38 Burst results for "Levin"

Fresh update on "levin" discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

01:15 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "levin" discussed on The Bio Report

"Into multiple different avenues, simply by taking something that was a long process in simplifying it. So is we used to say going from Ivy to Subcu-. When the company began, there were many people that looked at us. And I won't say as far as being crazy but perhaps they looked at it on the basis of being Very, unusual of the thought of taking these IV infused products and making them into a simple subcu- shot like you would with insulin and other products in the case of Car T. it really is a similar model where we like to say if we can take something from forty day process down to four hours. Then, we can do something very, very impactful for patients around world. And if we're able to do that, we think that the benefit the can be recognized. not just on the basis of. He's of US but patient access in getting these products more broadly used without a complexity. Those are areas I've always loved doing. I think in this particular setting, there's a lot of room for Improvement Greg Frost chairman, and CEO of exuma Biotechnology Greg. Thanks so much for your time today. Thank so much. Appreciate it. Thanks for listening the buyer report is a production of the Levin.

Greg Frost Biotechnology Greg Subcu Levin Chairman CEO
Trump says he will announce Supreme Court nomination to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday

Mark Levin

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Trump says he will announce Supreme Court nomination to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday

"Trump sent to announce a replacement for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. On Saturday, Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma joined Fox's Bill Hemmer to talk about the process. Of filling the vacancy realistically, and historically, when there's a Senate of a different party in the president, different party in an election year to make the decision the president president always always has. has. The The power power to to nominate nominate nominate Senator Senator Senator has has has advice advice advice and and and consent consent consent and and and the the the Senate Senate Senate can can can choose choose choose to to to do do do that that that or or or not. not. not. And And And so so so when when when 2016 2016 2016 which which which chose chose chose not not not to to to and and and to to be be able able to to carry carry that that over over the the election election we we can choose to this time clouds

Senate Senate Senate Senator Senator Senator Senator James Lankford Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Trump Bill Hemmer Supreme Court Donald Trump Oklahoma FOX
Fresh update on "levin" discussed on WGN Nightside

WGN Nightside

00:30 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "levin" discussed on WGN Nightside

"Group station. 16 6 degrees of 12 03. Good morning. I'm David Jennings. Demonstrations continue around the country, responding to the decision of a grand jury. In the death of Briana Taylor, WG and traffic. We still have some demonstrators out on the Northwest side, the area around Milwaukee Avenue, Levin and Fullerton that is and has been blocked for some time and still is Louisville. Police say Two of their officers were wounded. They were Investigating reports of shots fired as demonstrations continued around the city of Louisville over the Briana Taylor case. The interim chief of police, as both are expected to recover. The attorneys for Taylor's family, releasing a statement after the grand jury decided to charge only one of the three officers involved in the botched raid on her apartment. With three counts of wanton endangerment. Our news nations Ryan Burrow attorneys Benjamin Crump, Sam Aguilar and LL. Anita Baker called the indictment outrageous and offensive to Briana Taylor's memory and yet another example of no accountability for the genocide of persons of color by white police officers. The attorneys say, rather than wanton endangerment. The officers should have been charged with wanton murder. The three say they hope an FBI investigation gets the justice for Briana that the grand jury refused her. State, City and county leaders here expressed their frustration with the outcome of the principal says the justice system is a long history of failing black Americans, adding he will not be sitting idly on the sidelines, allowing it to continue, I wantto say to every.

Briana Taylor Louisville Endangerment Anita Baker Sam Aguilar David Jennings FBI Ryan Burrow Levin Principal Murder Benjamin Crump Fullerton
Majority Leader McConnell says a Trump Supreme Court nominee will receive vote by full Senate

Mark Levin

00:21 sec | 5 d ago

Majority Leader McConnell says a Trump Supreme Court nominee will receive vote by full Senate

"From ABC News. I'm Chuck's Everton solemnly swear that I will support and defend the constant, the landmark Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, The second woman seated on the court is dead at 87. ABC is Karen Travers in Washington, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. True legacy may be as the legal architect of the equal rights movement, she would help lead a movement that changed the nation challenging laws that treated men and women differently in employment, housing and government benefits. ABC News political analyst Steve Roberts Bater Ginsberg Legacy Is felt and reflected in all of those landmarks there and because she was among the leading figures that helped not only Guaranty Women's right to vote but also encourage women to be confident and brave in public life. President Trump's reaction after a campaign rally in Minnesota or not, she was an amazing woman. Lead on amazing life actually said that 04 years ago, Senate Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused to act on President Obama's court nominee in an election year, saying the American people should have a voice McConnell tonight. Saying the full Senate will act on President Trump's nominee this year. Republican senators Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins, saying they will not vote on a nominee until after Inauguration Day.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Trump Abc News Senate Republican Majority Mitch Mcconnell Supreme Court ABC Guaranty Women Senate Karen Travers Lisa Murkowski Chuck Susan Collins Everton Political Analyst Steve Roberts Barack Obama Washington
Fresh update on "levin" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

00:47 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "levin" discussed on Mark Levin

"Apartments. But none of the officers was charged directly in Taylor's death. This woman is taking part in a protest in Washington, D C and that it even happened in her own home. She's sleeping. There are also protest tonight in New York City in Denver and in other places. President Trump says he doesn't want the FDA to delay a covert 19 vaccine if the manufacturer says it's safe. That's contrary to what many of his health advisers, however, are recommended in Trump, dismissing possible stronger FDA guidelines to ensure any code vaccine is safe, tremendous trust in these massive Companies that are so brilliantly organized in terms of what they've been doing with the tests of those companies stand to make billions from a vaccine. One reason the FDA to make sure they are safe and effective, but the president suggesting he will have the final say what has to approve it and the field. ABC NEWS Washington Mourners were still in line at the Supreme Court waiting to file past the casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lying and repose on the steps. You're listening to ABC news. News of radio 6 10 W TV and Malice and Wyatt. Oh Soo's athletic director Jean Smith says their plan to trim the Athletic department budget does not include cutting any of the 36 of our city sports, but it does include furloughs for hundreds of staff members, pay cuts and the elimination of over two dozen full time positions. Objective was to make sure that what we did in our personnel management space was too I'll try and Checked the needs of our student athletes. That's where athletic trainers and strength and conditioning coach is are in the five day for little category. The athletic department will have to mitigate a $107 million budget shortfall, says athletic director Jean Smith for the 2021 fiscal year, he said, it's all brought on due to complications from the Corona virus pandemic. Kent State University is calling for a two week ban on parties and gatherings as the school's cove in 19 numbers are spiking amongst their students. The students are now being asked to only go to class or to exercise and to be vigilant and wearing their face masks and practice physical distancing. Ohio's attorney general is now trying to stop a nuclear plant to bailout law from essentially going into effect. Ohio A G Dave Yost has filed an injunction to stop payouts from House Bill Six. The billion dollar bailout of two nuclear power plants passed last year and now at the center of federal charges being filed against five people, including former state House Speaker Larry Householder. Yost is looking to stop the owners of the plants from being paid, though the filing would not stop the money from being collected. That collection is scheduled to start in January unless lawmakers acts Householder and four other defendants have pleaded not guilty. I'm Jack Crumley, Lordstown Motors has announced that they have over 40,000 preorders now for the Lord's Town endurance pickup truck. The company purchased the shuttered Lordstown factory from General Motors in order to build their electric pickup truck and just unveiled their model in June with the vice president. Elton John is returning to Columbus, the musician cancel the show's due to covert 19 and had them rescheduled for 2020 2022. That is, Sir Elton John will now play at the Schottenstein Center on April 12th at 2022. But original tickets will still be honored. The show is part of his farewell yellow brick road to her. I'm Alison Wyatt, your ABC six first warning..

President Trump FDA Jean Smith ABC Alison Wyatt Dave Yost Washington Sir Elton John Larry Householder Director Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ohio Schottenstein Center Athletic Department Taylor New York City Supreme Court Lordstown Motors
UN Fails to Pass Palestinian Resolution

The Friends of Israel Today

01:25 min | 5 d ago

UN Fails to Pass Palestinian Resolution

"In the news stunning move from the Arab League failed to pass a proposed Palestinian resolution, which would have condemned the normalization deal between Israel and the United Arab. Emirates the Arab. League comprises twenty two member states that include Bahrain Libya Levin on Qatar Egypt Jordan. Saudi Arabia and more a senior League official was quoted as saying discussion around this point was serious and comprehensive, but it did not lead to. Agreement over the resolution proposed by the Palestinians. Steve this is a big deal the Palestinians. If you think about this, the Palestinians probably have more friends in the United Nations than they do in the Arab League where they actually have full membership status, the Arab countries believe this is what the Arab countries are saying to the Palestinians. They believe that normalizing a relationship with Israel is more important than their complaint. Now I do believe that this is going to take the Palestinians in a certain direction I. I believe that there's one way out for the Palestinians and it's not through the Arab League it's actually to go into the arms of Iran. This is something that I think the Israelis are looking toward something that two countries are looking toward as well to make sure that the Palestinians don't go in that direction they already are shaking hands in many ways, but some of the PAL with the Iranians. So we gotta keep our eye on that, but we'll have to wait and see ultimately what happens in the end but continue to pray for the peace of Jerusalem.

Arab League United Arab Israel Iran Saudi Arabia Qatar Egypt Jordan Libya Levin United Nations Bahrain Steve Jerusalem Official
Big Ten football to resume weekend of October 24

Mark Levin

01:15 min | Last week

Big Ten football to resume weekend of October 24

"Wiant. It looks like Ohio State will be playing football this year is the big 10 reversed course and now plans to start the season in late October. T be ableto look These guys in the eye and let them know that they have an opportunity to play in that. There. There there fight. They have something to show for it. Now you know all the work that they put in now they have a chance to go play and they never, they never wavered. And they just kept swinging that that was our mindset during this whole time. Just keep fighting. Just never know what tomorrow's gonna bring Head Coach Ryan Day excited to get back on the field. The emergence of rapid testing may have triggered that new vote for the league to proceed. Big 10, chancellors and presidents voted unanimously to return to action. October 23rd after making several changes to help protocols, including more testing, data collection and analysis. Northwestern football coach Pat Fitzgerald really excited to be back? I'm excited for our parents and our families and our fans. And like you said, there's no more group on more excited for them than our players. The plan is for an eight game regular season. Any player who tests positive for covert 19 will have to sit out at least 21 days before returning to the field. Ryan Burrow ABC News Chicago Things will kick off the weekend of October 24th. But fans so far are not allowed to attend any of the big 10

Football Ryan Burrow Ryan Day Pat Fitzgerald Ohio
Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:01 min | Last week

Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

"Cheap. Wine. Dot Com. Review we put on the. CHEAP WINE FINDER DOT com website Levin years, and going strong. And today we have. Wine. Let me grab the bottle of lane twins. State. Older, by Zinfandel. Lodi. LISTSERV fifteen dollars and I found for twelve ninety nine for this is not an expensive why? And the stateline they own. Several vineyards. ONUM. It's all bears and the Lodi Appalachian, which is the Central Valley. Most. Most wind come from the coast central coast to coast. Lodi Clarksburg are a little bit of different they're. there. They're in the river valleys to the San Pablo Bay, which is the northern part of. This is a fairly well, I wanted to state wine. Not, single vineyard state by. The Lang twins are actually identify wins the. Fourth Generation. Family started. Farming in Lodi in the eighteen seventies in their first vineyard and the ninth eighteen sixteen. which is not that unusual. If you look you look into some of these big name Lodi. wineries they go back a hundred hundred and fifty years. Fairly regular basis and while there are wineries, other Appalachians have. Long Histories. Load is everywhere. and. Why is old vines? And there's a wine axioms. Wine Grapes half the struggle. To become. Complex. And best vineyards in the world are some of the worst land. Almost. No nutrients wraps through. No moisture. Justice not. Survive and thrive. Old Vines since they're old and. On their own without having any additions around them. So you KINDA GET A. Rape fine that is doing what you wanted to do. Donna dependent. From where what? Agriculture land is around. Old Lines are. kind of like highly sought after. These low dial binds are from. Before prohibition and they made communion wines. Church. Oceans communion wine. During prohibition. Kept him going and then the white Zimba trades the sixties planted. Zinfandel everywhere I just keep up the craze in those vineyards which are so so back mid day are sixty seven year old vineyards that are kind of. Little, jewel? How is the? State. Just. Kind of. Like about Lodi. There's a dealt with the same. There tends to be a bit of. A BIT OF A. Local resemblance or they're kind of. The kind of the middle I really liked that. Really High in Norman's infant infantile snappers those fast robles. Tend to, be more classic. Like it when you get this rougher edge to not a lottery rough that just just a little bit. That's my favorite. They tend to be less expensive on top of and there's a lot of great simple producers in California. Really great producers in California. Lodi does a for me may not prices usually right I'm gonNA, take a SIP. Tend to be less expensive clean here you get a single vineyard away a state multiyear Weinberg Thirteen. Don't really find that with some of the bigger producers, their winds there. Are More expensive to not only is it a style that I liked? Cheaper and we actually won DOT com. Also. There you go.

Lodi Old Vines Lodi Clarksburg Lodi Appalachian California San Pablo Bay Levin Norman Lang Rape Central Valley Donna Lodi.
Texas Supreme Court again blocks county from sending mail-in ballot applications to all voters

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | Last week

Texas Supreme Court again blocks county from sending mail-in ballot applications to all voters

"Court is block terrorist county clerk Chris Holland's from sending mail in ballot applications to all registered voters in the county state is suing Holland's on the grounds he is violating state law and confusing voters. State law only allows mail in voting for those over 65, who are out of their county of residence for the election or physically disabled. A statement. State Attorney General Ken Paxton says he strongly commends the court's decision Today.

Chris Holland Ken Paxton Attorney
West Coast fires kill at least 27 as Oregon braces for "mass fatality event"

Mark Levin

00:25 sec | Last week

West Coast fires kill at least 27 as Oregon braces for "mass fatality event"

"The death toll from Western wildfire stands at 27 people, but ABC is will car in the fire zone says that number is likely to go up at least 71 major fires are burning through the West in Oregon. They're warning of a mass fatality incident with at least 22 people missing in the state after the flames have wiped out at least six towns search prison canines, taking on the grim task of scouring through the rubble. Residents return in utter despair.

ABC Oregon
Padres take two wins against Giants in doubleheader

The Darren Smith Show

03:29 min | Last week

Padres take two wins against Giants in doubleheader

"What an afternoon on. Sunday. For the padres they sweep a doubleheader from the giants and extend their winning streak to seven consecutive games. The padres will finish twenty twenty over five hundred for the first time. Since twenty ten s San, Diego moved to thirty one and seventeen with a couple of very impressive wins on Sunday afternoon six nothing in game one by my cleven jer three, one in game two behind some clutch hitting three relievers. Behind Garrett Richards and the padres absolutely rolling into their huge series this upcoming week against the La Dodgers. This is the wrap up show with John for and Jim. Russell. If you're not following us on social media, please do that at twitter at John Shaffer at Jim Russell. St. Over the next hour, we're gonNA hear from the manager Jay's Tingler we'll hear from my clovinger as well LS scores and we'll get you set for the massive. At PETCO Park against La the begins on Monday and six ten. But what a weekend Jim, we didn't know if the momentum would be halted as the padres didn't play Friday and Saturday, because of a false positive in the giants organization but the Padres pick up right where they were and they've won seven consecutive games. Yeah. A couple days off may have actually helped team to be honest with you and they got to sweep today. Kinda like. Easy I to me it did it to me. It felt like there's no doubt in my mind that not only the Padres, the better team, but they're going to win these games. They're gonNA to find a way to win in the second game there, and then the first game I tweet this out after the third inning, I'll like this feels like clovinger I'm just GonNa go seven complete this game type outing for him and which he did he went seven. Felt Kinda effortless almost when you look at the box score complete game seven strikeouts only one walk only giving up two hits like that's the Mike Levin show that this team traded for and who they hope they get in the postseason is a guy that's going to give you seven innings going to not allow any runs couple couple hits given up. strikeout seven plus only walk one it was it was his best as a padre so far and couldn't have come at a better time. And then game to like it was you know giant scored I there but to me I was like, all right. You know I felt that they were gonNA come back and win that game somehow, and it wasn't pretty will myers at a home run. But other than that the other ones they scored wasn't pretty how they did it but still they got the job done and their bullpen. John, this is a strength of the team. Now it's incredible because it's been nine days. So the first twenty, three games of the year, the padres bullpen was six point four, eight, the last twenty, three games coming into today two, point, seven five and the bullpen today two and two third innings of one hit no run baseball Tim Hills now three. Now he was the winning pitcher in game two drew pomeranz not allowed to run JIM this year and fifteen scoreless innings and Trevor Rosenthal was able to work around two out error committed by Fernando Totti's junior. To Work School. seventh-inning for his tenth save and third with the chargers. If there's one thing we saw over the course of these two games and maybe over the seven game winning streak is that Fernando Totti's junior is a human. You know he wasn't GonNa hit three fifty all year. He wasn't GonNa hit thirty five home runs and sixty games you know he For the first time, maybe as a professional at the big league level actually slumping, he's one for fifteen. Now, in his last five games, the Patriots won all of those games. So that's the good news.

Padres La Dodgers Jim Russell Giants Fernando Totti John Shaffer Petco Park Garrett Richards Patriots Twitter SAN Trevor Rosenthal Mike Levin JAY Tim Hills Work School. Myers Diego
Tropical Storm Sally forms in the Gulf of Mexico

Mark Levin

00:18 sec | Last week

Tropical Storm Sally forms in the Gulf of Mexico

"Sally has formed off South Florida, the National Hurricane Center in Miami says. That the newly formed storm with the heavy rain on parts of Florida as it barrels into the Gulf of Mexico. Meanwhile, New Orleans another nearby areas were placed under a hurricane watch and Louisiana's governor declared a state of emergency.

National Hurricane Center South Florida Sally New Orleans Miami Mexico Louisiana
Houston police chief defends decision to fire 4 officers involved in fatal shooting of Nicolas Chavez

Mark Levin

00:45 sec | Last week

Houston police chief defends decision to fire 4 officers involved in fatal shooting of Nicolas Chavez

"Art Also, Vedo is defending his decision to fire four officers who shot and killed a suicidal man back in April. The police union has called the firings unjust and deplorable. The chief says union leaders are wrong. The union is when they're telling their members that you don't have to listen to what the chief

Vedo
Where to Get Your State Fair Food Fix Right Now in Dallas

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 2 weeks ago

Where to Get Your State Fair Food Fix Right Now in Dallas

"Of Texas canceled this year. Fletcher's is hosting a variety of pop offs so that fans Khun get their famous fair favorites. The pop Up comes to Dallas is Community beer company. This Thursday they will be on site with a mobile trailer's serving corny dogs, funnel cakes and curly fries. This event will feature the return of the fan favorite Funnel Cake Ale. News on

Khun Fletcher Dallas Texas
Trump Denies Calling Fallen Soldiers ‘Losers’ and ‘Suckers’

Mark Levin

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump Denies Calling Fallen Soldiers ‘Losers’ and ‘Suckers’

"A story in the Atlantic magazine where unnamed former administration officials say, among other things, he did not want to visit a World War cemetery on the Paris trip three years ago. Our false it was a funky, rainy day, the president said. It was a security issue due to the long dry said No, I want to go. I insist on going It would have taken us forever, the Paris police said. Please, you can't do this. But another former White House official who spoke to Fox News says the account in the Atlantic is true regarding the French trip to mark the end of World War ll. According to this former official, the president was not in a good mood. French President Macron had said something that made him mad. He questioned why he had to go to two cemeteries. Why do I have to do too? His staff explained he could cancel, but he was warned. They press are going to kill you for this. The president was mad as a hornet when they did, according to this source. Oxes Jennifer Griffin at the Pentagon. Democratic

President Macron President Trump Paris World War Cemetery Atlantic Magazine Jennifer Griffin Official Atlantic Fox News Pentagon Administration White House
Germany identifies nerve agent used to poison Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny

Mark Levin

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Germany identifies nerve agent used to poison Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny

"The German government says Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned by the same type of nerve agent used in a 2018 attack on a former Russian spy Germans dismissing the allegation, saying there was no evidence of poisoning when the Valley left Russia, the White House This thing is gonna work with allies to hold those in Russia accountable. As for Navalny himself, he remains in a serious condition

Alexei Navalny Russia Nerve Agent White House
House subpoenas Postmaster General Louis DeJoy over mail delays

Mark Levin

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

House subpoenas Postmaster General Louis DeJoy over mail delays

"By the House Oversight Committee, Democratic led panel is investigating operational changes that have slowed down mail delivery committee chair Carolyn Maloney. Is that joy has not sufficiently answered questions provided documents about those changes. The joy has testified twice in recent weeks about the removal of collection boxes and sorting machines. Joy suspended some changes until after the election amid concerns the actions would undermine expanded vote by mail operation boxes. Jared Helper, and they called him Tom Terrific,

House Oversight Committee Tom Terrific Carolyn Maloney Jared Helper
Detroit island park transformed into coronavirus memorial

Mark Levin

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Detroit island park transformed into coronavirus memorial

"A park that's an island in the Detroit River into Memorial Garden for victims of covert 19. They were all day processions today around Bellyache Park. More than 900. Photos submitted by families are on display on large posters inside the park More than 1500 people in Detroit died from the virus. Amazon,

Bellyache Park Detroit River Detroit Memorial Garden Amazon
Alabama man indicted in sale of 'homemade', untested cancer drugs

Mark Levin

00:19 sec | 3 weeks ago

Alabama man indicted in sale of 'homemade', untested cancer drugs

"Fox News in Alabama man facing conspiracy and other fraud related charges after prosecutors say he manufactured home made an untested cancer drugs in his kitchen and marketed them to so called alternative medicine doctors in the U. S. Mexico and elsewhere. Prosecutors say the man claimed the drugs which contained a compound he bought from China. Or

Fox News Fraud Alabama U. S. Mexico China
Hurricane Laura slams the Gulf Coast with 150 mph winds

Mark Levin

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Hurricane Laura slams the Gulf Coast with 150 mph winds

"Storm dumping heavy rain over parts of Arkansas. Early this morning, it made landfall on the Gulf coast of Louisiana as a category for hurricane the wind. Sparking a dangerous fire at a chemical plant has got the Louisiana National Guard standing guard the chemical plant fire, adding to the misery, forcing people to stay inside. In closing I 10, which is key for relief. Every city will be without power. That means without air conditioning. Many parts don't have water. The heat index right now is 97 degrees. Fox's Leland Deterred in

Louisiana National Guard Louisiana Gulf Arkansas Leland FOX
Republican Jewish Coalition official makes the Jewish case for the Republican party

People of the Pod

05:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Republican Jewish Coalition official makes the Jewish case for the Republican party

"As the Republican National Convention dominated the news this week I sat down with Matt Brooks the Executive Director of the Republican Jewish coalition to hear him make the Jewish case for the Republican. Party. Just a reminder AJC is a five. Oh, one C. Three, not for profit organization that neither endorses nor opposes candidates for Elective Office Matt. Thank you so much for joining US Saffy. It's great to be with you. Thanks for having me AJC held a series of virtual programs last week at the Democratic National Convention and we're doing the same this week alongside the RNC you spoke at. An Age RNC program yesterday and you guaranteed the Donald Trump will win a larger percentage of Jewish vote in two thousand twenty than he did in two thousand sixteen. What makes you so confident of that first of all, my understanding of the politics of the Jewish community I've been doing this job for thirty years. So I think I have a very good feel for the Jewish community. But then the most important reason is to look at the record of this president There is no question that he has been without a doubt, the most pro Israel president ever in history. That's not coming just from Matt Brooks, but it's coming from people like the prime, minister of Israel has said as much in the Oval Office in meeting with them. So there's a reason why fifty six percent of the Israelis who were polled in a recent poll would like to see president trump reelected and only sixteen percent. WanNa see Joe Biden reelected because they understand that this president is absolutely transformed the US's relationship beyond that Steph. Touch on domestic issues I think people in the Jewish community are deeply concerned about what's happening in our big cities whether it's Portland Seattle New, York, the lawlessness, the rioting, the efforts by the left wing progressives in the Democratic Party who want to defend the police. I. Think People in the Jewish community understand that president trump giving his incredible track record. Pre covid is the best person to revitalize our economy postcode and also recreate and bring back all the jobs that were lost as a result of this pandemic. So I think there's a wide range. Of issues that both foreign and domestic that to me give me great confidence to have my back moment point into the stands and guarantee that this president will do better among Jewish voters and twenty twenty than he did in two thousand sixteen was the Yankee Fan I. Appreciate any reference to Babe Ruth let me just follow up on that though you pivoted and spoke about domestic issues at the end, which obviously are very important. You started out with Israel though I'm curious does the RJ see any kind of polling or anything like that indicates that the? Percentage of American Jews do vote based on. Israel. My sense is generally not at top issue for American Jews. So we do have extensive polling and we're very data driven in our messaging and how we look at the races you know, I think your point is well taken but you know elections and campaigns about mosaics. It's about putting pieces of the puzzle together. It's not just one issue. There is definitely a segment of the Jewish community that does care about Israel we're going to appeal to them. There's definitely a segment of the Jewish community that appealed issues. Like school choice we're going to appeal to them. There's definitely segments of the Jewish community the care about the issue of defunding the police and having law and order in our streets in protecting us against anti-semitism. So we're GONNA have various messages targeted to various constituencies within the Jewish community. Our community as you well know is not monolithic. So to say that there is one issue that's gonNA drive the Jewish vote would be a mistake but I think we have enough experience and expertise in this arena to make sure that we're serving up the right messages. One issue that you just mentioned Matt is is Antisemitism Joe. Biden actually laid the cornerstone of his campaign on President Trump's comments after the unite the right rally in Charlottesville in his video announcing his candidacy, and then again last week when he accepted the nomination, vice president. Biden cited the president's very fine people on both sides comment at which he saw as excusing anti Semitism he cited those comments as motivating him to get into the race to beat the president. How would you want Jewish voters to think about those comments? Well, I, mean, that's going to be part of our task and we've had several events both with Nikki Haley Mark Levin with Senator Ted Cruz just this last Sunday night you know in which we've talked about that there is a mythology that has taken hold by the Democrats to try and create a false narrative that the president Or somehow tried to give support to white nationalist. If anybody takes a step back reads the entire transcript and admittedly I wish he had been clearer and less awkward in his original remarks when we put out a statement to that effect. But if you read a few sentences before and a few sentences after very fine people on both sides, it's very clear that the president strongly condemns White Nationalist Neo Nazis, and you know it is absolutely unambiguous also to some of his other speeches in actions you go back and look right after the tree of life synagogue tragedy he gave a speech that day to the future farmers of America No. President no president go back and take a look at the record, and you'll agree if you read the opening speech, no president has ever condemned anti-semitism and planted a flag about us and our strong commitment to fight anti-semitism wherever it raises its ugly head, and then obviously you look at what the president did it on his executive order to help protect students on college campuses who have been the victims of anti-semitism and I will tell you time and time. Again, this president has by action demonstrated his commitment, not only to condemn white. Nationalist Neo. Nazis. But also to stand up and take strong stands against the rising antisemitism in this country.

President Trump Israel Donald Trump Matt Brooks Joe Biden Vice President United States RNC Executive Director Democratic Party Babe Ruth Portland Oval Office America Steph Nikki Haley Mark Levin Life Synagogue Senator Ted Cruz
"levin" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

13:25 min | 4 months ago

"levin" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"Born in Israel Yuval Levin moved to the United States with his family when he was eight now director of Social Cultural and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute. You've all served the domestic policy staff in the White House of George W Bush. You've eleven's most recent book a time to build from family and community to Congress and the campus how recommitting to our institutions can revive the American dream. You've all welcome. Thank you very much. The economy is strong. We have rising household income and the lowest levels of unemployment in decades. And we're not engaged in any shooting wars anywhere on earth. There's a pretty good argument to be made that this is a good time. And here's the way you open a time to build two decades ago at the turn of the Millennium. Many Americans had a sense that we were living at the dawn of a new age by now it has become unavoidably evident that our country has experienced the beginning of this new millennium less as a dawn then as a twilight age. If things are so good how come. They're so bad. Yeah this is the question that really started me on the path to this book. And it's the question that the book opens with. Which is if you look at some of the familiar measures of wellbeing. How's the economy? Doing people healthier people safe bell measures. This is a great time And yet if you look at how people feel about this moment and if you look at the nature of our politics if you look at the polarization and dysfunction we're living through if you look at increases in suicide rates and use At at what's going on on college campuses and in a lot of arenas of American Life. It seems like this time of intense frustration and unease and the question is if the problem isn't evident in those areas where we normally look to. Where IS THE PROBLEM? And so the book looks for that problem in our social lives in the intersection of people rather than in how people are doing individually and ultimately ends up thinking about the health of our institutions as the way to understand why we're frustrated what otherwise seems like a good time. All right this is a rigorous argument rigorous arguments begin by defining their terms quote when I speak of institutions. I mean the durable forms of our common life the durable forms of our common life. They're the frameworks and structures of what we do together got to explain that. Yeah so this term institutions is very broad and capricious. It defines a lot of things right. I the families and institution. A corporation is an institution marriage institution. The rule of law has described as a student. I think it's right to call all those things by that same name but that means we have to think about what that name is and the book works through some of the attempts by academics to define the term but ultimately it comes to what for me as a sort of Priscilla an answer to the question. Our institutions are the forms of what we do together. They're not just clumps of people clumps of people organized around a particular end and organized around an ideal and a way of achieving that important goal so some of our institutions are in charge of of teaching our kids. Some of them enforce the law. Some of them just provide us with a good or a service but each of them forms the people within it into a shape that makes them capable of achieving that. And that's what makes them an institution you trace the collapse of confidence and institutions and the polling data is right there you go through it. The Gallup organization HAS BEEN ASKING AMERICANS CONFIDENCE. They have in our institution since the seventy. Here's just one example in the nineteen seventies more than forty percent of the public expressed confidence in Congress. You might think that's us. Starting at a relatively low point by twenty eleven that figure had fallen to percent and and you kind of have to wonder even those eleven percent savings. Do you know what I haven't met any of them. What accounts for the collapse again? A time to build we have moved roughly speaking from thinking of institutions as molds. You just mentioned that as molds that shape people's characters and habits toward seeing them instead as platforms that allow people to display themselves before a wider world. Yeah so the collapse of trust in institutions as you say the the fact of that happening sort of Cliche by now but it forces you to ask what do we actually mean. Trust in institutions. It's not the most obvious idea and wh- surely one of the things we mean. Is We think. The institution is competent and honest as so that incompetence and and fraud or corruption undermines our trusted institutions. But those things aren't new incompetence and corruption. That's that's part of the human experience if anything is so it doesn't explain this this collapse of trust lately but there is an element of our loss of trust in institutions. That seems more native to the twenty first century and that has to do with the sense that we trust and institution because we think it forms people to do their job in trustworthy way so that not only does it perform an important function it shapes the people in it to do that with integrity and defines an ideal of integrity for them. But what we've seen in the last. Several decades is a transformation in our expectations of institutions. So that we think of them less is doing that now. More is giving people on. I'm old thing I'm almost thinking of just to get to the point. I'm almost think he was something as Cliche as the Richard Gere. Move The old Richard Gere movie an officer and a gentleman. The young man is a mess. Put Him into the military outcomes. An officer and a gentleman. That's an extreme example of what all kinds of institutions do they take. Human beings are a mess in all kinds of ways in good institutions shape. Them make them useful with the military is interesting? Because it's the it's the great exception to our loss of trust and institutions. Americans have higher confidence in the military now than they did when Gallup started measuring the seventies and I think the reason for that has everything to do with what you say. Here which is the military is unabashedly formative. It's not just good at protecting us from our enemies of it is. It's also good at transforming young people into responsible. Serious men women when somebody tells you that they went to Harvard. You think maybe that's a serious person. Maybe that's an an intelligent person. Maybe not but you know whatever they are. They got into Harvard because Harvard sort of measured them decided if they were up to that standard and then let them in when someone tells you they went to the Naval Academy. You think this is a serious person and it's because of the Naval Academy because it made them that way right all right. You discuss a number of institutions in the book. Let's take a couple The federal government. Let's start with Congress a time to build. It is perfectly obvious that something has gone wrong with Congress in our time. There hasn't been a proper budget process in over a decade very little significant legislation gets passed and most member serving today have never really been part of a traditional legislative process. There's nobody on that hill. Who knows how it's who's seen with his own ice is how it's done now. Here's the provoke especially provocative sentence. Congress is weak because its members wanted to be week. Yeah explain that Yeah. I mean you know it's it's easy to go looking for external pressures that create this problem but I think Congress is the source of the problem and in fact. A lot of are other concerns about the government. I worry a lot for example but activist judges or about the administrative state. I think those are functions of a week. Congress congresses as left the the scene empty and judges in administrative agencies have rushed in and Congress has done on purpose because its members. Don't want the responsibility for hard choices. And they don't think of what they do fundamentally in legislative terms at this point at least many members don't they think of it in performance of terms they think of Congress as a way to be seen making the argument for the things. They're voters believe in especially to be seen making the argument against the things that frustrate their voters and a lot of it is about getting a better time slot on cable news or talk radio by getting a bigger social media following younger members in particular think of Congress in extraordinarily performed of terms. And they're not doing. The work of bargaining and accommodation compromised it is ultimately would legislation is limit. Let me try something that occurred to me as I was reading. This part of your book to impeachments nine hundred seventy two to seventy three the impeachment. Richard Nixon was never finally impeached because he stepped down before the full. House voted to impeach him. Nevertheless the impeachment proceeds proceeds pursuant to a vote of the full House Judiciary Committee that holds open. Hearings the President's council is permitted to play a role to cross examine witnesses. There are legal wrangles between the committee and the White House. They take their time for these matters to go to court and to be decided and when the Judiciary Committee does vote a recommendation of impeachment to the floor of the house it is a Republicans who vote no but it is a bipartisan. Vote impeachment number. Two of course is what we just saw doesn't take places pursuant to vote of the House but pursuant to a press conference by the speaker. It's the Intel Committee instead of the Judiciary Committee. At least at first they hold the hearings in private. The President's council excluded the vote is one hundred percent partisan. What accounts for the dance? What counts for the different? I do think a big part of it is the difference between an internal process and an external show. Though the impeachment of Richard Nixon was a process of members of Congress. Went through with each other as an institution and so they had a they had a nonpartisan staff head. Republican lawyers on the staff And they were trying to persuade each other to vote a certain way they were talking to one another. In this impeachment of president trump. Everyone was talking to an outside audience at all times. Even in those closed hearings the intelligence community. The whole point was fundamentally a performance point. I think there's a way of of of seeing this. As Congress losing its inner life. It doesn't think of itself as an institution that does its work and then goes out and talks about its work. The talking is the work and a lot of politicians. Now you know you might have said people people seek a microphone to get power and then change things. Today people seek power to get a microphone and then talk about things. And that's an institutional transformation the presidency a time to build every one of our past presidents was formed by a set of institutions formed by set of institutions as either a senior military officer or a government official. Donald Trump is the first American president. Who has not been shaped by any experience in such institutions? Close quote? Now you know that a lot of people will answer immediately. Yes and it was about time. Yeah well I I would say first of all. Donald Trump is not the beginning of this problem in the presidency He's an example of it but so is his predecessor. It's something we've seen building for a long time but I do think that the there's a way in which president trump thinks about the presidency as an outsider as a platform on which to stand and complain about the government. When the president isn't insider is the insider And and should think of himself as operating the executive branch more than speaking about it. And so this isn't. This book isn't focused on complaining about Donald Trump from it but I do think that what did what did you see. During the Obama Administration. I mean trump is Sui generis it. Let's say let's take a bomb Obama's presidency in of terms more than any of his predecessors really maybe not as much as donald trump has more than any prior president in the sense that he understood it as a place to change the culture He understood it. In terms of Away to elevate his own profile more than to work with the system he barely knew. Any members of Congress very rarely worked with the legislative branch in a way the presence generally due to advance an agenda. He used executive power in ways that we're just intended to avoid Interacting with the system in working inside and by the way part of what that's meant is that he wasn't a very consequential president because everything he did was ephemeral. It just went away when the next show came up I worry that some of that is happening now with things that I do like They're also being pursued by executive action and the Democrats are just keeping a list and they're going to go through a non do it? All as soon as they have an opportunity. The campuses shifting from the Federal Government. The campuses a time to build conservatives have clearly long been a minority of American academics but their numbers have dwindled to a tiny remnant in one thousand nine sixty nine a quarter of American professors described themselves as right of center by Nineteen Ninety nine. That figure was down to twelve percent. Recent surveys have put the number below one in ten and the situation is far worse in the social sciences and the humanities as political.

Congress Donald Trump president White House President Federal Government Richard Nixon officer Richard Gere George W Bush Harvard Israel Yuval Levin American Enterprise Institute United States Naval Academy House Judiciary Committee executive American Life
"levin" Discussed on What Shall We Do About...?

What Shall We Do About...?

06:51 min | 6 months ago

"levin" Discussed on What Shall We Do About...?

"I guess because I guess that's my way of profiting off. Parenting is what I'm doing now. I guess there's something about when you when you are a parent and you're reading books often that thought of like I've got a great idea and you make up when you make up silly stories kids especially right. Do you think can turn that into a book. Let's talk about the Book Day Nelson. Pumpkin aliens is the first one. What's the what's the kind of gist of the story? Nelson Hunt is the main character is book is in year three. He hates his school but he doesn't hide it anywhere near as much as he hates eating vegetables and his family love eating vegetables. His grandparents aren't vegetable gum and they're always sending down their award winning vegetables for Nelson's family to eight but Nelson refuses to even have one single. But he's hated thing in the world so he He's always formulating ways to get rid of the vegetables from his plate and Into the BIN or the toilet or under his bed but one night. He's grandparents come up with enough and his grandma forces him to a goal of Pumpkins and he passes out because it's the most disgusting things to do in his life but when he wakes up in the morning and he reaches for his alarm clock and hits it it smashes into paces then. He accidentally rips the cupboard door. A few of the of its hinges and he realizes that pumpkins super strength and he learns that all vegetables give him a different superpower. And so it's a book about him embracing the things that he hates the most to You know use the superpowers to save people. That are important to him and his life. That's such a cool idea. Yeah Look I love superheroes. I love comic books and I wanted to kind of write a story that was you know my mind my funny heroic origin story that kids can enjoy it. And what's the target audience as far as kids can send? I think it's like It's it's it's was the boys between six and ten but I mean actually made secretly made all of the female characters the coolest characters in the book like I love Nelson but Nelson is like a hopeless lazy teenager trapped in a Primary School aged boys body He's just like you know he doesn't want to do anything. Except play video games and stay in bed and so anyone that he doesn't really high school because he's bad at he doesn't like it is hates it because he's not his bed whereas his best friend all of is like this like ray of Sunshine Who just hangs out with Nelson? Because she finds him so funny and they can put their polar opposites. That's why their friends and then they nights the aliens in the title. There are millions in this book and the coolest alien is a princess name Rachel and of course. Nelson's grandma's about us too so yeah lots of Lots of great military characters in this book so I I definitely reckon that you boys angles would really enjoy this. I have already done episode of this podcast Code. What should we do about vegetables with Alice? Slavsky he was on Mousa Schiff Right and she was brilliant and get back and listen to haven't heard it yet but I think what I was wondering when I talk to her and she said the fact that a lot of vegetables on sold as being exciting you know and kids don't appreciate the fact that they are delicious thinks. Is there a sense what you're trying to do in these books is get kids a little bit excited about vegetables and saying that they can actually do cool things? Well I actually my kind of Englewood with with Rodney's book was to be nor moral lesson invade again. 'cause I for me like the lesson that kids should learn from the book. Is that reading rules. And they do more of it. Yeah so I don't. I don't need to cram all the lessons down their throats and I don't want Nelson to be like so you see Nelson. You should have been eating vegetables all along like every book ends. And he's like cool vegetables helped me save the day but there's still a west things ever refused eight but my kids both love vegetables. I love vegetables so this. This isn't some weed grudge that I harbour against them. I definitely agree that They so rarely presented to kids in an exciting way. So I I do. If the two series takes off I have lots of grand ideas and one of the cookbook series for kids which is Basically like in a fun fun recipes with vegetables. And then you have coventry from Nelson's saying how disgusting recipes that's awesome. That would be so good. I'd love to read that and that's my kids to my my out with suzie. Run adventure playing. So I WANNA do a Nelson choose but it's I c. h. Aws so choose your own adventure And so it's like if you WANNA go to page nine if you want to eight a lettuce go to page twelve. That is great. I'd love to say that published and you get to do a few of these books right. It's a series of Nelson Books. Oven Nelson tune is called Broccoli and spies and that's coming out in the next year it's grain cart one in orange. Every book is a different color that that relates to the whichever vegetable about were pretty fun. Yeah as we finish the podcast as we always do Andrew Levins. What shall we do about? Dj's I mean maybe just try try and employ them somehow them book them for your for your upcoming Live streamed office drinks yet as socially isolate other are genuinely if you had asked me a month ago. Maybe I'd have many more great fun ideas about what we should do about. Dj's but right now support them often them virtual hugs? Yeah give hugs the wedding. I look honestly I really. I'm excited about this book series. I think the timing of its great considering you kind of that. Dj Work. I Really WanNa wish you all the Best Levens for all. You're doing in feature that once covered thing passes that you can get back into it and You Byron Baggy can happen in years and you just yeah the industry rise again now. That would be such a great way to to sink to signify that everything was over and we can move on you know but look at this point. I don't WanNa be that selfish guy. That wants everything to be normal semi. My work comes back or whatever. I realized. This is a massive thing that everyone needs to take responsibility for. And if that means no gigs for me for a while so did I can find other ways to make money. I'm GonNa Lucky position like that and Maybe it'll mean that all right more mobile to Nelson series that haven't even been contracted yet and then it'll be like you know what ten books. It is unlikely that will happen if I have to keep home. Schooling every day the my wife's the primary schoolteacher and so she has to go to work should be way better at home. It's going in the name but so she has to go to work. And then I'm I'm I'm with the kids. Maybe you sit illicit play fee to count with the Knicks Sta plotlines for Nelson's adventure off. Believe me my my son. Archie is is all across. It is already.

Nelson Nelson Hunt Nelson Books Knicks Primary School Mousa Schiff Dj Englewood Rachel Alice Archie Aws Andrew Levins Rodney
"levin" Discussed on What Shall We Do About...?

What Shall We Do About...?

06:51 min | 6 months ago

"levin" Discussed on What Shall We Do About...?

"I guess because I guess that's my way of profiting off. Parenting is what I'm doing now. I guess there's something about when you when you are a parent and you're reading books often that thought of like I've got a great idea and you make up when you make up silly stories kids especially right. Do you think can turn that into a book. Let's talk about the Book Day Nelson. Pumpkin aliens is the first one. What's the what's the kind of gist of the story? Nelson Hunt is the main character is book is in year three. He hates his school but he doesn't hide it anywhere near as much as he hates eating vegetables and his family love eating vegetables. His grandparents aren't vegetable gum and they're always sending down their award winning vegetables for Nelson's family to eight but Nelson refuses to even have one single. But he's hated thing in the world so he He's always formulating ways to get rid of the vegetables from his plate and Into the BIN or the toilet or under his bed but one night. He's grandparents come up with enough and his grandma forces him to a goal of Pumpkins and he passes out because it's the most disgusting things to do in his life but when he wakes up in the morning and he reaches for his alarm clock and hits it it smashes into paces then. He accidentally rips the cupboard door. A few of the of its hinges and he realizes that pumpkins super strength and he learns that all vegetables give him a different superpower. And so it's a book about him embracing the things that he hates the most to You know use the superpowers to save people. That are important to him and his life. That's such a cool idea. Yeah Look I love superheroes. I love comic books and I wanted to kind of write a story that was you know my mind my funny heroic origin story that kids can enjoy it. And what's the target audience as far as kids can send? I think it's like It's it's it's was the boys between six and ten but I mean actually made secretly made all of the female characters the coolest characters in the book like I love Nelson but Nelson is like a hopeless lazy teenager trapped in a Primary School aged boys body He's just like you know he doesn't want to do anything. Except play video games and stay in bed and so anyone that he doesn't really high school because he's bad at he doesn't like it is hates it because he's not his bed whereas his best friend all of is like this like ray of Sunshine Who just hangs out with Nelson? Because she finds him so funny and they can put their polar opposites. That's why their friends and then they nights the aliens in the title. There are millions in this book and the coolest alien is a princess name Rachel and of course. Nelson's grandma's about us too so yeah lots of Lots of great military characters in this book so I I definitely reckon that you boys angles would really enjoy this. I have already done episode of this podcast Code. What should we do about vegetables with Alice? Slavsky he was on Mousa Schiff Right and she was brilliant and get back and listen to haven't heard it yet but I think what I was wondering when I talk to her and she said the fact that a lot of vegetables on sold as being exciting you know and kids don't appreciate the fact that they are delicious thinks. Is there a sense what you're trying to do in these books is get kids a little bit excited about vegetables and saying that they can actually do cool things? Well I actually my kind of Englewood with with Rodney's book was to be nor moral lesson invade again. 'cause I for me like the lesson that kids should learn from the book. Is that reading rules. And they do more of it. Yeah so I don't. I don't need to cram all the lessons down their throats and I don't want Nelson to be like so you see Nelson. You should have been eating vegetables all along like every book ends. And he's like cool vegetables helped me save the day but there's still a west things ever refused eight but my kids both love vegetables. I love vegetables so this. This isn't some weed grudge that I harbour against them. I definitely agree that They so rarely presented to kids in an exciting way. So I I do. If the two series takes off I have lots of grand ideas and one of the cookbook series for kids which is Basically like in a fun fun recipes with vegetables. And then you have coventry from Nelson's saying how disgusting recipes that's awesome. That would be so good. I'd love to read that and that's my kids to my my out with suzie. Run adventure playing. So I WANNA do a Nelson choose but it's I c. h. Aws so choose your own adventure And so it's like if you WANNA go to page nine if you want to eight a lettuce go to page twelve. That is great. I'd love to say that published and you get to do a few of these books right. It's a series of Nelson Books. Oven Nelson tune is called Broccoli and spies and that's coming out in the next year it's grain cart one in orange. Every book is a different color that that relates to the whichever vegetable about were pretty fun. Yeah as we finish the podcast as we always do Andrew Levins. What shall we do about? Dj's I mean maybe just try try and employ them somehow them book them for your for your upcoming Live streamed office drinks yet as socially isolate other are genuinely if you had asked me a month ago. Maybe I'd have many more great fun ideas about what we should do about. Dj's but right now support them often them virtual hugs? Yeah give hugs the wedding. I look honestly I really. I'm excited about this book series. I think the timing of its great considering you kind of that. Dj Work. I Really WanNa wish you all the Best Levens for all. You're doing in feature that once covered thing passes that you can get back into it and You Byron Baggy can happen in years and you just yeah the industry rise again now. That would be such a great way to to sink to signify that everything was over and we can move on you know but look at this point. I don't WanNa be that selfish guy. That wants everything to be normal semi. My work comes back or whatever. I realized. This is a massive thing that everyone needs to take responsibility for. And if that means no gigs for me for a while so did I can find other ways to make money. I'm GonNa Lucky position like that and Maybe it'll mean that all right more mobile to Nelson series that haven't even been contracted yet and then it'll be like you know what ten books. It is unlikely that will happen if I have to keep home. Schooling every day the my wife's the primary schoolteacher and so she has to go to work should be way better at home. It's going in the name but so she has to go to work. And then I'm I'm I'm with the kids. Maybe you sit illicit play fee to count with the Knicks Sta plotlines for Nelson's adventure off. Believe me my my son. Archie is is all across. It is already.

Nelson Nelson Hunt Nelson Books Knicks Primary School Mousa Schiff Dj Englewood Rachel Alice Archie Aws Andrew Levins Rodney
"levin" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

03:22 min | 7 months ago

"levin" Discussed on EconTalk

"To hurt the people in the near you at the same time you have this urge to show off and impress people and and to gain acclaim and fame and glory and money and etc. But we understand that we're on the dance floor We have a role to play. That role to play is a very powerful idea. Renaissance recently called the story of my life. And I think I see justice in there that we see ourselves as the hero of some great narrative and that that is often saves us and but often causes us to do things that not so not so You know kind and Get might be better to think of ourselves. As being part of an ensemble a a role. That's not the starring role a role. That's maybe cooperative a role that's ties people together a role that listens to what the other percents to say. Rather than trying to think of what you want to say next. And I think that That combination of what is your role in life. What is the proper thing to do in this circumstance and It isn't all about. You is really a useful way to think about life. Generally forget about institutions Which in the state of America and the populist versus whatever just that if you want to be a productive and and kind person and have a good life you got to pay attention to this. Yeah I think that's right. It's it's very basic in a sense of course but It's enormously important to having flourishing life in a flourishing society. I think it can help to see that through the Lens of institutions because that helps us see how this becomes a big problem. Not just a challenge for US individually in our lives but a problem for society a problem for people around us we care about but ultimately this is about understanding that we That that we have a role to play in the flourishing of a larger hole here It's a very basic point is a very familiar point. And it's not something we've forgotten entirely but we need to see it more. We need to see it more often and rebalanced some of the ways we make decisions respond to some of the changes that we've had to live with and that's part of what it is to build institutions. I think Americans in general have been pretty good institution builders in times of crisis in times of need We've lost that knack a little bit and I think some of the the extraordinary Options we have now as I said before for just being effective loners Have allowed us to avoid being forced to see these things and if we see them I think it is within our reach to do something about to make things just a little better. You don't have anything against loners. Though against introverts by the way which is another thing we have these conversations. People say well. It's you know this thing about putting your phone. Well that's great for you. You're an extrovert. I'm an introvert. I like to look at my phone alone. I I've always described myself as a communitarian introvert. I believe that it is important to be part of larger Social and cultural groups. But I don't find it easy and you know that sometimes you just have to see the importance of things that you don't find easy. So yeah I I. I have nothing against introverts. I am one myself but I think we have to see that. We're not alone here as you say I guess that has been Yuval Levin. His book is a time to build. You've all thanks for being part of ECON TALK..

America Yuval Levin US ECON
"levin" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

09:12 min | 7 months ago

"levin" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"All right we're back with Debbie Levin so Debbie I WANNA. What is a carbon footprint? It's like this thing in your hand so the very easy explanation is that we everything that we're doing industrialized for industrialized nation puts carbon into the air. When we have trees the trees take our carbon and they keep it for themselves. They keep that away from us because carbon is good for the trees but whether they've been put out is the oxygen that we need right now. Our carbon is fighting with our oxygen. Because we don't have enough tree because we don't have enough trees have and we have an industrialized society right where we are an an a fossil fuel based economy so whether it's plastics or whether it's your gas or whether it's all coming from fossil fuels there are a million percent technologies that we could stop this tomorrow and jobs and so we need to do is we need to understand that. We're looking for a sustainable economy. That's going to bring our our economy so that we are using more electric we're using we're using There's different powers that we have with water ride euro-power there's obviously solar. That can do everything instead of going to gasoline products as I go to which is going to run out eventually anyway. You also it's dirty. It's still it's not okay right. We've got wind turbines. We're all this technology and we've got jobs waiting in those in those sectors so it's really a matter of for us also being really careful who you vote for. Read what they stand for. So when you vote vote for sustainability understand that this is across the board from president down. Yeah is that. What do they think about the environment? What are they doing are they? For new technologies are they for sustainable technologies. And so that's a hugh you have so much power. We all have so much power to make changes every single day. Yeah and so you know if you get into carbon offsets and all that other fancy carbon words. Don't worry about that worry about making sustainable choices every day and you are automatically reducing your carbon footprint. Perfect well. I mean the economy will take a hit from this from the loss of nature. The economy is taking a hit. Because we're not actually listening to the technologies that we have now right. And what if you didn't have your iphone right and we were still dialing up on a rotary phone right and we couldn't communicate the way we could or have the information that we have. It's the same thing right. We have all the new technologies to get us into a place where not only are we preserving our planet but we're preserving ourselves so what do you think is the holdback? Why is there so much resistance to this? I mean do you feel like there is it? Just become really politicized. I don't know why because the earth and our health is not politicised right and so the reality is there's jobs that we are losing just because they're just old fashioned and that happens but we've got so many new jobs available in all these tech centers sectors where it's energy it's Food. I mean think about you've got beyond Burger impossible. Meet that eat like a hamburger and so there's so much there's there's a new tunafish one coming out. There's there's so many things that are happening right now. That are all innovator. Jobs looking corporations and saying we want to help you like we're doing with H. M. The automotive industry is huge. We've been working with Toyota Motor sales literally our start twentieth anniversary. Actually weren't you the one that put the Prius on the map? We were yes we met them. It's huge and you made it popular for celebrities. We do dry them. Which in turn you mean. That's the cash cow right there once the celebrities you something everybody else wants to you. It's been an amazing journey to be honest because talk about like first steps. A car was the first thing. I better by environmentalists leader because I was driving like not a good car. Ride a bike right but that wasn't as realistic L. And didn't want a little little not safe so I went and I. I met Toyota and I was buying a Prius because I have to do this and I actually was corporate it. Was You know the big corporate North America? Toyota and I said you know this is really cool. First of all it's affordable and second of all It looks different so people can be identified and say. I'm making a difference. I think I can get you all the celebrities in Hollywood and I can even get them to arrive at award shows in them and we can talk about it. No idea what I was doing. You believe they said okay. Yeah and that's like shit now. I have to do it and it was an amazing experience. It's still we've worked with them with their fuel cell technology which is incredible. They're going to be all electric twenty. Twenty-five they are honestly the best car company in terms of everyone is doing this. And Right I'm like copying and is the best form of flattery in the world especially as a sustainable human being absolutely But they were really the ones who put their necks out and said we believe in this technology and we are environmentalists to the core as a company. And so it's it's urgent for companies to take that commitment like I said like Ekos and ancient and Toyota Motor sales. And if they don't do that then there's not gonNA be product for people to buy and the product has to be completely as fantastic and work the same if not better as something comparable. That's not sustainable. And so that's what's been happening. And that's the most exciting thing that I can think of. This happening is that you have choices. You can actually be an environmentalist by shopping correctly. Right right and not like be mindful of what don't waste don't wait don't waste like don't keep buying that same white t shirt or black. Why did it no? I actually read this. I found this online food releases methane when it breaks down in a landfill and the methane intern warms. The Planet Eighty six times faster than carbon dioxide. That's mind blowing. It is and so that makes you think all that food that you just throw in the garbage you think Oh and I think the best mentality that we all have once we throw it away outta sight Outta mind but we're destroying our planet. We are doing it. Why just doing those little tiny things that we think are harmless? But it's destroying our plan and you of the power every day. Yes you helping your planet and human being absolutely well. That's yeah I feel like now. I want to go and buy everything. That's not flashing question though so if we do already have plastic in our possession just put it in the recycle that that's the best we can do. We really there's there's huge industries of clothing and Re for recycling existing plastic. It's clothing it's other items that we call plastic. It's reusable everything and that's something that we don't we don't want to you know perfect world. Add to the pile of trash right but we have the pile of trash. So let's turn it into fabulous new products right. 'cause right now. I still have all these old school tupperware containers do I just keep them so that I keep raising not add to the problem. Well that's true. I mean if as as we use them you have them buying them all over again but I think that actually our next job is to actually list on our website. What you do with Old Tupperware? Because you're so right. Yeah I have like three left. I've had probably for forty years. So just have them and I don't know what to do with so I just keep using right so it's really not buying new if you have something. I'm being really mindful of that okay. Perfect arc is any other last minute tips on how to not waste and to be more sustainable anything. We didn't cover that you want to. I mean I do think that you should realize how Sheikh you are by being sustainable. Oh thank you. I agree with that. We're all capable of doing it. Yes every day every day and if you screw up one day you have another you. Have you have the next minute so this is an ongoing process that you could be successful? I love that. Thank you for being here. So you motivating. Now we want to change it up for us. Ladies Gentlemen everybody listening. Just be mindful because this is our planet and we're not going to get another one so we gotta take care of it. It's the most important thing and leave it. Amazing for our future absolutely wrong and always remember you. Sit with us. Thanks for listening to ladies like us from the League and podcast delayed again that is produced by will sterling. Steve delegator I woodward Elizabeth fake pigs for rating and reviewing wherever you get your podcast and tune in for new episodes every single week..

Toyota Debbie Levin North America president Hollywood Steve delegator Ekos intern H. M. The
"levin" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

11:58 min | 7 months ago

"levin" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"She's one of the most influential people in the environmental movement and entertainment industry. Let's welcome CEO of the environmental media. Association Debbie Levin Yay. Soga or guys Danny you. This is a special episode. Yes we really. We've been talking about being environmentally friendly with our everyday life. So we're excited about this. I've heard snippets on your show. Okay yes I was very happy and very like excited that you guys were into this way before we met. Yes that's awesome. Well I think like that's just what's happening right now is everyone is realizing. Oh Shit this is bad. This is getting bad. I mean you've known this for a while right. Most changes real. It's all real so like she said we. We're we're going to need like the the handbook for dummies saw on how to do this. The Right Way. Tips and tricks Before we get into that let's go back to like your beginnings and why you even went down this road. I'm just curious. What intrigued you into this. It's kind of a random story okay. and I've been running the Organization for twenty years. This is literally my first year. Yes Environmental Media Association. You were way ahead of the game. Website is green. The number four and all of our handles instagram marine for marine for So I was actually a mom. I mean I'm still a mom and I had teenage kids and young teenage kids and I was invited to and I knew nothing about the environment. I was just really excited when they actually dropped off some little little. Been when my kids were really young at my house and said you could put stuff in here and it's separate from the garbage so I was really excited like I put newspapers in there. We were still getting every day. And I put you know whatever cans and bottles and I just thought I was like the coolest personal. But that was you were and so. I was invited in nineteen ninety nine to a very small luncheon. That was actually the the Yemeni awards it had started. We're celebrating our thirtieth anniversary which is an organization which is amazing. It's amazing how forward that was and so I sat there At at this table with people who had no idea it was it was literally a mother from school. Invited me and so I as I'm thinking about this and as I'm hearing what they're doing the idea of because our mission is to get environmental content into the media using the media to talk via pop culture right. I mean my God. This is the most brilliant thing I've ever seen in my life. We are the storytellers for the environment. They weren't doing a minimal of that at that time they were. They were working to get environmental messages into content which was great but remember nineteen ninety. Nine right NOSSA. Not even a hint of social way thing and so we. The I knew that they were doing which was great was they were talking to writers and trying to get them to put things into content. Which was incredible. I was blown away by that idea because I was a person who was not aware because at that time. Only like environmentalists. Talk to environmentalists. Rile happens a lot. Environmental groups talked to environmental groups and no one is speaking to the public to tell them what they can do. How they can be empowered and how they can actually implement. Why is that? They don't know how to speak. English right excites their scientists are saying yes there researchers litigators go do it. Our job is to tell the story voice and so I asked wdv too many questions to the guy sitting next to me. He literally asked me to go to lunch with him the next day and come run the organization. Wow I mean he. I didn't know they were sort of saying it was kind of crazy. Destiny right there for I walked into an empty office. There was no one there. There was almost no one on the board left. It was an amazing board. There was one on the board because it was it was put together by heads of studios and amazing people and had a great pedigree but it was really not there was one assistant who was basically stoned offer us. And I'm like okay here weekend and no files and I thought this was at the very beginning of two thousand and I thought you know we do what we do is. We're actually celebrating her thirtieth year of it. We do the awards and honours gala which is like the Green Oscars or the Green Golden Globes and all about content and and sustainable and environmental celebrities. And it's like this wonderful wonderful event that we do. It's an award show but it's also an honoree show and so I thought going we'll go back to that but I thought okay I've got like let's push it to December because it's like February I and I don't know what I'm doing. I didn't even notice and repeat was which is I just thought it was this thing that has logos ask in front of it. Is I know how to name. And so I said let's just push it to December and we'll figure it out and because it was gonna be the tenth one so I thought it's either amazing and it's the tenth or we don't exist and I really really tried and so bottom line is it worked We had amazing honorees. We had incredible performers. The first thing that I did do taking over in early two thousand was I was invited to a ton of environmental organizations to their events to sort of see what the what the community was like and the community was old And even I said that I thought they were really old and I had teenagers and so I thought. Oh my God this is. It was old white by the way. I thought this is just not going to work right and so I my kids were in school and I kind of literally pulled from like they had cool. Parents aren't school in Santa Monica. There was a lot of people in the industry. Some of their friends as they were getting older. We're starting to work and My my goal was to make the make environmental issues and sustainability way cooler and weighing that and And it's evolved tremendously got. There's so much to talk about but my goal has always been to be very clearly using celebrity voices influence. Our voices loud voices to be the voice for the environment that they could speak personally and as a parent I wanted to also know. How do I do this? So it's easy and I just keep my family safe. Uh-huh how are we healthy? And how do we not have toxins and chemicals in the house? Because I think that's the thing that's relatable people were talking about climate change now. Actually everybody is talking about climate change which is a conversation but nobody wanted to know about what those words were when they wanted to know was how can afford to keep my kids safe. What do I feed them in what away? Because that's their world and it should be And so for for us and for me and I think that that everything and so I always approached it looking at somebody in in the way that I want to. Just get information just like you guys. Tell me what to do so that I understand what this process is and how I can be better and also really in terms of process really forgiving and knowing that everybody is on the path and no one is done right. No one is done. I don't care who you are. You're not done. It doesn't stop does not and we applaud every step of the way right and you are just as kick ass on step three as you are on step four hundred three step in the right direction. It's an awareness. Yes so this is something that you know. This is sort of how it's informed the organization and we're an organization now that has incredible celebrities. I'm sure you've looked at our board. Jaden Smith is one of our corporate board officers which I didn't know that he started the box. Water right or what is it? Just watch which is just water so as she pushes away our plastic but I did it. Come armed with gas. I'm sorry so amazingly so we have the with the awards and honours gala every year We also have m impact. We've got program so we can talk about that. But I was told C. J. Didn't twenty-one think this was like five years ago. I was told that he had started with starting this box. Water company have. This was everything to him and he was seventeen years old. He created this like this is all him he. It was him when he was a kid in the ocean and found plastic bottles and said to incite what the hell yeah and he is so smart and so kind and so knowledgeable and so passionate and so he started this with with with his partner drew with the support of his family which is really important. His father's very involved the whole family is really involved. Easing and his vision was to have a completely recycled sustainable Barber bottle with plant based so sugar king cab coming from Natural Springs. How cool and he. They figured it out and it launched when he was seventeen. Wow and so it's amazing. And so I was connected with him. Bef- like as they were just starting to launch a and I said we need to honor you. You're seventeen years old absolute and we have a future award for people. Who are you know on their road to you know environmental greatness and it's been everyone from Ian Summer Halder Shalin Woodley to you? Know we have all these amazing people that we've honored and so he and I got along on the phone. Wake me like I just like. This kid is incredible completely bonded. We ended up honoring him that year in October He came backstage and said this is the most beautiful group of people. These are like my people. And how do I joined the board and I said you just it and so he honestly he is such an important part of our organization his vision he immediately got really involved with impact which we can talk about He's amazing. And then we have other people like Lance Bass who also has a podcast who lance has been involved with us for fourteen years. Wow Atlanta's are co-chair and lances like he was this kid from in sync from Mississippi who didn't have a clue and we met at an event of small event that we did and he's like what. I don't know any of this but the sounds amazing. And you know these are babies and are this is the future so this is we. Our job is really to be able to speak to the public in a way. That's really relatable and now using social media post a gift I mean it's all you're doing it all the way it should be done because that's the way to get especially to younger generations especially having. Jaden on your side on your team that he's the perfect example. Yeah so impactful. Because they'll listen to him. I'm does it. There's nothing like literally. He's like running around doing shows. And then he's like texting me about some guy who should speak at one of our events. And so he's like he's passionate. Yes passionate yes. Wow that's incredible. Es So w what was your first personal step in the right direction. Like what was the first thing you did at home to change question? I WANNA know because I'm making personal changes that blocks straws all of that stuff so I want to know your I I mean. I think the first thing was recycling. Because it's so easy you could just everybody just.

Jaden Smith Environmental Media Associatio Lance Bass Debbie Levin CEO Soga Santa Monica Ian Summer Halder Shalin Woodl Danny Barber Mississippi partner C. J. Natural Springs Atlanta co-chair
"levin" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

09:23 min | 7 months ago

"levin" Discussed on The Long Run

"We disagree about certain things but we also have things in common hot if if we stop talking it if we put ourselves up on a pedestal. Like I'm ideologically right and the other side is evil. We will definitely not solve complicated problems like this. That's for sure that is for sure we'd Buchanan. Whoever you vote full their must be the ability to have to have a discussion and a rash. Irrational discussion with somebody disagrees with you. Because what is that about? You actually learn things all the time you learn about areas that you ninety thing about an each one of us is formed by the circumstance that we were raised in for example myself as I started out this conversation I'm raised by family. That was stripped of everything twice. I've seen several walls. I don't like any of that. And the end of the day. I walk into a circumstance like America which is such a treasure of a nation such a treasure of a nation with the view that there is so much rich so much good here that if we allow the forces that try and politician US try and partitionous those who tried to do that if we allow them to be. Successful in the essence of this great democracy really is will be questioned by many. So how do you practice issue as chairman of bio you go to Washington D. C? You meet with lawmakers presumably from both sides of the aisle. How do you approach them for these conversations so under the wonderful things about bio and also others is that whether you speaking to people in the West Wing and I've had the privilege of doing that or in Speaker Pelosi's office or in In spy leader McConnell's office or for that matter and Senator Grassley Office is not a visiting one approach for me and that is how can they please understand what will benefit innovation and therefore America's strategic capabilities? And at the same time how will they? How will their actions impact patients? Because if they do impact patients negatively by removing the types of new medicines. That we have by not ensuring that they get access by not ensuring that you have a flourishing innovative environment than in actual fact their actions damaging a nice. I find no difficulty in having that dialogue irrespective of what party individuals are. The question is for them not for me. The question is them. What kind of America do they want to see? And I'm always impressed when I meet. Some of the lead is not all that they really do. See a future where they can have dialogue with each other and they do want that. Do they all recognize that? This is a source of competitive advantage for the United States during one. And it's a gift to the world that we've been So so good and steadfast upon medical research in all the way through the value chain Lucas on a gift. We make money out of this. Okay so I think what's really interesting about this fact is that do they realize it? Some do some. Don't I think at the end of the day? Those who are most thoughtful those who really believe that the America they want to give to their children and their the children of those that support them has to be in America. That is rich strong and robust not just rich and strong but is robust in other words robust in the way that it's driving innovation there are others that simply look at the very short term fashion. I would hope that the majority fall into the foam case because America is remarkable and it remains remarkable and if they do take steps to take short-term damaging actions which is a minority set of people trying to do this then those individuals will end up harming the competitive advantage. And what they give to their children. Because we I inherited what was and my children will inherit what was done in the in one thousand nine hundred forty seven when the NIH was founded we today harvesting so much and we're investing so much and when giving gifts abroad we're making money out of it. I think it requires moral leadership. I agree with you doesn't had we had that coming out of World War. Two and you know if if all you want to do is maximize your profits for the next quarter. I mean you know he can work at a bank or something I mean. I don't think for biopharmaceutical industry is really the place and we can continue on that course which we've been. I think that will kill the industry without a values reset. And that's really why I believe this kind of a voice around. The compact is a good beginning for us to make our statement but we do need to promulgate that in. Washington. Dc and in the state level. Because you're right. If you look at a short term reaction that the only thing that matters is the dollar that you make tomorrow as opposed to the hundred or one thousand dollars you'll make in a month and a million dollars that you'll make in a year and we're done because all it'll happen is we will fragment and people will run every corner by the way. I think that this whether you be a Wall Street Titan whether you be politician in Washington. Dc whether you be a CEO old for that matter bench. Scientists company all need to appreciate that short-term racism is destructive to the value that we actually have as an industry. Now we're talking walsum pretty grim stuff here that we're going to have a bumpy wild ride this year for sure. I mean this is like safest statement right. It's GonNa be white knuckle time for the industry as we head into the summer in the fall do see scenario. What's the what's the positive scenario that we could come out of this? Have this conversation. Twenty twenty one and get to a better equilibrium where the world at large and biopharmaceuticals in live together in a social contract. You know in a storm the most important thing that you can possibly do. If you're on your boat is to keep calm. And if you keep calm and you keep your eye on where you're trying to go. You'll get there if you panic and you start doing irrational short-term things you will destroy so. I think there is a positive here. I do believe that the vast majority of them are actually calm. They don't care for it likely this but I think they can speak with a concerted voice. One which is measured thoughtful and takes into consideration some of the constraints but in order to be successful Luke. It's critical in order to be successful. We need to look into our narrow and look around faces Nas. What did we do wrong? We can't just pass us off to everybody. We did do things wrong. We need to call out these bad actors in. It's not a moment is lot more than it's a lot more than that. We need to ask the question. Have we constructed the incentives in our compensation and the way that we run our companies to focus only on patients and Innovation Ohrid we structured for short term profit and therefore maximizing every buck? We can make out of the patients today out of old drugs. These compensation issues need to be addressed. I've said this many times. It's what drives many people and I think it's the obligation of the boards to do that. I would also say that you allow bio and its board and it's individual to construct the right kind of measured approach to deal with Congress. We will do a good absolute confidence in that. No panic no sharp edges. This is about a dialogue. It's not about destruction sought about win or lose it's about how can we get things done? And I think that sets US APART. Twenty Twenty One. We will have a new. I don't know what the elections bring. I do know that this is Among the extreme political and media turmoil very difficult to dissect through and actually read. What's going on but I do know that in a storm. Just keep your principles and that we're GONNA do Jerry Levin. Thanks very much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having means a pleasure. Thanks for listening to the long run. Production Timmerman report painter. Assad of ED separate media was the sound editor. Music comes from. Da Wallich. See you next episode..

America US Washington Dc Twenty Twenty One Twenty twenty Buchanan Jerry Levin Speaker Pelosi Senator Grassley Da Wallich chairman Innovation Ohrid Lucas Production Timmerman NIH Assad McConnell
"levin" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

14:48 min | 7 months ago

"levin" Discussed on The Long Run

"Jeremy Levin Chairman of the Biotechnology Innovation Organization. Welcome thanks for joining me today on the long run. Thanks Luke appreciate you having me. So Jeremy is you know on the show the long run. I liked to go through people's whole life history before I get to their moment possibility and the interesting things that they're doing in their companies for the case of you. I'M GONNA throw up that model and I'm going to point people to a previous podcast. You did with nature. Biotech Co first rounders. Where you talked about your life story one a for people to that because today I want us to talk about your role as chairman of bio and some of the major issues facing the industry. But before I go into that I do want listeners. To know that you're a man of substance You grew up in South Africa and beard escaped apartheid. Your Dad was a journalist who opposed the apartheid regime and that took a moral compass and some courage to follow one's convictions. And I think there's a through line there in your life and so this is a very important conversation that we have today about democracy the role of the pharmaceutical industry and society. So thank you for Georgia. Thanks Luke it's important to me. There's a line in. It stems all the way from the Northern Cape in Bata all the way through the battlefields of Israel through to this country which is a remarkable country. So I'd be delighted to do that but at the end of the day boils down to one thing you stand on principle because nothing else matters and this industry has some principals it really does. It has a lot of capacity for good. You're you're training the scientists and a physician and now you're out there working hard to create medicines off but the the wider world does not appreciate this. This is the moment of I think existential crisis for the pharmaceutical industry. Biotech Industry How we develop new medicines. The political moment Is is is dire big. Tobacco is considered more and more positive light than what you guys do this. We run the risk of killing the golden goose and this is like on your shoulders now as the chairman to try to preserve the innovation ecosystem. So it's not so much on my shoulder as being starting in nineteen forty seven with NIH was invented essentially conceived of funded and then drove the beginnings of innovation in biology in the United States. You have a multi decade process whereby innovation a- surged in the United States. In a way that is nowhere else in the world absolutely no it is completely unparalled. Capital markets grew up around it. You had a huge scientific base. You have a medical base. You have patient expectations for new cures. We made that investment as a society coming out of World War Two was built on American exceptionalism. It win believed that we could do anything. And we would put our tax dollars to work and advance the frontiers of science maintain science and technology leadership in the world and some people would benefit in the long run. Both here and everywhere and it was a thank. You just landed on the moon. This was a moment where all possibilities were opened in a way which is absolutely wonderful and now we face a moment when we are now the parietal. We're the pariah. Because absolutely the vast majority of Americans today equate the pharmaceutical industry medicines with bad things and yet we need them. And this is tremendously important. So as I look at this and I think about how to use your woods. Existential Israeli is it is existential. You have a moment with the populace is frustrated with us that allows politicians to use this moment to actually gain advantage and in this year particularly as we go into very rancourous discussion around the presidency. Ann Elections this is a moment where you have various parties using any any possibility to gain additional votes to beat on this industry. And we've given that on a plate. We HAVE NOT. We have abrogated link that we have with patients and our primary focus on innovation. And rather we've allowed the population to think about us. Only in terms of prices opposed to what value? We've helped them and the fact that we see budgeting costs every year of all drugs. This is not acceptable. None of accepted. But I'd I'd go one step further. This is not on my shoulders. This is on the shoulders of everybody in the industry and Buddying. This industry absolutely everybody. In this industry everybody has a responsibility to take action. Everybody has to look in the mirror and realistically say Guys Gals. What did we do here? How did we lose the trust of so many people in the population and allow that to now color? What is by far the most important and fundamental factor now industry? Which is the delivery of medicine to patients? You gotta go back to basic questions or who are we. What do we do? Why do we do it? I look I one hundred percent. That's exactly right you have to. What is the purpose of this industry? I liked to say when you look at a company if that company vanished. What difference would it be? Well if our industry vanished. Well where would we be? What would the future of mankind looked like? This is what's really important. We can't allow that to be that so-called if I can use a genetic expression the delete experiment to happen but some politicians unless we actually explained teach them that delete possibility is real. It is a very real possibility if you just look at the two parties in the United States who are at war at the moment You have Medicare for all proposal a single payer system which would clearly bring Thomas crews bring it would it would bring price controls and that would dry up investment by alert. Everyone agrees now. If you go to something like a call Medicare for all who wanted. I mean he's still gonNA have a colossal powerful buyer that will become more and more powerful over time in all likelihood plus the consolidation of large private. Insurers as you alluded to in your talk earlier today you could live under a world of monopoly. Like an Amazon has imposed deflationary economics. You Know Walmart Costco. All these like giant Colossus that dry over the economy pharmaceuticals hasn't hits live under such. Aw owners terms. Those are a couple of different options under the Democrats and Republicans are talking about indexing to international prices which would in effect have pretty similar kind of effect. I don't know who's going to save the industry from this kind of fate of being reduced to surplus so I think the factors note is GonNa save us except ourselves. This is a moment where every single individual in the industry needs to know that they actually do have power. They do the authority they do speak with a passion and they have a right to say what they need to say and say loudly but he has his kiss thing there are ill conceived notions like I P I where you're trying to compare the pricing in Turkey with the pricing in Minnesota. I can't imagine for a minute that any sensible politician can allow something like that to happen. It just simply something which is incredibly difficult to conceive of the complexities of the one party states. The one bias states in Europe. Do not compare to what we have here. If you however having said that we've also allowed something to grow up and that is the intermediaries between the innovators the companies large and small. Find new medicines and the patient so we have the WHO are not adding incremental value. They'd taken added slice. You only have to look at the price of The net to gross and we keep on talking about net to gross. This is absurd net to gross on automobile net. Kenna somebody imagine a net to gross of an automobile. Let's get down to that. Would you every year? Cnn increment in price. Let's say let's take an importer drug an import a drug. This'll be called. It's called it. A folks walking that folks log. Every year increases its price the same model the nineteen sixty six model every year to now. Increase it by five percent and oh by the way. The vaas bulk of that five percent price increase goes into the pockets of somebody else. Besides the manufacturer of the folks right we conceive of that. It's it's dysfunctional. It makes us. It makes no sense and it's hard case to make people don't understand this. They just know that they're paying more and they're not getting more. That's the prices are going up in our overall health as a society or using individual stock. Getting better that is correct worse yet by doing this when they go to the pharmacy to decide. What is the medicine that they should choose? And should they pay out of their pocket? Full that mets in which they desperately need all should they consider saving that money to buy something a new automobile or buying dinner or something like that. Can THEY AFFORD IT? The whole concept of being able to afford your medicine that will prolong and make your life. Productive goes away. That dialogue is critical. And we need to take a really concerted efforts to reduce the cost of out of pocket. We have to look with obscenity. We have patients rationing their insulin. Is We have cancer patients and their families going bankrupt. We have just ordinary medicines being with no additional innovation being priced at nine ten percent increases every six months so in paying just so much more in its permanent patents. Pretty much on a lot of biologics that have been have been doing this for twenty years and I thought the patents would expire on some of these pioneering medicines of the nineteen nineties. They're still there making billions and billions of dollars. Biosimilars not coming along. I mean people have their upset and rightfully saal in many many cases. And what that that moment that time when you that anger bubbles up obscured something really fundamental? It's what is happening right now in the industry is that you have all of these new curative medicines coming up and instead of having the debate which is okay which is important. How do we afford to pay for those medicines and bring the value that they bring and cure the disease that we cure? We're having the debate to that. That's too expensive. That is not the right debate. But it's colored by this history of some of these drugs going on forever and never never others having price rises every year where there's no incremental value and that's not helpful and this as you say it's the best of times and worst of times. The best is that the science has never been better. We've got the cell therapy's gene therapies all kinds of under underpinning information about the biology. It's never been better understood. Rare diseases are suddenly. That had no option before looking more tractable. We're looking at hundreds of thousands of dollars or a million dollar price tags. But we don't in the system as you say that that can logically look at how much we really ought to pay and get to sell kind of fair price that rewards the innovator but also ensures maximum access. It's a balance we've got a strike and we're not. We're doing a terrible job of its lucrative. It's not a good job at the moment. We're we're constantly battling and the wrong question there are. It doesn't matter whether you're a small company or allowed or a big company they both basically. Today it's one industry effectively but the array of medicines that each of these different parties brings to the table often differs so the question is how can we get a politicians to understand that across this array of different companies there is an enormous amount of value being generated and that that values critical actually? I would argue. It's critical to democracy. You can't have a population which is democratic in awful more than not getting the medicines they need. That's just doesn't make sense so with regard to the perpetual franchises. Look we need to actually take a couple of things we have to congratulate the FDA? I think it's really important. We do that because they have made steps to facilitate changes that have been critical however in the past systems. We really need to tackle that frontally. They are not letting the introduction of many of these new biologics that are out there. And there are there if we do not solve for the biologics. Now we face something even more important as time goes on the biologics that you've seen in I've seen for the last twenty years did not become biosimilars. Are going to laying the groundwork for what's GonNa Happen. When we have gene therapies. What's going to happen? We have carty therapies. What will happen? When the second and third generation new biologics come on and now patents expire Ernie million dollar drugs we. We need to tackle and understand how we'll deal with us at this time because if we don't we just possible down. The anger will grow and indeed. The industry won't be able to show its true value to the society so I would appeal to those who really developing these incredible medicines to really think about that because if we don't every sector of society will defected and I can assure you the cures that are possible today in cancer would never be at. We have faced the and the cures. That should be present..

United States chairman Jeremy Levin Luke Biotechnology Innovation Organ Biotech Co South Africa Chairman Georgia NIH Northern Cape Europe Costco FDA cancer Amazon Bata Kenna
"levin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

08:53 min | 9 months ago

"levin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Like this is a point that people like James Wallner Megan and others but if people wanted to disrupt Congress so that you know Michael Bennett and Mitt. Romney just came out with a very good. I think Basic income for children. BILL IS A. It is a bipartisan. Tax Bill that is the first like really good piece of bipartisan legislation. I've seen in a minute and the two of them have plenty of possibilities for leverage. Like if they wanted to force a vote on that bill all I expect they will not. I think it has great with it. I do not want them on. The microscope is here. They are doing something good. But there's a lot of things that come up like that where I look could I think well. Why don't you just force it? I mean we saw how few members of the House it took to basically forced John Bainer out of the speakership. You did not need more than a couple dozen tea. partiers has to keep calling the question on him and their ways to do Discharge petitions and other things. There's a lot of going along to get along in Congress. The amount of time members of Congress spend complaining about raising money will they could change it. they could change that works and they don't in part because they benefit from some of it in part because they're worried about what will happen if they stat align but it is like it is very hard listening to them to at least hold my belief in members of Congress individual actors because they end end up they sound like individuals when you talk to them and then they act like automatons when they turn away from you the expressions of party enforces. And maybe I've just over absorbed that lesson. That's why my book is so much about institutional forces as shakedown individual decision-making but it's just made me very pessimistic. Like nothing will make you more optimistic about the possibility ability for change the talking to some members of Congress about how much they hate how things are and then nothing will make you less optimistic about it. A seeing what happens after you walk away from that conversation. Well I I think I would temper that a little bit with with some patience and some history I I worked on Capitol Hill in the late. Nineteen nineties which in some ways was completely different world One of the striking things to me about members now is actually just how few of them were. There are thin and have seen any form of Congress other than this one so that the point you make which I think is right that they could change. It is not actually obvious to them a lot of the time I think genuinely isn't the idea so part of what I've been doing with a small group of people with members on the right is talking to them lately about nineteen forty six reforms of the House and Senate which were very dramatic fundamental reforms of the committee system of the budget process basically intended to rebalance the relationship between Congress and the president were Congress got tired of just being pushed around by by strong presidents and the members at that point. Just did that because they could and you could do it now. You could change the budget process now very easily you could. You could recreate it from scratch. Various Union majorities. But but the the idea that you even could is not top of mind. For a lot of members I think they take the present the status quo to be the default and therefore to be the only imaginable way for this institution to work and they try to work within those boundaries. The idea that institutional reform is possible. The idea that it's possible by simple majority votes is not an obvious fact to these folks and I think that's part of the of the Of of the dynamic that you describe it's also the case that these things take time. I think you have to be dissatisfied for a long time before you really take action and you have to be dissatisfied through some series of changes particularly changes in leadership in Congress leadership has been pretty stable in Congress for a while unusually so and so I I. Don't I think that we've seen for example. What the next generation of Republican leadership in the Senate could involve if you think about the members who that leadership might consist of who are now now in their forties say? There are a lot of Republican senators in their forties. Early Fifties Those people are very dissatisfied with this situation. They're generally I'm really aware of some of the dynamics. Enforces it. We're talking about and they might be inclined to do things differently. I I think there are some people with that kind of mindset among Democrats to and the dissatisfaction is just something to work with. So I you know I think change takes time but that time can't just be spent waiting. It has to be spent filling the space with the premise premise. That change is possible. And that's that's part of what I'm trying to do here. There is an optimistic point that all agree with which is if I'm trying to see how things things are different. It isn't because I think that you can just draw linear line from what's going on right now to everything being a lot better it is. I think a lot of changes generational racial that things that seemed to be slow efforts of persuasion actually really aren't there cohort replacement and the next cohort. Billy something very different or grew up in something very different and I think you see it among young people on the left. I think you see it at different ways among people on the right. I think you're right that a lot of pretty younger members of the right in the Senate are clearly coming out of a very different milieu. And I think that's true among young members of the left in the house So there is something that is clearly going to be different front when these groups take more power Whether it'd be different for better or worse I think we're GonNa have to see That that's the other inside but it could change. That is a very very very important dynamic in our politics right now you know. Donald Trump was born in June of Nineteen forty-six George W Bush was born in July of nineteen forty six wchs and Bill Clinton's born August of nineteen forty six and a lot of the people who are in power in our politics were born within a few months a few years of that very peculiar moment in American history. The older baby boomers have exercised a lot of power for a long time and they Zeh have certain views of things. Certain expectations certain default assumptions. We should not underestimate the significance of generational change In our politics and the on the right as you say it's very very evident among members of Congress in general but especially in the Senate where there is a generation that is just not not as much in awe of Reaganism as the boomers are and it thinks differently about the circumstances of the country then in some ways is a lot more at home in twenty first century America than than the president and the Fox News viewer. The median age will Fox News viewers less Jewish sixty eight. The median age. So I I think there is a very very important generational factor. Here that will make a difference. A- It's impossible for me at least say exactly how but I think we shouldn't assumes as you say a straight line gets a good place to come to a close so let me ask you. It's all it's our closing question. which is what if your books? You've read the recommended. The audience well inclination is to go for classics I'm not entirely sure that these aren't exactly the same three books that I recommended. Last time I was on a few years ago It would be neat if they are actually but I I would say everybody needs to read democracy. Democracy in America Alexis de Tocqueville's very famous and familiar classic which is probably less familiar than people. Imagine and full of a lot of wisdom about are kind of situation are kind of time time A second book recommend is called. The quest for community was written by a A mid twentieth century sociologist who who Made an argument that we now would associate with their own time. And that we now think wouldn't actually been true in the fifty zero to nine hundred fifty three And makes the case about the importance of community in a free society in an individualistic society. That is just enormously league consequential and relevant to our time now my my book. My new book is full of quotes from Robert and his. But this the author of the quest for community because Whoa it's impossible to read that book and not think that it is about twenty first century America that was born nineteen fifty-three written nineteen fifty-three very highly recommended. The third is probably the book that shaped me. Most as I started to think about politics in my late teens early twenties. And that's a book by George or Jeff Wilpon. Cold Statecraft is so craft A book that is really about the ways in which politics is unavoidably formative and it seeing that can help you make sense of some very complicated social and political questions An enormously important book to me a short book made of basically what we're a few lectures and again very highly recommended. You've all Evan. Thank you very much. Thank you thank you all for being here. Those a lot of fun. I hope you all enjoyed it. His book again is a time to build. Thank you for being here again. My book is why were polarized. You should preorder if you haven't already. You should check out the tour dates if you.

Congress Senate America president George W Bush Romney James Wallner Megan Union Bill Clinton Donald Trump Fox News Michael Bennett John Bainer Evan Mitt Billy
"levin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

12:38 min | 9 months ago

"levin" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Super delegates can only act on the second ballot. And so to me. That what that shows you is it. Even if parties wanted to intervene. They don't have the Public Authority the legitimacy to intervene. I think it's understood that what happened. There isn't that the super delegates really got weakened it's at the party's already so weak. The super delegates couldn't even be used at least not on a first ballot way that people would feel took something being away from them. And so there's this way in which you like have a circular problem of the institutions. Need more trust to be able to make the decisions decisions that at least in this analysis would allow them to be more trusted but by not having a trust. They don't really have a shot at making those decisions. I think that's true up to a point. The parties you know the parties aren't public institutions. They they don't need everybody's descent to make these kinds of changes and the parties have incredible leverage that they don't use their barely aware of each of of our two parties. Owns a banner that gives its possessor the right to forty five percent of the vote in the presidential race. Just being the Republican candidate. It means you've started forty five percent on election day. That is a huge source of power and leverage and it is also a huge source of a it ought to be an object of responsibility. The Republican Party should have been much more concerned about the fact that it held in. Its hands forty five percent of the vote on election day and should have thought about what that meant required of it. In the process of nominating presidential candidate there was a massive collective action problem in two thousand sixteen where there were people people the entire time all the way through standing on the side screaming. Welcome do about this. We've got to stop this. And those were the people who would have had to do something about it. And they understood understood themselves as outsiders rather than insiders and I think this is another way of describing the same problem. A lot of people in our institutions want to behave as they're outsiders without power rather than acting like insiders with responsibility. This is what I mean. When you see? President Trump tweeting complaining about the Department of Justice. This is the reaction we all should have as well. The Department of Justice works for you. You should resolve this with a phone call and not stand outside as if you're a commentator. Maybe it's a good thing that he doesn't doesn't seem to know that or be capable of doing that. But Donald Trump wants to be outside or that's the source of his power. A lot of members of Congress want to behave like outsiders and and I think the people who have some power parties also wanted to see themselves as outsiders commenting on events rather than take themselves to be the people with responsibility to actually stand up and do something I think they have more power than they think. It's not that it would have been easy. It's not the Ruben simple and they're certainly would have been real challenges of legitimacy in anything that they tried to do to take some control of the nominating process back. But what really are these two parties if they're just platforms forums for people to see who can gain the most attention and get the most Free Press and by that get access to forty five percent of the vote. I don't think it makes any sense for the Republican or Democratic parties to understand their roles this way they have a real responsibility in him but that that exactly is it I mean maybe this is where I am. mm-hmm somehow conservative pessimistic and away. But that I think you just described to a large extent with the parties are have become. I think a theme here and you mentioned that you you take on directly in the book is the role of transparency. And something that I would say. I've made this arguments in the in in our conversation. But the the the way transparencies move is simply ideological phenomenon but a technological one. Yes we keep building technologies make things more transparent that once you had television cameras was it was only a matter of time before they came into Congress once you had the Internet and social media in particular. It's only a matter of time before everybody moves onto that and all the politicians are there and you know Donald Trump I think I don't think twitter is exactly why he won but he wins without twitter. I think he needed that. Sort of alternative communications medium to to control all the traditional media and the way he was able to do and so I think that was one of the places where I had the most trouble imagining how we implement some of the approaches in your book because I think the technology is sort of only going one way. It's only going towards more information. Delivered faster. And in Evermore Vivid constructions instructions such at everything just becomes more and more transparent. But you know as you say that our institutions Nestle worse than they are but you can really see the ways in which they maybe. We're always bad. And then they become worse than they were. I think this is too fatalistic We're we're not simply at the mercy of these technologies their new and so we. We are not television but some of them are new and we're learning to live with them and over time we learn to live with them in ways that are gradually more constructive to I so I it seems to me that we can't simply say well. The technology is there and so this is going to happen. We have to ask ourselves. What should the rules be? And what should ormsby. And how should we behave given that this technology is here. One example using the book is too I in thinking about journalism in particular is to look at the political critical journalism of the early Republican America. which was a lot like in some ways? A Lot. Like twenty-first-century American political life. Where again there was there? Were very low. Oh barriers to entry to journalism. Basically anybody could could sort of start a A A newspaper in one of our major cities at the beginning of the American republic public. You see partisan newspapers pop up basically convey partisan news and make the case that the one party or the other one had made. It was very very hard to tell what to trust. And what was really going on conspiracy theories I mean. We think it's bad now. It was much worse. It in in the late eighteenth early nineteenth century in in American politics the kinds of things that were said and widely believed about what was happening in our politics and over time American political journalism actually did change in ways that that pushed against this some that professionalized some And that mediated some. It didn't change entirely highly. And these problems in go away but they became less bad and I do think that it's possible for us to think about ways that that might happen again because in part I think there is a market for that and in any case there's a need for it and so it's incumbent upon us to try to find ways to use these technologies more responsibly. There's nothing inevitable about our politics. Drifting onto twitter in the way that it has it's entirely imaginable that it could sort of drift back out of it because a a lot of people who spend all day on twitter basically don't like it and find it disgusting and despicable and you know there is a collective action problem but there's also there's such a thing as collective action and recognizing the nature of the problems. We face could help Assira way to again changing the balance. Not Fundamentally fundamentally transforming our way of life here but pushing back a little bit against the worst excesses that make our politics so intolerable just now uh I'm Jillian Weinberger. Who's the impact a podcast from? Vox about how powerful people affect the rest of this season. We're looking at the big ideas media from all the people running for president. In twenty twenty hit this opioid crisis had on public option. move away from energy efficiency. And it's GONNA v Great Wall and it's going to work. A lot of those ideas have actually been tried before like that. Wall trump wants to build the gallows Zona has had one on its border for decades. I don't understand why individual people have a right to have a fence and yet the country can't Senator Warren's proposal to end the OPIOID crisis it's based on what we did to fight the AIDS epidemic. We would like to name it the Ryan White Care Act and the green new deal. Germany tried something similar in two thousand. This solution this season on the impact. We have those stories. How the big? The ideas from twenty twenty candidates worked or didn't work and other places or at other times. These are the stories that will help us understand what might happen if these proposals get rolled out here in the next four years. Subscribe to the impact on Apple. PODCAST or your favorite podcast APP to get new. Oh episodes now so give me some of the More optimistic version of where things go from. Here tell me a story that for you leads to. I don't WANNA say like Utopia but some level of institutional renewal like what are some decisions that get made or policies to get past that lead to some of this getting sort of back on a better track right so there's no utopia conservative. There's not even optimism. There's hope I am hopeful. And the difference between hoping optimism is it. I don't just expect things will turn better but I think they could could with some effort and at the center of that from my point of view is what I take to be the great on asked question in our public life now. The question is given my role here. How should I behave given that? Iam say a journalist or politician Or the principal of the school title or a a a military officer just or parent A member of the PTA. Given that. What should I do in this situation? That's a question that I bet at the people who you most respect in your life seemed to ask that question at moments of decision and the people who drive you crazy in American life now seem like they never never asked that question and everything they do makes it clear that they didn't ask that question. I I think each of us can start by asking that question because each of us has some role in some institution and we find ourselves in places where there's an easy way but there's also responsible way and we could do a little bit better at pursuing pursuing the responsible way that's one cheesy way to start there also institutional reforms that could make a real difference. We've talked about some of that. We've talked about Congress for example title. I find that members of Congress. I spent a lot of time with Republican members of Congress in particular. I wouldn't say recommend that to anybody but it is. It's certainly a way learn a lot about what's happening in our institutions now and members of Congress are not happy with the status quo. They are I think open to persuasion about how things might change inch now. They're under some very intense incentives and pressures but I think there is a way to think about how to change congress in ways that would make it more tolerable enjoyable to its own members and that would make the work of legislation which is fundamentally a work of compromise and accommodation A little bit more appealing and I also think there is a significant portion of the electorate. That would find that more appealing so that there ought to be ways around some of the incentives that they confront. These are all going to be small all steps. I don't think that there's a there's version of this story that looks like a social revolution. And maybe that's because I am a conservative but it seems to me also because of the nature of the problems we face these. These needs to be small incremental steps that arise out of the realization that there is a problem here at the heart of the problem is irresponsibility and and the solution dear responsibility is responsibility and not exercise by other people. But by you and me and everybody else And and that's that means that solutions will be hard but it also is a reason for hope because it means that we don't have to persuade everybody before anything can happen. We can persuade persuade people one by one. And that's the purpose of a book like this I. It's funny I think Congress is is in some ways the best example here I spent a Lotta time with members of Congress as well for my sins wins and I came to believe over time it was one of the worst ways of learning about Congress that you you learn a lot but mostly learn rationalization and what I would here and you and I have had this conversation before but I'll listen to these members of Congress and I will think well okay. Why don't you change this job? You hate so much. If you don't like how any of it works like why not do it differently It would not be that difficult for ad-hoc had hawk coalitions in the House and Senate to bring bills to the floor..

Congress twitter President Trump Republican Party Public Authority Donald Trump Evermore Vivid Department of Justice Free Press Ruben Apple Jillian Weinberger Germany Assira president Senator Warren
"levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"We've got the whole series on transgender. We're doing a little we're doing a little podcast series of famous transgender vigil. You have to go over there. And check it out. See what that's all about. And we of course, had the opium series where the entire history of opium is reviewed throughout human history, including how we got into our last opium epidemic in. But we did about him what we did wrong. And how we got into this mess. We're in presently course, you live is there hashtag and this life and weekly infusions. Whereas some of the opium series interviews can be found in also drafted are. Today. Like to welcome Laura rose Levin. She is the founder of the missing piece interferring Zion, which we're gonna talk about neural feedback today and missing pieces not like a piece of pie. It's like peace. Peace sign. Yeah. Peace of mind PAC. You can check out the website missing in my SIM g peace like like peace sign like, no war foreing Zion. It's the number four. Not deaf are and you can also follow doctor Levin Levin. Say Lavigne at at Rhodes Levin. Arose is our H O D E S and neuro vile feedbacks what I want to talk about today and all of its various application. So thank you for coming in. My how'd you get into using this madelli? You know, I was teaching meditation at treatment centers drug, alcohol, abuse centers, and one of them said we like you. We really want you to learn neuro feedback. And I said, okay, sure. And I really could not believe what a game changer. It was it's it's really what was the first step leading to my center. I went out on my own doing neuro feedback for people and. It's works. Well, I call it the men in black because it's been around for about sixty years sixty jeez. Yeah. But big pharma not a fan. They want people on meds. But NASA uses it, we'll tell you. No. No. No, no. Because I was around when we were using it for all kinds of things it's insurance companies that are not a fan we used to.

opium Levin Levin Laura rose Levin Rhodes Levin founder NASA Lavigne H O D E S sixty years
"levin" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"levin" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Levin. Because ZipRecruiter, the smartest way to hire. How much time do I have rich? Ladies and gentlemen. Let me tell you something, and I make it into this a little bit more tomorrow, depending on what's cooking. We're a fight here. We're in a campaign on this Amazon site. You need to understand the New York Times puts out its bestseller list. The New York Times does not want me to be number one on their bestseller list. When my book is released in may. They don't want me to be number one because they don't like me. We've been number one five times in a row, you wanna know why? Because of you. But here's what I want to tell you. It's not enough for me. And you with one of my books to beat the competition by three by a few thousand books as I have to win by like twenty thousand book sales or they ding me. That'll be especially true in a book called unfreedom the press. You get my point. Where I have an entire chapter on the New York Times called the New York Times betrays millions. Now, do you think the New York Times book review page, and those who are cloistered in the shadows? At the New York Times what my book number one on the New York Times bestseller list. The answer's no. And they're going to do everything they can to make sure that that doesn't happen. They're gonna keep pushing Michelle Obama Michelle Obama, Michelle Obama, they're pushing now maybe they'll push Howard Stern. I don't know what they'll push. I'm counting on you. The same people who voted me into the radio hall of fame the same people who come to the airwaves every single night. Whether it's my podcasts, whether we're on satellite weather on AM FM, whether it's on the Mark Levin app, or I heart radio app, or whether you're listening to streaming on the computer, you're gonna make the difference. It's almost like a campaign. Unfortunately. They want Michelle Obama to win. I got it. They want the book on the supermarket to win. I got that too. This is a very very important book. Not because I wrote it because it's very important confronts. It addresses the issue of freedom of the press, and what's happening in this country, right before your eyes. It is a propitious thing that this book is coming out. Now, it wasn't playing that way. I've spent a year on it. And it exposes them their history their conduct their ideology. Not what you hear every day or see on TV or radio every.

Michelle Obama Michelle Obama The New York Times Howard Stern Mark Levin Amazon Levin.
"levin" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"levin" Discussed on WJR 760

"Levin. Establishments worst nightmare, Mark Levin. Call in now, eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. Welcome back. It is the marklevinshow. Ben Ferguson, filling in for the great one tonight. A judge has ordered the pole dancing stripper stormy Daniels. Do oh I forgot. She's a porn star to to pay nearly three hundred thousand dollars to Donald Trump and attorney fees insert your refund from porn star joke right now. Go ahead. You can do it. Also want to give you a quick update q dead in that shooting in the French city of Strasbourg police say the shooter has not been caught yet. They just gave us an update on this police said that the armed person entered the Christmas market around eight o'clock heading towards where the shops were the suspect then opened fire police said police said they have identified that shooter. Who unfortunately at this point still remains at large what we know is six people suffered life threatening injuries. Six others suffered minor injuries. And as I said at least two people are dead. The suspected gunman was injured they say during an anti terror operation. The suspect is a twenty nine year old man that the French network has known about the suspected gunman was also under government surveillance, and they have a file on him. The annex spent an extensive file on him the group that was monitoring them as a French terror slash radicalization. Watch lists that he was on and includes thousands of people some of you are under active surveillance main. They they are actually on law enforcement radar. They are confirming that so this looks like this is a direct connection to terrorism. We'll keep you updated on that throughout the evening as well. All right. I want I just.

Daniels Mark Levin Ben Ferguson Donald Trump Strasbourg Levin. attorney three hundred thousand dollars twenty nine year
"levin" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"levin" Discussed on KTRH

"Levin. Mark Levin radio show. I was just thinking during the break. I mean, if you listen to the propaganda over the last several months in this election. The governor elect to Florida was a racist to Santa's the governor elect of Georgia's racist camp. I believe the Senator elect who's the current Senator in Mississippi. She's a white supremacist. And so basically any conservative any Republican? Is a racist. They white supremacist unless they're of the John casick. Ben sasse. Flake variety, which is why they are the way they are. And they kowtow to the left. And of course, Trump forgot Bernie Sanders gives it up when it comes to climate change what they're really up to not that you need him to tell you. But it underscores it cut six go. You know, what the intergovernmental panel on climate change said that if we don't get back together within twelve years, not a long period of time is going to be irreparable harm to this fire. So the point is the American people have got to stand up and say that for the sake of their children and their grandchildren. We have got to have to take on the greed of the fossil fuel in. There you go. The greed the prophets at the fossil fuel industry and give it to government. Ladies and gentlemen, how many more failed human experiments in socialism and Marxism? Do we really need? And when you point to them they point somewhere else. Air look over there over there. The problem is you can't contain this stuff. Look what's going on in Venezuela. Local it goes on and Cuba. Look, what goes on in these major societies, you know. Our country and liberty. It's not guaranteed to survive in perpetuity. It's not. It requires a virtuous people and virtuous politicians. This is not a virtuous politician. He's a carnival Barker. And yet he's given the platform even though he's kind of a freak politically. Oh, I should change that he was kind of a freak politically. But more more the democrat party is moving in his direction. And so what he wants to do all these decades, we talked about energy independence. We need energy independence and through American know-how, including two fossil fuel companies. That's right. I'll say it all companies. We finally reached that point. It's great for our economy. It's great for a national security, excuse me. But it's not good enough. Now, we have to destroy it off the work walk around with a battery warming socks and propellers on our head. You know, when Bernie Sanders campaigns that way, I'll think about it. But I don't I don't think he he has that intention Bob, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, great WTI cue. Go. All right, Mark, thanks for taking my call. And this is kind of on a last topic not so much on the environmental issues, but I'm reading a book by David McCullough. Which is about eighteen years old already two thousand one I believe about about John Adams. And I've I've just noticed a correlation that, you know, a lot of people think that this is all new if the parties can't get along and everything else and all the while in animus was serving Jefferson was accused of being a monarchist. And while he was dealing with France at the same time goes way back, but I just noticed a correlation. Dad, I'll tell you the difference. I'll tell you the difference. The left because of all these decades now of being on more from the constitution wants to use government to devour, the civil society Jefferson and Adams had very serious disagreements, but fundamentally they embrace the same principles. That's not the case today. You agree. It's different. I do agree. It's very different today. We have people who really want to transmute or transform this country into something that is that is quite diabolical..

Bernie Sanders Levin. Mark Levin Senator John Adams Jefferson Ben sasse John casick democrat party Florida David McCullough Mississippi Santa Georgia Venezuela Cuba France Trump Wisconsin
"levin" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"levin" Discussed on WRVA

"Levin radio show. Mark levin. Now, let's think about something as rational people. Let's stipulate that three thousand people perished. Last year as a result of those hurricanes in Puerto Rico. How is it? Donald Trump's fought. See the arguments seems to be that FEMA didn't act quickly enough or the weren't enough resources. Well, how do we know? How do we know? People weren't swept away in their cars are swept away out of their homes. When the hurricanes hit the ocean waters. Rose. How do we know people didn't die because from from the roofs caving in their homes. Do we know how many of those people perished as a result of a lack of clothing or water or food or shelter? Or medical attention. Because that's basically what FEMA does. We have no idea in each case. How any of these poor souls perished? There's no study on that. Then I'm aware of they point to this study. And well, I mean the study says it's approximately three thousand okay? It's a horrible number. So horrible disaster. But I am asking. How is it? Donald Trump's fall. Exactly, what was it that had to be done that wasn't done. We don't know. We don't have any idea. I seriously doubt the vast majority of those people perished because of a lack of FEMA resources. I suspect most of those people perished early on. When the Broncos hurricanes slammed into that island. But the media don't help us discern anything. It's a mud fight. In the middle of another hurricane. Now, the president didn't trigger this fight the Democrats and the media one in the same. They triggered the fight. They trade the fight because they're trying to destroy this guy. They do it all the time. No matter what occurs. Braga. Obama was never blending for damn thing. All they say, you see the Republicans don't agree that there's climate change. And these hurricanes wouldn't be happening in these lives wouldn't die and everybody nods their head up and down over Google and everywhere. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. That's right. Which is insane. Absolutely insane. Katrina happens a New Orleans and President Bush is blamed playing for what? He wasn't managing that city for thirty years. Funneling money where money shouldn't have been funneled. And people perished it was horrible. But how was that George Bush's fault? Well, they didn't react fast enough. They are active pretty fast. I don't believe we've ever seen anything like that. First of all female is not the first responder responder. If you're going to blame politicians, which is awful enough, quite frankly, then why wouldn't you be blaming the local mayors her on the ground? Why wouldn't you be blaming the governor? Why wouldn't you be blaming those people? Since it is they who live there every single day. Since it is they who raise the taxes to pay for local municipal. Infrastructure and so forth. Why wouldn't they be the ones you're blaming? If you have to find somebody to blame. How is it? The president's responsibility for what took place in Puerto Rico. He didn't run the public electric utility. It didn't run the water system. He wasn't in charge of the bridges and the roads structure, he wasn't in charge of their various floodwalls and so forth in Puerto Rico. And yet it's on him. All day long all day long. And then. Having triggered this kind of a truly poisonous debate truly awful debate in the middle of a hurricane. Then the people who trigger it. Claim the target of their venom the president of the United States for being unpresidential. He's supposed to be like, George W Bush, just accept whatever they dish out. But he's not George W Bush, and he's not going to just accept whether he gets his numbers, right or whether he gets his numbers wrong. The fact of the matter is this three thousand number is very troubling to me. Not only and especially because of all the the human beings who perished, but that's not why these politicians are using that number. They want you to believe that Donald Trump was lazy and incompetent. And as a result of that three thousand people died in Puerto Rico ipso facto he's a racist because he doesn't care about Puerto Ricans. This is what they're saying today. Which is crazy. And yet we hear it on CNN. We hear it on MSNBC. We read it in the newspapers. And it goes on and on and on is if it's news, which is not. I don't know what to do about this. I really don't know what to do about this. It is a it is a sad fact that in the not so distant past, but we had these natural disasters or manmade disasters the nation United around the president the United States, whether he could do something about it in the short term or not. But we have a media the media that come between the nation that is the people and the president. They come between the people in the president. And then try to tell us what's taken place. And try to assign blame. And are ideologically driven. This is why none of them will come on this program because I expose them day in and day out for who they are. And what they do. They see coming tragedy like this. And they're managing editors. And there are other editors and the reporters so-called are all excited. They're getting ready for what? To blame the president. Or if you don't accept the ideology climate change. It's on your hands. This is why so many people buckled of this stuff folks, including Republicans. We have a NASA administrator. Now Breitenstein remember, Mr. producer used to come on the show, so solid conservative frat, Oklahoma. We endorsed a minutes. First race. Very nice man combat pilot. He can't say it enough. Now climate change is man made climate change is manmade climate because they beat them down and beaten them down. And now embraces it. This is the nature progressivism. This is the nature of Alinsky is..

president Puerto Rico Donald Trump FEMA George W Bush Mark levin United States Broncos Obama Google Puerto Ricans Oklahoma Rose MSNBC Braga CNN NASA administrator New Orleans
"levin" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"levin" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Levin i'm louis vuitton in yeah wild ninety four nine number one hit he's station okay sean known amazing i don't don't mesa okay okay yeah just me okay coming back with nine i know doing on ninety four nine music the base station.

Levin
"levin" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"levin" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Levin i'm louis vuitton four was wrong poli was last now now two so let me in okay when we come oh man knowing that i that i love go love one ten nah beats me ed i just didn't know.

Levin