31 Burst results for "Leuven"

Fresh update on "leuven" discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:00 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "leuven" discussed on Security Now

"Was vulnerable to the crack exploit That's the key reinstallation attack. That was discovered three years ago in twenty seventeen. So these devices don't have up-to-date wifi stacks. Imagine that on the other hand. Why would they of course. The crack attack opens any attached network to intrusion by allowing the networks wpa wpa two encryption to be cracked without much effort. Given you know state of the art cracking tools so of course again none of this comes as any great surprise. But i think it's nice to examine some specifics from time to time because it's too easy to sort of wave off generalities the advice of course if you wanna buy a smart doorbell there is x. I would say very good reason especially smart doorbell. You got a video camera right in. Ain't that anybody monitoring it can see what's going on out of your front door can see when you all leave. The house can see when you come in can watch what's going on around you anyway. It's i i would argue. There's very good reason to stick with major brands. You're going to pay more. But i mean you have to care about security and you mean unless you take personal responsibility for what one of these devices does you have. You have to isolated on. Its own network and i would argue by for a major brand even if there's a problem and and you know we know these things are going to have problems. The problems will make the headlines. The vulnerabilities will be found and cured responsibly. And promptly as opposed to absolutely never so anyway. I just thought it neat that these guys took the time to just sort of say. Let's take a look at these doorbells and see what they're doing and yet to know surprise now the good news on the most recent of three tesla key fob hacks is that it's not easy to do But it also shows that even well designed devices can get hacked As tesla found out for the third time from this one researcher we've spoken of him before. Leonard routers W o u t. E r s. He's a phd student at the computer security and industrial cryptography group at the catholic university of leuven. That's k. u. leuven Had we've covered a bunch of the work coming out of their located. in belgium..

Leonard Routers Tesla Catholic University Of Leuven Leuven Belgium
Been Caught Stealing

Your Brain on Facts

04:40 min | 2 months ago

Been Caught Stealing

"Thankful faults jewelry and fine art. Maybe a casino carefully organized plans by people dressed in black turtlenecks with lots of cool gadgets close calls. What we remember as the daring heist of one of the world's most famous paintings. was really neither of those things. The heist wasn't particularly daring and the theft of Leonardo DAVINCI's Mona Lisa. Wasn't even noticed until well after it had happened. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. These days the Mona Lisa also called in Italy login Kanda and her famous enigmatic smile hang in a prominent place in the Louvre in Paris. It holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in History at one, hundred, million dollars in nineteen, sixty two. So. That would be about eight hundred million dollars today. Over six million people go to see it each year. It's so popular that you can't even snap a quick Selfie of it without having a few dozen other strangers, hands, and cell phones in the frame. This popularity certainly wasn't the case when the painting was I hung in the Leuven eighteen o four or for the century subsequent. Neither was popular with critics when the artistic elite who often relegated it to the low end of DAVINCI's work it was basically just another painting. It was so unsocial in fact that it took the better part of twenty four hours before staff even noticed the painting was missing in Nineteen. Eleven. A handyman named Vincenzo Perrugia was working in the museum and he simply waited in a closet until after the museum had closed. Tuck to the painting under his smock walked on out. He was unwittingly aided by a plumber also working in the museum who unlocked a for Peruta when he found himself stuck inside. The police were called and they searched the museum. The only sign they found the Japan Kanda was frame laying on a staircase. Though police did find some twenty one other paintings in the museum. The curator's had previously reported missing. The. Search went citywide then national then international. Ships were searched before they left France or after arriving in their port of call. A reward of over half a million dollars in today's money was offered. The Mona Lisa's picture was printed in newspapers all over the world. It became a of Mona Lisa Mania. The theft of this single painting served a spawn multiple criminal enterprises. People on the wrong side of the law knew that those with more money than morals would want to buy. LEGITIM- Kanda. A pair of confidence men from Belgium hired a small army of forgers to make quality fakes, which they then sold to select around the globe. They made sure their buyers were unlikely to ever meet and rested soundly knowing that no one would let on that they had purchased the most famous stolen painting in the world. Though today, one of them would probably take a selfie with it. The huge reward and the number of fakes in circulation meant the police were inundated with leads. For two years they searched tirelessly. But Fruitlessly The sixty man strong force even interviewed, Peruta Twice. But decided, he couldn't be the criminal mastermind they were looking for. Not only did those two years not yield the Mona Lisa the police didn't even find the forgeries. The head of the Paris police retired in shame. Did, peruse, you get an enormous payday for the stolen painting. People were soon to learn that he didn't steal it for money. When ferruccio approached museum in Florence to sell them the painting, the museum's director called the police instead. After. His arrest Russia's stated. I worked in the Louvre making frames for paintings stolen from Italy by France every day I pass login Kanda and swore I would return it to its rightful home. He seemed convinced he would be heralded as a hero. This was sadly not the case but the Italian courts were sympathetic giving him only a year in prison for the world famous theft. These days legit Kanda sits behind more bulletproof

Mona Lisa Kanda Theft Mona Lisa Mania Leonardo Davinci Legitim- Kanda Louvre Paris France Italy Vincenzo Perrugia Peruta Russia Japan Belgium Florence Ferruccio Director
"leuven" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"leuven" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"As we hear from K Y del Abuse Justin Judo for full abundance, the area's largest hunger relief organization, the Corona virus pandemic has forced them to do more with less, officials say, because of social distancing. They've had to accept fewer volunteers. And they've gotten less donations. What? There's more demand for their services. Obviously Cove it's kind of rock, the food bank and the safe in that system from the moment it hit in mid March, And so we've been seeing about up to a 60% increase in need across our nine counties service area. Samantha Mohr with Phil Abundance says part of their pandemic restructuring was pausing their food drives. We received about a million pounds of food and food drive donations annually. But now those drives are back in the nonprofit is encouraging people to go online and schedule a contactless drop off folks could come drop off. Food there and they don't even have to get out of the car right? Morse's in Leuven person food drives They've been hosting digital ones where people can donate money to specific food items, she adds. Those will continue. Justin you Tok y w News radio 6 55 Money news sponsored by Victory Bank. Optimism about treatments and vaccines for covert 19 sent stocks sharply higher. Dal Industrials game. 378. Yes, And he added 30 for the NASDAQ climbed 68. On the first day of school Zoom, flunked videoconferencing company suffered several hours of partial outages on the first day of school for students in many parts of the country, reports a service has since been restored. Cyber security provider. Palo Alto Networks is opening its checkbook with a deal to acquire the Crips, this group for $265 million Virginia based Crips. This is an incident response risk management and digital forensics consulting firm. Audible is rolling out.

Justin Judo Phil Abundance Palo Alto Networks Samantha Mohr Leuven Victory Bank Morse Virginia
"leuven" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:35 min | 3 months ago

"leuven" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Down to 70 for many in person food drives across the region, getting the thumbs up to restart after being forced to shut down for the last five months as we're from killing abuse, Justin Udo, a local nonprofit, says it couldn't come at a better time for full abundance, the area's largest hunger relief organization, the Corona virus pandemic has forced them to do more with less. Officials say, because of social distancing. They've had to accept fewer volunteers, and they've gotten less donations. What there's more demand for their services. Obviously Cove it kind of rocked the food bank and the safe in that system from the moment it hit in mid March, And so we've been seeing about up to a 60% increase in need across our nine county service area. Samantha ran more with Phil. Abundance says part of their pandemic restructuring was pausing their food drives. We received about a million pounds of food and food drive donations annually, But now those drives are back in the nonprofit is encouraging people. To go online and schedule a contactless drop off. Folks could come drop off. They're there, and they don't even have to get out of the car right? Morse's in Leuven person food drives they've been hosting digital ones where people can donate money to specific food items. She adds, Those will continue. Justin, you'd okay Y w news radio. It's the first day of class at colleges and universities all over the country today. Here in Philadelphia killed abuse Andrew Kramer. Not by temples campus to see how people feel about returning to school during a pandemic. Emily's a freshman here, a temple, her college journey begins with mostly online courses. I wanted the real experiences like I kind of wanted most my classes being person. Most of them aren't which is unfortunate, but I'm dealing with how do you feel being here? Do you feel pretty safe? Pretty good. I mean, everyone's being pretty safe wearing their mass and everything.

Justin Udo Phil Leuven Samantha Andrew Kramer Morse Emily Philadelphia
AI Changing the Workforce, Interview with Valerio De Stefano

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

07:17 min | 7 months ago

AI Changing the Workforce, Interview with Valerio De Stefano

"Hello and welcome to the AI today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen. I'm your host Ronald Schmeltzer. Our guest today is of Alario Distefano. Who is professor of labor law at Keio Leuven Hive Alario? Thank you so much for joining us on today. Thanks so much for the action thrilled to have you. Welcome Valerio and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell us a little bit about your background and your current role especially as it relates to artificial intelligence for so professor of Labor Law the University of love and in Belgium and before debts I was some Offi several stage National Labor Office. Which is a you and specialized agency that deals with everything that concerns labor and work there. I started working on technology. Impacts on labor may be working for a number of years about platform worth in the economies and he was the first time I started to reflect on automated management platforms. Vastly use technology to manage NBC. Fine Worse for instance. They allocate us in worksheets using. Gps and you. Software to constantly monitor work by collecting for instance customer reviews on cutting out of the Latham's workers debts on a meet. That very high on this that is required to be met are for taking screen shots of people that were aligned to show their clients that they are actually working so blaffer work as being used as a pilot for management by But management by algorithms is much broader than that so my interest come from the label sides and when we talk about and management and automation and occupy. It affects the workplace. Well we see that. A loss of the debate is about the wanting of jobs. How many jobs we'RE GONNA LOSE COMMISSION WE? They're all but still my competent job or not so much on the quality side of it's our technology is gonNA impact on my every day working life out not used to write my performance discipline my work so I think an researcher I am trying to fill these gaps. San One of the ways between these by editing a special issue of a journal Competitive Labor Law and policy are now that's east about automation artificial intelligence and labor protection and especially should we gather he contribution of many labor experts. Sociology economies lawyers investor relations specialists to investigate out technology. Easings reducing the workplace The facts our worke life beyond question all losing jobs. Yeah that was a really interesting insight. Thank you so much for your input on that you know. Some employers are having their employees use wearable tools that track emotions and stress by collecting data on heartbeats and the tone of voice for example. So you say that. Most of these practices should be urgently restricted because losing one's privacy especially their internal privacy mental privacy arguably threatens one of the core elements of being human. Can you explain to us why you say this? And what data. You may have to show how it can be misused so having a system the trucks your emotions and read your facial expressions or the tone of your voice is percents agreed invasion of our private sphere impersonality so basically when these options. I'm giving a data concern my most privates. In evening we will aspects the most private People of my life my thoughts my emotions and in some cases I might not even be much aware of these emotions of deceased themselves so basically managers know more about me they night about myself and these basically economic up on stress levels in general is generates huge information asymmetry now permission cement always being there at the workplace but he's really tilting the scale on the employer side. This is why. I think this should be restricted in a way because we are experiencing something that was completed America off in the past. The facts that employers manages can read my mind now so the question is not about Audi St that are be misuse. It is the very thing collection of the data. That should be called into question using us. His answer no in my mind better and faster than I women to share busy formation with other people percent abuse so we do not need data on specific issues is practice already are issues pursuing my. You know it's interesting because data is at the heart of AI and people have been freely giving away their data for many years in exchange for free services. And I think for a while we weren't even thinking about it we were just signing up giving away information leading different companies and systems and apps that we were using track us and didn't think twice about it but what happens when the workplaces start requiring employees to use these tools that collect data on them you know such as facial recognition technology or wearable tools that are able to track a variety of different things. This is where it starts to get. Maybe a little bit more gray where we're not necessarily giving it out so freely but almost being more fired too. So what have you seen discussed around this subject with regards to laws and regulations so first of all as a lawyer? I feed the assumption that people even customers even as the mets F- truly consented to give away all. These data is percent questionable. Now when we started to get away those day that when we hey member of facebook or twitter or whatever we did we could not imagine how far reaching implications of data could be an Audi. St could use it was not a manageable of the point. And even if this was describing fine prints in thousands of pages of terms of references. Nobody haven't read those sense of Serres. Now if we want to give you becky ambulance seeker lawyer. I mean it can be enough. Yes you gave your consent to even read the fine print so bad for you but as a society any tens of policy we need also to question much consent in our bailable and valued consent loss when we start to all these away now acids from days when it comes to employment fierce. Give bits even more complicated because employment is percent. Somebody us. Fowler's augured the other party at employers in any legal system as some amount of authority over workers they can be supplying the workers. They can monitor their work. The director work so it is already unbalanced situation. And when it comes to employment because of these unbalance consent is really never to be taken for goods in the sense that most people don't have a choice whether to work or not whether to apply for a job or not whether to be subject to certain vises tools than that monitoring techniques or not so there is not each choice and therefore there is not a free

AI Audi Professor Competitive Labor Law Keio Leuven Hive Alario Alario Distefano National Labor Office Ronald Schmeltzer Kathleen Valerio Belgium Latham Mets NBC Researcher Fowler Serres America
A Very Spatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

09:50 min | 11 months ago

A Very Spatial Podcast

"I'm Jesse I'm sue and this. This is frank and this week. We of course have returned to our our traditional once upon a time five years plus ago. We're going more vintage you did. And so yeah we're got some conversations about Earth Day coming up I we're GONNA kick things off with the news. I have a news. Hawaii is actually changing the maps. They use in their products to Tom. And it's kind of one of those weird legal things things but the reason is is because US band Hawaii from using Google maps. So the would rather be using Google maps but because of of the trade restrictions that are in place now in the United States Chinese manufacturer Hawaii of smartphones is not allowed to use Google maps. They've had to switch the tom-tom which just just kind of interesting that the that would drive the data choice much more so than anything else. Yeah I mean Yeah Yeah. I don't know what to to say too much about this one. Yeah I mean it's is this I think what it is is that we make a somewhat of an implicit assumption assumption. I think a lot of us. Do I certainly do that. In the geospatial realm that we can make technical decisions that are best for technical solutions and we can debate about whether whether this works best for this. Or that's for the other thing and sometimes we don't think about that. There's a complex legal infrastructure under not ended that underlies this that may make decisions for us whether we like it or not. Yeah so licensing Of course we've talked before about how China has limited who can create maps about China. But this of course is kind of the opposite where the. US is limiting. Who Google can provide map data to? I think it's a little different And hence the export controls and things like that. Yeah so so. It's it's it's just another variation of all of this where governments have levels of control over over what companies can and can't do in terms of import export Or what again with the China example. What they can do within their own countries? Yeah and actually what they were working on his are making. This is never a good idea in my opinion in technology. Not they're making their own deviant version of things like android and the Google play store because you know then they control it and you end up with these weird sort the deviant versions that. It's not always good. It's oftentimes how viruses and such get out there. But you know those get out there on the regular play store as well so yeah I don't know I mean it's not the only thing that So I think Subaru also announced that they're going to be using Tom. Tom yes and Of course we talked last time about what here was saying while they were at CS so yeah a lot of different things coming out I'm in a second part just out today but I don't have a linked to the IT came up as alert on my phone is apparently Britain has said we don't care so. In Britain they can use school matching presumably most of the EU. They can use Google match. Just fine I I'm confused about the overlapping jurisdictions distinctions. Here I. It's it's very odd. Yeah well again. It's just like whenever Google has to adapt to e you rolling things. They don't always apply those same changes in their technology and privacy settings to everywhere. Sometimes they do just because it's easier but sometimes you don't yeah looking at other nations in some data things. Of course Glonass we've talked about it in the past and I think really the last time we talked about launches for Glonass and the Constellation was back. Maybe in twenty eighteen barely twenty nineteen but recently at A in not investors meaning but Discussion to the Russia's science and Technical Council Iss Rush Nev- company. Is that right CHATEAUNEUF reshef. Okay the person who took Russian back in the day. has announced that they Have Twenty seven more GLONASS satellites to build and are hoping to double the number of launches and twenty twenty compared to twenty nineteen so This is kind of important. We're still waiting for Galileo to come completely online. I think there's still a few more satellites left to get By sorry Yeah but how online so we don't have either of those too much built into a last systems but we're seeing more and more of the newer systems uh-huh rowing those out but there's a lot of old systems that were both. GPS AND GLONASS compatible and is is great to see more interest being put into more satellites of course literally Interest and money being put into the GLONASS system well and it's interesting. I didn't realize this that Back in December the launch was for A new updated GLONASS AGLOW GLONASS M so that replaced a retired satellite. So it's sometimes because we forget that that the larvae systems have to cycle in New Hardware and new systems to keep going so. GPS courses going through was what's the current round the satellites that are going up our GPS three late Tuesday early threes a camera. Yeah and so so. This is an example. I mean they. They've got orders going out a number the years To get these twenty seven satellites You know up in the air Eventually but it's part of that process of cycling out as things. Let's get obsolete and stuff so that's really interesting. I mean I just had realize we were already. Glonass have been up in orbit long enough for for us to start cycling through through the number. I kind of weird it struck me. Is that any given time. They have about fifty satellites in various stages of production. which I I still come from an era when like it seemed like us? Satellite took years to make one in like you made one and then you didn't make one for a long time. I mean it was. He's just there so you know one off unique things that they have fifty of those sort of production level capability at that level. It it it seems odd even though I know it really shouldn't seem Hexagon has rolled out a new platform. Visualization Platform I'm not sure if it's hex St our Dr. I think it's heck still hexter definitely not going to say that wash a couple all the videos about it rally couple of things and it looks like an interesting System of course it looks a lot like some existing systems from other companies as well but of course since. It's a hexagon tool It's they're really highlighting the fact that you can bring in data from a lot of their From hexagons did you systems hardware for data capture at the ground level street level. And of course Bring an aerial imagery as well so I don't know it looks like it's going to be a really cool tool and try to play around with sometimes this year I have to say the three D. Swipe thing that they demonstrated was pretty pretty cool where he can embed models and you can actually swipe into if you've built your model with interior and exterior you could swipe in cake look at it in nc she to like in place and that was pretty cool too? So here's the thing it stuck me is is in the person's said to the hexagon the introduction of Hexter. I'M GONNA use it I knew cloud based Duh. Everything's Club now. Digital Reality Visualization Platform. Now I know what augmented reality is. I know virtual reality is and I know digital is but I don't know that I've run across digital reality those looking to go and All right they just slip that in there. Yeah I was on hold on. You didn't define your terms there. What do you mean by that? That's the way they describe it. It seems like it's it's just a I I guess digital reality is a good way to describe it but it is an interesting term. It was like we on. That's neat that's interesting. The thing that struck me in here is that they have an exclusive growing Which means you have? Apparently they get it. Three point six petted. Ah Pet abide collection of town cities landscapes on the one hand any amount of databases a lot. I mean just. It's a lot but on the other hand I feel like that's enough is going to be a lot of places right right. I was like man right. That's what you're saying Well I mean the one they show off most was Paris. They have video separately just for Paris But yeah I mean they should have some other locations as well. Yeah I was being vestiges there obviously but I mean yeah it doesn't it takes very little at this point whenever you're talking about a combination of lighter and imagery and not just aerial light are but also also land-based light. Are you know what we're talking about. The light are being captured for artistry. There there you go The LEUVEN and others Thursday. They show in the video. I mean those. Are you know gigabyte of data on their own between the imagery in and point data and the models that they're deriving from so just than scaling out that out to a whole city and then multiple cities yet three point. Six isn't going to be a lot of places

Google TOM United States Hawaii Hexagon China Paris United States Chinese Manufact Britain Frank Subaru Russia EU
"leuven" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

Tha Boxing Voice

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"leuven" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

"You know what I'm saying Ness, I just wanna tell you man robber near he's Beck. He's telling me, you wanna fight which, you, he says, you want to be the next Andy release. He said. He feel like he can shocked the world. And I tell you, I like Anthony Joshua. I'll tell you, you know, you oughta Diaz a wilder. He he said he's willing to fight. He's not scared. I mean I just wanna make the biggest fights again. I get my Bouma, right? I'm here to talk bossing. You know what I'm saying? I got these, I got these fighters right now. I got I got Joseph Rodriguez super Mace. He's calling us not go. He said he knock them out. If you wanna watch border wars, there's only one place, you can watch it and that's on a patriot on, on a bus invoice. So everybody signed up right now. Everybody from TM gee, we ain't here Ness. You let me know about this fight he, he wants to so bad. He said he wants to shock the world. He say is the king of jersey. He from jersey you from jersey that people wanted they wanted the streets wanting. This is a big fight on the jersey goes. So what you do it. H money thanks for calling in. Going out to Bouma Ranga in Texas. Dr. No, mike. But. Il, yo, had to come back and just throw a couple of names that I'm not one name. I didn't hear it mentioned is. And I don't know where he's been since he loves the Charleston, but Leuven Leuven Burgess hatley wouldn't be a bad by. But when I wanted to be Patrick day, and another name, too. I think he was going to contend as well. That do Eric Walker that do give anybody from though. I mean, it's a few names that moving can mix it up with right? But as far as trout goes and listen to I like, well he, he. He's one of my, my, my I like watching that, dude, man. I did not like it. And it seemed like it seemed like he's at a point where. It's, it's almost town to hang it up. You know what I'm saying because now you get you like a contended tested. You know what I'm saying gate, keeping now and I don't like from. With that chop chop demaim, hold on a minute. Hold on a minute. Damarcus call is made a career today. He's been in ring when Mayweather and dozens of other top tier names like you can't acce Austin trout to retire. You can only acts people to retire him ISE just retired over forty something years old. And it's because Lubin retired him this is boxing. You know, lasting to go was your last goes your power. Roy Jones box. He still boxes whenever he could get a fight. You got to retire them. Let me let me ask you. When we accurate, I'm gonna put your shoes, then I'm I wanna put you on the shoes. Right. So your favorite fight, or one of your favorite fighters is. Let's say Danny Garcia. No. Let's say one time keep one time, Thurman. Right. And he gets to a point where, you know, he can't be, you know. To me to say, but let's say they keep going contenders as the they, they ready for the world title level, when you want to continue watching keep be that guy. No. No, you wouldn't. If you know what I'm saying, we cannot answer that trout isn't getting washed, man. He's not getting washed. He's being competitive. Just that simple. Now. Would you want to be gatekeeper if that's what if that's what his life becomes? That's what it became just like a manual. Gustis just like David price, just like Tony Thompson. This numerous dozens hundreds millions. It's part of box in bro. Everybody. People on the bench..

Ness Lubin Anthony Joshua Austin trout Joseph Rodriguez Beck Bouma Ranga Dr. No Thurman Diaz mike Leuven Leuven Burgess hatley Patrick day Roy Jones Andy Eric Walker Texas Il Mayweather Danny Garcia
"leuven" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"We won't hesitate to take that opportunity one really proved invaluable for our franchise. I think we made ourselves better came close on a couple of other ones, we won't stop can't score. If you don't shoot. So we'll keep you. And you know, if those opportunities are there. Can't score. If you don't shoot. Look, you Hooper Leuven. Who John next ball bottle? John. So I was down there on the sideline for for that bears game at the end of the game. When when Allen Robinson got that ball knocked out, and you know, the forty Niners were one more chance to win the game. I was standing right next to John Lynch and in bobbling their PR guy. They were so hype man like you John Lynch on. Let's probably still got it still wants to go. And he still wants to go play. There's that level of doozy. Azam like, I get it like a results oriented business bringing some players. I don't need a guy. I don't need a Rah Rah guy. I need a guy that's gonna make the right decisions and bringing the right people. But I do think that there is something about John Lynch because he commands that kind of respect that guys. Don't wanna let him down. You know what I'm saying? And Michael put all his tape. Right. Yeah. Rotate put on his tape. He there was nothing. Eighty percent about John. Let's say like he even when he got juke by berry. He was all in. So here's a couple of names that may be out there, and we'll see how it all shapes up with you guys resigning or getting franchise, but just and DeMarcus Lawrence you can just forget about that. He's not going anywhere. I mean, you know, twenty seven years old coming into his prime eleven sacks last year. I mean, obviously that would be a beautiful thing. But I mean, this guy was talking about last year that ended up getting franchise Ziggy Ansah in Detroit. I mean, I don't think that they're gonna be bringing him back. And I mean, he only had four sacks. But he did get hurt this year only in a plane seven games. But I think there's you know, you still want to go draft somebody, but to bring in another veteran pass rusher and me think about Elvis boomer Ville when they had him. I was like, wait. So why is an Elmo do real hanging out anymore? I okay, I can see he's old and maybe wanna get somebody else in there. But I didn't see that level of production get replaced anywhere. That's for sure. I know. Right. Makhachkala worse enough with the roundhouse is baby. Give me a little more production. I mean one. They were probably go away. Like, hey, we might as well see these youngsters says, you know, we're losing doesn't matter. But they made the decision to turn away from him for the year start again. And that was when Jimmy G was still healthy. And they had one five here. They were they were growing with the youngsters it was it was a movements. My John Lewis. Look, he's one of those guys where I'm like it could work, but you just can't give him too much money. Like if you give them too much money, then it becomes a detriment. And you can't give them like a three year. Yeah. It's gonna be like two years right in that window. I think that's what they'll end up going that route because that that's what will be available. And I think there's something to this as well. I think that the forty Niners if nothing else they've made this. I would imagine. I mean, I guess only the players know, I would imagine they've made this a pretty attractive destination. They've got money to spend. So they can maybe give you a little more the next time. We think about the money they gave pure Garcia jerick McCain like they gave those guys. Nice deal. You know, even Sherman. They locked him up quick. And that's why I think, you know, maybe do that two point. Oh style with Earl Thomas, I'm cool with that. I think it will Thomas has got a lot of tread on the tire. You do you know who you know, who I think should get. Get jalen. Yeah. Boy will he costs. Yeah. Well, at least at least Jalen Ramsey. I at least a I and maybe a second. That's a lot. Although he's unhappy. Can you get a Solomon Thomas was the first Kim? He's like a I like you said it says personnel. Jalen Ramsey and Richard Sherman. That'd be nice. That would be nice. See? That's why I want them to clearly edge rusher needs to be addressed. Because that's getting pressure with four in. This defense is critical. And how do you do that? You gotta have nasty guys off the Girardi got the push up, the gut with Armstead embark, etcetera and Sally and rotation. You gotta have the guys coming off the edge to finish the deal and Matt barrels in on it. We've been talking about it. I don't wanna see do they get one in the draft or do they get one in free agency? I want to get the draft and in free agency. And okay, if you if you're sitting there with the second pick, and whoever you want, whether it's sweat or whoever Farrell from Clemson if you think that that merits the number two overall pick, and that's your guy. Cool. No problem also going one, I would say so I mean, don't put it past the cardinals to screw something up. But I mean, they've got a need there. They absolutely do. Probably the cardinals is they've got needs all over that football team. So. And they still beat tonight. Yeah. I think Bosa is the consensus number one. But it's funny. How this stuff changes Marcus because I mean, it's January second right now those draft prospects like we see this every year, I know the kid from from Oregon's going back to school. And so the quarterback classes even thinner this year, the closer we get to the draft the more enticing in the better the tape starts to look on a lot of these Bax though question it works like that every year and all these teams if that that pool that that crop of guys that they think could actually be franchised quarterbacks. If that gets whittled down to like to the teams that are going to be in on those guys there could be a bidding war on the forty Niners sitting there with the second pick could be like cool. He good to talk to me trade up to get your quarterback. And and then we'll move back a couple of picks and we'll still get an edge rusher. Pick up a little more draft capital, and maybe a little corner. We'll right be the ideal way to do with though right is to trae down and get more picks. That's it. If you're a team like for you got you got a lot of positions to feel. I think if you could get both of those if he somehow false the horse. I don't think you could trade up to get him. No. I don't think you can make a deal with the cardinals cardinals are trained with the team in their division. Anyway. So if the cardinals are taking both thanks to bashing Janikowski like you couldn't have just missed that kick and let the cardinals win in overtime. I mean, really couldn't just done a solid cardinals. Did all they could. AMD the passion bucket for that. Let's hear from from Kyle Shanahan real quick about the need to make any splashy moves is he feeling the pressure here. Coming up in your three. Go ahead. I hope we never have to make a decision that's based off of because we're going into this year the third year before I hope every decision this. We're going to be aggressive because this opportunity came across do not pass.

cardinals John Lynch John Jalen Ramsey Richard Sherman Hooper Leuven Allen Robinson Kyle Shanahan Earl Thomas John Lewis Jimmy G DeMarcus Lawrence Azam Ziggy Ansah Bosa Detroit AMD Michael Oregon
How Does Gelatin Work?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 2 years ago

How Does Gelatin Work?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff unmourned Bogle bomb, and if you've ever eaten in the cafeteria or attended a cookout or family reunion in the United States. Chances are good that you are dessert or salad options included, some form flavored gelatin perhaps from the brand name jello, hundreds of recipes use flavored gelatin to create everything from your simple institutional style squares to ornate designs that incorporate varied flavors fruit and whipped toppings jello and similar mixes consist of five basic ingredients gelatin water sugar or artificial sweetener, flavorings and food coloring. The gelatin is what allows you to mold the stuff into whatever shape you like solid at room temperature but melts in your mouth, but let's breakdown y gelatin behaves that way gelatin is a processed version of a structural protein called collagen that occurs in many animals bodies, including humans collagen makes up almost one third of all the protein in the human body. It's a fibrous protein. Gene that strengthens the body's connective tissue and allows them to be elastic that is to stretch without breaking as you get older. Your body makes less collagen and individual collagen fibers become increasingly cross linked with each other one might experience this as stiff joints due to less, flexible tendons or wrinkles due to the loss of skin elasticity. Gelatin can also be made from the collagen in the bones, hides, and connective. Tissues of cows. Pigs today, the gelatin jello is most likely to come from pig skin. Collagen does not dissolve in water in its natural form. So it must be modified to make gelatin manufacturers grind the animal parts and treat them with either a strong acid or a strong base to dissolve the collagen. Then the pre-treated material is boiled controls every step of the process ensure purity and safety the materials are washed and filtered repeatedly during this process. The large collagen protein ends up being partially broken down the resulting product is gelatin solution that solution is chilled into a jelly. Like material then cut and dried in a special chamber at this point, the dry gelatin about ten percent water is ground. If it's going to make a flavor gelatin product like jello, it'll be ground into a fine powder. When you buy a box of whatever brand of flavor gelatin at the grocery store, you get a small packet of the powder gelatin with a sweetener flavorings and colors added at room temperature. The gelatin protein is in the form of a triple helix. This is a fairly ordered structure not entirely unlike that of DNA with DNA to chains of nucleotides are twisted together in a spiral pattern resembling a ladder. It's a design known as a double helix in the gelatin protein, three separate chains of amino acids called poly peptide chains have lined up and twisted around each other. So to make this dry gelatin able to fill out and take the shape of a mold you first at boiling water to the powder gelatin you then star the mixture for about three minutes until the gelatine dissolves completely. But what happens to gelatin? When you add that boiling. Water the energy of the heated water breaks, the weak bonds that hold the gelatin strands together, they're helix structure unwinds and you're left with free floating protein chains. A next you add hold water and refrigerate the gelatin mixture, which makes the chains begin to slowly reform into their tight triple helix structures as it cools the mass acts like a sponge soaking up the water that you added, but in some places there are gaps in the helix and and others. There's a tangled web of these poly peptide chains the chains form sort of net and the net traps water inside pockets between the chains. This protein net is strong enough that the gelatin will hold the shape into which it's been molded, but because of the water trapped in the pockets, the mold has that characteristic jiggle. But gelatin isn't just for making fun, molded salads, or desserts. Gelatin is a common ingredient in foods because it's so versatile. It can also be used as a thickener to give foods and more pleasing texture into a multiply or stabilize processed foods like yogurt or cake frosting. It's used to clarify juices vinegars and even beer special gelatins are made from only certain animals, or from fish to meet the standards of folks who don't eat products made from the mammals that are usually involved and vegetarian and vegan substitutes made from extracts of gooey stuff. Like seaweed are available to the range of those products that gelatin can be found in is legion everything from dairy and dairy substitute products like sour cream margarine and cream cheese to suites like gummy bears and marshmallows to process meats, like sausage and can't him to soup sauces, gravies jellies and even whipped cream. It's the coating for pills that makes them easier to swallow. It's in some lozenges, and white minutes, and cosmetics may contain a former gelatin that doesn't tell you might see it on the label as. Hydrolysed collagen and gelatin aren't just used in foods and health and cosmetic products. It's also commonly used in the manufacture of photographic films and papers match heads sandpaper glossy, printing papers, playing cards and simulated human tissue for testing, guns and ammunition and for forensic science. It's even sometimes used to hold down the hair a synchronized swimmers in place. Today's episode was written by Linda, see Brinson and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other well gelled topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessities, the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah.

Daniel Whiteson Leuven Physicist Unmourned Bogle United States Apple Linda Tyler Clang Brinson Three Minutes Ten Percent
BrainStuff Classics: Why Do People Go Bald?

BrainStuff

06:49 min | 2 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Do People Go Bald?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff flooring Boko Bob here with eight other classic episode for you or host Christian Sager is explaining what's too many folks, a pressing consideration as they get older. Why do some people go bald? I'm Christian Sager. And this is brain stuff. Have you ever heard that if you're maternal grandfather went bald that you will to or what about the one? We're getting a scout massage. We'll send more blood to your head and caused your hair to grow back. Some people also claim that if you shave your hair it will grow back even fuller than before sorry to break it to you. But all of these are bogus myths as long as men have been losing their hair they've been trying to figure out what causes baldness and how they can cure this sign of aging. In fact, it's estimated that forty million Americans are losing their hair, and that's men and women and all of those people are spending more than one billion dollars a year on everything from hair transplants to to pays in spray on hair, now hair, real hair grows. Just under the skin on our heads from the close to one hundred thousand follicles there this growth happens in three phases. The antigen phase where it's grown. Knowing the cabbage in phase in between and the television phase where it falls out and hair falling out is totally normal. We should lose fifty to one hundred hairs every day as part of the television cycle. But if more hair falls out than is replaced. You are probably balding if the hair that grows back is thinner than what fell out, you're probably balding. And if it starts falling out in clumps. Oh, yeah. You are balding. But hey, take comfort that you are not alone. My friends by age thirty a quarter of all men have already started to lose their hair. What's weird is wide? Humans. Go bald in the first place baldness is actually pretty rare and other animals and hair serves a lot of important purposes. It protects our heads from the sun maintains our body, heat when we're cold and may even attract a mate, some researchers think it suggests a dominant status or a sign of maturity in different society. He's in fact, a paper from the journal, social, psychological and personality science found evidence that women find completely bald men more attractive than partially bald ones. The study also found that baldness was highly associated with two traits dominance and strength. So if you're starting to lose your hair, maybe you should take action shave it all off and show. The world would a tough assertive man, you are to understand baldness a little better. Let's look at the different types that occur. I the most common type is called Andro genetic alopicia, otherwise known as male pattern baldness, it's related to our inherited genetic predisposition from both of our parents, this affects how sensitive we are to a hormone called dihydrotestosterone hereafter referred to as DHT for most guys five percent of their testosterone is converted into d. HT if you're sensitive to DHT it acts like toxin on your hair follicles, producing thinner weaker almost colorless hair until hair production in the follicle simply stops, researchers have also found that male pattern. Baldness also causes men to have an abnormal amount of a protein. Lipid called prostate gland in D to some dermatologists, even think that men could re-grow their hair if this inhibiting protein were removed other types of baldness include the female pattern baldness that occurs. In some women post menopause, an autoimmune disorder called alopicia Ariadna and a condition called television a flu VM the mixer hair fallout faster than normal. People can also have brittle hair from hair, shaft defects. Or in rare cases, they may even pull out their own hair compulsively if they have a disorder called trick Attila. Mania? You think that sounds scary? You can also lose your hair from illnesses. Fungal infections burns chemical applications medications, and of course, cancer treatments, like chemotherapy smoking is also reported to increase the risk of baldness. You should definitely see your doctor. If your hair starts falling out in clumps. Or if you get a burning itching irritation on your scout. Episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler Klay. If you missed Christian, check out, his new podcast is acting pop culture. It's called super context, and it's available wherever you get your podcasts. And of course, for more on this and lots of other Harry, topics. Visit our home planet has to work dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here. It has stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More firm Elissa nineteen ninety-five was a nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer. It's also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share his intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa as she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore

Quicken Loans Female Pattern Baldness Melissa Jespersen Christian Sager America Keith Hunter Jespersen Boko Bob Leuven Alopicia Ariadna Elissa Tyler Klay HT Dihydrotestosterone Testosterone Harry One Billion Dollars Five Percent Ninety Days Thirty Year
Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

BrainStuff

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren vocal bomb here. A wine lovers on the whole probably don't need any particular excuse to pair a glass with a rich cheese board. But a recent study in the journal food science shows what people have long suspected cheese improves, the taste of different types of wine. Researchers at the center for taste and feeding behavior in France asked thirty one French wine drinkers to taste for different wines. I on their own then with each of four different cheeses to see if and how the taste of the wine was changed by the cheese. The method used to evaluate the taste is called multi intake temporal dominance of sensations, which simply means that the drinkers were asked which taste sensations were dominant in length and intensity or in layman's terms, which ones did you enjoy? And why the winds were the same through all five tastings, a sweet white a dry white a full bodied red and a forty red in the first session, the tasters took three sips of each wine with no cheese. In the following sessions. They again took three sips, but in each session tasted a different cheese between sips all four cheeses ranging from creamy, two semi soft and stinky to semi hard too, hard or tasted with each wine. The study found that all of the wines tasted better after eating cheese less stringent unless sour and in the case of the fruity red, for example, that Ferdie flavor lasted longer the lead researcher Meribel Marini told the telegraph. We learned the duration of the perception of stringency of a certain line could be reduced after having cheese and the four evaluated cheeses had the same effect in short when having a plate of assorted cheeses, the wind will probably taste better. No matter which one they choose which is a relief to those of us who find creating pairings a clunky prospect at best the effect of the cheeses on the taste of the winds probably happened because the fat in cheese coats, your mouth, and reduces the dryness it might feel due to tenants from the wine a bit of tannin in wines and other. Things like tea or meant is a fun sensation. But too much can be puckering and unpleasant beyond making wine and cheese parties, a potentially less expensive endeavor. The researchers have a practical application for this study. To better understand how the taste of food can change when paired with other foods leading to new and possibly better meals as different foods are served together. Today's episode was written by Karen Kirkpatrick and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other flavorful, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you news stories of the trials 'em triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Daniel Whiteson Apple Leuven Physicist France Walt Disney Meribel Marini Casten Researcher Karen Kirkpatrick Vietnam Jonathan Strickland Tyler
Why Did London Once Have a Train for the Dead?

BrainStuff

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Why Did London Once Have a Train for the Dead?

"Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I've been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charter to join that gig economy. Oh, that's right. Just like Uber folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side hustles are created equally. Exactly every week. We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain Steph Lauryn Bogle bond here what you ride a train with undead passengers or if not what about a train with actually dead passengers from eighteen fifty four to nineteen forty one. The London necropolis railway took a forty minute journey across twenty three miles. That's thirty seven kilometers carrying both the deceased end the living who mourn to them to a cemetery after departing a special station near Waterloo, built specifically for the line. And its passengers the train rocked its way across the three in countryside on a route selected for it's comforting views once arriving at the Brookwood cemetery in Surrey at the time, the world's largest cemetery and built in partnership with the railroad funeral goers would lay their dearly departed to rest, and then have drinks and snacks at one of the cemetery's to train stations. Oh, we spoke with John Clark, author of the two thousand six book, the Brookwood necropolis railway. He said both cemetery stations had refreshment rooms usually run by the wives of the station. Staff. Off the cakes and sandwiches served would probably have been homemade, and it would have been customary to eat this lunch with a Cup of tea at the station before returning to London. The refreshment rooms were fully licensed, so guests could have alcoholic drinks as an alternative to tea or coffee. After this brief repacked, the guests, then boarded the train and return to London. The trains passenger list. A bit lighter than before the idea may seem odd today when many of us keep the debt as far from daily life as possible. But at the time it was a popular one during its peak. London's necropolis railway transported more than two thousand dead bodies a year. The number of live mourners at carried reached into the tens of thousands even so riding in these same trainers. Corpses. Took some getting used to Londoners initially wondered whether loading up the mourners and the deceased and transporting them on the same train was a bit too practical, the Bishop of London when appearing before the houses of parliament a full twelve years before the necropolis railway opened considered it. Improper Clark says that the bishops stated he would consider the hurry and bustle connected with it as inconsistent with the solemnity of a Christian funeral plus they're worthy corporeal elements with which to contend such as the odors and potential disease. Transmission of the bodies. Social mores were tested to could the rich really ride side by side with the poor to bury their dead. And the concern wasn't limited only to people of different social classes. There could be different religions aboard each requiring its own traditions. The solution at least aboard the necropolis railway was elegant in its simplicity separate cars were designated by class, but all were allowed to ride regardless of their station in life the cemetery. Meanwhile, allowed the rich and poor to be buried side by side, but section separate areas for various religions, it was a workable solution for the time and one driven by necessity. Few could argue London's in town cemeteries were already chock full by the middle of the nineteenth century Londoners were being buried at a rate of about fifty thousand a year previously buried bodies sometimes removed and cremated to make room for new ones until parliament began closing admission at city, cemeteries and shipping bodies to greener pastures like the out of town Brookwood cemetery, which encompassed about one thousand five hundred acres, but the nineteen twenty s motorized hearses worthy. Vehicle of choice for moving the dead and many Londoners had access to either automobiles or one of the trains the living that also made a stop at Brookwood station and in April nineteen forty one during World War Two the London terminus of the funeral train was damaged in a German v. Two rocket bombing Brookwood it no longer serves exclusively as a departure spot for the debt, and they're mourners, but remnants of these stations are still visible if you know where to look how's that for living history? Today's episode was written by Lori Al dove and produced by Tyler client for more on this and lots of other lively, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science. A like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Necropolis Railway Brookwood Cemetery London Brookwood Necropolis Railway London Necropolis Railway Daniel Whiteson John Clark Apple Brookwood Station Brookwood Steph Lauryn Bogle Bishop Of London Matt Waterloo Joel Surrey Lori Al Leuven Physicist
Is Black Friday the Busiest Shopping Day?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 2 years ago

Is Black Friday the Busiest Shopping Day?

"I'm Jeff Rosenthal. Co-founder of summit a thought leadership community ideas festival, and I have a new podcast called art of the hustle. We'll be breaking down how the world's most fascinating successful. People have hustled their way to the top hearing their wisdom and understanding their ways of seeing with guests like Arlan Hamilton, and Tim Ferriss new episodes drop every Wednesday. So subscribe now on apple podcasts or listen on the iheartradio app or anywhere else. You find podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb and for scores of Americans as soon as they digest their thanksgiving Turkey. It's time to think about holiday shopping local newspapers wear such still exist are bursting with circulars and advertisements heralding black Friday sales and every retailer that's ever gotten. Hold of your Email address has been sending desperately friendly missives coined in the nineteen sixties. Black Friday refers to the day after thanksgiving that marks the traditional kickoff of the holiday shopping season. The black and black Friday symbolizes stores turning a profit a being in the black versus in the red with the term stemming from an age when handwritten financial ledgers recorded prophets and black ink and deficits in red ink. These days many stores, don't even wait for Friday morning. They open at midnight or even earlier on thanksgiving evening to give deal hungry shoppers and early start for the shelves. But is black Friday really the biggest shopping day of the year in America. Not everyone is eager to whip out their wallets while the scent of pumpkin pie still lingers in the air. You can divide holiday shoppers into two distinct camps, the black Friday, go getters, and the procrastinators breathing a retail mall the day after thanksgiving can involve heavy crowds, and seemingly endless masses of cars. Waiting to find parking people elbowing their way through aisles and qs once you're finally ready to check out all the while the nonstop tune of Jingle Bells the most frequently played holiday song. In shopping, malls goes jingling all the way into every crevice of your brain black Friday enthusiasts as worth the hassle though since many stores will strip down prices to move merchandise. As far as the number of humans who walk in and out of stores black Friday halls the been one hundred and one million braved the crowds in two thousand sixteen that heavy black Friday foot traffic translates to high dollar prophets accounting for four point five to five percent of all holiday sales in two thousand fourteen the average. Shopper spent about three hundred eighty one dollars over thanksgiving weekend of the total retail spending was about fifty one billion dollars. And although more recent numbers are difficult to track down trend watchers say they've been going up. But these undeniably large numbers aren't the largest of the season. In fact, black Friday isn't the busiest shopping day of the year normally, despite what popular opinion holds. Instead the holiday shopping procrastinators win out the highest sales day of the year. It usually strikes the Saturday before Christmas. How is that possible? If shoppers lineup in front of stores at the crack of dawn on black Friday, a customer volume goes through the roof, but sales don't follow suit surveys have shown that despite these steady streams of people flowing into stores on black Friday, not all of them drive home with trunks full of holiday presents. A for instance, one study conducted by researchers at Indiana University found a consistently low rate of purchase among black Friday shoppers higher percentage of those shoppers bought items the following day into. Net shopping and early previews of black Friday sales leaked online may also trim the amount of transactions that day as people have more options for tracking down the best bang for their holiday buck in two thousand five online retailers designated be Monday after thanksgiving to be cyber Monday the web merchants figured that. This day would see a substantial sales bump because majority of online shoppers make their purchases at work with the general boom in online sales. The distinctions are breaking down as people shop online every day of INC's giving weekend including Turkey day itself. With two thirds of all orders coming in from smartphones and tablets as of two thousand seventeen and black Friday is a phenomenon that spread beyond the states as of two thousand seventeen countries like Spain, South Africa and the UK which do not celebrate thanksgiving. Nonetheless, saw increases of up to forty six percent over that weekend versus their average daily sales online. Oh, and in case you were wondering about another shopping holiday over thanksgiving weekend. Small business Saturday was created. In two thousand ten by the Goliath credit card company American Express as a way to encourage spending at small local shops. Today's episode was written by Kristen conger and produced by Tyler clang if you're doing some shopping this weekend. Consider our online store t public dot com slash brain stuff. Every purchase supports us directly. And of course for more on this and lots of other worthwhile, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey, Jim breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Daniel Whiteson Apple Jeff Rosenthal Iheartradio Co-Founder Arlan Hamilton Tim Ferriss Turkey Lauren Vogel Leuven America Indiana University Physicist American Express
Does Turkey Really Make You Sleepy?

BrainStuff

05:25 min | 2 years ago

Does Turkey Really Make You Sleepy?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was a nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer is also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore a serial killers mind, but the investigation has daughter needed to walk away whole you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff. I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And our question of the day is does Turkey really make you sleepy America's favorite holiday bird. Does have the makings of a natural sedative in it and amino acid called tripton. Tripped event is an essential amino acid, meaning that you need it. But your body can't manufacture it. The body has to get trip to Finn and other essential amino acids from food trip to vent helps the body produce the B vitamins niacin, which in turn helps you produce. Serotonin serotonin is remarkable chemical that acts as a sort of calming agent in the brain and plays a key role in sleep and trip to Finn is also a precursor to another common compound melatonin. So you might think that if you eat a lot of Turkey, your body would produce more serotonin and melatonin, and you would feel calm and maybe more likely to fall asleep. But nutritionists and other experts say that the trip defend in Turkey probably won't trigger the body to produce more serotonin because defendant works best on an empty stomach. Mc the trip in thanksgiving Turkey has to vibe with all of the other amino acids. The body takes in in order to pass the blood brain barrier and get to work only part of the trip. Defend key dinner will make it to the brain to help produce serotonin. The fact that thanksgiving meals are often carbohydrate heavy actually does help. I think of all the bread stuffing potatoes corn and candied tubers covered marshmallows that we eat before we even get to the real desserts, the insulin. Our bodies releases to process all of that also serves as sort of rideshare vehicles for a lot of amino acids, but not for trip to Finn which hitches a ride to the brain on a protein called albumin. So with most of the competition out of the way, it is. In fact, easier for trip to fin to get into our brain and start the process that leads to the production of more serotonin melatonin. Meanwhile, is produced outside of the brain. So you don't have to worry about that competition at the blood brain barrier. But you do have to worry that you have all the other compounds necessary for your body to create it. Overall. Researchers think it's neither the melatonin nor the Serra Tonen produced from trip to Finn that leads to rampant late afternoon napping on thanksgiving. Most likely it's the whole traditional meal together producing lethargy the average thanksgiving meal contains three thousand calories more than most of us usually eaten a whole day and your body works hard to digest all that food. After all your nervous system is set up to prime your body for maximum nutrient absorption every single time. You eat a part of this is called our rest and digest response when we eat. We excrete more saliva and gastric juices and our heart rate and blood pressure lower. Also, our bodies are sending more blood to our guts in order to help out. Meaning that less is available for the brain. And these skeletal system all of this can make you feel the limb heavy and relaxed also if you drink alcohol with your dinner, you'll likely feel the sedative effect of that as well. But there is a way to take advantage of the trip defend in Turkey. If you have trouble getting to sleep one night while they're still leftover Turkey in the fridge. You can have a late Turkey snack. And that nutritionists say might be the right amount of trip to fin on an empty stomach to help produce sincere tone. Today's episode was mostly written by a house stuff works contributor, the name of whom has been lost to time. If it was you right in it was produced by Tyler clang with the kind of Paul decade for more on this and lots of other fulfilling topics, visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey, Jim breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Turkey Finn Melatonin Melissa Jespersen Leuven Apple Keith Hunter Jespersen Daniel Whiteson Lauren Vogel Physicist Serra Tonen America Niacin Tyler Clang Jim Breakdown
Is There a Best Way to Load the Dishwasher?

BrainStuff

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Is There a Best Way to Load the Dishwasher?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer is also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share his intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore a serial killers mind, but the investigation has daughter needed to walk away whole you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff unlearn Vogel bomb. And look I'm not here to start any fights among your family. Many people have very strong ideas about how to best tetris load of dishes into a dishwasher, but I am here to give you some scientific advice because if the dishes are not coming out of your dishwasher is clean as he'd like you might be tempted to blame the appliance or your brand of detergent. But the problem might just be what an how you're stacking in the machine when you're loading in its first important to consider what's dishwasher safe, and what isn't some of the items on the no fly list are fairly obvious. Cast iron will rest and loose seasoning. If placed in a machine a fine, China and crystal can't handle the intense heat, but you should also leave out insulated, travel, mugs. The high heat of the machine can ruin the vacuum. Seal and reduce the mugs ability to retain heat aluminum. Pots are very prone to scratching and can develop a dull finish Turner, blackish color in the wash and wooden spoons or cutting boards can crack from the heat and humidity allowing germs to set up. Shop. Also, although most nonstick pans on the market today are dishwasher safe. Check the washing instructions first and limit dishwasher time, even if it is allowed frequent high temperature washes can cause the coating to wear off. Secondly, either rinse all of your dishes before stocking them, or none at all most modern dishwashers come with a sensor that evaluates the water to determine how long the cycle should be. And how much water is necessary to produce a thorough clean during an initial rinse cycle. It'll measure how cloudy the water is and run more or less thorough wash cycles accordingly. If only some of your dishes are rinsed it won't be able to properly evaluate how to run its wash cycle plus on the side of not hand rinsing. I at all of the dish detergent, you use likely has compounds in it that are specifically designed to break up food particles. A basically the companies that make those detergents assume you won't pre wash. If you do those compounds may leave a powdery residue on your dishes because of that we'd recommend that users of modern, dishwashers and commercial, detergents, scrape off chunks or anything that might clog the machine, but not be fussed about rinsing sauces or crumbs a third you wanna fill the machine to your best advance. Pige load the dishes to face the center of the machine spray arm sprays out in a circular motion so plates that aren't facing the center, we'll get a heavy cleaning on the wrong side. Also because the heating unit is located on the bottom of most machines, heat sensitive, plastics, should go on the top rack to avoid risk of melting forks and spoons should face up to minimize the risk of nesting inside a packed utensil basket. And this also keeps the basket from getting in the way of the wash making sure the head of the utensils gets nice and clean. If you have a ton of silverware to wash try to spread out similar pieces to avoid nesting or alternate them. Head down head up along the same lines resist the urge to overload the dishwasher in general, if one item is completely blocking another neither will get truly clean. Finally, you should run occasional maintenance on your machine, your dishwasher likely has a filter that needs to be removed and cleaned out on occasion, a most soils like saucer crumbs will slip right through the filter, but any errant chunks of food will get caught. And clogged up to clean, simply remove and rinse. With a little bit of dish, soap, a ABI SHA to rinse it completely or it will cause sudden thing during the next cycle also limescale especially in areas pard water and grease can build up in these spray arms and filter over time to prevent any problems from escalating, it's a good idea to clean your machine about once a month. There are dishwasher specific cleansers on the market or you can Google to learn how to run a cleansing cycle with vinegar. Today's episode was written by Allee point and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other sparkling, topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works then. You'll or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Melissa Jespersen Leuven Apple Keith Hunter Jespersen Daniel Whiteson Vogel China Google Turner Allee Physicist Testif Brian Tyler
Will Temperature Changes Make You Sick?

BrainStuff

04:18 min | 2 years ago

Will Temperature Changes Make You Sick?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer is also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share his intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore a serial killers mind, but the investigation has daughter needed to walk away whole you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. A raise your hand. If a parent grandparent or an older wiser caretaker of any kind has scolded you for not bundling up when the temperatures drop if you waving your arm frantically, you're far from alone across cultures and geographical boundaries. There seems to be a long held pervasive belief that sudden meteorological changes automatically trigger colds and flus, but does the theory really pan out. Well, yes, and no, according to health experts whether driven sickness is thing, but the temperature itself as more of an indirect cause of the resulting illness. In other words, it's not the cold itself that makes you sick, but the environmental factors related to it. A two thousand two meta analysis found that exposing your skin to chilly temperatures doesn't automatically make you more susceptible to the common cold. What does likely set you up for sickness is the drop in humidity associated with that sudden drop in temperature the mucous membranes in your eyes, nose and. Lungs all dry out, those mucous membranes are your first gooey as line of defense against bacteria and viruses. So losing the goo makes you more susceptible to sickness, and because viruses are more likely to survive and replicate in cold than in heat. You're more likely to get sick. When the weather turns frigid and a two thousand ten study Columbia University's Jeffrey shaman and his colleagues compared thirty years worth of climate records to health records. They determined that. Flu epidemics, almost always followed a drop in air humidity. Their evidence was reviewed in two thousand fifteen study and replicated again in two thousand nine analysis of these swine flu pandemic, the research paints, a pretty compelling picture of why and how dry air fosters this kind of cold and flu free for all. When there's moisture in the air the particles. We released from our noses and mouths when we cough and sneeze, stay large. But in dry air. They break into tiny pieces can stay suspended in the environment for hours or even days, creating a virus filled cloud for us to. To inhale. A Furthermore when it starts getting cold or more likely to stay indoors for more time exposing ourselves to that virus soup. One easy trip to lowering your risk for illness. During the colder months is to run an air humidifier a twenty thirteen study found that doing so for just an hour. A day could kill thirty percent of the airborne viruses in schools, but like everything else in life balance appears to be key since some pathogens like mold actually thrive in humid environments, and of course, relying on good old standbys like vaccines and handwashing is always a good idea to reduce your risk whether you bundle up in cold, weather or not. Today's episode was written by Michelle comes down to Naf ski and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other bundle topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was a nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer. It's also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share his intelligence, and charisma how do, you know,

Melissa Jespersen Keith Hunter Jespersen Leuven FLU Colds Apple Michelle Columbia University Jeffrey Shaman Tyler Clang Thirty Percent Thirty Years
"leuven" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Go home. Go home. Tags. Everyone with go home. Go home. He sits there with a gun a pedicab who's doing like this Alex Jones type bid. I can't remember what that was about their. He's got a whole series of them. And. Usually you find out about this guy or whatever cause people young people don't watch TV. I think everything from my own and so the seat on YouTube, and so it's kinda brilliant. And in that regard in that, he's. They'll get some votes. I'm kind of interested to see. Yeah. This this will tell you how many young people actually show up because they're the ones that are seeing this on YouTube. Another version pedicab info wars, they're not. I'm here talking about the dome, and my friend Alex stringer. His running for mayor Boston. He's going to be the new Mary's number one in the home. We're talking about the caravan not the one south of the border the one in our community right here. We have caravan coming from out west Leuven, deep the heart attacks. A lot of Californians they're bringing their communist stalinistic, Hitler ideas with. Coming here in the form over drivers. That's what we're going to build a gigantic dome around Austin. We got materials growing and Lockhart. Got some road out. Round rock..

Alex stringer YouTube Alex Jones Lockhart Leuven Austin Boston Hitler Mary
"leuven" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

14:02 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on KTOK

"And welcome back Wilkerson with us as we talk about Hollywood, godfather, the life and crimes of Billy Wilkerson. That is his father what caught your father interested in the movie business in the first place Willie. Well, it's really interesting because in nineteen twelve psalm as a medical student. He was studying to be a doctor us at Jefferson medical school in Philadelphia and his father suddenly died and with no way to support himself, whereas mother he had to go to work. So in Philadelphia at that time, there was a film company called the Leuven picture company. And so that's where he went to work. He knew nothing about movies or films. But once he got into it that was it was love at first sight. And he then went crazy. He loved it. He got into the Speakeasy business. Now, what exactly is that? Speakeasy? Yeah. Well that was that was during during prohibition in America. Those were those were illegal bars. Well, those places where they slid something on the door to look at you. And you've set a code word in you came ex exactly exactly it was they were just venues there were like bars except that they were now clandestine and. After my in nineteen twenty six when my dad knew that he couldn't be in studio because of this this terrible cartel. He was up against he went into the speaking Speakeasy business in in Manhattan and absolutely made a fortune his business model again, which would be the precursor to all the wonderful things. He didn't Hollywood was to give the best service. In other words to get the best booze possible to get the best floor shows, everything top quality and make people pay for it. He was charging some of the highest prices in Manhattan that time, but they were paying it. Yeah. He was he was getting your father had an affinity for class at me. Yeah. I mean, it was just it was it was a incredible. When I think about it because he was charging. We'll probably get into an in a second. But it's cafe truck era, which he started at at the middle of the depression. He was charging the highest restaurant prices in the United States. And there was like a two week waiting list to get any neat there. Don't figure no nine hundred twenty nine though the stock market hit him hit him hard. Didn't it? Oh, absolutely. Yeah. He again your ears his gambling. Okay. He he decided that he wanted to start the Hollywood reporter and he needed he needed twenty five grand. That's what the seed money. He thought that that would cover it. Sure. But but the way he thought was gee, if I can he he bought a faltering trade paper in in Manhattan pumped some life into it. So let for twenty twenty five grand. But then his thinking was chief. I can only double this. I could I could really get out to California, and I wouldn't have to worry. So he he bumps into a Wall Street friend said listen get into the stock. We don't know what stock that was. It's like rock bottom. It's going to take off. And my dad said, wow. This is really a sure thing. So. He went and got another twenty grand from a loan shark dumped it into the stock. And and so he took the close to fifty grand. And and went to the went to the Wall Street exchange on the day, the market crash and lost every penny. And and so there was no. There was no choice at that point. He had to get out of New York City because the clock was ticking against him the repayment to the loan shark was thirty days, and he didn't have the money. He didn't have it didn't have the money. So he packed up is his mother his wife is dog into a car and they hit the road, and they came to California. So that was that was that horrific story. So once he started the Hollywood reporter was he pro studio anti studio what why did the studios hate him so much well again. The reporter was really started as a device to get even with the studios again. My father was very angry that he couldn't have his dream as an independent studio because he couldn't get film distribution and their large theater chains, obviously their theater chains for their movies. And so is thinking was the way my dad thought is that you're not gonna let me in cheer club? Okay. So I'm gonna really wacky you and show you who's boss? So he came out to California. He started the reporter and immediately. Started criticizing these guys. And boy, I mean, I have to tell you. I mean, it was I it was immediate trench warfare. Was he vicious? Oh, it was it was it was incredibly incredibly vicious imprint because he he had worked for these people. He knew how corrupt they were. I mean, why would he would he be favorable to a good movie? Or did he go after everything? Well, he would he would basically go after everything. I mean, if I give you an example of a of this this this mounting warfare. I mean, it was just really wonderful trick after another. You know, my dad would would would write something that would question their questionable practices. They would reply by burning his newspapers, by the way, you didn't do that to my dad he fought back by having reporters climb studio walls in the dead of night break into their offices and steal sensitive information. Data hack, and then publish it. And then publish it. They would retaliate with an all out ban on the reporter including shutting out all advertising support. My dad would strike strike back by a news blackout on all their films. Then the studio owners would forbade all their their employees to have anything to do with reporter. And then it would really really get nasty. My father hit below the belt by retaliating by going after their talent in one famous case by starting what we know. Now today is the Hollywood blacklist. He was the one who did that. Yes. Yes. He with with McCarthy that whole thing. Well McCarthy McCarthy came in nineteen fifty so he sort of co opted with my dad did. But my dad we have we have to we we have to remember that they were playing dirty on both sides. Okay. So my father in this is David and Goliath on steroids here. So he knew that if he was going to be in this game he had to be as nasty or even nastier than they were. And so is thinking was is that if he could hurt studio talent, it would translate into hurting their bottom line. And so he he he went to his friend J. Edgar Hoover got the bona fide list of card carrying communist in Hollywood and printed them front page, and boy were the to the racists at that point. And of course, that's scars still with us today. That's amazing. I mean, it's it is amazing just one actor who's still alive who probably would remember your father, and that's Kirk Douglas. Oh, yes. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. Kirk say about your dad. Well, we're talking about the blacklist here. And and he was in the film Spartacus of which was that the the film of which the blacklist was lifted it actually gave Dalton Trumbull. There was a movie. Cranston played that part. Yeah. Good. Good part to. He did a good job. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So. You know, those those are are still deep I still get emails from people. And I I don't know George we come from unfortunately, a nation of witch hunting. I mean, we started back in sixteen ninety two burning which is the steak, you know, we we moved right on to to interning Japanese Americans during World War Two. I mean, the witch hunters yours gotta be false sexual harassment allegations in the workplace when we can go on and on and on. And so there's gotta be some some lesson that we can learn from this that will install some safeguards where we don't keep repeating history win the Hollywood reporter your father's newspaper was struggling because it was getting squeezed by the studios in advertising didn't Howard Hugh step in and buy ads and help you father. Absolutely. He now there was a. A couple now not all the movie moguls were against my dad. The majority of them were. But a couple of them broke ranks. I mentioned Joe's gang who was the the chairman Twentieth Century Fox and then with Howard Hughes who was at that time an independent and he on my dad kindred spirit. And of course, Jews came into town with deep pockets. And. And whatever your dad needed advertising Howard would pay them up front. Right. Absolutely. I mean, he he took out yearly contracts with my dad, but whenever my dad was in a pickle. I mean, he could pick up the phone and and in Houston center where check for enormous amounts. Apparently, they were always paid back. But that those kinds of friendships were the ones that really bail my dad out as well as the one in organized crime. We just mentioned Johnny Rozelle. Right. Did your dad in your opinion, changed the face of Hollywood? Oh god. Yes. I mean without him busting this illegal studio monopoly. I mean who knows he probably wouldn't have YouTube today. I mean back in those days, or Netflix or Amazon or anything. Are any of that? I mean to me he is he is my hero. Now how he did. That was very unsavory. I mean, I I tell people my dad did a lot of terrible things in the name of good. But finally when the studio monopoly was broken with the help of the supreme court in nineteen forty nine it gave rise to the industry that we have today, which is which is open competition. We have Netflix Hulu all of that stuff. And that's what my father was was aiming for well, it's kind of interesting because he kind of parallels the life of Jimmy Hoffa in that, you know, Hoffa did a great job for the team stores for the working man and woman, he he was tough unionist and he got the job done for them. But at the same time, he was very unsavory. And he he built Vegas in a different way than your father did by lending money to the mob, and in those days as as we found out with your place the Flamingo and what Bugsy did the mob owned olive Egas. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And Jimmy Hoffa's funded it with the Teamsters pension fund. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's a there's in my book there's one and save restore after another of these behind the scenes, very powerful. Movie titans that will turn your stomach. But that's how Hollywood was built, you know, George when we think of Hollywood power. This is the time that it was born what we came after with Harvey, Weinstein, whatever they were. They were merely products reflections at what came before. So the temple was really created around this time. What did your mother say about your father? Well, it was really kind of like a shotgun marriage. She was what nineteen twenty years old. And my father was sixty two she became pregnant by me. And so she wasn't happy about getting married to him. It wasn't happy marriage. I think it was a marriage of tolerance he was very happy because out of five previous marriage. He never had any kids. So he was delighted finally. That he has. He finally got his dream of having a family was was was she your mother his last wife or did he get that was the last one, Greg? Okay. Is she still with you or not owner Necati passed away in two thousand four sorry to hear that. Your father kind of looks like Howard use on the cover doesn't. He. A lot of them all that kind of cookie cutter. They have that Flynn look. Yeah. With the pencil thin mustache, it must have been reading the same magazines..

Hollywood reporter Manhattan Jimmy Hoffa California Kirk Douglas Philadelphia Speakeasy Billy Wilkerson Leuven America Willie United States McCarthy McCarthy Jefferson medical school George New York City Howard Netflix
"leuven" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And welcome back Willie Wilkerson with us as we talk about Hollywood, godfather, the life and crimes of Billy Wilkerson. That is his father what caught your father interested in the movie business in the first place. Really? Well, it's really interesting because in nineteen twelve psalm as a medical student. He was studying to be a doctor. He was at Jefferson medical school in Philadelphia and his father suddenly died and with no way to support himself or his mother he had to go to work. So in Philadelphia at that time, there was a film company called the Leuven picture company. And so that's where he went to work. He knew nothing about movies or films. But once he got into it that was it. I mean that was love at first sight. And he then went crazy. He loved it. He got into the Speakeasy business. Now, what exactly is that? Speakeasy? Yeah. Well that was that was during during prohibition in America. Those were those were illegal bars. Well, those are the places where they slid something on the door to look at you. And you set a code word and came ex exactly exactly it was they were just venues there were like bars except that they were now clandestine, and after my in nineteen twenty six when my dad knew that he couldn't be in studio because of this this terrible cartel that he was up against he went into the speaking Speakeasy business in in Manhattan and absolutely made a fortune his business model again, which would be the precursor to all the wonderful things. He didn't Hollywood was to give the best service. In other words to get the best booze possible to get the best.

Willie Wilkerson Hollywood Philadelphia Speakeasy Billy Wilkerson Jefferson medical school Leuven Manhattan America
Why Do We Trick-Or-Treat on Halloween?

BrainStuff

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Why Do We Trick-Or-Treat on Halloween?

"In Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel and Horry explain the universe in which physicist, Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey chum breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space. New episodes come out approximately pie divided by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can check out Daniel her. Hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren Boko bomb here to grasp the rhyme and reason of why children, Don ridiculous, costumes and banged down. Doors demanding candy once a year, we must rewind the clock a couple of millennia and visit the ancient Celtic clans of Britain, the Celts celebrated the end to fall harvest and the beginning of their new year with the pagan festival, Sal wean which fell on November first on the night before the celebration. Commenced the dead were thought to travel back home for their annual visit to frighten away any accompanying evil spirits, the Celts lit fires around the countryside and some dressed in disguise when venturing into the Erie outdoors to avoid being recognized by familiar, but less than friendly ghosts, traces of these rituals persisted as centuries wore on and even as the Catholic church sought to abolish these pagan pastimes and the eighth century the church began commemorating the feast of All Saints on November I possibly as a replacement for Salween the preceding day became known as all hallows eve was further. Sean. Shortened to Halloween as the secular Salween and sacred all hollows intertwined, the dead spirits. The characterized the holiday assumed more negative connotations at hence, the modern Halloween. Icons of scary witches ghosts and ghouls to appease these evil spirits, people left food and drink outside to protect their homes from spiritual retaliation, gradually savvy. Celebrants took advantage of the tasty offerings by dressing up as the dead and trekking from door to door to ask for provisions in exchange for protection from wicked spirits, according to the American Folklife center the practice, which became known as mumbling served as a precedent for trick. Or treating in England. The poor would organize soul parades to bed for alms on all hallows eve and exchange for prayers to deliver dead souls from purgatory to heaven as the years wore on children took over the tradition. Calling themselves solar 's bands of children would knock on doors and sing songs in return for sweet current topped breads called soul. Cakes the trick or treating custom crossed the Atlantic with the influx of immigrants from England and Ireland who moved to the United States in the mid eighteen hundreds but trick or treating wasn't widely popular in the United States until around nineteen forty before. Then the mischievous holiday had spiraled into an adolescent free for all marked by rampant. Vandalism and excessive tomfoolery as communities sought to provide alternate Halloween activities for the local youth trick or treating as we know it today gradually caught on retailers. Also noticed the trend and began offering ready made costumes and candy manufacturers seized on this golden opportunity in the late nineteen seventies and early eighties. Sensational reports of razors and candy apples, treats laced with laxatives and other horror stories dealt a blow to trick or treating nonetheless, the tradition is still alive. And well today just ask the national confectioners association this pumpkin hued holiday takes the cake for the highest candy sales of the year in two thousand eighteen Americans are expected to shell out. About nine billion dollars for Halloween candy, but in spite of halloween's commercial appeal, those ancient Celtic rights still echo on as hordes of costume children trick or treat every year in the October twilight. Today's episode was written by Kristen conger and produced by Tyler clang to hear more from Kristen check out her podcast unladylike, they've got a book out to and of course for more on this and lots of other treats, visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hi, I'm Daniel am Horry. And we're here to tell you all about our brand new podcast Daniel, and hey, explain the universe in this podcast. When I talk about a lot of things mostly about physics and the universe in all those big mysteries. Scientists a lot of

Daniel Daniel Am Horry Daniel Whiteson England Physicist Catholic Church Lauren Boko Kristen Conger United States Erie Don Ridiculous American Folklife Center Britain Vandalism Sean Tyler Clang Ireland Nine Billion Dollars
Why it’s almost impossible to steal a Tesla (and get away with it)

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

01:26 min | 2 years ago

Why it’s almost impossible to steal a Tesla (and get away with it)

"Now, your host for Silicon Valley insider Keith coup. Welcome silken Saturday. I'm your host key to and today, I'm joined by special guest Huma lots who's the CEO and founder of JAMA and also the author of an upcoming book the enterpreneurs journey high. You gave. Thanks. So in this week's tech news. How many of you? Tesla owners a group of researchers from KU Leuven university in Belgium demonstrated how hackers can clone. A key fob of tesla model s and it can steal a car within seconds and only take six hundred dollars worth of IT computing or radio. Why would reported that when Tessa was presented with this formation? They introduced to authentication and a security patch. The only problem is to make sure us the owner. Patrick software. In another tesla news story, a tesla model three was stolen from the mall of America. And the thief only use of smartphone. Now, what the funny thing is is the guy got caught. But.

Tesla Keith Coup Ku Leuven University Silicon Valley Huma Tessa Jama Belgium CEO Patrick Founder America Six Hundred Dollars
"leuven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They put you in jail house for loafing on the street that has a Charlie IRA Leuven Leuven brothers with cash. On the barrel head why were the Leuven brother? Is important to you I think it's because number one they were the first act that I ever heard that country based although, they had a little. Bit of blue grass go into but I you know, the first things that I listened to sort of country nature with things that were on the the radio in the late fifties early sixties. In England and although I really liked that material My ears up it wasn't. Until I got, to know some of these American servicemen that lived on the Royal airforce base is in the north of England and they would. They would bring with them box loads of records, from the United States that things that played on the radio in England and weren't. Even released in England and the first of those, with people, like Hank snow, and lefty Frizzell but the one the ones that re the ones, that really. Really stuck, out to me and just knocked my, socks off with the Leuven brothers and I think because they told, stories and that's that's the thing that really should have gotten, side my, head and, sparked my imagination and then that move me onto people that really you know tell stories also but a bit more hardcore country, like Johnny Horton and. Johnny cash Marty Robbins and that's that's Really those those people were really the. Blue touchpaper for me when it came to realizing, that you could tell stories cinematic and put put a rope around it so when, you were writing songs I writing lyrics for songs, I did, you do you, do you feel like you were seeing those influences in what you, were writing, absolutely I, mean It's it's not a secret that I've. Always, said that Marty Robbins El Paso was, the song that really made me imagine that it, might be possible that I could write songs not that I went in that direction initially but it certainly came back like a sort of boomerang later on when I got the sort of muscle to. Feel that I could do the, things I wanted obviously the, first songs. That we ever? Wrote we were really contract right is so we were we were in a? Sort. Of trap Two two right So the middle of the road commercial material for acts that didn't. Write for, themselves I mean it was sort of a mini Brill building, situation in London and this was way before out ever thought becoming an artist in? His own, right so we we weren't really writing the things that were inspired by the music that actually inspired us if that. Makes any sense what's making sense to me even more than that, is that this this sort of reinvention of these songs that's on these, two compilation. Records they are they're almost an indication of what you originally set, out to do which is other people, sing, your, songs Yeah that's a good point but, they singing the songs that we want Makes a big difference Things that we were writing back in sixty seven and sixty eight You know I it wasn't really an inspiration to us to have sort of the likes of sort of Engelbert Humperdinck and Vince hill and all these sort of and they were all they were kind of cabaret singers and now disparagement to them They you know fill the space that was, necessary but it wasn't what we, wanted to do and then a guy called Steve Brown came along and late sort of I believe sixty eight early sixty nine, and, he was sort of a, radical, kinda hippie, kinda character who infiltrated a very very conservative straight laced publishing company and he kind of. Shook it all up and he, saw the potential in us in the frustration and he kinda just said hey don't listen to these suits man you know just do what you wanna do and I'll I'll take the heat. And he actually did and and from that moment on we started writing songs. That were, really, indicative and channel this Janas of music that we were listening to and from then on it was it was a much much brighter world for us I wanna play one of the songs the only song that is on both Both records on Elton's say compilation Elton's version of these songs it's by the killers on yours it's. By the great country singer Marianne Morris this is Mona Lisa's.

Charlie IRA Leuven Leuven lefty Frizzell England Marty Robbins El Paso Leuven Johnny Horton Marty Robbins Steve Brown Elton United States Hank snow Mona Lisa Marianne Morris London Engelbert Humperdinck Vince hill
"leuven" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hits, closer to home for me IRA Leuven. And like dear friend Michael, Dave's Michael They share a, birthday in fact which. Happens to be today IRA was half of the Leuven brothers, the one who sang all those. Gorgeous tenor parts tremendous songwriter as well Michael is the king of New York's, sneakily thriving, bluegrass One of, my favorite singers and guitar players alive he taught, me this Leuven brothers. Song MRs cash on the barrel head shall we credit Cow see Lord put me, in the jailhouse When the judge heard the verdict Was a guilty man Four to five dollars Thirty days in That'll be Thank you Jason Founded down the phone number And on Had a good.

Michael MRs cash Jason Dave New York five dollars Thirty days
"leuven" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Juke. I've got you Kim all over the place. And on August fifteenth, the late deadline for the Leuven international short film festival takes place. This festival takes place from December first to the eighth in the beautiful medieval city of Leuven Belgium, it isn't Academy Award and BAFTA qualifying festival the festival screens more than two hundred short films from all over the world divided into more than twenty five different categories awards include ten thousand euro kit packages and reigned from one thousand two thousand euro cash prizes. So pretty good stuff here. And that's a lot of short films, two hundred. Sundance picks like sixty nine. So trade dukes. Listen up trade dukes. Can you imagine how many of these screens to whittle it down to two hundred? And now what you've all been waiting for weekly words of wisdom wisdom. We'll home. Cinematographer, Loretta previous did some coverage this week from one of my favorite festivals. The Sheffield doc fest in England, and one piece was from a panel with two duck filmmakers Ramal Ross of hill county this morning, this evening who you interviewed right. And Maceo frost of two, beautiful our right to fight who were both at the festival with their films. It was a really insightful discussion about how they shot these films and how they decided which tools to use and Rawson particular. I don't know if you found this when you interviewed him, but he seemed to have a very philosophical approach to shooting. And even though it's fallen out of favor in some ways, he had a reason for shooting with the canon five d, Mark, three. He said, quote, the Mark three allows you to attach the camera to your body and it becomes an extension of your eye and to a greater more fluid sense and extension of consciousness. If you don't have a big rig and you can keep the camera really small, keep the Mike small and the lens small, and you really practice using the cameras and extension of your eye, then you're able to sort of cross a boundary from pointing at things to sort of ingesting them and observing them in a way which you more naturally would. So I know that sometimes shooters use the cameras away to put distance objectively between themselves in the subject and Ross took the opposite approach here, which I thought was really interesting. The article has a lot more jumps like that. So I recommend checking it out a no films school dot com. And it's time for our shot outs. Yes, it adds wishy chefs out who friends, hey, I think this is the best thing that's ever happened on this podcast. Really happy. So for shadow goes to me. We take the song back. No, it's not. It's not. It's not typical that I would do this, but it is that time of year again that the south by south west panel picker is opens. You can vote for your favorite panels. Check it out there. A lot of great contenders, but I will put in a bid for you to vote for one that I was asked to be on. I'm really excited about. I think it'll be helpful to a lot of you. It's called make your own damn movie slash web series slash VR experience. So yeah, I was asked to be on this panel with Lloyd Kaufman of famous trauma entertainment..

Ramal Ross Rawson Leuven Leuven Belgium BAFTA Mark Lloyd Kaufman Maceo frost Sundance Kim Juke. Mike small Loretta hill county England
"leuven" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Dot ritual dot com we have thousands literally thousands of plant based recipes everything is super customize based on your personal preferences your allergies your budget how many people are you cooking for foods do you like do you not like we have unlimited grocery lists even grocery delivery in most us cities with international delivery certain cities coming very soon you get all of this for just a dollar ninety week when you sign up for a year people who have been using this it's been a little over a year since we launched this product it's been superpopular everybody really enjoys it it just makes plant based eating super convenient as well as delicious so for more on all this go to meals dot ritual dot com or click on meal planner on the top menu at ritual dot com and if you would like to support my work it's easy to share this show with a friend or on social media subscribe to the show on apple podcasts or on whatever platform you enjoy this content subscribe to my youtube channel this episode is on youtube in video format for the visually inclined youtube dot com slash rich role subscribe if you're enjoying the videos all this just helps with the shows visibility extending region audience and all of that helps me to intern book the very best people for future shows you can also support the show and my work on patriotic at ritual dot com for such donate and as always i want to thank everybody who helped put on the show today because i do not do this alone it is team effort jason kam yellow for audio engineering show notes production interstitial music blake curtis margo leuven for the video work in the editing and the graphics and theme music as always by anna thanks for the love you guys back here on a couple of days until then find that their door busted open walk through we realize your dreams piece plants.

youtube jason kam margo leuven intern ninety week
"leuven" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Estee so there you have it did it i hope you enjoyed it make a point of picking up frank's new book how to be well wherever you find books and give them a shout out on twitter at dr frank lippmann let them know what you thought of this conversation as always check out the show notes lincoln resources related to today's conversation on the episode page at ritual dot com and do not forget to pick up a copy of the plan power way italia or the new edition of finding all tra if you have not all ready and if you're looking for more nutritional direction check out our meal planner at meals ritual dot com we have thousands of plant based recipes literally thousands everything is totally customized based on your personal preferences your allergies how much time you like to spend in the kitchen what your budget is how many meals you're preparing or how many people there are in your family unit we offer unlimited grocery lists even grocery delivery most us cities with international delivery and sir cities coming soon and you get all of this for just a dollar ninety a week when you sign up for a year to learn more go to meals dot ritual dot com or click on the meal planner icon on the top menu on my website ritual dot com if you would like to support my work all you gotta do is subscribe to this show on apple podcasts or whatever platform you enjoy this content share it with a friend subscribe to my youtube channel although there's no youtube video for this conversation all of that helps in extending the reach and kind of spreading the word and i really really appreciate it you can also support the show and patriot on at ritual dot com slash donate i want to thank everybody who help put on the show today as always jason kam yellow my steady audio engineer he helps out with production and show notes and interstitial music blake curtis and margo leuven for graphics and theme music as always by anima thanks for the love you guys be back here soon in the meantime the well.

Estee dr frank lippmann engineer youtube jason kam margo leuven
"leuven" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To the united states when the summer was over but guess what something was different she was pregnant then guess what happened guess what happened between them they split up yes of course they did the relationship died you wanna know why died by because it started with kissing at the leuven having a date at the eiffel tower that's why to much because it wasn't a real relationship it was to people's dumb idea of a relationship from a movie well now we have a problem because the kid on res six years old and ms illuminates wants child support but guess what he's over there in france oh he's not here he's not in the united states he's in france so this is one of the very first test cases here in california there's a treaty there's actually an international treaty and it was put into place in two thousand seven it's the hague convention on the international recovery of child support and family maintenance and here in the united states had took effect january one last year covers thirty six countries and its reciprocal relationships to collect child support from parents who aren't around now within the united states there's a very robust system between states to enforce child support stuff internationally it's a little tougher because it's a treaty it's an agreement that doesn't mean every country even ones that signed onto the treaty or that into it but there's also another problem he was never here you can understand let's say you're the sexy guy from france and you come here and then you have a kid and then you go back to france and you were here and you were ordered to pay child support and then you try to move to france to get out of it right we all understand oh yeah there's probably an there should be an international mechanism that you can't get out of your he was never here he was never in a family court he was never ordered by any judge in the united states to pay any child support so that's what makes it the legal side of it extremely murky now he is not guaranteed to be off the hook here because we do have this treaty and we also have the fact that apparently he did voluntarily sometimes send her some money and that's going to be a.

united states leuven eiffel tower france california six years
"leuven" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"A search underway at this hour for a missing sharded woman charlottemecklenburg police say 33yearold megan stack left her home on cloistered drive off providence near fairview around two months after noon but never returned homeless actually there is concern for her safety she's a white woman about five four one hundred ten pounds they say was driving a hyundai santa fe with a paper tag he was wearing a bulletproof vest on it was orange jail jumpsuit monday the man charged in connection with the disappearance of threeyearold mariah woods down in oslo county 32yearold earl camry leuven boyfriend of which mother now being held in a million dollars bond police say he secretly disposed of the child's body though he's not spin charged with killing her sentencing hearing continuing today for former north charleston police officer michael slater for shooting and killing a man running from a traffic stop back in 2015 slugger pleading guilty to violating the civil rights of water scott prosecutors now pushing for life sentence defense attorneys say slugger deserves a shorter term in part because he was has accepted responsibility for the shooting lee republican national committee once again supporting embattled republicans senate candidate willing more the rnc resuming its financial support the alabama manu alabama parties ever do elect more to the us senate despite the sexual misconduct allegations against and meanwhile abc news says it has confirmed from family members that embattled michigan congressman john conyers will announce his retirement later this morning john conyers recently reminiscing about how long he'd been in congress i was myself on urged nixon's enemies lewis mr kanu's arrived to even before nixon he played a big part in civil and consumer rights laws and scolded politicians who he thought broke the law this is something that we can't sit by and let happen as if it doesn't matter conyers colleague saying the same about harassment charges against him andy field abc news washington the texans jg watch the astros jose out two of a name sports illustrated sportspersons of the year watt raised more than thirty seven million dollars for hurricane harvey relief efforts all too vague led the astros to their first world series title is brought to you by my computer career eu it training for.

mr kanu world series harvey abc harassment michigan abc news senate michael slater charleston fairview astros megan stack nixon congress congressman john conyers us rnc slugger civil rights officer oslo county hyundai santa fe five four one hundred ten poun thirty seven million dollars million dollars two months
"leuven" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"Now the roof they've had in country seniors other i'm sure any blake shelton or something probably yeah i only wheel wocka juniors in the mix i don't i feel like that to some might people would have told me they submitted me for that who your heroes your country music euros my guys are waylon willie um eta even older stuff like book owens in leuven brothers and sugar ovens what's at nine on they're they're often check them out um um and you know both the hanks i love hank senior and junior um and the other has you talk and i'm looking at this it's still got fifteen thousand dislikes you know seventy five million views with fifteen thousand were like i don't like it gang bruno mars hulu you you get to slide you a lot of hate while 'cause you you don't see some countries stuff scare which them so i always tell people my i think it's like my my like my i tuned the albon they put that items review averaged all it's almost always two and a half stars two and a half because it's it is it's every review is five stores or onesta or maybe it's three against that would be in seattle lighters i'd like it literally like the greatest album of all time followed by this man needs to have washes mouth up with soap and talk to his momma all by eight is a artist of ever lived fall by five like what's wrong like he needs mental help just sloughed goes there's not app that's why i love i don't want beulah i'll be in the middle i don't want be minuses you know i want a you know there's a guy that saying stan.

blake shelton owens hanks hank stan leuven seattle
"leuven" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Good move but nothing wrong with the way they're pulling back right now i mentioned the retail already it just remains a big wowed by to want to mention one name and again before i do these things will not tell me to buy them when i tell you this selam were not town cover schwartz would just let you know with their do when and you guys check check it out dollar tree some of the discount dollar stores are getting a bid a first love dollar tree of some inside a buying in the junejuly area which was around seventy it's already eighty nine bucks earnings a pretty good revenue growth is pretty good and the stock is on the verge of leuven out of this whole range here which goes back ear and we'll see what happens now the old high was i believe a hundred eighty nine right now so it's got some work to do but definitely you've got a relative bit in there and then you can go look at other names could you could look go look at dollar general that one's near rob yearly highs the that's what we mean by will lead to our scams thanks show up hopefully there's a few names and a group our big thesis is we always want to see a group move we don't wanna see twenty stocks on a group and only one scott movement will typically not touch it member starts with the market in the indices the groups and underneath that the actual individual names always better to buy in a group that's in a bull market with more than one scott preferably a bunch of stock in their own private bull markets also that's why every day we come on the show we say the eu semiconductors or energy or gold and silver we separated out there are about come at a cold about 100 areas of the market that we follow and that doesn't even include countries they were bowled bear market sidebyside it differing countries right now which is normal so we also want to know what the areas of the global work in and work.

schwartz junejuly leuven scott eu
"leuven" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"leuven" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of bitcoin founding a 500milliondollar hedge fund to invest in cryptocurrencies he sat down with bloomberg sarah chatoo are to discuss how he got hooked on digital money mike i have heard that you're raising a 500milliondollar hedge fund what can you tell me you know i can't confirm or deny at the sec doesn't allow us to but let me just tell you that i'm really excited about the space on working real hard and why what what on earth got you interested in bitcoin cryptocurrencies i had a roommate from college got him joe leuven who was one of the key guys and building the theory and project and at this point if they hadn't had just launched i called him and his as your career office and you can give me a tutorial on like what are your own in and really let's think fru i keep this stuff i buy more and i went over to bushwick in brooklyn this would have been january of last year two thousand sixteen and i expected to see joh a dog at one assistant and i saw thirty dynamic young people crammed into in a bushwick warehouse coating talking on the foam making plans for this revolution and analysts on he pulled up video screens and there were people in other countries and he only at forty employees at this point a theory was about '85 sense and in amac guys are instinctive mayans thing was damn i would abide chunk of his company and literally the break than i was like what does it cost around this company per year if i give you ten million bucks how much would have help and as we started talking about a deal he said you know it's going to take me a while to to figure out exactly what the company looks like because we need things about this culture is it's distributed everything distributed trust distributed ownership and.

bitcoin sarah chatoo sec brooklyn bloomberg bushwick joh amac 500milliondollar