35 Burst results for "Leukemia"

Rush Limbaugh leaves show early today

KMOX Programming

01:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Rush Limbaugh leaves show early today

"Thoughts and prayers. I was not listening at the time. Apparently, Rush left the show a little early today, all of us now he's been very straightforward and incredibly strong and stoic. You know, And if you know anybody that's gone through any type of treatment. It just, you know, to save you. They have kill you and they wipe you out. I mean, I watched this many times in my life. I remember when my mom had In a late stage, breast cancer and chemotherapy and radiation and she lost their hair and you just you know, after treatment, you get wiped out, and then you rebuild your strength again and and it's all part of a hard, hard process. Thank God we've made so much progress in terms of treatments of poor, varying diseases and cancer is a matter of fact. Russia's raised you know hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research and Hodgkin's and locate Ah leukemia, etcetera. So our thoughts and prayers are with him today is, you know he's been battling and fighting and doing his show, You know, as regularly as possible, incredible, incredible heroism, and he just loves this country. Always has has led this conservative movement all these years, and we're all praying for rush today on that he's getting well soon and recovering. Um

Hodgkin Rush Russia
'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

"He was the first known person to be cured of HIV, according to the International Aid Society, Timothy Ray Brown. Is died of cancer. Brown, who was also known as the Berlin Patients, was considered cured of his HIV infection and 12 2008 in the years prior, Brown received a bone marrow transplant in Germany to treat a separate disease. He had been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Rounder made HIV free. But for the past six months he's been living with a recurrence of the leukemia that it entered his spine and brain. Timothy Ray Brown was 54 years

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Leukemia International Aid Society Berlin Germany
First man cured of HIV has died of cancer

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

First man cured of HIV has died of cancer

"The first person known to have been cured of HIV has died from cancer. CBS News correspondent Elaine Cob reports from Paris made history in 2007 as the Berlin patient when a unique type of bone marrow transplant cured him of HIV. Timothy Ray Brown's experimental treatment was risky and expensive. Thie American remained a staunch advocate for the search for a more accessible HIV cure. He also had acute myeloid leukemia. That's what prompted the transplant. Brown suffered a relapse of the leukemia this year. His partner today announced his death. He was 54. Elaine, called CBS News.

Timothy Ray Brown Elaine Cob Leukemia CBS Elaine Berlin Paris Relapse Partner
Timothy Ray Brown, first person to be cured of HIV, dies aged 54

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Timothy Ray Brown, first person to be cured of HIV, dies aged 54

"The first person known to have been cured of F of HIV has died. Timothy Ray Brown was known as the Berlin Patient name for where his historic treatment took place. The cause of death was a recurrence of the cancer that it prompted the unusual bone marrow and cell transplants he received in 2007 in 2008. Well for more than a decade. That treatment appeared to have eliminated both his leukemia and HIV. His case inspired more research toward a cure, something that many scientists had thought was impossible until he proved otherwise. Round passed at his home in Palm Springs, California He was only

Timothy Ray Brown HIV Palm Springs Berlin California
1st man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

1st man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

"Cured of HIV infection, says he is terminally ill from a recurrence of the cancer that prompted his historic treatment 12 years ago, Timothy Ray Brown, known for years as the Berlin patient, Brown had a transplant in Germany from Adana with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown's leukemia and HIV, but Brown says his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. This case has inspired scientist to seek more practical ways to try to cure the disease.

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Adana Berlin Scientist Aids Germany
First man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

First man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

"Been cured of HIV infection, says he is terminally ill from a recurrence of the cancer that prompted his historic treatment. 12 years ago, Timothy Ray Brown was known for his years as the Berlin patient. Brown had a transplant in German, Germany from a donor with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown's leukemia and HIV, but Brown says his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. His case has inspired scientists to seek more practical ways to try and cure the disease. This news segment has been brought to

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Berlin Aids Germany
Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

The Bio Report

04:25 min | 2 months ago

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

"Greg. Thanks for joining US getting so much standing. My pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Cartesian therapies, exuma biotech, and your efforts to develop rapid point of care delivery of these therapies. Let's start with Cartesian therapies themselves out of these therapies work today. Well you know if we were to look at this technology today. And put it in the context of what we do in science and medicine even fifteen years ago. The the thought that we could truly have living medicine with genetically modified. LYMPHOCYTES in the body would have been unheard of it. And really I think the basic process of taking one cells from the body. In reprogramming genetically lymphocytes in returning them back into a patient to retrain those cells to see cancer antigens much in the same way we've done with monoclonal antibodies in the past, but wiring all that into itself is what is made Carta. Medicine which has been both exciting in is of course had. Equally that the number of challenges in in many different areas. Well. How are these therapies typically prepared and administered? Well it's a complicated process that has. A tremendous amount of technical skill required as well as logistics so typically. When a subject is entering into a trial or on therapy for approved medicines, their blood is drawn and separated into white blood cells and then shipped usually on a plane to a central manufacturing facility where those cells then are taken into a cleanroom, they are activated their genetically modified they're grown for about. Fifteen days, and then they are prepared just like you would with drug. And then ship back to the site. So there's a tremendous amount of time that can be lost for patients during this period and then once those cells. Are received. Back The patient receives Olympic depleting chemotherapy regimen to kind of make space. And then the cells are infused and at that point they take off and they're on their own. These cell therapies have been more successful in hematological answers than in solid tumors. What why is that? Well I. Think if you look at the history of the Field Dang, what you will find is that. One of the principal challenges in building cellular therapies has been it. They can be incredibly potent. So in the case of something, we know very well like CD nineteen, this isn't a liquid tumor setting those cells with CD nineteen will eliminate. All targets in the body that express CD nineteen, and this is found in many lymphomas. leukaemias. But the problem is in the case of CD nineteen, you're eliminating all of the normal cells make CD nineteen, which are called E. Cells, and this is tolerable in the case of liquid tumors. But when you think about the antigens targets that we go after in solid tumors, those are often expressed in tissues that. Not Be safe if the immune system were to attack it. So we've been forced to really take steps back on how well we can make a car for solid tumors to try and make them smarter to help recognize friend from foe. So the great efficacy I think that you've seen in relapse refractory ael l.. As well as in diffuse large B. Cell Lymphoma, and now also I think exciting we in places like multiple myeloma getting that stain level of efficacy in solid tumors has required that people really think about the precision inside of the problem to make sure can get a potent car but also one that is safe.

Solid Tumors United States Carta B. Cell Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Field Dang Olympic Principal
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

Innovation Now

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

"The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket with cygnus resupply spacecraft on board will head to space. Later this month launching from the mid Atlantic regional spaceport at NASA Wallops flight facility. The Antares launch is the company's Fourteenth Commercial Resupply Services Mission. Cygnus will deliver NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station highlights of space station research facilitated by this launch include a plant habitat for radishes the test of a biologic drug that could be used for the. Treatment of leukemia and the Universal Waste Management System. A new compact toilet that astronauts can use on deep space exploration missions a new three, hundred sixty degree virtual reality camera from a Montreal based film. Studio will also be transported to the station. So astronauts can capture a future spacewalk in cinematic virtual reality cargo resupply from US companies insurers a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station and significantly increases masses ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

International Space Station Nasa Wallops Antares Cygnus Jennifer Pulley United States Nasa Atlantic Montreal
Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

Clark Howard

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

"Sue to medical sterilization plants on behalf of the half dozen cancer patients they have lived. Did school in close proximity to either stare genetics or barn for a Pallone linked time years and each of these persons have been diagnosed with either lymphoma. Leukemia or breast cancer attorney Kill calmly says they'll be able to prove the company's ethylene oxide, a known carcinogen made their clients ill and some 200 others have been diagnosed. Sarah Gen X and barred insists their levels of E T O are safe. WSB news time is 11 03.

Pallone Sarah Gen WSB SUE Lymphoma Leukemia Attorney
My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

Sounds of Science

05:54 min | 4 months ago

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

"I'm joined today by singer, songwriter and patient advocate, Gracie van brunt formerly based in Los Angeles. Gracie moved back to the Boston area before the Kovic pandemic. She's the recipient of the two thousand thirteen rare champions of hope patient advocacy. Award. From the nonprofit advocacy group global jeans at age two, she was diagnosed with a rare disease that I'm going to let her pronounce, and even before the pandemic, she was an expert at social distancing. She is here to share her story and her art welcome Gracie Hey. Thank you so much for having me what an amazing introduction. Thank you so much for being here. We're I'm really excited. This is gonNA. Be Fun. Yes, I'm so. Yeah you too. All right. So can you tell me about your disease and how is it pronounced? Yes. So it's called Schwartzman. Diamond. Syndrome. Like a Walkman, but just with an ass and then I'm in just like a like a diamond gem and then syndrome and it is a very rare disease that only affects I think around like five thousand people in the whole world how and I was diagnosed when I was two and now I'm twenty five. So it's a genetic chronic disease that is currently incurable. We are working on a cure for it, which hopefully can be developed soon, it is also life threatening. So the main aspect of the disease is your bone marrow and a lot. Lot of patients with SDS as we like to abbreviate, it have bone marrow issues where their bone marrow fails and We don't have enough blood counts really like we don't have enough platelets, not enough white cells and not enough red cells, which basically makes up your immune system So we get sick a lot quicker than a normal person would and we also a lot more prone to getting leukemia, which is a blood related cancer, and so the point of getting a bone marrow transplant would be to eliminate that risk. Let's start to talk about this and dig in Can you tell me about your song run ron run because I'm kind of obsessed. It's pretty great. Thank you. Run run run is a song that I wrote about my disease and having to live with it and confronted every day and The first line is my disease does not define me, but recently it's all I. can see and that is because three years ago in twenty seventeen, I got like a huge Epstein Barr virus. I just got really sick from having the Epstein Barr virus, which kind of like was the catalyst to me getting my heart transplant to use later, and so it's kind of just about having to actually confront my disease head on. which is something I haven't had to do for a long time because you know growing up after all of my hospital stints. I got gradually better and I was able to kind of dislike, put my disease into a little box and leave it there and On. A kind of live my life as a normal person. A. and. So when I got this Epstein, Barr in two, thousand, seventeen, it was a huge huge hit to my system. I was extremely sick for a few months and that ultimately led to me having to get a transplant but. Up, until then, I. You know I could be a normal teenager like do normal activities and. not really have to put a lot of emphasis on my body or my health. But because of this catalyst I'll say Really really. Forced me to take my disease out of that little box. I had it in and really really face it. So the chorus goes. To run run run just like I've always done and I leave it alone. But I, have nowhere else to go which is me really just like having to confront the fact that you know I'm still sick I will never be a normal bio typical person and I have to do this transplant for like to better my own quality of life and Just. Focus on. My health more than anything. So that's pretty much what it's about, and then like a little fun fact is. I had already written it before I got the news about my bone marrow transplant. So I had my doctor's appointment on December twenty, fourth two, thousand eighteen, which is like Yay, Christmas, time such great news. But so I had my doctor's appointment, and I already had like a little demo of this song done because Louis is my boyfriend and he's a wonderful producer and we had already been working on Um songs for my upcoming EP and then we'd already done this one. So the first thing I did when I came home was I actually just listened to this song to make me feel better. Because, it's just like it was just the best remedy for me because it is exactly how I felt in this. Little compact. Song.

Gracie Van Brunt Epstein Barr Producer RON Gracie Los Angeles Boston SDS Schwartzman Leukemia
My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

Sounds of Science

05:43 min | 4 months ago

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

"I'm joined today by singer, songwriter and patient advocate, Gracie van brunt formerly based in Los Angeles. Gracie moved back to the Boston area before the Kovic pandemic. She's the recipient of the two thousand thirteen rare champions of hope patient advocacy. Award. From the nonprofit advocacy group global jeans at age two, she was diagnosed with a rare disease that I'm going to let her pronounce, and even before the pandemic, she was an expert at social distancing. She is here to share her story and her art welcome Gracie Hey. Thank you so much for having me what an amazing introduction. Thank you so much for being here. We're I'm really excited. This is gonNA. Be Fun. Yes, I'm so. Yeah you too. All right. So can you tell me about your disease and how is it pronounced? Yes. So it's called Schwartzman. Diamond. Syndrome. Like a Walkman, but just with an ass and then I'm in just like a like a diamond gem and then syndrome and it is a very rare disease that only affects I think around like five thousand people in the whole world how and I was diagnosed when I was two and now I'm twenty five. So it's a genetic chronic disease that is currently incurable. We are working on a cure for it, which hopefully can be developed soon, it is also life threatening. So the main aspect of the disease is your bone marrow and a lot. Lot of patients with SDS as we like to abbreviate, it have bone marrow issues where their bone marrow fails and We don't have enough blood counts really like we don't have enough platelets, not enough white cells and not enough red cells, which basically makes up your immune system So we get sick a lot quicker than a normal person would and we also a lot more prone to getting leukemia, which is a blood related cancer, and so the point of getting a bone marrow transplant would be to eliminate that risk. Let's start to talk about this and dig in Can you tell me about your song run ron run because I'm kind of obsessed. It's pretty great. Thank you. Run run run is a song that I wrote about my disease and having to live with it and confronted every day and The first line is my disease does not define me, but recently it's all I. can see and that is because three years ago in twenty seventeen, I got like a huge Epstein Barr virus. I just got really sick from having the Epstein Barr virus, which kind of like was the catalyst to me getting my heart transplant to use later, and so it's kind of just about having to actually confront my disease head on. which is something I haven't had to do for a long time because you know growing up after all of my hospital stints. I got gradually better and I was able to kind of dislike, put my disease into a little box and leave it there and On. A kind of live my life as a normal person. A. and. So when I got this Epstein, Barr in two, thousand, seventeen, it was a huge huge hit to my system. I was extremely sick for a few months and that ultimately led to me having to get a transplant but. Up, until then, I. You know I could be a normal teenager like do normal activities and. not really have to put a lot of emphasis on my body or my health. But because of this catalyst I'll say Really really. Forced me to take my disease out of that little box. I had it in and really really face it. So the chorus goes. To run run run just like I've always done and I leave it alone. But I, have nowhere else to go which is me really just like having to confront the fact that you know I'm still sick I will never be a normal bio typical person and I have to do this transplant for like to better my own quality of life and Just. Focus on. My health more than anything. So that's pretty much what it's about, and then like a little fun fact is. I had already written it before I got the news about my bone marrow transplant. So I had my doctor's appointment on December twenty, fourth two, thousand eighteen, which is like Yay, Christmas, time such great news. But so I had my doctor's appointment, and I already had like a little demo of this song done because Louis is my boyfriend and he's a wonderful producer and we had already been working on Um songs for my upcoming EP and then we'd already done this one. So the first thing I did when I came home was I actually just listened to this song to make me feel better.

Gracie Van Brunt Epstein Barr Gracie Los Angeles Boston Producer SDS Schwartzman RON Leukemia
Undruggable Drugs

a16z

08:54 min | 7 months ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
Take Back Your Life  Coping with Change

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:05 min | 7 months ago

Take Back Your Life Coping with Change

"For here today to talk about how caregivers can take back their life but also more specifically. We're GONNA talk about change in the changing roles. We face when we're dealing with somebody living with Alzheimer's so thanks for joining me Lauren. My pleasure thank you Chen. I'm glad to be here. There's a lot going on but The caregiving which I thought had sort of ended is ongoing My husband passed away three weeks ago and my son is in a medically induced coma right now dealing with both leukemia and he did get the virus so he's where holding positive that he's GonNa come through this so my my daughter and I are healthy and supporting each other through this. Well I can relate as you know. My mom passed away on March thirty first. It's a little bit of surprise although it probably shouldn't have been but other than that everybody's doing well we don't have any of the other issues that you're dealing with. Was I really appreciate that? You can take the time and enjoy me in the midst of all of that at some very One one of the things that I tell people because I'm seeing clients doing video zoom telephone sessions and I say it's very grounding for me because what can we do. That's part of the issue everybody's dealing with that. We feel very powerless and part of being a caregiver is we like to feel in control. We like to feel empowered. That we can make a difference that we can do things. So it's all very surreal for sure but I think it's very surreal for a lot of caregivers especially if you're not living with your parents or spouse or whoever who has out timers your caregiving role has changed in And it changed in a different way if you are living with your loved one because you can have the same outside support that you had previously so change happens whether we instigate it or not definitely evident right now our living in a pandemic and trying to figure out how we're going to restart our country and go back quote unquote back to normal. Even though I don't think that's going to happen I'm hoping for some improved normal. It will definitely be a different normal. Yeah I hope it's different in a better way absolutely and I think that it can be but

Coma Alzheimer Chen Lauren Leukemia
Rishi Kapoor, Bollywood Leading Man From a Film Dynasty, Dies at 67

Radio From Hell

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Rishi Kapoor, Bollywood Leading Man From a Film Dynasty, Dies at 67

"Rishi Kapoor Bollywood leading man from a film dynasty a wildly popular actor in one of Bollywood and that's the Indian film industry Bollywood's most celebrated families died on Thursday in Mumbai he was sixty seven the family confirmed his death in a statement Mr Kapoor had been diagnosed with leukemia in twenty eighteen was admitted to a hospital in Mumbai on Wednesday about the statement did not list cause of death the news rocked India just a day after another Bollywood hero the veteran actor your fun Colin died Mr Kapoor was best known as a romantic hero with the charm and charisma the quickly made him one of Bollywood's leading man of the seventies and eighties later he began taking on more supporting roles in notable character parts as

Mumbai Mr Kapoor India Colin Rishi Kapoor
Coronavirus: Trump retweets call to fire gov't expert Fauci

Rush Limbaugh

00:59 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus: Trump retweets call to fire gov't expert Fauci

"Governor Wednesday Cuomo said then he wants partly to hold cloudy talks high with governors fifty Murphy two and Lamont about a regional Richard a wedding eventual at the weather re channel opening on seven but he says ten first W. there's O. a lot R. of information this report out there is sponsored to be absorbed by unbound you look around the world dot you org see right now warning there are young signs people people across across from from the the countries countries world world facing facing who who a a have have tough tough opened opened choice choice and and continue continue my my point point their their dream dream is is of of to to education education our our team team or or drop drop out out I I to to help help want want their their families families to to learn learn put put food food from from on on those those the the table table other other countries countries you you can can president president help help change change trump trump their their will will future future no no doubt doubt in in be be a a asked asked single single about about moment moment it it today see he how has far retweeted your support a message can go on Twitter at featuring sundown criticism dot org of Dr Wall Anthony Street Fauci right now the Dow from is Sunday down night four retweeted hundred thirty a message nine points on Twitter nasdaq that was is critical off thirty of Dr nine Anthony found and G. and the S. included and P. is down the hashtag just about forty fire found that is she brought you by opposed the T. J. Martell by conservative foundation activists joined in California the T. J. Martell foundation takes issue in with the fight doctor against found leukemia G. on cancer CNN and on aids Sunday your where he support acknowledged helps that facilitate putting social cutting edge distancing research measures that will lead in to place more effective earlier treatments and would save have more made lives visit TJ Martel dot org to learn about music's promise for a cure next news at two thirty breaking news at one starter David Lambert Michael riddle in the morning six to ten tomorrow morning I'm Jeff McKinney seven ten W. O. R. N. B. C. news radio station fifty nine degrees now it's two oh six W. O.

T. J. Martell Foundation W. O. R. N. B. C. Jeff Mckinney Tj Martel President Trump Lamont Governor Wednesday Cuomo David Lambert Michael Riddle CNN Murphy California T. J. Martell G. Dr Wall Anthony Street Fauci Twitter Richard
The Show Must Go On: Wrestlemania Is Still Happening

ESPN Daily

11:37 min | 8 months ago

The Show Must Go On: Wrestlemania Is Still Happening

"In the WWE. That is we say what our jobs are. Every day is to put smiles on people's faces all over the globe and we truly believe that and then this time maybe more than any other in in my memory people need those smiles right now more than anything that's WWE executive vice president. Paul Leveque better known as triple h talking about the decision to move forward with this weekend's wrestlemainia thirty six. It's the closest thing to live sports. That's happened in a wild but with no fans permitted the arena and concerns over the safety of the wrestlers and staff. What will the showcase of the immortals look like in the age of Corona virus? I mean at times. It's Friday April third this. Espn daily Greg. You're ready to talk wrassling. Damn Right Excel it talking about sports with funny named people trying to punch each other in the face. Greg Luzinski is a senior writer for. Espn you can check out. Lapsed Fan's guide to wrestlemainia on. Espn DOT COM. Yeah actually I wanted to ask you think. Most people know your name from hockey. How long have you been on the Wrestlemainia beat my wrestling a Bona Fides? Go back to when I was a we child watching Hulk Hogan and the more cartoonish W. F. which really sort of capture my heart as you know through the decades there have been times where it's been okay to say a wrestling fan and then sometimes when they've you don't mention it to a lot of people. I think we're in an okay dimension it part of wrestling right now. We're sort of a necessary to mentioned it portion because there's nothing else going on and wrestling is somehow improbably still happening. How is this even occurring? Well the way it's been occurring for the W. E. and their competition. A W which Ariza. Tnt network is that they've been holding shows in empty facilities but for me that means holding their weekly television programs raw and smackdown at the W. E. Performance Center a training facility in Orlando and what they've been doing literally holding it inside of an Empty Gymnasium. I'm the game triple agent. I would like to personally. Welcome you to the. Wwe Performance Center now. This show will be different from anything you've ever seen before. Sit Back Relax. And if you can't forget about the world around you and let. Wwe Do what we do. Let us put a smile on your face to start. That was a little bit awkward because the wrestlers would come out and they would look to the crowd. That wasn't there and they would do all of the usual pantomime they would do to get the fans excited except there was no fans getting excited. You see it doesn't matter if there's ten thousand fans at their zero fans because this is how I I remember that can only way I could describe it as it's like when you're at chucky cheese and the animatronic band starts playing into an empty room. It's still playing. It's still doing. Its own thing. But there's nobody that Iraq to it and that was like the first couple of weeks of this and also they've been utilizing more space around the performance center lake attacks in the parking lot and stuff like that to try to make it feel more than just trying to recreate something inside of an empty room derailed. Me With that chucky cheese analogy this. It's the it's the rock afire explosion ban. Greg get it right. There's nothing better than being in an empty room with the rock afire. Explosion Band and just hearing the gears clunk together. It's jarring but also satisfying so wrestlemainia. Thirty six is happening on Saturday. What was the original plan for the event the original plan was to hold wrestlemainia? Thirty six at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa and this was going to be a huge event for those who don't know it's not just simply wrestlemainia. Inside of a stadium. It is an entire city being overrun by. Wwe events you have the Access Fan Festival you have the WWE Hall of Fame Ceremony. Where wrestlers of old honored and put into a virtual hall of fame. Physical building doesn't exist quite yet and then also after Wrestlemainia the next day on Monday. It's tradition to hold Monday night raw in that same city so this isn't just simply one event on a on a on a Saturday night for The city of Tampa. It was a whole citywide sort of celebration for wrestling as of March. Third The W. E. and Tampa's mayor said there were no plans to postpone the event the W. E. said look the health safety of our fans and performance of our top priorities. But we remain committed to hosting Wrestlemainia at Raymond. James Stadium fast forward to March twelfth. Now you have Hillsborough County's commissioner less Miller saying he'll probably have to cancel wrestlemainia if the. Wwe doesn't make the decision itself because of the virus pandemic governor Rod Santa's that points that cities and counties should cancel mass gatherings over the next thirty days and so it was becoming a worse than worse. Look for W. E. to keep wrestlemainia scheduled framing Jamie Stadium on March sixteenth. They made the decision not to have upwards of sixty five seventy thousand people come to a stadium during a virus outbreak and instead moved into their performance center in Orlando. It's a two night event April fourth and April Fifth. How has wwe justified or explained their decision to go on with us? Well there's the public explanation and then there's the assumed explanation that the public explanation according to the WWe is that it is for the fans the fans are the lifeblood of the organization it is a panacea the fans to be able to hold this event. It is going to give them some comfort in a time of confusion and trouble. It's also going to be arrested for the performers themselves who you know are looking for some direction or looking for some focus in life during uncertain times. And that's sort of the the public explanation for this. If you know about the wrestling business you know that part of this is the fact that story lines that are going to have their big payoff. At wrestlemainia are a month long process. All the story lines all the action. They all run through. Vince McMahon they are on one track. And they're going to stay on that track through hell or high water. These are storylines narratives that the W has been planning to wrap up in culminate at Wrestlemainia happens every year and then they kind of moved to new stuff after that so from a function process to have wrestlemainia occur and wrap up which are the signature feuds and storylines of their season. If you will was a pretty important thing was there any blowback to all of this. Yeah I think there has been some in the rest in wrestling circles amongst wrestling reporters and and amongst the fans wondering okay. We are looking around the sports world. We're looking around the entertainment world. We're seeing literally every pro league every concert tour Disney on ice everything canceling out of concern about corona virus and yet professional wrestling roles on as a weekly television product so there is a bit of confusion. There're two why this continues while every other facet of sports entertainment seems to have stopped. What about amongst the wrestlers did any of them have reservations about participating in this one particular did so wrestler by the name of Roman reigns one of the bigger stars and WWe had a very highly publicized battle with leukemia? He left in October. Two thousand eighteen returned to WWE IN FEBRUARY. Two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and he's compromised so news started to break recently through some of the quote unquote dirt sheets in wrestling. The ones who report the rumor. Innuendo that Roman reigns was not going to be participating in his scheduled match against Goldberg for the Universal Championship at Wrestlemainia. Wwe basically said hey look. This is understandable situation. The health and safety of our performers paramount Sakiz. The biggest name that we know will not be participating but quite frankly until we see what events they air this weekend we won't know who else may have decided to pull out or had to be quarantined or any of that nature because they're being very clandestine about what the card will actually be the first wrestlemainia. That's taking place over multiple nights. It's also the first wrestlemainia that is going to be completely pretaped. So when did they take this weekend's event and what steps did they take to ensure the safety of the wrestlers in the people working on it? It's been a race against time for me. As I mentioned the performance center is in Orlando Florida Orlando Florida. Recently issued a stay at home order March twenty sixth that really closed out all the essential businesses. Just like we've seen all over the country so the WBZ has been racing. It's time to not only record wrestlemainia matches but also record. Future television matches programming as well as far as the safety of the wrestlers. It is a closed control facility. Stephanie McMahon the daughter of owner Vince McMahon who is the brand manager for WWe said to variety. Recently there's extensive testing screening. When you first come into the facility regardless of whether you're a talent crew member or anyone else if you have a temperature taken and you have a temperature over a hundred point four degrees you're automatically asked to leave also any wrestlers de out of the country or in contact anybody who's been out of the country you're not actually allowed to enter the facility. Either so they are taking some safety measures as far as trying to make sure anyone exhibiting symptoms isn't allowed in the facility or anyone who might have been exposed to corona virus through travel or relationships isn't allowed in the facility. Which is you know what you see from other companies as well but obviously there's no way to be sure without Virus testing whether anybody actually has the center of city so they tape this before the stay at home order. Does that mean this is going to be the last big event like this or is this something they're going to keep on doing? There is a lot of sort of mystery as to how these wrestling organizations are going to continue to keep on doing their thing. I'm not sure what the regulations mean for the performance in Orlando. I don't know if this is GonNa be it for their use facility or not. I can't tell you that. Eighty w their competition with also filming inside of an empty facility in Florida's well and there was news this week that they're gonNA be taking their show to some undisclosed to record matches going forward so I don't know if it's GonNa be a shell game where these companies have to start going to the few places around the country that don't have restrictions in place or what have you. But it's clear from both cases that even though they're putting a bunch of their product in the bag right now in our taping matches and episodes for future use on television. The show apparently is going to go on

WWE Wrestlemainia Wrestling Greg Luzinski Orlando Wwe Performance Center Espn Vince Mcmahon Tampa Wwe Hall Of Fame Ceremony Raymond James Stadium Paul Leveque W. E. Hulk Hogan Stephanie Mcmahon Executive Vice President Orlando Florida Orlando Florid
Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

"The Seattle based infectious disease research institute will soon begin trials on an investigational immunotherapy that could be a promising treatment option for covert nineteen it's based on immune cells in the body known as natural killer in case cells which are already used to treat leukemia multiple myeloma patients the immune cells to get the sites of active via affection kill the virus in induce an immune response that controls the if infection the trial will begin soon with approximately a hundred patients diagnosed with a coded nineteen infection

Seattle Leukemia Multiple Myeloma
"leukemia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"leukemia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So all we did the transplant put in the central line catheter. That was a little bit were deal. It was started bleeding too much like filler die whatever I do. But they just trudged through it. And then you know after about. Out. Four or five months everything successful transplant land. Well, my brother. Stop taking the anti rejection medication and his body rejected. The transplant. So. So he know of the change direction that you were heading down that. Yeah, we're talking about that time. Yeah. We did. We we mentioned that I told him I think I wanna do this and something that was he was aware of how how do you think of your brother and your job now? So every time I go into work. You know, it's funny because the the unit that we did the transplant a lot of the whole. Employees who work there though. Call me Benjamin, I'll call them Benjamin back like him walk out of the hey, Benjamin Benjamin that's not Benjamin e man out. We have something going on or say to like, one of the female, nurses, and they're like, no, that's that's that's not, you know, people there that then you end up working with them eat you remember that while a so like Toby, gene Dulcie those who's actually the educator. She's on she's on our team for the leukemia. Lymphoma society, she's educator for that department. Okay. Shoes actually a patient on the same unit with member. Other jury members story we're talking about. He was having a hard time with the treatment throwing a lot. And she offered to take them down to buy a slice of human eat pizza. Okay. So so while I've got you here ICU nurse. Stories. I mean, do you just have stories for days? Are you the one that you had a party? Somebody says tell me I see you stories. Yeah. There is a. People are different breed of people where the kind of people it's like the bodies are our career rights. We we see a lot of things. Yeah. I've seen lots lots of interesting things, we we. We're not judgmental. Of course. And and really at the end of the day. It's like you're here with me for this amount of time in my job is to deliver you healthy out of this situation. Regardless of what you make whatever you came in with whatever you did to yourself or to your body. That's not my role my role right now is to take all of them all that I've acquired over these years and get you healthy and deliver you with a heart rate and blood pressure in the day. I love that therapist saying so people come to be with their their things that they are going through and the, but with mine, it's a lot harder at times to try to sort through the reality. They're afraid of being judged. You know, how much am I going to let this person know in the ICU? It's there, you know. What's one? Yeah. Here stories that don't quite match up. But correct. Correct. And then and then, you know, you'll get the you'll give them that live from really really really is. That would happen is or my this is the one that like. It kind of gets me. The question marks. We're gonna give you drugs. We're gonna give you medication that actually can interfere with some of the drugs that you can't tell me that. Because if I don't know I give him something I can actually kill you. And I want to my mind my job or my career is trying to save you my I'm not gonna judge you taking this. We need to tell me what you've taken beforehand because if you if you've taken something that I don't know. And I come I mean, one of them that I'm just going to throw out the taboo, one is the blue Bill and a lot of people. Yes. But if you're if you are on something like that. We need to know a head of time..

Benjamin Benjamin Lymphoma leukemia Toby gene Dulcie five months
"leukemia" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:32 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KTRH

"Leukemia's Levi's with us tonight on ground zero to talk about is the host of the nuclear hotseat. We're talking about the problems with the Wolsey fire that's burning at the moment. And how it started a facility that was considered a nuclear reactor was a nuclear reactor facility now owned by Boeing was originally owned by Rocketdyne question is how do you organize an independent investigation into this? Because from what I understand more people are concerned about climate change and putting my towards the studies, and and all this other stuff clearcutting and forest management. But what about the people who are concerned about inhaling this type of stuff? They had just gotten a huge boost in terms of visibility. The bad news is so many people are being exposed to God only knows what however what is done is. It has broken this site out from obscurity, there are people who have lived in the area for decades who didn't know about it because it was so well hidden now, it's suddenly headline news, certainly in the Los Angeles papers, and it's showing up in publications around the world, you mentioned the Kardashians. They have now been quoted in multiple sources talking about this very issue. So the cat's out of the bat out of the bag, and it's not going back in. That's the first thing. The second thing is that people need to pay attention to what after this have been saying. Because the last thing we ever want to be able to say is I told you so and we've been saying I told you so except now we've got people listening, so they can for social responsibility in Los Angeles has been spearheading a lot of these issues. And they need the support right now. They're the ones who sent out the press releases that all of a sudden cracks through the brick wall of the media. And they're the ones who have gotten the vast amount of information out. I did a special on nuclear hot seat this week which is at nuclear hot seat dot com. I invite people to listen because it's got a lot of injuries. But one of the people I spoke with is with a group called Fairwinds energy education on the east coast Arnie Gunderson, and he is behind the twitting to data group, and he has put together a system for people to be able to have the dust in their homes tested. If they are within twenty five miles of the savage Zana field. They can't do it yet. They have to wait until after the fire is over and on my program. He get some specific information as to what has to be done. The testing will be done for free to the first level. And then if a hot particle is found. There's a more involved system after that. But all of those of us who've been working to reveal the truth about nuclear are pulling together at the same time to try to reveal what's going on there and try and force action to take place. That's that's going to keep this in the public eye and get some results and the only way we can do that is with a lot of support one of the things I would like to mention this has been asked specifically of the mom, I mentioned earlier, Melissa bums said whose daughter has twice had leukemia. He's been very ill that he put up a petition up unchanged dot org. If you go to change dot org slash Santa Susanna. It will come up, and it's headline. No more cancer in kids, and it goes on for she's got over four hundred fifty thousand signatures. We're up against Boeing we need over a million. So I urge all of your listeners to sign and then get one other person that they notice. And for them to get one other person to sign that we've got to create noise, we've got to create a groundswell of energy and attention. We cannot let this one drop with all the things that are going on that can distract people. And heaven knows there are so many things out there that can pull our attention. We can't look away from this one because this is our genetic future. One of the things we've explored on nuclear hot seat is the fact that when they give the impact of radiation on the human body that is based on an ex ternal radiation dose to a male military body, meaning a Caucasian male of European or North American descent who is a hundred and fifty pounds. It has been found from data analysis after here Shema, which is the longest survival after exposure to nuclear radiation longest study that has been done. They discovered that women who were exposed to radiation or one and a half times more likely than the. Male model. The Dow reference man as he's called to develop cancer, children are even more vulnerable. A little boy who's exposed to count is exposed to radiation in childhood has a five times greater chance of developing some form of cancer in his lifetime. Then the model demand and a little girl is ten times more likely to develop cancer and little girls are the genetic future of our species and should be the ones who are most protected and this again is going with external doses. How it's being calculated an internal dose is far more dangerous because there's no distance between the radionuclide spewing out. It's it's whatever those atomic particles are and your internal organs. I'm just curious because I was commenting with a friend of mine the other day since these fires have begun tonight. We have the fires going on, of course in July, June, July. We had fires everywhere on the west coast. All of the world and the air quality here got really bad. And I never really felt. I mean, I have lung problems. I've had the problem since I had a a number of embolisms are number of clots get into my lungs awhile ago, and lately, though this situation here this fire here has been more irritating to my lungs. I feel like this burning sensations if I've been smoking a lot of cigarettes are and I went to pot party or something I had smoked lot of marijuana or something, and it just really is hurting an irritating. And I and I worry, you know, when I first read about this. I thought how far is radioactivity this radioactive ash coming because when we wake up here in Oregon, we wake up to the soot and the smog in and and the clouds, they burn off, you know, during the day when the sun comes up a little breeze comes in, but we have this stuff hovering. And I know when Fukushima happened there were worried that a lot of this so-called deluded radio-activity was going to go into the Pacific, and they were detecting it off the coast. So. So I'm curious about how far you'll the smoke is gone. And because I know when Chernobyl had a fire in there in the woods nurture noble people were getting spikes of radiation in England and other places, and they were curious as to whether or not Chernobyl's ash radioactive ash was spewing out over Europe. And I'm just curious how far of a reach this has. We don't know. And it's still going on. You know, we're we're not at the end of the story at we're somewhere in the middle of it. Hopefully, we're in the fire part of the middle of it as opposed to the early part of the middle. It is. And also just because it wafts out. And then it lands. It's not over because the next time a win come of its comes in the dust. It's spreads that much further and it spreads that much further. If it rains, we should only be so lucky to get rain here in southern California. If it rains it gets into the ground water, and then it comes up in the plant. It comes up in our food supply animals. Eat the food we eat the animals, it's there, and that when you eat it, or when you drink it it is internal contamination when you breathe it it's internal contamination, and it's gonna be hard to even detect. It can become a cancer can be. It can be leukemia. It could be a number of things that we're exposing ourselves to with this people who live in that area of danger impact, I was reading that they're saying that it would be wise to get gas masks. I don't even know if that's too late is that too to lady gas masters, should they get gas masks. I think a respirator if you're especially if you're in smokey area is not a bad idea. I happen to live only thirty miles away from the saddest Susannah field lamp, fortunately, I am upwind of it. But we've had shifts in wind where it's been very smoking in this area. I tend to stay indoors with my dog, and I've got my A filters cranked up. All the way, I also because of my research and because of the program another program I put together under wrapped awareness dot com. It's radiation awareness protection talk. I know things that I can do about supplementation and taking zeolite drops and other things to help protect myself. I will give you and your listeners one thing if they're going through any kind of a smokey or possibly radiological area. If you're driving through always keep your car on research for the circulation of the air. So you're not pulling an air from the outside. You are you are, you know, recirculating the air. And after this event is over. I would say change your air filter in your car, and you might want to advise your mechanic to get some kind of a radiation monitor justifying out if anything is showing up in the shop. It's just it's just terrifying. That you know, I I do not see one single mainstream source, and I'm talking about network news reporting happened, and why why are we going to hear it on the mainstream? I feel like the only radio show that's discussed this. I probably Amulya radio show. This discuss this because everybody else is talking about climate change talking about directed energy weapons. Which of course, I'll probably talk about later on in the show. What I'm saying is is that this is a huge disaster. This is a this is a huge story that should be on mainstream mentioned warn the people. And like, I said, it was hilarious. Because once I started talking about this somebody had referred me to a story that was done about Kim Kardashian the Kardashians. Angry that they have been exposed to that. You know, what can be done about it keep talking about it? Please CLYDE because this is potentially a nuclear disaster. I mean, you're right about Chernobyl when they had their forest fires. There was tremendous fear and panic over it. And I think the reason that we aren't hearing about it in mainstream media is the desire to not panic the people, it's the they're they're Missy don't worry your pretty little head about it routine. And they don't want us knowing the truth on so many levels is, you know, they don't want us knowing the truth. And this is a true. It's not, you know, something that could be dismissed as fantasy or delusion. Karen? This is a physical reality right here in front of us now, and it must be dealt with. And the means must be discovered to be dealt with it. And the people responsible must be held responsible for doing their job for getting the data for cleaning it up for letting us know, and we have to keep looking for things that we can do to support our health to protect our homes. Our families our children all of it because we can't rely on the government. We can't rely on officials who are out there. None of the bureaucracy is going to do anything to try and help us. So we've gotta figure it out and put it together on ourselves. And there is a very strong interconnect, anti-nuclear groups and radiation research.

cancer Leukemia Los Angeles Boeing Rocketdyne Levi Zana field Oregon Fairwinds Melissa bums Santa Susanna Europe marijuana California Kim Kardashian Shema Arnie Gunderson Pacific
"leukemia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Leukemia's. Ground zero to talk about this. She's the host of the nuclear hotseat. We're talking about the problems with the Wolsey fire that's burning at the moment. And how it started a facility that was considered a nuclear reactor. It was a nuclear reactor facility now owned by Boeing was originally owned by Rocketdyne question is how do you organize an independent investigation into this? Because from what I understand more people are concerned about climate change and putting towards the studies, and and all this other stuff clearcutting and forest management. But what about the people who are concerned about inhaling this type of stuff? They have just gotten a huge boost in terms of visibility. The bad news is so many people are being exposed to Donald knows what so ever what it is done is it has broken this site out from obscurity, there are people who've lived in the area for decades who didn't know about it because it was so well hidden now if suddenly headline news, certainly in the Los Angeles papers, and it's showing up in publications around the world, you mentioned the Kardashians. They have now been quoted in multiple sources talking about this very issue. So the cat's out of the bat out of the bag, and it's not going back in. That's the first thing. The second thing is that people need to pay attention to what after this have been saying. Because the last thing we ever want to be able to say is I told you so and we've been saying I told you so except now we've got people listening. So is it for social responsibility in Los Angeles has been spearheading a lot of these issues. And they need the support right now. They are the ones who sent out the press releases that all of a sudden cracks through the brick wall of the media. And they're the ones who have gotten the vast amount of inflammation out. I did a special nuclear hot seat this week which is nuclear hot seat dot com. I invite people to listen because it's got a lot of interviews. But one of the people I spoke with is with a group called Fairwinds energy education on the east coast Arnie Gunderson, and he is behind the pudding too. He a data group, and he has put together a system for people to be able to have the dust in their homes test. If they are within twenty five miles of the sandwiches and a field left. They can't do it yet. They have to wait until after the fire is over and on my program. He gives some specific information as to what has to be done. The testing will be done for free to the first level. And then if a hot particle is found. There's a more involved system after that. But all of those of us who've been working to reveal the truth about nuclear are pulling together at the same time to try to reveal what's going on there and try and force action to take place. That's that's going to keep this in the public eye and get some results and the only way we can do that is with a lot of support one of the things I would like to mention this has been asked. Specifically, the mom I mentioned earlier Melissa bumps said whose daughter has twice had leukemia. She's been very ill that she put a petition up unchanged dot org. If you go to change dot org slash Santa Susanna. It will come up, and it's headline. No, more cancer in kids, and it goes on from there. She's got over four hundred fifty thousand signatures. We're up against Boeing we need over a million. So I urge all of your listeners to sign and then get one other person that they notice. For them to get one other person to sign that we've got to create noise, we've got to create a groundswell of energy and attention. We cannot let this one drop with all the things that are going on that can distract people. And heaven knows there are so many things out there that can pull our attention. We can't look away from this one because this is our genetic future. One of the things we've explored on nuclear hot seat is the fact that when they give the impact of radiation on the human body that is based on an external radiation dose to a male military body, meaning a Caucasian male of European or North American descent who is a hundred and fifty pounds. It has been found from data analysis after hero Shema, which is the longest survival after exposure to nuclear radiation longest study that has been done. They discovered that women who were exposed to radiation or one and a half times more likely than the. Male model the reference man as he's called to develop cancer, children are even more vulnerable. A little boy who's supposed to count is exposed to radiation in childhood has a five times greater chance of developing some form of cancer in his lifetime. Then the model of the mess and a little girl is ten times more likely to develop cancer and little girls are the genetic future of our species and should be the ones who are most protected and this again is going with extra doses. How it's being calculated an internal dose is far more dangerous because there's no distance between the radionuclide spewing out. It's it's whatever those atomic particles are and your internal organs. I'm just curious because I was commenting with a friend of mine the other day since these fires begun. We had the fires. Going on, of course in July, June, July. We had fires everywhere on the west coast all of the world and the air quality here got really bad. And I never really felt. I mean, I have lung problems. I've had the problem since I had a number of embolisms or number of clots get into my lungs awhile ago, and lately, though this situation here this fire here has been more irritating my lungs, I feel like this burning sensations. If I've been smoking a lot of cigarettes are I went to a party or something. I smoked a lot of marijuana or something, and it just really is hurting an irritating. And I and I worry, you know, when I first read about this. I thought how far is radio activity this radioactive ash coming because when we wake up here in Oregon, we wake up to the soot, and the smog and the clouds they burn off during the day when the sun comes up a little breeze comes in, but we have this stuff hovering. And I know when Fukushima happened there were worried that a lot of this so-called deluded radio-activity was going to go into the Pacific, and they were detecting it off the coast. So I'm curious about how far the smoke has gone. And because I know when Chernobyl had a fire in the woods nurture noble people were getting spikes radiation in England and other places, and they were curious as to whether or not Chernobyl's ash radioactive was spewing out over Europe. And I'm just curious how far of a reach this has we don't know. And it's still going on. You know, we're not at the end of the story at we're somewhere in. The middle of it. Hopefully, we're in the fire part of the middle of it as opposed to the early part of the middle. It is. And also just because it wafts out. And then it lands. It's not over because the next time a win come of it comes it is in the dust. It's spreads that much further and it spreads that much further. If it rains, we should only be so lucky to get rain here in southern California. If it rains it gets into the groundwater, and then it comes up in the plants. It comes up in our food supply animals. Eat the food we eat the animals, it's there, and that when you eat it, or when you drink it it is internal contamination when you breathe it it's internal contamination, and it's going to be hard to even detect. It can become a a cancer can be. It can be leukemia could be a number of things that we're exposing ourselves to this people who live in that area of danger impact, I was reading that they're saying that it would be wise to get gas masks. I don't even know if that's too late is that to lady gas masks or should they get gas masks? Yeah. I think a respirator if you're especially if you're in a smokey area is not a bad idea. I happen to live only thirty miles away from the Santa Susanna field. Lamp, fortunately, I'm upwind of it. But we've had shifts in wind where it's been very smoking in this area. I tend to stay indoors with my dog. And I've got my hep A filters cranked up. All the way, I also because of my research and because of the program another program I put together under wrapped awareness dot com. It's radiation awareness protection talk. I know things that I can do about supplementation and taking zeolite drops and other things to help protect myself. I will give you and your listeners one thing if they're going through any kind of a smokey or possibly radiological area. If you're driving through always keep your car on research for they circulation of the air. So you're not fooling an air from the outside. You are you are, you know, recirculating the air. And after this event is over. Over I would say change your air filter in your car, and you might want to advise your mechanic to get some kind of a radiation monitor justifying out if anything is showing up in the shop. This is just terrifying. That you know, I do not see one single mainstream source, and I'm talking about network news reporting happened. Why why why are we going to hear it on the mainstream? I feel like the only radio show that's discussed this. I probably am the only radio show this discuss this because everybody else is talking about climate change. They're talking about a directed energy weapons. Which of course, I'll probably talk about later on in the show. What I'm saying is is that this is a huge disaster. This is a huge story that should be on mainstream. It should warn the people. And like, I said, it was hilarious. Because once I started talking about this somebody had referred me to a story that was done about Kim Kardashian the Kardashians. Angry that they had been exposed to that. You know, what can be done about it? Keep talking about it. Please quiet because this is potentially nuclear disaster. I mean, you're right about Chernobyl when they had their forest fires. There was tremendous fear and panic over it. And I think the reason that we aren't hearing about it in mainstream media is the desire to not panic the people, it's the they're they're Missy don't worry your pretty little head about it routine. And they don't want us knowing the truth, and so many levels, as you know, they don't want us knowing the truth. And this is a true. It's not, you know, something that could be dismissed as fantasy or delusion. Karen? This is a physical reality right here in front of us now, and it must be dealt with. And the means must be discovered to be dealt with. And the people responsible must be held responsible for doing their job for getting the data for cleaning it up for letting us know, and we have to keep looking for things that we can do to support our health to protect our homes. Our families our children all of it because we can't rely on the government. We can't rely on officials who are out there. None of the bureaucracy is going to do anything to try and help us. So we've got to figure it out and put it together on ourselves. And there is a very strong interconnect, anti-nuclear groups and radiation research groups around the country around the world that are actively giving their inflammation. Again, if people can listen to my nuclear hop. Feet this week. It's episode three eighty six is.

cancer Leukemia Boeing Los Angeles Rocketdyne Donald Santa Susanna Santa Susanna field Oregon Fairwinds Europe California marijuana Melissa bumps Kim Kardashian Shema Arnie Gunderson Pacific
"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Standard for what the what the health effects of a particular chemical are and so they are used not just by federal regulators these at program offices that UPA but. Are also used by state regulators and they're very well respected internationally so so if if a report like this, were to come out finding finding you know major risks associated with formaldehyde at low levels of exposure most likely would lead. To or you know could? Very easily to stricter regulations down the road but even, beyond that there's a concern around class, action lawsuits. Cleanup lawsuits. If anybody's seen the movie Erin Brockovich. Is that that sort of thing where and and the leukemia finding is particularly controversial For that reason he is one of the most common cancers in the country, and so if, if if a report like this is on the. Books saying there's a, link to formaldehyde then industry could, be looking, at lawsuits from from anybody who gets leukemia and thinks that the from hide industry may have had something to do with it Johnson and Johnson just faced a class action lawsuit related to baby powder is that right I think that's accurate I'm not familiar. With that one That's though the seems to be the driving concern here among corporate, interests that down the line there they could face lawsuits they. Could face increase regulations that could? Affect their bottom line are there beyond the monetary concerns are there? Other potential just science concerns that these companies might have. Maybe. They doubt, some of the science in these findings absolutely I mean and and to be to be clear. Like the finding about leukemia is a scientifically, controversial one it's not just a politically controversial, reversal one but if I look like concert controversial one I think we're learning a lot more about how the sciences. Done as it's become more controversial under the Trump administration but just a little. Bit of background about how these risk assessments are done there are multiple types of studies that are. What we used to understand the, risks of the chemical the one type is epidemiological research. So that's research on. The effects of chemicals on human And so that sounds like the kind of thing that we would be most interested in because we are after all humans but. Of course there are ethical limits to how those studies. Can be done right so like we're not gonna go expose people to high levels of formaldehyde and just see what happened that wouldn't be ethical, so oftentimes that kind of research is coming from incidental exposure. You know workers who were accidentally? Exposed or a community that was accident accidentally exposed and so you? Can't control an experiment like that or a study like. That. In the, same way that you can that you can control exposures to like lab rats and so it. Could be telling to figure out okay well, so we're seeing this exposure and then we're, seeing this pattern of health effects but how do I know that the leukaemia that I'm seeing in this community was. Caused by by exposure to this chemical as opposed to something else that you. Know maybe within the water supply for the community or maybe there's a virus going around in this. Particular community so it can be. Hard to sort of detangle that sure the causal relationships Always become Exactly and then you've got so then to sort of account, for that you have these other streams. Of research so you have the kinds of kind of lab experiments that it was describing where you might be using lab rats or other animals to you can do a more, controlled experiments but, you know in, that case you're looking at Iraq instead of. A human and, you know scientists say that for the most part of set of long as long as if you see an effect, in one you're likely to see it and. The other but, you know there are different animal different and then and then you're also looking at sort of Petri, dish science would you were taking from the molecular level and sort of expanding it and extrapolating outward using using. Computer models and so the the work that these risk assessors, do you it's sort of try and try and navigate research and information is brought from these three different streams of research and figure out how it all..

leukemia Erin Brockovich UPA Johnson Iraq
"leukemia" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"I was diagnosed with with the chronic lymphocytic leukemia and i for eleven months i believe that and i lived in fear not fear like i'm going to die and pour me and all of that kind of thing just sort of a subconscious feeling about oh my god how did this happen and i had this experience with john of god who down and you did a whole show right as a farmer who does this for no money and and i'm going to go see for myself because john yes so let's let's finish the story though so i i had a friend from bulgaria her name is reina 'pisco via she's a medical doctor and in california and i is urgent and she flew down that she wanted me to go with her because she found out i had leukemia john of guy i had heard of john of god but i didn't know that much about them you know and i was on the fence about it because there's so many people who charlotte ten yeah but anyway she got down there and she called me and she said take a picture of all dressed in white when you go down their own you only dressed in white everything isn't what and take a picture from the front from the back from the side from the side and send it down we did that she emailed them down there she took the pictures to john of god she said would you do surgery she said he said to her i can't because he's not taking these herbs especially herbs that you take so she fed ex i'm god bless her and she went in to a fedex office from down in brazil near brasilia got these things fedex step to me on a on a tuesday the herbs i took the herbs and a special water and did all of the things that i was supposed to do and we took the pictures again and she said your surgery will be it was on my mother's ninety fifth birthday so that's why i remember so so much april twenty first and so i had the surgery and i i didn't feel anything i went to bed i drank the water i did everything that i was supposed to do i woke up the next morning and she called me from brazil surgery i don't know i just had the survey surge i was in maui different time zones i know i was a skeptical is the is anybody could be about this you know and some people because this is will i know how this sounds sound like it sounds crazy so anyway rain reina 'pisco v calls me from down in aba johnny she had the surgery i had the surgery now the surgery this is a guy who can do surgery two thousand people in a room at the same time this is not he he is not somebody who does the surgery okay he doesn't he doesn't remember any of it that he does you can watch them vote he goes he gets into this thing and he he picks up these instruments and you can actually see pictures of the entities that enter his body as he as he does this i know when you're going down there you'll see i'm going down you'll get a whole show on every time i've heard about him or talked about him or even written about him in the magazine it has been through somebody else's fis and i keep hearing these stories in direct experience a direct experience so i so i went to bed i didn't feel anything nothing changed i took the herbs she said you'll wake up the next at seven o'clock she told me what ten the surgery was at seven o'clock she said you'll get up at eight o'clock and then you'll drink some of the water the blessed water and you'll go right back to bed for twenty four hours let's get you the surgery part okay the surgery is just it's a remote surgery i mean it was twelve thousand miles from where i was so it's you know i don't i don't know what happened these are entities they don't have any form they're just the spirits that that enter his body it's been going on for forty years tell you a certain time to lay down a certain way to lay down just go to bed where white just where everything is white we'll drink the water take the herbs and and don't have sex and.

leukemia twenty four hours eleven months ninety fifth forty years
"leukemia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Perspective if you have a patient as lukaemia if you treat them with chemotherapy that raises the leukemia but it also raises their immune system and so it's very helpful to give back blood stem cells from a matched donor like a brother or sister and they end up amplifying tremendously to reconstitute the blood system so i can see what you're interested in studying these blood stem cells and this paper rather than looking at leukemia treatments or anything like that is actually the evolutionary perspective it's quite interesting when we first started studying blood development in my lab i knew about being a hematologist i knew that the blood cells are formed in the bones but when we started doing work and the other model organism that i studied the zebra fish we found that the kidney was where the blood cells were made and the blood stem cells were actually in the kidney and it was kind of strange to me to think that why isn't in it in the same place and so that's been the central question of this paper and the evolutionary implications of that and people are nine for a while that blood stem cells live in different places into creatures so fishes in the kidneys fabian of in the liver birds in mammals it's in the bones but it wasn't really clear why that would be the case but you went even trying to answer that question when he started out you initially studying the environments around the the blood stem cells in your body so what other cells and things was rounding them this sort of niche that right that's right so in these organs that have stem cells there are specific regions that are very important to support those themselves or to nurse those stem cells and these regions are known as the stem cell niche.

leukemia
"leukemia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Leukemia yeah nineteen a big joe henry having all kinds of fun thank you for joining.

joe henry
"leukemia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Yeah so because the low blood because faction he had the infection can be the leukemia i like crayons it's my lamont acidic leukemia looks like an infection when it comes on really really dr dr just loved actor would you have when you have leukemia you don't fight infections normally so minor infections can become rather nasty looking so you know and he's held is he he's fifty three okay so if it's a my logic leukemia would you would you hope for is my logic kimia not a l l or acute lymphocytic leukemia the myelogenous leukemia is are pretty treatable so so it's going to be unpleasant but there you can look forward to some real good response but there he needed bone now transplant i would be i'm the siblings so i would be the best probably candidate you're jumping way ahead yeah let's just see what he's got i whether transplants are appropriate and i forget where they get the donors from for most of thought thought they might be able to use it hologhan even like his own but i don't have done this in a long time but but so i just let's get down to the diagnosis i and each kind of leukemia kind a little different has sort of different treatment with different prognosis little different sort of course and so let's find out what this is i okay dr drew 'cause i knew you know he's gonna help me i think you're gonna be look i look forward to just stay posit look for good response the bone marrow is interesting i heard a red house essay read.

leukemia lamont
"leukemia" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"Commute news there is no family history or anything like that like nobody not of that i mean my grandma died of cancer which he was very old and it was stomach cancer and choose cuban and it was that like pork heavy greasy diet and i've heard thursday connection well he was like very ill so i guess theoretically there it is but i feel like everyone has some maria totally cancer there so he went into a chemo he i mean he just have to start a very aggressive treatment regimen after that it's interesting that you bring up sort of getting a second opinion and like doctors are people too because he was fascinating to see a doctor um go through that experience because you know there is a level of removal and he became very consumed with the disease and researching the disaster area and he could i mean he was reading that he still reads medical journals about out his specific mile uh leukemia and he knew of at the best treatment for that kind of leukemia was at a m d anderson in texas in houston i feel houston is like a leading cancer it is yes specifically without one at sort of the cutting edge so he went there he still goes there because he has to monitor it now but there was a point where it was we didn't know um because the truman wasn't working and uh man the way he explains it was start worse like he was like so my uh white blood cells are attacking views cells an you know i don't remember any other home uh white blood cells are stormtroopers yeah yeah exactly but it they came back at lake worked out sort of in the eleven thhour and he was able to get his platelet count backup.

cancer chemo leukemia texas truman houston
"leukemia" Discussed on We're No Doctors

We're No Doctors

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on We're No Doctors

"Katerina uh thank you cat this was i think a great email to end on yeah and good for you in getting help and i'm glad this is something you can live with i the second i saw leukemia in your email uh i'm not gonna lie my the first thought was very dark ashley you know don't know a lot about that leukemia cancer any a guts made a dentist's office is calling so i immediately just go to a dark place when i see the word cancer or see the word leukemia um but it's good to know this is something you can manage uh congratulations on very happy for you cuba's updated uh and thanks for the mouth all right uh i can either a couple of times i almost cried many male but i must strong white male of the worst thing to say no um um so stupid this has been over an hour i've talked for over an hour um i hope you found this a worthwhile episode guys uh thank you for listening we will be back again with busy i promise i'm also very curious oh i know why might dentists calling i didn't cover this but last week uh this was a horrible horrible thing i went to my dentist and um uh had hetero canal last year late in the year but the very back tooth and um i'd had a bunch of other dental work done so my dental insurance only covers a certain amount of money.

leukemia cuba
"leukemia" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"And the 20th century the bonds of that democracy what tested again when we come back the political upheavals of the 1960s and they're echos today stay with us support for this podcast in the following message come from subaru who was love promise is a dedication to make the world a better place here subaru retailer rocky decrease the fauna on how to saen subaru makes a positive impact a lot of corporations give money and support charities but the subaru love promise goes much deeper than that we had a bike building event uh uh last year the end we had our staff build these bikes for children that had leukemia in then we brought the children now to get their bikes the active actually taking your staff and going in delivering them and having a deal with the emotion pretty pretty special powerful staff to learn more about the subaru commitment to its customers and communities visit subaru dot com slash love dash promise we are now in the 1960s is thrown world is exploding violence flaring bull as low euro martin luther king junior is leading the civil rights struggle are deep partisan divisions in the country it's another moment of crisis where it seems like the nation as coming apart protest pickup lines meetings took her age ward demonstrators protest us involvement in vietnam war the complex plan is a secret organization which for one hundred years has been allowed to exist in this country america has given the negro people are bad check attack quick his comeback mark in but pippen frana.

subaru leukemia vietnam war civil rights america pippen one hundred years
"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The boys be you know woke up a bureau living with his family and suddenly a settlement when what did to check out on the computer at this could be the kimia i of unita yeah i just sat him to get your computer check this out and i've no medical beck wife no idea and he was checking like lidl's pulse the backs and whatever legs and of course he didn't find anything because this is a fairy thank god is a very rare form of leukemia and especially for newborns but that was the situation so when did you realize it was the kimia how to data that him about yeah so forth in holland when something doesn't solve itself after two weeks your tall to go to the hospital so we went for a biopsy and then we got the result of the by abc's and that was when we were told that she was very very sick and what you just said that we had to prepare for the worst that she didn't have much chance of survival his leukemia has high survival rate went three two well but this form she had to my other we kimia my inuit leukemia because it's in your blood it's just the most dangerous form and your reaction your doctor noticed your reaction because it was different than the reactions had seen before how well in the in the original 21st herded i felt i didn't wanna hear it i felt like who are you having this opinion on my child i mean i carrots were for nine mall i know best the but my child who are you telling me this i just couldn't handle that was just too too much to in face of and i just wanna go out site with my husband and pretend that nothing was the matter i i i just walked out of that room with his can away i just need it the privacy of my intimate life did you and your husband react the same way well my husband is a scientist and he he's more he wants to know defects and he kiss last oldest questions but the at the same feeling of let's go out of deir an venkov or in the.

lidl leukemia holland abc scientist unita beck inuit two weeks
"leukemia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And then there's another family of children that lost everything in the fire it's really heartbreaking and one of the kids and cancer treatment and the home that they were sharing with their mother and her parents that she moved into was burnt to the ground this is the kid with leukemia so me i put them up the cinema fire victims' family and only a thousand thousand fifty cents fifty thousand fifty has been given so far and what people are so cheap but summit wrote something she said i lost everything to a fire years ago everything it's a loss of identity at first in long run i learnt the cherish people memories and experiences you will too sending levin well wishes your wait i thought about that do you have you thought about what would happen if your house burned down or your apartment he had to leave and through seconds and get away with just with your life have you actually thought about what you'd lose i don't mean the money or the goal of the bitcoin's or the let us say the assurance you know all the stuff that i am talking about your photographs for example i mean truthfully that's a big deal i of i'm a big photo guy and i have old style photos in addition to all the years of digital i wouldn't know what to do without him i gotta digitalize all of a fast about last year i digitilized though my super eightmillimetre family movies going back to what my father still live in new york i couldn't believe it i mean like the family story in fifty eight minutes this guy does the stuff for me what an amazing thing to watch my father walking around the store and there i was a young guy would my goofy friends at parties when my parents were young it's astounding to watch that stuff which ask yourself you know what would happen if you got burned out will the people are going through that right now shrinks take the streets to demand narcissistic trump's ouster that is not related to this but it is some one on 25 nutjob psychologists and other mental health psychos march long lower broadway in new york saturday to demand the president trump he thrown out of office based on a constitutional clause allowing presently ouster when the cabinet decided quote unable to discharge.

leukemia levin new york cabinet president fifty eight minutes
"leukemia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Need give me an hour give me an hour of positively give me an hour of good stuff i'd been involved with a number of charities over time i i wanna do something fawn something good something that makes a difference i i wanna do that because if i don't i swear by here's was going to light on fire so in wanting to go about this mission i've been involved with in those people i work with who are involved with leukemia lymphoma and they have their like the night um they have a light the night event coming up tomorrow and money raised goes to leukemia lymphoma leukemia lymphoma foam of the reasons are coast to me and number of for is for a couple reasons leukemia lapalme society gets as gets more per dollar to research gets more per dollar to the labs than most charities do and k in a waste their money on marketing they don't waste their money on decorations or on overhead paying everybody billions of dollars just to be the ceo my cousin who i met once didn't make it till didn't make it to six years old because of childhood leukemia had he'd been diagnosed with that today he'd have a better chance of survival so what they do matters would they do has been working what used to be a death sentence back in the 80s now is is more than a chance so michael worker challenge me can you raised two thousand dollars an hour okay no one i'm going to try going to try to raise two thousand dollars in an hour seems like a low number unless you don't have to thousand dollars but i i need it i need something i need something and he.

lymphoma ceo leukemia two thousand dollars thousand dollars six years
"leukemia" Discussed on Black Girl Nerds

Black Girl Nerds

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Black Girl Nerds

"I've seen bits and pieces of leukemia honors progressing plus saw a rough draft oh gene because this girl really get the falcons grade but of course you're characters the pilot as a full tank of enhanced debris has dogged with him because his companion on a rare light rain so what's unique item that you have to take the human you fly all it's funny because we have two french bulldogs had worked for an we should search were mr he cares we housing law people bandogs plan especially as a small on the fringes so we haven't dutch up because they're still run a year old home cases to ovarian zero posture unhappy that have their own instagram's immediately there is famous for them and the but the dog the store movie among drivers we and while the first courses are have parking migra had to give a small claimed his crazy stuff i should say find out more about that mrs now uh and so we did is harming the director i saw march fire todd martin how to do crashing he had a in the hangar hey upon for the future there okay and all kinds of into ashes troops gutter people come to town he sitting are actually copilot's the at it was crazy because he had to all of us have hit marshalls though i was pretty much it of the seat but he drew his and k running back and forth was thrown all over the place and talk had two at a certain time slovak phallic argument by ray ray either moves a snack leaving late usual don't get into debt hat ad uh he has via the exact spot because homes are deal was the crash hutu.

falcons instagram director todd martin ray ray
"leukemia" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on WINS 1010

"On pit kim avenue in brooklyn 67 degrees building up to eighty three today mainly clear skies at the moment some bushwick presidents have sued hoping to clean up the environment in their neighborhood lawsuit is against the company that runs the garbage transfers station on porter avenue and bushwick jin chen turnout pay shea is president of the group clean up north brooklyn said they have met face to face with the company and i've had public forums with them to spell out their complaints let she claims the company still refuses to obey the rules and regulations that would keep the site cleaner family demanding better air for themselves and better air for olive asked local resident ssris arias is speaking through an interpreter said he signs health is at risk because besides toxins in the air residents say the site creates does excessive noise vibrations and attracts vermin carol d'auria ten ten wins in bushwick bpb capital the company that runs the scientists had no comment on the situation the us has cleared the first living drug for tough childhood leukemia we hear about this from correspondent john sold as the food and drug administration has approved the first treatment that would genetically engineer patients own blood cells to seek and destroy childhood leukemia the fda's action makes novartis pharmaceuticals car tcell treatment the first type of gene therapy to hit the us market and it's one in a wave of socalled living drugs being developed for blood cancers and maybe other tumors as well the novartis therapies for children and young adults with acute lim for blaskic leukemia despite some serious side effects a key test found a one time infusion put about eighty percent of hard to treat patients into remission johnson dole nece wins news time four fifty one.

brooklyn shea president us john leukemia fda leukemia bushwick bushwick bpb engineer novartis eighty percent 67 degrees
"leukemia" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"leukemia" Discussed on Novel Targets

"This episode comes from the two thousand and sixteen annual meeting the American society of hematology, commonly known as ash we've called it controversies in hematology because each of the expert show here officer, very personal view. The not everyone is going to agree with leading them fomer specialist tells us what he really thinks about Carty. So I I'm not ready to go to my desert island with only a cartesian L agent to treat whatever patient, I might encounter and have the right targets being chosen for pioneering trial in acute myeloid leukemia. AM, oh, you're over sixty the survival rates. No more than about two percent at ten years. We have to do something better in ceelo, chronic lymphocytic. Leukemia will hear what it liberal expert for it was exciting at the me too. So it's sort of tastes great less filling version of brew. Linden. Now is it really better in his own little trial. It seems to be better. Finally, one of the prominent topics at fishes ash meeting was sickle cell disease, while we're excited about novel therapies, a lot of ad is actually controlling the disease, but what about cure? We'll hear more about the potential for gene editing and gene therapy later immature. This so despondent punch and Intech over the past two years. They sponsored fifteen episodes would grateful for their support and just to be clear if we do mention any products we made an independent Detroit decision to do. So our sponsors have no control of the topics. We cover who we interview of questions we asked. So let's start with a mentioned for the leukemia and lymphoma society at Ashby out to major new initiative called beat AML, this postering and adaptive clinical trial that will investigate multiple targets with multiple drugs from different companies. This approach has never been done before AML. Will it be a game changer? I spoke to one of lead investigators. I'm Brian Drucker director of the Oregon Health and science university night, Ken through toot in Portland, Oregon beat AML really is groundbreaking. We're going to be able to assign patients over sixty two treatment based on their genetic makeup of leukemia within seven days of diagnosis and our goals to try to have a treatment for every single patient who enrolls, and that's truly remarkable.

Leukemia AML American society of hematology Carty Oregon Health and science univ Intech officer Oregon Brian Drucker Linden Ashby cure Detroit Ken director Portland two percent seven days ten years two years