cormon joseph apple Joseph gordon levitt mike marc maron Michael
"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:10 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"If you love this. Show and others from pushkin industries. Consider becoming a push nick push. Nick is a podcast subscription that offers bonus content and uninterrupted listening for four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. look for push. Nick exclusively on apple podcasts subscriptions. Hey i rufus. Chris kim host of the next big idea podcast the show where we talk about the most groundbreaking new books each week as elicited to revisionist history. You know that no one tells a story like malcolm glad well. But how does he do it. We dig into a storytelling techniques in our conversation about his new book the bomber mafia. Here's a sneak. Peek you describe some of the brutal fighting that was necessary to secure the marianna which we proved to be strategically crucial to our ability to win the war. Or actually it's not describing the fighting. It's a veteran corporal. Melvin dalton and. I think we have a clip from that well then one morning. There's a little island sticking vowed they tell you that set in our main job was well. We're supposed to soften him out. So the troops in the landing barges could on the beach. This is a veteran corporal. Melvin dalton recalling a fight the next morning why the crack of the oceans just full of ships and barges headed for the beach and just gunfire. You can't believe dead bodies everywhere display and nobody had time to pick up when those marines hit. Those beach has a terrible sometimes. It has to be one of the most emotionally evocative piece of tape that i've heard and it's just even for a writer of your skills that emotion would have been impossible to render imprint in the same way runner. Yes that's yeah that's exactly that observation distills perfectly. Why i wanna make audio books audiobooks like this. 'cause there's something you can do and a there's a response you can summon in this telling a story this way that you cannot do page. Just hearing that guy's voice transcript without its works but it doesn't. It doesn't approximate that guy breaking down with a memory. You know you know you know. Forty years as pastor. Fifty years has passed since that happened. And he you just hearing in his voice just what that was like. It's funny that this parenthetically has been the best reviewed book i've ever ridden There's been one or two bad reviews but the batteries are all people who didn't listen to it the criticism that i'm sort of more longer. Yeah you can't make the listen to it. Because i'm using the tape to make my argument now and you have to listen to the tape and certainly interesting audio. The audio version are quite different. They're not they don't work the same way on the on the audience. It feels to me having listened. Also read that. The audio experience is like the full flesh and blood. Beating incarnation of this book and the ridden book is like daguerreotype. It's the it's like a black and white sepe atoned snapshot like just. There's so much more that comes through in the audio and actually we had a fascinating conversation with john. Colapinto author of this is the voice talks about the power of the human voice and he calls it molecular lasagna. because there's so many layers of meaning. Yeah that are coming through in a sequence of words delivered audio and it strikes me that it also probably changes the clips that you use. Because when you're writing a print book you tend to be looking for quotes that either. Backup the argument or move the narrative along right whereas an audio you do that too. But you're sometimes looking for clips that just deliver a kind of emotional depths to the experience. Yes i think. That's quite true. The function of quotation changes your rights. Like you trying to underscore an emotional point often with the clips use in audio whereas in the book. You're you may be advancing the argument you can hear the full interview right now. Just follow the next big idea wherever you get your podcasts..

Melvin dalton pushkin industries nick push Chris kim Nick rufus malcolm apple Colapinto john
"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

01:33 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Helen of it. Slender short wearing an elegant black dress smiling at the camera is full of intelligence and compassion and life born in brooklyn nineteen sixteen dodge in los angeles. Nineteen ninety-three can judge helen levitt. I know her. No and what she went through. I can't Revisionist history is produced by meal bell..

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Helen. Levitt slender short wearing an elegant black dress. Smiling at the camera is full of intelligence and compassion and life born in brooklyn nineteen sixteen dodge in los angeles. Nineteen ninety-three can judge helen levitt. I know her no and what she went through. I can't a revisionist. History is produced by meal bell..

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"<Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> helen. <Speech_Male> Levitt slender <Speech_Male> short <Speech_Male> wearing <Speech_Male> an elegant <Speech_Male> black dress. Smiling <Speech_Male> at the camera <Speech_Male> is full <Speech_Male> of intelligence <Speech_Male> and compassion <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and life <Speech_Music_Male> born in brooklyn <Speech_Music_Male> nineteen sixteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dodge <Speech_Music_Male> in los angeles <Speech_Music_Male> nineteen ninety-three <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> can i judge <Speech_Music_Male> helen. Love it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I know her know <Speech_Music_Male> at what she went through. <Music> <SpeakerChange> I <Music> can't <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> vicious history <Speech_Music_Male> is produced by <Speech_Male> meal. Abell <Speech_Music_Male> leeming stu. <Speech_Music_Male> And jacob smith <Speech_Music_Male> with elleray's <Speech_Music_Male> linton and on <Speech_Music_Male> a name. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Our editor <Speech_Music_Male> is julia barton <Speech_Music_Male> original scoring <Speech_Music_Male> by louis. Gera <Speech_Music_Male> mastering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by flawn williams <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and engineering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by martine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> gonzalez <Speech_Music_Male> fact checking <Speech_Music_Male> by amy gains <Speech_Music_Male> special. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> to the pushkin crew <Speech_Music_Male> had a fame. <Speech_Male> Carly mcclary <Speech_Male> maya <Speech_Male> akanik. Danielle <Speech_Music_Male> laekan <Speech_Music_Male> mega taylor. <Speech_Music_Male> Eric sandler <Speech_Music_Male> nicole. Moreno <Speech_Male> jason gambrill <Speech_Male> and of course <Speech_Music_Male>

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"A picture this. It's morning you've just woken up and your phone is right there. But instead of looking at a video of a goat on a trampoline you spend five minutes getting all the business news. You need to know. In a way you didn't know was possible. That's the idea behind morning brew the free daily newsletter. That delivers the business news of the day without all the boredom it only takes fifteen seconds to sign up for free at morning brew dot com slash revisions history. The leads clawed their way. Back into show business. Both of them wrote scripts under assumed names. The call themselves the august's but they never had the kind of career screenwriters. They once imagined for themselves using the big screen to tackle serious issues elevated wrote for tv sitcoms. I'm sorry greg but football is out like this brady bunch episode where greg one of the many brady kids wants to play football. And his mom worries. He'll get injured. Mama guy can get hurt right in his own home fallen in the bathtub. Sure but he doesn't have to other guys in the bathtub with him trying to knock him down the did more than sitcoms. They became active in the writers guild. Where helen that mentorship program for young black screenwriters because it's just grotesque that they simply on not hard to right on. Why chose almost all their employment. Disarm shows back blacks. Just to pay you to this. I would agree with taking money for teaching black riders with your teaching white writers. Would your dream team for. I don't want to be a teacher for money. I mean that's just not what i do. One 'cause led to another a friend of eleven had a heart attack. The paramedics took forty minutes to arrive after that delivers decided that they needed to learn cpr. Gosh evert we found myself such a circumstance we would want to be. The people who knew. Helen was in her sixties. By this point so it was very stressful. Difficult for me because i never to muscle in my life and I didn't even know that. I that i have had asthma. My life and the breathing was very difficult. The compressions with. I really wanted to training. Because i was determined that i was going to pass us eighteen of us. Who took the question on the eleven paths and is weeks through here in this country. Thousands of tv and movie script. Writers walked off their jobs today in nineteen one. The writers guild strike the levitz old leftist. That they were had to support strikes. The key stumbling block is the union's demand for a share of home video profits. I looked at each other that we've got all this. Cpr skill in the gill. Now if anybody has a heart attack on the picket line boy. We better really be prepared to them. Consulted with doctors. Trained people to teach. Cpr organized the group of first aid workers into teams. I remember realizing and saying at the time that the right is skilled. Take a line. Eighty one was probably the safest place in the world to have heart attack because at no point wasn't sixty seconds away from somebody who cpr. And so i'm kind of like a general you know deploy forces at every pickett all my students. My black writers workshop wanted to work for me. So i've got core very loyal young people. I had planned to stay home right screenplay but maybe this is better. Helen levitt got there in the end not on the grand moral political stage that she had imagined for herself as a child. She wasn't very good at the grand and the political she was better smaller and more ordinary causes giving a voice to black screenwriters or on the picket line. Making sure no. Medical emergency was left unattended. Caring for the neediest cases expression called guten schumer which kind of means good in themselves you know kind of just intrinsically good people who had your same strive to do strive to know what the right thing to do is and then do it and sometimes they have along the way what my younger self did not understand is that there is no perfect and easy path to conscience. Sometimes it's circuitous and full of unfortunate detours and maybe what we owe. Each other is faith and patience because some of us will take longer than others to figure out where our conscience lies. Can you describe them. What do they look like. I recently called up allen. Helen son tom on zoom. I wanted to ask him about his parents. My dad Looked a little a little bit like me. He was slightly taller. My mother was short. She was about five foot. I have pictures of them. I can show you. Would you like me to do that. Hang on just moment all the other room. Tom levitt came back with two black and white photographs in wooden frames. He held them up to the camera. Here's my dad. Oh he does look like you. Uh-huh yeah sites kenny. That's your father. Here's my mom. E. c..

heart attack greg football levitz Helen levitt helen Helen guten schumer asthma pickett Helen son tom Tom levitt allen kenny
"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Miss delta young people who were on the campus who did not get involved either with the young communist or the young socialists. Either weren't bright enough. 'cause it was heavy stuff man angles and even lenin i mean marks impossible to but angles was comprehensible but very well. It was a challenge to read. But i was very impressed with angled and lennon. They both were extrordinary minds and took incredible writers. A young people who didn't get either didn't have the intellectual Capacity while the cartridge as i listened to.

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Miss delta young people who were on the campus who did not get involved either with the young communist or the young socialists. Either weren't bright enough. 'cause it was heavy stuff angles and even lenin i mean marks impossible to but angles was comprehensible but very well. It was a challenge to read. But i was very impressed with angled and lennon. They both were extrordinary minds and took incredible writers. A young people who didn't get either didn't have the intellectual Capacity while the cartridge as i listened to.

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Most dazzling.

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Most dazzling.

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:18 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Father political persian. Yes he was what you'd call a parlor pink. He and his friend. Harry civil would fight the revolution in outliving. Roomy they would have these violent political discussion. The women would sit there so disgusted because he's two guys couldn't make a decent living here. They were talking about changing the world. But i realized fairly recently and looking back that those two guys were doing natural my benefits because was one person that room who is listening. That was some me. Helen listened as a teenager. She was a junior counselor at her summer camp. And my new friend. I came to cam. She was beautiful and she got these incredible love letters from radical boyfriend new york that she would let me read that. We jets romantic and political. She took me to to meet him on the nights that he was making a speech from his soapbox in manhattan that was where i was exposed to the young communists the young communist league the white seal the youth branch of the american communist party. Nobody recruited helen. She just walked up and volunteered in the thirties. The young communist league of america has thousands of members the y. c. l. branch in new york was a world unto itself filled with ideas and ashen. They were people going hungry. All over the united states an ongoing moral catastrophe in the american south of vicious war in spain against fascism not to mention him as rise in germany americans were looking for answers and many found them. In the world's biggest communist empire the soviet union i found it on their unfairness of life unbearable and assume that god if it were fixable how wonderful and the fact that was country the soviet union which was really trying to fix. It seemed quite mar with jimmy. First time i stepped on soviet soil. I felt myself a fool. Human being a full human being the black american actor and singer paul robeson then at the height of his fame made a pilgrimage to the mecca of communism and said for the first time in my life. I walk in full human dignity that people who are doing sleeping really out there fighting the good fight with the but the on communists. Helen was now attending brooklyn college volunteering. In a rat infested building for the white seal making sandwiches that the branch could sell to pay the rent i would get out of the kitchen the rats would take over and i could see a. Helen met eleven at summer camp. He was from the bronx. He wanted to be a writer. He followed her into the white c. They got married and moved to los angeles. Had two kids lived up in the hollywood hills. I'll wrote for the movies and television social parables like one thousand nine hundred forty eight technicolor film. The boy with the green hair everywhere. You go people will say they will say. There is the boy with a green hair and then people will ask. Why does he have green hair. We'll tell them. Because i am a war orphan and my green hair is to remind you that war is very bad for children. Must tell all the people. Helen help found a nonprofit theater. In hollywood volunteered ran things. My whole life has been that way. It's always been somebody else. Bill do something you know. I did it and i always did much more batman's asked me. That was story of my life while i was listening to helen. Levitt story of how she came to join the communist party. I couldn't help think of myself at eighteen. The age that she was when she entered the movement just started college. It was the early eighties. I had a poster of ronald reagan on my wall. If you asked me what. I was back then i would have said i was an anticommunist. That was my 'cause. The soviet union had just invaded afghanistan defender and the russian attackers fought bitterly for almost four hours and according to the afghan source casualties on both sides were heavy. It was holding much of eastern europe hostage. Poland now under martial law is sealed off from the outside world britain america and other western nations are watching. The soviet union apparently wasn't involved but from the background. They approved the summer after my sophomore year. I did a journalism internship in washington dc where we were required to do a research project. Mine was on how many people have been killed by communism. I spent the summer in the library of congress trying to track down who was killed in what government manufactured famine or who died in what internment camp. I was horrified. Helen levitt got caught up in the communist movement at the same age. I got caught up in the anticommunist movement and for the same reason because eighteen is the age that we look for a cause bigger than ourselves. It's funny. I haven't thought about that time in my life for yours. Except when i listened to helen levitt and did all came rushing back the brightest and most beautiful were leading young radicals. I mean they were the.

Helen american communist party soviet union young communist league of amer helen new york paul robeson Harry brooklyn college manhattan hollywood hills america spain jimmy summer camp germany bronx Levitt los angeles communist party
"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"I thought it would be a useful.

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:06 min | 11 months ago

"levitt" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Pushkin no one is reading your mind. But hp instant inc knows when you're printers running low and sends new cartridges before you run out so you never have to think about inc for details visit hp dot com slash instant inc conditions apply spending more on groceries this past year wanting to order some weekday takeout. Whether you're spending on the essentials like groceries or splurging on dinner from your favorite local restaurant do so with your discover credit card because only discover automatically matches all the cash. Back you've earned at the end of your first year and it is so easy to earn cashback since discover card is accepted at ninety nine percent of places in the us the take credit cards when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often. Learn more at discover dot com slash match. Imitations apply twenty. Twenty.

The Prague School of Rehabilitation and Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

The Peter Attia Drive

03:58 min | 1 year ago

The Prague School of Rehabilitation and Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

"I think for the purpose of this discussion. Let's assume a person has never heard of. Dns has never heard of the prague school or any of these things can you in a somewhat succinct. But not terribly brief manner. Explain to people how all of this school of rehabilitation coalesced around this idea of what we call. Dns going back to the founding fathers of the prague school and what these various insights were that each of them had and how that sort of came together dns dynamic neuro muscular stabilization. Kind of built on some pioneers of functional rehabilitation. There's many that have been part of the prague school rehabilitation. But i think talking about the influence on the development of dynamic muscular stabilization by professor powell whole lodge who runs the rehabilitation department at prague school. At this time. I think we need to go back. Post world war two cold war era. Nine thousand nine hundred fifties his wear prague school rehabilitation was was really founded and it was founded as part of the medical faculty of charles university in prague czech republic or formerly czechoslovakia now czech republic and being post world war two cold war era so they were in eastern europe behind the wall. That may have been a factor for. They're not reliance but tendency towards the use of of observation in both diagnostic diagnosis but observation and palpitation for diagnosis and treatment. All three of these pioneers neurologist. And who are the three. Lot of miranda kerr levitt and ballclub woida professor janda. He had a keen sense of observation and he formulated concepts and principles that tied into pasta habituation specifically the tendency for specific musculature tend towards tightness and other musculature to tend towards weakness. And he he termed this upper cross and lower cross syndrome. So for example with an upper-crust syndrome meaning the neck and shoulder region with demands of life and tendency towards paschel habituation such as with sustained seated postures There is a tendency towards the muscles in the back of the neck the exceptional muscles the external cloud asteroid muscle which is the muscle that also attached to the skull in down to their sterner curricular joint the pec muscles the upper traps that musculature with ten towards a tight meaner over activation other musculature in the upper extremity the radius which attaches to the ribs in the back of the scapula the deep neck flex irs the middle and lower traps would have a tendency to tend towards the weakness and with that tendency towards over utilization or hyper tenacity and underutilization in addition weakness. That would also he also recognized that that would affect the quality of movement throughout the kinetic chain and subsequently would lead to overload in specific areas throughout that kinetic chain so that was a big contribution on his

Prague School Prague Professor Powell Medical Faculty Of Charles Uni Czech Miranda Kerr Levitt Ballclub Woida Janda Czech Republic Republic Europe
Another metro Atlanta teacher hospitalized with COVID-19

AJC Briefing

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Another metro Atlanta teacher hospitalized with COVID-19

"Covert news. A first grade teacher in the cobb county school district is in the hospital with cove at nineteen making her the latest known case of educators who have contracted the disease dana johnson who teaches at camp elementary school in powder springs was admitted to the hospital december. Sixth after struggling to breathe according to a gofundme account created this week by friend josie levitt the gofundme campaign hopes to raise twenty thousand dollars to help johnson and her family with medical bills. No one wants to be in the hospital. During the christmas season so i felt it was necessary to help her and her family levitt told the atlanta journal constitution

Cobb County School District Dana Johnson Camp Elementary School Josie Levitt Powder Springs Johnson Levitt Atlanta Journal
Trump making longshot bid to slow state vote certifications

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Trump making longshot bid to slow state vote certifications

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the trump campaign gets a favorable ruling in Pennsylvania a Pennsylvania judge sided with the trump campaign and issued an injunction Thursday Commonwealth court judge me Hannah Levitt ordered Pennsylvania counties not to count mail in or absentee ballots for which the voter didn't submit valid identification within six days of election day the order affects a subset of about ten thousand ballots that arrive within three days of polls closing as of Thursday Democrat Joe Biden led president Donald Trump by about fifty five thousand votes in Pennsylvania hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court Hannah Levitt Joe Biden Donald Trump Mike Crossey
The Latest: Pennsylvania judge sides with Trump campaign

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: Pennsylvania judge sides with Trump campaign

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a Pennsylvania judge sides with the trump campaign on a limited number of mail in or absentee ballots the trump campaign has secured a favorable ruling in Pennsylvania Commonwealth court judge Mary Hannah Levitt has ordered Pennsylvania counties not to count to mail in or absentee ballots for which the voter didn't submit valid identification within six days of the November third election trump campaign general counsel Matt Morgan calls the order win but the court order affects a subset of about ten thousand ballots that arrived within three days of polls closing as allowed by the state Supreme Court as of Thursday night Democrat Joe Biden leads trump by approximately fifty five thousand votes in Pennsylvania I might cross yep

Mike Rossi Pennsylvania Commonwealth Cour Judge Mary Hannah Levitt Pennsylvania Matt Morgan Supreme Court Joe Biden
It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

"Okay gel so. I think we better start with a nod ben calendar. I mean. it's the most classical gift you could give somebody. I mean i just love this trend that started probably like five six years ago but the beauty advent calendar. So there's so many out there. I just want to highlight one. Though that i think is really good value for your money and that is from the body shop. It's the make it real together advent calendar. Sixty-nine dollars in it's worth one hundred and thirty seven dollars on the outside. It looks like a house like an a frame house in it's purple kind of cardboard packaging. So i like that because it's actually paper so at the end you can recycle it. It's not going to be a ton of waste very beautiful illustrations on the inside and there are twenty four. Little doors that are filled with mini goodies. Yes so i like that you get the full twenty four door experience. Spot is on a lot of bulk and it's not a lot of waste. Yeah so you get everything in there from their lip. Bader is to scented lotions handcream. Shower gels body scrubs. And i like the little extras that they've done. They have a festive nail file. They have hairclips. They have a bath. Lilly in there and bath gloves so these are just like the little things that are like. Oh yeah. I do need a new house. And they've included them in this particular thing so i think it's great bang for your buck and we're spending so much time at home might as well have something to open every day while you have your coffee. Yeah hell yod surprise and delight me every day. You know but. I love the body shop around the holidays because it's great for all ages. It's just so giftable and it doesn't break the bank. So i think that was a grapevine gel. Now i'm really excited to tell everybody about my fine from sephora like i said i crunched all the numbers i put my lake analytics hat on and the winner was the first aid beauty. All that fab five piece holiday sat so this is forty nine dollars. Us with a hundred and twenty seven dollar values. So they're seventy eight dollars in savings. So i know that's a lot of numbers. I just threw out you but basically you're saving more than what you paid for the box. So that's pretty aussie. That's awesome math. It's going to be sixty four dollars. Canadian with hundred and sixty seven dollar value. One thing that i really like about this five piece set is that four out of the five pieces are full-sized. They're not just many. So that's great because you hear a great value. You think it's just going to be the travel size and then has every step of your routine as well. So it's got a cleanser moisturizer cream lip product and exfoliating toning pads. So it really. Has you like completely taken care of all season long. And i'm a fan of i aid beauty anyway because it's great for sensitive skin you know. They don't add a lot of the product. It's been dermatologist tested. I think even if you don't have sensitive skin going into the winter you need that like bare your repair and they have all of these ingredients. That are going to help with that. They've got glycerin to hydrate. Nyah cinema. that's going to help with texture and tone as well colloidal oatmeal. That's going to help to soothe irritated skin and then in the exfoliating toning pads at scott. Aj's going to give you that gentle expoliation. This is a kit. That's great for all genders. All ages all skin types. You know it's just basically like soothing. Brightening doing everything you could ask for mainly hydration so this is a win for me joe. Yeah and no hate no shade to first aid beauty. They're not necessarily sexy looking packaging or products. But they've dressed them up right on this package. I have it right here too. So kind of like an art deco vibe on the front of it is really fun. Ads like silver and gold and black with celestial stuff on it. I mean anybody wanna open this for the holiday awesome levitt. If you guys are on a budget you know when you're not willing to pay the the triple figure price tag. I know you found a kit that was like sitting right around twenty five dollars with some products that we also love right. Yes so this is from bioscience. It's their lives glow kit. It's twenty five. Us dollars with a sixty two dollar value. That's thirty three canadian. Seventy nine canadian value so this includes two products. The scaling and lactic acid resurfacing nights serum plus the scaling and vitamin c rose oil. These are both like smaller. They're not full sized. Get the full experience using these products and for me that squealing and lactic acid. Resurfacing night serum. It's one of my favorite products. I've tried in all of two thousand twenty and the reason is you put it on before you go to bed. You wake up. You're so glowing. It's insane you get those instant results. But there's no irritation and then the vitamin c rose. Oil smells amazing. And it's not greasy at all and it really. I think is a great product to use in tandem with that exfoliating. Yeah i love a face oil. When i'm using heavy duty exfoliating because my skin just got so dry and it just feels like It needs that like give me that oil. After you know so i love this little combo. It even has the gift box like you. Just write. someone's name on the top. You don't even need to give perfect perfect. Yeah love

Bader Sephora Lilly Spot AJ United States Levitt Scott JOE
Trump says he will only declare victory when it happens

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Trump says he will only declare victory when it happens

"President trump is batting down concerns that he will declare an early victory amid fears the president would call himself the winner even before vote counts are definitive he tells fox and friends that won't happen only when there is extreme and there's there's no reason to play games though he's been threatening legal action to stop ballots received after today from being counted saying the nation needs to know the winner tonight constitutional law expert Justin Levitt says that's unlikely I think we'll actually know by weekend saying the fact that it might take longer to count millions of absentee ballots doesn't mean the system is broken it means the system's working Sager make ani Washington

Donald Trump Justin Levitt FOX Sager Ani Washington
"levitt" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"levitt" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"You said the fleet of blockchain. So . intensive <hes> the infrastructure easing, , is it the using the theory infrastructure your inbox? ? What's the deal? ? Yes. . So it is a its own blockchain <hes> early on, , they lunches an ear, , t twenty tokens, , but essentially <hes> as. . A STOPGAP <unk> pretty quickly we realized like a lot of projects in two thousand seventeen. . <hes>. . There is nowhere close to scaling for our purposes and. . I I didn't think we'd still be seeing in twenty twenty in that would still be accurate but <hes> is what it is. . So glad we we win our own wrote and built a data blockchain which on intestine twenty eighteen and <hes> that they may not live. . March twenty, , nineteen and <hes>. . conceptually, , it shares a lot with tender moment <hes> that was sort of the original. . Design source for though in the end our CTO Jae-in is team built. . The Code Base Ninety five percent from the ground up though there are still said some design influence from tender met, , which is cited. . You have ended up with your own. . Feta, , blockchain. . Yeah and that's Obviously there straight off there was a of <hes>. . Lot of development working in the ongoing along the way but we still feel confident that was the right decision just because we have A. . <hes> <hes>. . Perhaps more specific use case early, , some more to focus now on video delivery and wraps expanding to more generalized data delivery, , and while we are rolling out more somewhere generalized. . Boxing features like an easy incompatible smart contract. . <hes> environment. . That's we're still not <hes>. . We're not looking for data to be another east killer <hes> sort of everything for everyone <hes> at Jane Seo. . Made more sense for us to just build what's necessary for specific use case and trade-offs that that made sense for video delivery in peer to peer cdn rather than try to be <hes> a competitor F reaching out there was not a difficult decision to make to. . Go with your in blockchain think is the whole idea of outsourcing infrastructure to a theory is it? ? Say's law that? ? That cost of duplication customizing it, , but is swollen that. . Sharon, , and even if you are yard, , you know building purpose built for what we're trying to accomplish here. . They're still on location just inherently in that you're you're building a new a new chain that's disowning built but <hes>. . Yeah, , it's certainly rather than staying on a Theorem <hes>. . Just be if nothing else because of throughput <hes>. . But even if you had, , say you know that there is a trend for a good mountain, , their twenty nineteen where it seemed like every smart contract law was trying to the win away the business <hes>. . Try to incentivize your pay the project to convert to their own, , but you know at the end of the day than. . You still beholden to someone else's development schedule and someone else's feature said you don't really. . Not, , really in the driver's seat for that which <hes>. . Just seem like without knowing enough about where these projects were going. . It's like a big risk to attach ourselves to one of those. . And you see some these registers where they've had to jump a few different times to different chains and even besides the extra development were to do that it's just a really. . Difficult user experience for your token holders <hes> in a confusing one as you're jumping from. . <hes>. . Not, , only just from a technical sense of covering tokens but also just you know you ingratiate yourself in this ecosystem and then you gotta do a one eighty and say now we're absolutely new relationships. . It's. . Somehow even more of a mess than building your own blog

Theta Lamps West Sir Inya West Levitt San Francisco Coney Chris A. Stream rea- Meyer aws Paulo Brazil Google Lincolnshire United Kingdom Korea
Interview with Wes Levitt from Theta Token

The Cryptoverse

03:56 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Wes Levitt from Theta Token

"You said the fleet of blockchain. So intensive the infrastructure easing, is it the using the theory infrastructure your inbox? What's the deal? Yes. So it is a its own blockchain early on, they lunches an ear, t twenty tokens, but essentially as. A STOPGAP pretty quickly we realized like a lot of projects in two thousand seventeen. There is nowhere close to scaling for our purposes and. I I didn't think we'd still be seeing in twenty twenty in that would still be accurate but is what it is. So glad we we win our own wrote and built a data blockchain which on intestine twenty eighteen and that they may not live. March twenty, nineteen and conceptually, it shares a lot with tender moment that was sort of the original. Design source for though in the end our CTO Jae-in is team built. The Code Base Ninety five percent from the ground up though there are still said some design influence from tender met, which is cited. You have ended up with your own. Feta, blockchain. Yeah and that's Obviously there straight off there was a of Lot of development working in the ongoing along the way but we still feel confident that was the right decision just because we have A. Perhaps more specific use case early, some more to focus now on video delivery and wraps expanding to more generalized data delivery, and while we are rolling out more somewhere generalized. Boxing features like an easy incompatible smart contract. environment. That's we're still not We're not looking for data to be another east killer sort of everything for everyone at Jane Seo. Made more sense for us to just build what's necessary for specific use case and trade-offs that that made sense for video delivery in peer to peer cdn rather than try to be a competitor F reaching out there was not a difficult decision to make to. Go with your in blockchain think is the whole idea of outsourcing infrastructure to a theory is it? Say's law that? That cost of duplication customizing it, but is swollen that. Sharon, and even if you are yard, you know building purpose built for what we're trying to accomplish here. They're still on location just inherently in that you're you're building a new a new chain that's disowning built but Yeah, it's certainly rather than staying on a Theorem Just be if nothing else because of throughput But even if you had, say you know that there is a trend for a good mountain, their twenty nineteen where it seemed like every smart contract law was trying to the win away the business Try to incentivize your pay the project to convert to their own, but you know at the end of the day than. You still beholden to someone else's development schedule and someone else's feature said you don't really. Not, really in the driver's seat for that which Just seem like without knowing enough about where these projects were going. It's like a big risk to attach ourselves to one of those. And you see some these registers where they've had to jump a few different times to different chains and even besides the extra development were to do that it's just a really. Difficult user experience for your token holders in a confusing one as you're jumping from. Not, only just from a technical sense of covering tokens but also just you know you ingratiate yourself in this ecosystem and then you gotta do a one eighty and say now we're absolutely new relationships. It's. Somehow even more of a mess than building your own blog

Blockchain CTO Boxing Jane Seo Sharon
Islamic State 'Beatles' in court over US hostages' deaths

The World

04:18 min | 1 year ago

Islamic State 'Beatles' in court over US hostages' deaths

"Fighters have been charged in U. S Federal Court for the deaths of four American citizens in Syria. Widely reported killings happened six years ago. But it was just today that Alexander Coty and El Shafie L shake were extradited from Iraq to the US so they could stand trial. The world Sharon Jafar has been following the events today for us. What can you tell us? You're in about the charges he's manner facing. Well, Michael with these two men have now being charged the SYRIZA felony offenses unofficial at the Department of Justice today without the charges. Conspiracy to commit hostage taking, resulting in death. Hostage taking, resulting in death. One count for each of the American hostages. James and those Americans Marco are James Foley, Steven Sotloff, Kayla Mueller and Peter Kassig, who were aid workers and journalists in Syria when the Islamic state was operational in the country, and you might remember Marco the gruesome videos off the beheadings that came out at the time. It was really shocking and terrible. Those were horrific videos. What have you heard from the families today? Sharon. I reached out to the family of James Foley, The journalist who was tragically beheaded in Syria on the representative for the family told me that they are inundated with media requests today, but they have put out a statement saying that they welcome these charges on the fact that these men are facing justice in American court. It's been six years since these American citizens were killed in Syria. Why did it take so long to bring these men to the U. S? Well, First of all, it was very difficult to find and capture. These men remember, Syria was in the middle ofthe war. It still is. And these men were captured by Kurdish forces in northern Syria in 2018, and then since then, they've been transferred to Iraq and they were held in U. S military custody in Iraq, but the US couldn't just extradite them because they are British citizens. How did that complicate matters? The British government said it won't cooperate with the U. S. Unless it rules out the possibility of giving these men that death penalty. Here's how Bruce Hoffman, with the Council on Foreign Relations, explained it to me. The United States indicated that if Coty and I'll Shaffi, I'll share Were brought to the United States, They would face the death penalty. Of course, the United Kingdom abolished the death penalty some decades ago. And generally will not extradite persons to other countries where they have the potentiality of facing death. Then what happened? Marko was the attorney General William Board said Fine, We won't seek the death penalty and just hand these guys over and that's how they ended up here in the U. S. Now, I should mention that if convicted, thes men could face life in prison. Sure Intel us more about these two men. Who are they? And what do we know about how they ended up with Isis in Syria? Thes. Two men lived. Invest London and a few years ago, they decided to travel to Syria and join the Islamic state. They ended up being part of a group of four men, all from the UK who allegedly kidnapped, tortured and killed foreigners in Syria. Their captives gave them the nickname the Beatles because they all spoke with British accent. On as to what happened to the other two members of this group. One of them was killed in an air strike in 2015, and another one is in prison in Turkey. So these air two men could these cases serve as precedents for prosecuting more Isis fighters in U. S courts. I had the same question, and I called up Matthew Levitt to get his take his director of the Reinhardt program on counterterrorism at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. There've been many cases in U. S court involving significant terrorism trials. There has not been a case quite like this. That is involved the kind of brutal not just kidnapping but murder beheading of American citizens. The use of footage from those murders in terrorist propaganda of the type that has been seen around the world. Michael Levitt also pointed out that this required a lot of cooperation between different countries. And it just goes to show just how important these corporations are to bringing Islamic state criminals to justice.

Syria Alexander Coty United States Sharon Jafar Iraq James Foley Michael Levitt U. S U. S Federal Court United Kingdom Department Of Justice El Shafie L Bruce Hoffman American Court Council On Foreign Relations Matthew Levitt Intel British Government Beatles Turkey
4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

Optimal Living Daily

04:27 min | 1 year ago

4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

"For ways to live each day with intention by. Shelley. Levitt with live. Happy Dot. com. I WANNA move through life energy and a sense of discovery achievement, joy and engagement. That is my intention. My hope is that living according to it would be the antidote. The uneasy feeling I often have at the end of the day when I flop into bed filled with self-reproach and wonder where my time went. My. Intent is to be guided by purpose instead of feeling that I'm spending my time haphazardly succumbing to whim or distraction according to expert Mallika Chopra creator of the website intense dot com and psychologist Eliot. Berkman. Head of the social ineffective neuroscience lab at the University of Oregon setting intentions. Confession is a kind of internal northstar lighting, the path to greater fulfillment and life satisfaction. These are the changes I've made in the few weeks since setting my intention. Number One, I meditate almost daily. Is taking me years to commit to a meditation habits but the ten or fifteen minutes I spent doing a guided meditation on the common APP has been transformative. The turning point was a workshop I took with so Kessedjian Norman Fisher, a poet and Zen Buddhist priest. When people say they don't have time to meditate. He said I asked them how do you have time to not meditate with a regular mindfulness practice he went on you'll have fewer accidents you lose things less frequently your focus will improve making decisions will become easier. Remarkably found all these things to be true and when I'm feeling stressed I summoned the image I visualized during my meditation I imagine my breath as a long string of pearls and it helps reconnect with that experience of stillness yet as good as meditation makes me feel I'll skip it unless I keep to a schedule. So make sure to meditate daily at eleven am with four PM has a backup. Number two, I've stopped binging on the news. More than ever I. Feel it's important to stay informed but watching new show afternoons show wasn't bringing greater insight into the issues. I care about is only fueling a sense of outrage and I'm happy to have added The Washington Post, my beloved New, York Times subscription reading either one in bed was only deepening my chronic insomnia. So of made some rules, no new shows or Newspapers after nine. PM. Instead I think about how? I WanNa feel inspired amused transported and lanes and I choose what I want to read watch listen to based on that this has led to fewer hours with CNN and more with globe netflix's comedy about a real life women's wrestling league from the eighties the on being with Krista Tippett podcast and Elena Ferrante as beautiful Neapolitan novels. Number three, I cook more. I'd like to lose five or ten pounds, but resolving to lose weight is usually both joyless an unsuccessful. So instead I think about nourishing myself in ways that will align with my intention to feel more energize. And that helps to your me away from takeout Chinese food and into my kitchen when I cook pots of Faro. Embrace Swiss chard practice poaching the perfect tag and dig into cookbooks like Paulo I of food of Morocco and what to eat for how you feel the new all your data kitchen by divvy alter. And try new dishes like Paulo's egg plans a luke or devious sprouted among solid also experienced that sense of discovery and achievement that I'm looking for. Number four, I do at least one new thing each weekend. I've been having all sorts of new experiences, a meeting interesting people volunteering to do kitchen prep at a food pantry hiking trail taking a class in brewing booja walking the Los Angeles River in a meet up led by long distance, swimming champion Diane, and yet attending a talk by no Levine author of Dharma police at the inaugural Budapest in La. Some outings have turned out to be less than inspired. The less said about the mass meditation held at a conscious life expo the better but I always feel like falling through on my intention to step outside my comfort zone. I'm far from living completely in line with my intentions. Three countless ways I stray from the path but feeling courage rather than defeated I've more clarity about the way in which small things Afar too messy desk and unmade bed can undermine your vision of how you want your life to unfold and I think it'll be able to put some new habits in place soon.

Berkman Elena Ferrante Paulo Mallika Chopra Levitt Shelley University Of Oregon Kessedjian Norman Fisher Los Angeles River Insomnia Afar Krista Tippett CNN Eliot Netflix Diane Morocco LA York Times Levine
New York Attorney General to empanel grand jury in Daniel Prude case

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

New York Attorney General to empanel grand jury in Daniel Prude case

"New York Attorney General Leticia James is planning to select a grand jury in the Daniel Prude case. James said the proof family and the Rochester community have been through great pain and anguish, and she plans to do an exhaustive investigation into his death. James first began looking into the case in April. The 41 year old Prue died in late March after police put a spit hood on him and held him to the

Leticia James Prue New York Rochester Attorney
Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

"Baseless. The federal agency that announced a $765 million loan to camera company Eastman Kodak. Weston two weeks ago, said the offer is on hold pending probes into allegations of wrongdoing. US International Development Finance Corporation said in a tweet that we will not proceed any further unless allegations are cleared. Congress and the Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating the deal and Kodak Sport said Friday. It's also opening a review of the loan

Eastman Kodak Kodak Sport International Development Fina Securities And Exchange Commis Weston United States Congress
New York State reports 32 new coronavirus deaths, lowest yet

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

New York State reports 32 new coronavirus deaths, lowest yet

"Today governor Andrew Cuomo proclaimed a victory over the pandemic that held New York hostage for months with New York reporting thirty two deaths due to the corona virus in the last twenty four hours the lowest since March but Cuomo went from sounding victory to caution as the virus has not been eradicated half the states are seeing an increase fourteen states a twenty five percent increase this

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York
Police confirm remains found are missing Idaho children

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Police confirm remains found are missing Idaho children

"Well in Idaho authorities say the bodies found this week in a rural property are those of two children missing since September the Rexburg police department said the remains have been positively identified as belonging to seven year old JJ fellow and a seventeen year old sister Kylie Ryan police have issued a warrant for a man who recently married the children's

Rexburg Police Department Idaho Kylie Ryan
New York area walloped as global virus deaths pass 100,000

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

New York area walloped as global virus deaths pass 100,000

"The death toll in the U. S. is kind of of twenty thousand that moves the U. S. past Italy is the country with the most people lost to corona virus in the hardest hit state of New York governor Andrew Cuomo says it is not yet time to lift restrictions and reopen businesses in my opinion you can't ask the people of this state or this country to choose between the lives lost and dollars gained in Ohio governor Mike DeWine says even if you do re open businesses there is no guarantee of a return to normal even if we open tomorrow which we're not going to do the company is not going to war back until you know people have more confidence if people are scared to death literally they're not going to

Italy New York Andrew Cuomo Mike Dewine Ohio
Restrictions Are Slowing Coronavirus Infections, New Data Suggest

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Restrictions Are Slowing Coronavirus Infections, New Data Suggest

"New information suggests tough restrictions on people's movements are working CBS news correspondent Vicki Barker has more now from the foreign desk in London data from China and Europe and preliminary data from the US to just stay at home and social distancing orders can reduce coronavirus cases and deaths faster than many mathematical models predict New York is on the main Stanford university's Michael Levitt accurately predicted when China's pandemic would peak has turned the corner Switzerland has turned the corner we hope that Spain is also joins select type of people who opposed in the courts but epidemiologists are warning that all that progress could be reversed overnight if restrictions are lifted too soon the Barker CBS news

Vicki Barker China Europe United States New York Stanford University Michael Levitt Switzerland Spain CBS
Lighthouses

Travel with Rick Steves

06:54 min | 2 years ago

Lighthouses

"Lighthouses changed the fortunes of nations helping determine which ones would dominate in the nineteenth century. And it's all because a French physicist knew enough about the properties of light to vastly improve the signals produced by their beacons today. Lighthouses can be destination all. They're all complete with a great view. And maybe a beautiful limbs designed Augustine for now on display. Teresa Levitt tells us about the birth of the modern lighthouse in her book a short bright flash. She teaches history at old. Miss Joins US right now on travel. With Rick Steves Theresa Welcome thank you. Let's go to talk to you for me lighthouses. Really have a mystique. I think for a lot of travelers. We see these lighthouses. And what is it about lighthouses? That has that special attraction. And why are you so interested in White House? We'll I think half of the question is that they're always in these amazing locations right. I mean the very definition of a lighthouse is that it's on the edge of civilization. You have to travel to get to them. And then when you're there that's about as far as you can go. I just love that because I really liked land's end. There's so many of the road you know when you get to the end of the road. There's still a lighthouse out there and that's the last thing you see and you can also imagine for someone travelling over the ocean that that's the first thing they see and so it's also the indication of the beginning of civilization for them before we get into specifics on lighthouses and the technology behind them give us a little primer where would the earliest lighthouses and they must be very expensive to build. What's the practical use of them? Well it's interesting because I think the word lighthouse can mean a lot of different things. People have this idea that lighthouses are very ancient form of technology. And this isn't necessarily wrong. You know in the sort of Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Everyone knows about the lighthouse of Alexandria but actually a second one of those wonders was also a lighthouse. The Colossus of Rhodes people now think was was holding up a light so on the one hand they go back very far but really these sort of ancient technologies or in many ways different from what we think of a lighthouse now They started out really to mark. The entrances of harbors so as ships would becoming usually. There'd be sort of a day beacon Some sort of marker to show that this was the entrance and then often they put fires on top of these to help make them more visible and this is really essentially what a lighthouse was for us with Epson restaurant. Because what do you think Alexandria and you think of roads? Those are the two most famous ancient lighthouses that I know about. And both of them didn't warn mariners about a refer. Iraq. They just marked great harbours right so that would be something that You know sort of sailors would be sort of wanting to approach them. That was the whole point and you can see in this sense. It's fine if the light is fairly that is I mean. Obviously you want the light to be as bright as possible but in this sense a dim light is still better than having no light at all. It'd be like a light marking the limits of your driveway. So people can get in running over your garden. Yes and these really weren't anything. Fancy I mean obviously the Lighthouse of Alexandria has a great reputation but usually what these were. Were simply fires either. Wood fires or coal fires that were at the top of sort of elevated platform so then things changed and did that come with trade when when ships were going farther afield and they just had to have markers for different things that were dangerous. Did Change started to pick up in the eighteenth century and obviously he's sort of pushed by the fact that you have lots more ships making these voyages but they're still in a way. There's still was this problem that the the lights were not necessarily bright enough to make what we think of as modern lighthouse to to really fully warn ships away from a coastline. So even once you get to the eighteenth century you've got a fairly vigorous maritime trade lighthouses are still being lit by coalfires fires or or candles and they still almost entirely marked entrance to either harbors or sometimes entrances to where you would turn into enter obey. This gets into the theme of Your Book. Which is the development of this new technology by Fornell and the birth of the modern lighthouse? And what's fascinating to me at which your book described it so beautifully as that in eighteen nineteen. You have this famous painting that those of us who've been to Paris people ever the Jabber Coz the raft of the Medusa. This horrible shipwreck. And all this suffering. I never put it together. There was no good Lighthouse in the shipwreck ran aground because there was none of that safeguard and in the same. You're for now was filling this need by developing this radical new kind of lends that could sign a much stronger beam be more effective for maritime safety. What is it about this new lens that enabled it to be head and shoulders above the previous technology? Will it's able to capture all of the light available. I mean the problem that you had with just having an open fire on a pillar is that most of the light going out of a light source. The light will radiate in all directions. Only a very small portion of it is actually hitting your eye which means that most of it is being effectively wasted in terms of its brightness. So at this lens is able to do. It's able to capture all of the light that would have been radiated in the opposite direction or above or below and it's able to bend it into a single beam which is much much brighter than what you would have seen with the naked flame alone. Okay so when I look at this for now. It looks like a picket fence of reflectors is directing all the different late that it can under one spot so then it can be pushed out or are. How does that work in Layman's terms? So the idea of lenses that it's going to end light but the problem with the standard lenses of the day. I mean you can think of these big convex lenses with sort of bulge out in the middle. If you're going to try to use that to bend the light a lighthouse it would have to be simply enormous because you're bending the light through these really sharp distances so what have been larger than anything that was physically possible to produce at the time and also it would have been so thick that a lot of the light would have been lost. Trimmer so for nels. Big Innovation has sort of big insight. Was that you could achieve the same effect of bending all of the light into a single beam by cutting out all of the glass in the middle essentially and instead having a number of different prisons that are arranged in a precise mathematical way such that. They're directing all of the light into this single beam. And so that's what you're seeing. When you see a Fennell Lens it looks like this. Beehive of Of Glass Prism some way. But they're arranged so that mathematically the light is all being directed into a single beam and you'll have different kinds you have. What are called the fixed lenses which sends the light all the way out in a plane. I level or you have a rotating lenses which will fix it into individual beams and then as the the lens rotates. You're going to see a flash of light every thirty seconds or fifteen seconds or whatever. The designated signature is

Lighthouse Of Alexandria Alexandria Rick Steves Teresa Levitt Physicist Augustine Epson Mariners Iraq White House Fornell Big Innovation Paris Layman
"levitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"levitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Were ultimately did give Levitt their data fifty four million user sessions from four cities Chicago San Francisco Los Angeles and New York from the first half of two thousand fifteen the result is a working paper by level and four co authors including two economists who work at you'll recall that the white whale let that wanted to chase with the uber data was a real life demand curve there were two reasons for this one is that once you know the demand curve it tells the people who are producing the suppliers it tells them what the right prices for them to charge okay and that's how people usually think about demand curves and whether important but for those of us who aren't suppliers for those of us who are just consumers there's another reason to be excited about the demand curve if you know the demand curve then you know how much consumer surplus there is consumer surplus meaning the extra happiness utility joy willingness to pay that eighty consumer derives from being able to purchase a good at a given price in consumer surplus is one of the most important things in economics it's one of the incredible beauties of the market system is set for so much of what we buy we would have been willing to pay way more for it then we actually have to get better grades samples water Hey how much we pay for water each month I mean I don't know what your water bill as mine is maybe forty dollars but think about how much would be willing to pay for water waters I mean we'd be willing to pay almost anything for water but it's really really cheap so in that way the modern economy has arranged things so that we get things we need like water and food much more cheaply than be be willing to pay and and and that is really important that is really the magic of of the market to me what sounds like the problem is how do you measure that because like I need to know what you in your head we're willing to pay for what you were thinking about being willing to pay before you came to the store and then we're confronted with the actual price so how typically have a calm is measured those two numbers what you pay and what you're willing to pay so governor you have never been more right about anything your life then what you just said because we simply have no good ways to measure consumer surplus because we know what people pay we can sometimes see that observe how much they buy but we never see what's inside their head what they're doing is what they would be willing to pay so how do we tried so the way you kind of have generally try to do it is often through surveys where we would ask people and this is usually more environmental setting so how much would you be willing to pay to save a polar bear or all the polar bears and people come up with some number and we use that to estimate what they might be willing to pay but the the real way like if you've really we're going to estimate consumer surplus what you would want to do is you want to take consumer and somehow magically you want to reproduce that consumer and and ten parallel universes.

Levitt Chicago forty dollars