12 Burst results for "Leslie Berlin"

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:09 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Two others injured in a shooting at a church near Birmingham Alabama The suspected shooter is in custody It all happened this afternoon during an event at saint Stephen's Episcopal Church in vestavia hills Former vice president Mike Pence is not speaking out about January 6th as a democratic led House select committee continues to hold public hearings while Pence was the talk of the third public hearing of the committee he was in Cincinnati for a round table with members of Ohio's oil and gas industry Pence talked about energy independence and the rising gas prices All eyes will be on Wall Street Friday morning after stocks closed lower today with fears of a recession growing Art Hogan managing director and chief marketing strategist at national security said investors are worried Once you start seeing the selling of what's working then that's towards the later part of the cycle here So we're a lot closer to getting to that bottom than we were even a month ago I'm Brian chuck And I'm Brian Curtis in Hong Kong Let's check this hour's top business stories and the markets Japan's benchmark bond yields rose above levels tolerated by the bank of Japan It raises the question of whether a change in policy is imminent at the BOJ The ten year yield rose to 26 and a half basis points in early trading the highest since 2016 The BOJ concludes a two day meeting today with economists forecasting no change to keep policy Switzerland's Central Bank unexpectedly increased interest rates for the first time since 2007 It raised by 50 basis points The main rate to tame inflation Adobe cut its annual sales forecast $17.7 billion that was down from the company's previous forecast of 17.9 billion and Elon Musk addressed Twitter employees for the first time since agreeing to buy the company Here's Bloomberg's Ed ludlow on the main takeaway Elon Musk did not and I underscore did not explicitly state that he intends or has a commitment to the deal You know there have been reporting going into this meeting that that's what he intended to do He wasn't even asked the question by Twitter's CMO Leslie Berlin who was kind of moderating aggregating questions from Twitter staff When asked about potential layoffs Musk did not dismiss the idea Right now looking at currencies dalyan one 33 26 the Nike is trading down 2.3% The Hanks hang index is trading up about 7 tenths of 1% and the CSI 300 is up about four tenths of 1% Briefly looking at yields the yield on the two year treasury 3.16% so gaining back 6 basis points the ten year at three 25 Global news 24 hours a day live and at Bloomberg quick cake brought to you by 2700 journalists and analysts in a 120 countries around the world In Hong Kong I'm Brian Curtis reporting This is Bloomberg This is Bloomberg law with June grosso from Bloomberg radio In 2006.

BOJ saint Stephen's Episcopal Chur House select committee Art Hogan Brian Curtis Brian chuck vestavia hills Mike Pence Elon Musk Pence Birmingham Alabama Ed ludlow Cincinnati national security Ohio Twitter
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:38 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"They've been reporting going into this meeting that that's what he intended to do He wasn't even asked the question by Twitter's CMO Leslie Berlin who was kind of moderating aggregating questions from Twitter staff When asked about potential layoffs Musk didn't dismiss the idea he said Twitter needs to get healthy Musk also said Twitter needs to allow more space for people to say whatever they want as long as it doesn't violate the law His goal is to expand Twitter's user base to a billion users JD.com is exploring a move into the food delivery business We are told the company has considered launching an on demand service as it hunts for new revenue streams This venture would go up against current industry leaders met tuan and Alibaba Now the CEO of JD's retail is Schindler He says the partnership with logistics affiliate data could help lay the groundwork We have considered and explored the core business that other market competitors are doing Data has strong capability in same city delivery so other competitors are guessing whether we would do this business We did thoroughly consider it The CEO of JD's retail by the way through a translator obviously he went on to say a timetable for the move is unclear and it will depend on the company's capacity to set up the necessary infrastructure Well Adobe had a Daniel sales forecast to $17.7 billion That is down from the company's previous full cost of 17.9 billion The company saying the decision was brought on by currency fluctuations and a seasonal shift in demand additionally the move to end sales in Russia and Belarus have added to the reduction The forecast otherwise overshadowed a strong quarter for the software maker with revenue increasing 14% Sales in the creative products division also jumped 15% in the quarter 33 passed the hour Brian Curtis is in Hong Kong looking at market action here So both Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland holding up remarkably well in spite of some of the heavy selling that we're seeing in other parts of the region Yeah there's been outperformance here for a while and we can't forget that the PBOC is actually easing policy So going the opposite direction of all these other central banks and particularly with the big move like the fed moving three quarters of a percentage point and one fell swoop you can see that there's some attraction to equities in the Hong Kong and China sphere evaluations have come down a lot However there's still a lot of fears about slower growth in China And with those with the testing the mass testing in Shanghai doesn't look like the Chinese economy is about to return to the norm anytime soon So you may see a little outperformance but probably net net not broad gains The CSI 300 down about a quarter of a percent The index is flat here And I was just having a look at the one month high bore So you know because of the fixed exchange rate in Hong Kong You're not going to see A big move in the currency Right now the de facto Central Bank here the HK MA is protecting the Hong Kong dollar from weakening by buying Hong Kong dollars and selling U.S. dollars So we're pretty much at the weekend of the convertibility range of 7 85 against the greenback So what does fluctuate though is the inner bank rate and the one month high Borg of which most of us who have mortgages have them priced off of high Boris who would be X number of basis points plus one month high or is moved from 20 basis points to just under 60 basis points just in the month of June So we are seeing some action there so there will be an impact even if you're not seeing the banks actually raise interest rates but those inner bank rates do have an effect Right now in terms of currencies the dollar is strengthening now after weakening broadly for two days in a row right now the Bloomberg dollar spot is up a third of 1% or three tenths of 1% Dolly yen is now one 33 25 a lot of tension on the BOJ today The Nike is trading down 2.2% and in terms of other currency action we see the Euro trading against the dollar one O 5 and the Aussie 70.32 U.S. cents Just to fill out some things Bitcoin is traded down to the low 20,000s WTI crude is trading around a $116 and 66 cents And let's see what else can I tell you about we mentioned Hong Kong equities The CSI 300 in China is down two tenths of 1% 35 minutes past the hour Juliet Thanks Brian Time for global.

Twitter Hong Kong Leslie Berlin Musk JD creative products division Brian Curtis tuan Alibaba Schindler PBOC de facto Central Bank HK MA Belarus China Adobe
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:05 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"8 30 a.m. in Hong Kong and here in Singapore I'm Juliet Sully And I'm Brian Curtis here in Hong Kong looking at markets in the Asia Pacific broad sell off again today the nikkei cracking down a little more than 2% the ASX 200 off two and a half percent Details on markets with Doug prisoner in a few moments Now some of the stories moving markets Juliet Well Elon Musk has addressed Twitter employees for the first time since agreeing to buy the company His Bloomberg's Ed ludlow on the main takeaways Elon Musk did not and I underscore did not explicitly state that he intends or has a commitment to the deal They've been reporting going into this meeting that that's what he intended to do He wasn't even asked the question by Twitter's CMO Leslie Berlin who was kind of moderating aggregating questions from Twitter staff When asked about potential layoffs Musk didn't dismiss the idea he said Twitter needs to get healthy Musk also said Twitter needs to allow more space for people to say whatever they want as long as it doesn't violate the law His goal is to expand Twitter's user base to a billion users Well JD.com is exploring a move into the food delivery business We're told the company has considered launching an on demand service as it hunts for new revenue streams The venture would go up against current industry leaders may tuan and Alibaba JD retail CEO shin Li jun says the partnership with logistics affiliate data could help lay the groundwork We have considered and explored the core business that other market competitors are doing Data has strong capability in same city delivery so other competitors are guessing whether we would do this business We did thoroughly consider it Shin Li jun says that a timetable for the movie is unclear and it would depend on the companies capacity to set up the needed infrastructure and it was interesting because JD.com also said that it sees worrying signs that shoppers are reluctant to reopen their wallets even as major cities where they live emerge from COVID lockdowns Juliette Well Adobe cut its annual sales forecast to $17.7 billion that is down from the company's previous forecast of 17.9 billion The company says the decision was brought on by currency fluctuations in a seasonal shift in demand Additionally the move to end sales in Russia and Belarus have added to the reduction The forecast otherwise overshadowed a strong quarter for the software maker with revenue increasing 14% Sales in the creative products division also jumped 15% in the quarter All right the time is about 33 minutes past the hour and it's a time that we look at markets Here's Doug prisoner with his take on the action today Yeah a lot of concern about the outlook for growth recession is one term being tossed around certainly that was the case in the U.S. today and it was underscored by that mammoth increase in the fed funds rate from the fed yesterday seemed to underscore the enormity of the problem which is essentially inflation right So look at the NASDAQ composite in the U.S. session We were down 4% And if you look right now at what's happening in the Tokyo market information technology leading the way lower for the nikkei the entire group is down about 4% right now the nikkei is off about 2.2% We've got a BOJ meeting later today and I'm seeing a lot of weakness creep in now in the Japanese yen were all the way at one 32 85 after quite the rally in New York trading Now some of that yen strength if I can put it that way was tied to a surprise decision that we had earlier in the day from the Swiss national bank with a half point increase in its key rate That weekend the dollar substantially it helped to weaken the dollar substantially with the Bloomberg dollar spot index dropping about 8 tenths of 1% in New York and in turn that dollar weakness provided a lot of support for the end But as we looked at this BOJ decision and a lot of speculation about a potential shock from policymakers in Japan you know the BOJ has been keeping a lid on JGB yields since about 2016 pressure has been building to change that situation now either through altering the policy stance or maybe giving some guidance on an end date for that Again the N one 32 80 right now in the nikkei is down 2.3% In Seoul the Cosby weeker by 1.6% and in Sydney the ASX 200 is down about 2.6% We're also seeing U.S. yields across the curve Move higher now in the Tokyo session a ten year at three 23 a two year at 3.14% and crude oil giving back a little bit we rallied in New York by about 2% after the international energy agency said global supply will struggle to meet rising demand and Goldman Sachs was indicating that the oil market really is tightened at a rate much faster than the firm was expecting We'll talk more about markets in 15 minutes Juliet Thank you so much Doug It is 35 minutes past the hour time for global.

Twitter Juliet Sully Brian Curtis Juliet Well Elon Musk His Bloomberg Ed ludlow Leslie Berlin Musk Hong Kong Alibaba JD CEO shin Li jun Shin Li jun JD.com COVID Elon Musk Doug
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:34 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Friday morning in Hong Kong and 9 30 here in Sydney I Paul Adam And I'm Doug Krishna at the Bloomberg interactive broker studio in New York We had a sell off and U.S. equities today and at the top of the hour we're expecting to see some tough sledding for markets in Tokyo Sydney and Seoul is they come online We'll take a closer look at all the market action when Brian Curtis joins us in a moment Right now a few of the sours top business stories Well Elon Musk addressed to Twitter employees for the first time since agreeing to buy the company His Bloomberg's Ed ludlow on the main takeaways Elon Musk did not and I underscore did not explicitly state that he intends or has a commitment to the deal They've been reporting going into this meeting that that's what he intended to do He wasn't even asked the question by Twitter's CMO Leslie Berlin who was kind of moderating aggregating questions from Twitter staff So Willie was asked about potential layoffs some Musk didn't dismiss the idea he said Twitter needs to get healthy Musk also said Twitter needs to allow more space for people to say whatever they want as long as it doesn't violate the law His goal is to expand Twitter's user base to 1 billion users JD.com is exploring a move into the food delivery business We are told the company has considered launching an on demand service as it hunts for some new revenue streams the venture would go up against current industry leaders Michelin and Alibaba The CEO of JD retailer Shen Liu jun says the partnership with logistics affiliate data could help lay the groundwork We have considered and explored the core business that other market competitors are doing Data has strong capability in same city delivery so other competitors are guessing whether we would do this business We did thoroughly consider it That is the translator for the comments made by the CEO of JD retailer Schindler jun he went on to say a timetable for this move is unclear and it will depend on the company's capacity to set up the needed infrastructure The Swiss national bank unexpectedly hiked rates by 50 basis points and that's the biggest increase in nearly 7 years Sparked a rally in the Swiss franc currently trading one O three 43 against the greenback That rally came even though the SMB vowed to intervene if the currency gained excessively The strength of the Swiss franc triggered weakness and both the Euro and U.S. dollar Yeah quite a bit of dollar weakness today with the Bloomberg dollar spot index down 8 tenths of 1% 33 passed the hour almost couldn't get it out there Let's get to Brian Curtis looking at markets What are you seeing Well for one thing a little unusual the action that you talked about with JD retail JD.com subsidiary because the same firm sees worrying signs that shoppers are reluctant to open their wallets reopen their wallets even as cities come out from the lockdowns which would suggest that consumer spending may take months to recover so that's pretty interesting And yet the business I guess is just so appealing to try to take on food delivery the competition there with may tuan And Alibaba Alibaba by the way was down more than 6% in the U.S. session so very tough session there And you had the NASDAQ golden dragon index was down 4.4% So it sets up as a tough day here We've got hanging index futures down more than 1% We've got an EK fuchsia suggesting a sizable tumble when we open Also Australian futures down more than 2% S&P E minis here are stable China futures are down just two tenths of a percent The one thing you can say is that with all these central banks raising interest rates as one Central Bank is going the other direction that's the PBOC So some money you know maybe still pushing into China to try to take advantage of that that the authorities the policy makers in China do want to stimulate the economy They just aren't doing all that much to do so So there's a lot of frustration there among investors Like we'll get on with it Right now the yield on the ten year is at 3.19% the two year at 3.09% and we've got WTI crude a little bit lower One 1684 but it had to hire in the U.S. session And again a lot of red numbers here on the screens for this Friday in Asia Paul back to you All right thanks very much Brian 34 minutes past the Ana time for check of global news.

Twitter Brian Curtis Elon Musk Paul Adam Doug Krishna Bloomberg interactive broker His Bloomberg Ed ludlow Leslie Berlin Musk Alibaba Sydney Shen Liu jun Schindler jun JD U.S. Seoul Hong Kong Tokyo
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:48 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"But we do have the 17th consecutive day of rain So and I'm not just talking about hard rain is going to fall in the markets This is literal rain Anyway we'll get to market coverage We do see some rainy skies there too We'll get to that in just a moment But for now some of the top stories of the hour were shot All right indeed and let's just turn to what's been going on with Elon Musk because he addressed Twitter employees for the first time since agreeing to buy the company Here's Bloomberg's Ed ludlow on the chief takeaways Elon Musk did not and I underscore did not explicitly state that he intends or has a commitment to the deal They've been reporting going into this meeting that that's what he intended to do He wasn't even asked the question by Twitter's CMO Leslie Berlin who was kind of moderating aggregating questions from Twitter staff When asked about potential layoffs Musk didn't dismiss the idea saying that Twitter needs to get healthy Musk also said that Twitter needs to allow more space for people to say whatever they want as long as it does not violate the law His goal is to expand Twitter's user base to 1 billion users The fed appears on track to lose money next year Former New York fed president Bill Dudley points to the gap between what the fed makes and what it will owe The fed has been paying banks for cash reserves that they hold at the Central Bank but as the fed Titans the raid on reserves will exceed the rate of return on the fed's balance sheet holdings Dudley said that this will not affect the implementation of monetary policy However it would dissuade policymakers from selling mortgage backed securities And Dudley said that it would trigger a fierce debate about the fed's past use of quantitative easing Well let's have a look we had of course rate hikes of course seamlessly from the Federal Reserve naturally but also the Bank of England We look ahead to the bank of Japan today But it was a Swiss national bank which unexpectedly hiked its cost of borrowing by 50 basis points as the biggest increase in nearly 7 years and sparked a rally in that the Swiss franc The rally came even though the SMB vowed to intervene if the currency Ghana gained excessively that strength of the Swiss franc triggered weakness in both the Euro as well as the dollar Yeah big drop in the dollar run Well let's get to markets The time is about 33 minutes past the hour so the selling feels like it's about ready to get real Doug Oh man it was a crushing day if you're along the equity market here in the U.S. Brian that unwinding of yesterday's relief rally boy that's really what it was essentially A lot of concern that we're going to be dealing with a vicious recession and that seemed to grip the market and send the equities a tumbling particularly if you look at the NASDAQ composite we were down about 4% today the Dow weaker by about 2.4% And for the broader market the S&P 500 down about 3.2% That supersized rate hike that we had yesterday from the fed really goes to the heart of the matter The enormity of the inflation threat that the fed is facing Now yesterday we heard from chair Jay Powell he expressed some optimism in avoiding the hard landing but I think it's fair to say markets are really unconvinced The S&P already down by more than 23% 23% so far this year and the guys over at luth hold group saying it could get worse They have found cases where even with this 23% decline that the valuation for the S&P still looks very very stretched when stacked against the historic norm and that would imply there is some more rough water ahead We had yields across the curve moving lower today in the case of both the two and the ten each down roughly 9 basis points so we have a tenure now at three 19 a two year at three O 9 that's where the action is going to begin in the Tokyo session With that drop in rates a lot of dollar weakness today the Bloomberg dollar spot index dropping about 8 tenths of 1% as some of that dollar weakness was also attributable to the surprise move from the Swiss national bank You guys unpack that story a moment ago We also have on the flip side a much much stronger Japanese yen up against the dollar today in New York trading by about 1.2% The yen right now one 32 35 Chicago nikkei futures at 25,755 So let's say quite a bit below where we were in the cash market yesterday in Japan so a potentially some very very tough sledding for the Japanese equity market on a day when we have the BOJ meeting We'll talk more about market action in about 15 minutes All right absolutely I just took that to do some of those stories making global news Well there are differing accounts about.

fed Twitter Elon Musk Ed ludlow Leslie Berlin Musk Bill Dudley fed Titans Dudley Swiss national bank Bloomberg BOJ Jay Powell Central Bank Bank of England luth hold group
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:37 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bitcoin down by 3% ten year yield 3.24% spot gold up 1.1% 1854 the ounce West Texas intermediate crude up 1.4% one 1692 a barrel I'm Charlie palo that is a Bloomberg business flash All right Charlie thank you so much You're listening to Bloomberg business week watching us on YouTube We were alive in Texas at the BNY Mellon Pershing inside 22 conference Right now though we want to talk a little bit of one Texan who's not here at this event We're in Texas but when Texan that we know really well a new Texan if you will He is a new he voted in the most recent election That's how I know he's actually a citizen here of Texas We're talking about none other than Elon Musk he's the wealthiest person in the world He's not here because he is meeting with Twitter employees or he did earlier today Bringing his pitch for changes to a largely skeptical staff Kurt Wagner Bloomberg news technology reporter He has been all over this He joins us on the phone from San Francisco Kurt Musk in your most recent story saying that Twitter should allow pretty outrageous tweets He didn't rule out layoffs He endorsed some remote work which is really interesting What else did we learn from Tesla's CEO about Twitter Those were I would say a lot of the highlights the other thing he did talk about was he was asked if he wanted to be CEO Just that question quite literally he said that he didn't care about titles but that he basically wanted to make sure everyone still listened to him So I took that to mean that he does intend to have a kind of a forceful voice and opinion in how Twitter builds its product and moves forward even if maybe the title itself is not CEO He certainly did not suggest that he was going to buy the thing and then hand the ranks to somebody else All right what did you hear about kind of how it went down I can only imagine the IB chats and the tax behind the scenes since this was virtual People like texting each other on the phone as all of this was going on What color can you give us maybe about this communication Because it was the first time that Elon has actually addressed the Twitter employee since agreeing in late April to buy the company That's right This was a virtual meeting and we posted by Twitter CMO chief marketing officer Leslie Berlin She asked the questions Employees have submitted questions over black beforehand and had kind of been voting on them and then kind of combined different themes and the questions that she then asked the month As you can imagine employees were quite actively chatting amongst themselves during this process I'm told that there was a slack channel that was very busy with a lot of people kind of chiming in as he was saying things I know for example that he brought up the term exceptional a few different times saying hey if you're an exceptional employee you can probably keep working from home if you're exceptional employee You don't have to worry about layoffs And I know that employees took that and kind of ran with it in the slack channel because of course everyone's now sitting around wondering if they are indeed exceptional and therefore get the perks of keeping their job and working out So courtesy is still going to buy this thing That's what I want to know I was hoping for a little more clarity myself actually because you know on the one hand why bother showing up and addressing employees if you're not actually interested in buying that And then on the other hand I didn't hear him really say that explicitly today I thought maybe he might say you know I'm going to do everything in my power to close this deal or something to that extent And he didn't really offer that up So I don't know I do tend to subscribe to this idea of why bother coming to talk to employees if you're just going to walk away anyway So in that regard I think this was a good sign At the same time it is Elon right Hard to predict And the fact that you can give a more forceful declaration does make me pause You know I want to note something that I read in one of your stories about this before the meeting actually occurred You said it's not surprising It's not atypical for a company that's acquiring another company or a person acquiring another company to come in and speak to that group of employees before that deal actually closes But there's nothing typical about this deal And I'm wondering what does Twitter's interest in actually inviting him in because at times they seem to cooperate at least in public but at other times they've really seemed to be at odds with one another That is Twitter and Elon Musk Yeah I think this is in Twitter's best interest to do everything they can to show Elon and the outside world that this deal is moving forward and progressing right You look at Twitter's stock price right now I think it's still something like $37 a share and Elon had offered to buy the company at $54 a share And so when you look at that discrepancy and you consider the scenario where Elon walks away you can imagine a scenario where Twitter stock just absolutely craters And so I think it's very very important for the company and its board to make sure this deal happens because I think the alternative for them is a lot lot worse So inviting him in making sure everyone knows he's there and taking and play questions I think is a sign for them that the deal is happening The process though Kurt is excruciating And we're not even covering it in the sense that Kurdish.

Twitter Charlie palo BNY Mellon Pershing Texan Texas Kurt Musk Elon Musk Kurt Wagner Leslie Berlin West Texas Elon Bloomberg Tesla YouTube CMO San Francisco
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

Daily Tech Headlines

02:41 min | Last month

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

"Mozilla will make its total cookie protection feature on by default for desktop Firefox browser users. The feature keeps cookies isolated to the site on which they were created to prevent tracking. The feature launched in 2021, but users had to turn it on until now. WhatsApp is adding a feature in beta to let users move chat histories, contacts, and other data from Android to iOS. It will be part of apple's move to iOS tool and encrypted so you'll have to authenticate in order to access it once it's been moved to the new iPhone. You'll also get the option to back up WhatsApp data to iCloud. Elon Musk will attend a Twitter employee meeting Thursday, June 16th to answer questions about his pending acquisition of the company. Twitter employees will be able to submit questions ahead of time and Twitter's chief marketing officer and head of people Leslie Berlin will moderate. Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong announced the company will lay off nearly 1100 people. That's about 18% of its workforce. Coinbase quadrupled in size over the last 18 months, laid off employees will lose access to company services and email immediately, but they will get a minimum of 14 weeks of severance pay with an additional two weeks for every year of employment. A trucking strike in South Korea has disrupted shipments of a week's worth of isopropyl alcohol to a chip factory in China. The strike is in its 8th day and four rounds of talks with the government failed to resolve the strike, talks resumed Tuesday. Samsung and SK Hynix report that they have three months worth of supplies on hand to whether any shipping delays. However, height general makers of Soju say shipments have fallen by 40%, so pressure to resolve that crisis is growing. Meta's horizon worlds enables voice chat by default when you enter the VR chat app. New options for voice mode though are being added over the next few weeks that will let users disable or garble voices from strangers. Garble lets you know a person is talking, you'll hear a garbled mumbling, and you can raise your hand to your avatar's ear to temporarily hear them without having to add them as a friend. Finally, the Indian computer emergency response team announced in April that VPN providers must store customer names, email addresses, IP addresses, and some other information about customers for a minimum of 5 years. ExpressVPN and SurfShark have already removed servers from the country as a result. And now NordVPN announced that it will do so as of June 26th. For more discussion of the tech news of the day, subscribe to daily tech news show dot com and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening. We'll talk to you next time..

Coinbase Twitter Elon Musk Brian Armstrong SK Hynix Mozilla Soju Berlin apple South Korea Samsung Meta China government
"leslie berlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:47 min | 3 months ago

"leslie berlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"We have a number of guests coming up in the course of the week next week These elections in these primaries are hot and heavy There's a couple of authors the O'Reilly is requested to come on I always love talking to Bill O'Reilly You know he and I used to hate each other's guts You remember that mister Medusa But we figured out you producers have a lot of power It was producers that caused the problem It's like beckon me We used to now we're buddies Again producers caused the not you mister producer Mister producers the nicest guy in the world But intermediaries So I like Bill O'Reilly I've met him now He's a good guy And so he'll be on the and we'll have some more candidates on because we're getting down to it There's early voting in Ohio people know where I stand on that Johnny swan Johnny swan over there at axios he knows where I excuse me I say Johnny You Johnny has a distinct burp in his in his verbiage Leslie Berlin Twitter CMO A Twitter CMO a something of communications from a meeting Monday in a leaked audio We want to thank project veritas which is constantly under attack by the FBI and the DoJ and The New York Times This is a fantastic room With a fantastic young leader in James O'Keefe Cat 9 go Out of the board and mister monster plan on dealing with a mass exodus considering the acquisition is by a person with questionable ethics with the authority I can answer this for mister Musk if I may The exits over there drag your ass out of there and go join Disney Get the hell out of here Or maybe you can work for Nike in China Maybe you'll enjoy that or maybe or maybe you'll enjoy working for Apple in China Go ahead But drag your ass out of here And the fast of the better Questionable ethics they said mister Musk you know what That's based on ladies and gentlemen These constant attacks and filings against him in the Securities and Exchange Commission Where the bureaucracy is highly politicized and anti business Oh so he must be unethical He must be unethical So these are the dead Enders These are the hardcore lefties that are used to controlling your speech And they don't like the fact that now this is going to be a private company So they need to go Mass exodus are you kidding me A lot of people would love to work there Love it Love it Go ahead We'll keep you on accountable and how Elon made it clear You don't have to keep Eli accountable It's a private company The hell do these people think they are They've created nothing This is where the inmates really are in control of the asylum And how can I be sure that the questionable ethics of E line Elon Musk won't want to affect my job And what about that My good mother go to hell I'll be right back Months love end On 77 W ABC Individuals and businesses with Listen to this podcast now on the red Apple podcast network One tough podcast with bodeo This is Bo died On my latest episode of one top vodka I tackle the issue of.

Johnny swan Bill O'Reilly Johnny You Johnny Leslie Berlin Reilly Twitter veritas DoJ China FBI Ohio The New York Times Nike Securities and Exchange Commis James Disney Apple Elon Eli Elon Musk
"leslie berlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"leslie berlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Leslie Berlin Twitter CMO A Twitter CMO a something of communications from a meeting Monday in a leaked audio We want to thank project veritas which is constantly under attack by the FBI and the DoJ and The New York Times This is a fantastic room With a fantastic young leader in James O'Keefe Cat 9 go Out of the board and mister monster plan on dealing with a mass exodus considering the acquisition is by a person with questionable ethics with the authority I can answer this for mister Musk if I may The exits over there drag your ass out of there and go join Disney Get the hell out of here Or maybe you can work for Nike in China Maybe you'll enjoy that or maybe or maybe you'll enjoy working for Apple in China Go ahead But drag your ass out of here And the fast of the better Questionable ethics they said mister Musk you know what That's based on ladies and gentlemen These constant attacks and filings against him in the Securities and Exchange Commission Where the bureaucracy is highly politicized and anti business Oh so he must be unethical He must be unethical So these are the dead Enders These are the hardcore lefties that are used to controlling your speech And they don't like the fact that now this is going to be a private company So they need to go Mass exodus are you kidding me A lot of people would love to work there Love it Love

Twitter CMO Leslie Berland Asks Board About Mass Exodus Following Sale

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Twitter CMO Leslie Berland Asks Board About Mass Exodus Following Sale

"Leslie Berlin Twitter CMO A Twitter CMO a something of communications from a meeting Monday in a leaked audio We want to thank project veritas which is constantly under attack by the FBI and the DoJ and The New York Times This is a fantastic room With a fantastic young leader in James O'Keefe Cat 9 go Out of the board and mister monster plan on dealing with a mass exodus considering the acquisition is by a person with questionable ethics with the authority I can answer this for mister Musk if I may The exits over there drag your ass out of there and go join Disney Get the hell out of here Or maybe you can work for Nike in China Maybe you'll enjoy that or maybe or maybe you'll enjoy working for Apple in China Go ahead But drag your ass out of here And the fast of the better Questionable ethics they said mister Musk you know what That's based on ladies and gentlemen These constant attacks and filings against him in the Securities and Exchange Commission Where the bureaucracy is highly politicized and anti business Oh so he must be unethical He must be unethical So these are the dead Enders These are the hardcore lefties that are used to controlling your speech And they don't like the fact that now this is going to be a private company So they need to go Mass exodus are you kidding me A lot of people would love to work there Love it Love

Leslie Berlin Twitter James O'keefe Veritas DOJ FBI The New York Times China Disney Nike Securities And Exchange Commis Apple
"leslie berlin" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

15:52 min | 3 years ago

"leslie berlin" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Enough. American express was my climb and so my client and they asked me to come over to new york from chicago to me at that point felt like a big thing to leave chicago haugen go to like the number one financial in the world was let's do this right and as boy who's born in wembley london in the city was in chicago lived in the suburbs and they went out to school in dekalb illinois so like practically by the border island right so i was craving t- environment so went went to michigan express and i was part of the data analytics capabilities group and for about four weeks my role was to pretty much oversee the relationships with the credit bureau's but also to understand what does data from a variety of sources should be coming into american express's decision for the consumer called services group and risk information management group so that they can make better decisions for the consumer and so actually that was about four weeks and then as a stroke of luck would have it my v._p. At the time she came came up to me and she said you have a facebook account right. I'll say she sake as she was looking at me. Always guiding my question say so you want you get digital right so she's notting ahead for our good. Even i ah i could respond. Also yeah sure facebook where she's at great. She's you can lead the digital transformation for the division and i was like okay and in my head you know i don't know if there's even a brave nece or a little bit of both in my house i couldn't be that difficult so i put together the digital transformation for <hes> risk information management and consumer cards gutman tim's of who should partner with why we should partner with them and ultimately it was solving the problem that american express had at the time and and that was more so how do we increase our called member base so they were looking at reaching out to folks who had nontraditional at that point in time so they wanted to younger consumers of people have divest backgrounds and so forth and it's which platforms can we connect without gal help us reach those audiences right so put together this whole digital roadmap and what's my favorite is because i saw it there. What thing is like september october so i didn't really have any vacation so i worked all through that december it came around january presented it what well and went on to get leadership in action award and so forth and my role to hats now it was lead this digital digital transformation for g in addition to bringing in data deals through some of our net- bureaus and so forth and i mean at american express i really dade at the time it was the c._e._o. And he's a marvel of man in that all the way from him being the this c._e._o. To american express being several thousand people everyone felt a connection to him and why really that from that experience was how he was able to quickly distill information. I think till today what has helped american express ticket is their agility information travels so quickly the very concise i every i mean the town. Oh pulled a every president is burgeoning c. suite of every person that's interesting. That's a a and i haven't interviewed anyone from american express so appreciate the insider insider view to that's pretty interesting and you go from credit bureau who has all the data on everyone to amex who knows at the transaction in level what their members are doing <hes> and and then you you flip the switch if you will to the platform side and digital transformation mation i guess data's the common thread ray. It has a completely right and that's why i tell folks. Data is now like a thing. I came into the industry when data was even a career and it's very like the career a lot people have asked me. It's just a career. You thought you were going to have right and austin college. This didn't even exist and even now now the work that we're doing at cantor and so forth of our products infusing a._i. And so forth the these pieces and exists until a euro backer in some cases a few months back and i i think where american express is doing it right and they've always been doing it right is they've always had the foundation of days help their their experience company so they build stories on that day. Take they build experiences on that data because data is only as good as the data. It's the story that you tell and they've done so many good things all the way from these partnership with fashion fashion week to do things with the u._s. Open i mean it to you. Airport lounges they get their called members and that's why they're called and called members and not card holders because they have members of a larger group who they want to treat with respect and give him experiences that will help give them a better life right. You're so true so true are they. You said it much more eloquently than i can but the fact that they were using the data for the benefit and utility of their members <hes> was was fantastic and everyone's trying to emulate that in some ways now they are investing. I think a lot of this is about speed to market right so i think these brands who have done it i they've they've just made a cachet behind it is this is who we all this is what we stand for all the way to the partnership with the new york taxis where you could use your credit leslie berlin and twitter sink that was like a big that was actually the first big social media relationship that went in place to that was like two thousand team two thousand fourteen they have been innovators and they've done it quickly but they've done it in a way where is improving the life and the experience of their called member base and so your amex then you end up at w. p. Oh gosh yeah so how tells about that transition and leading the data alliance eventual sure so interesting enough. If you're gonna realize the theme of my life i guess fired a lot by television and i literally was watching an episode of madmen and it was the episode assode where'd don draper was a pitching the idea of the carousel for kodak and as the pictures flipping up and they're coming up on screen and i watched that episode now i could do that this. I called my sister safina funeral. I think wanna get to advertising my sisters. You are nutcase but this this is what we've learned to expect with you. Let me see who i know who could try and connect you up. So as khalil gibran would say what you seek is seeking you so my sister connected me with someone. One who i met lesson that was never turn down a meeting so i met this gentleman jim tobacco and met with impove now our and nothing happened the six months later. He reached out to me and i'm with a phone call w._p. And they've got this group called data alliance would could you be open to to coming in so i was like sure why not and he's he sends me this literally six page job description which was is everything and the bathroom sink and a lot in ice or job descriptions. I would say you know sixty percents of else. I could do twenty percent of it. I could figure out twenty percent l. Just fudge vic figure out over the drought but when i saw the job description as i've done all of this so i could do this so a short minogue back and with immunities c._e._o. Wants to meet you all right and went in and i met the c._e._o. Who at the time was nick. Knight the hat who's currently the chief digital off canton and also the chairman of our profiles division so i met him. He spoke about division but what was the hook for me to come to w._p._p. As much as i understood with the group was trying to do it was i felt a connection to nick as a person and it and that is a ruled. I've actually let i have to pick people over job. Titles and descriptions i just felt very connected to nick and his vision and the type of person that he was when i grow on nick that was what was supposed to be a half hour. Forty five minute meeting ends up being like two and a half thousand. I walked him to the train and and i was just at this is it i'll say this is the place i want to be so came to date alliance and what data alliance that the remember days alliance who was very much to bring together data partnerships so that we could bring those those day to assets into w._p._p.'s decision systems so what we what we refer to as house we'll have coined data destinations so how'd you bring data into the d. n. p. over at one time and how do we bring data into <hes> pre and platform than into platform how'd taste into their how to bring day and enter the panels council so that we could understand the three hundred and sixty degree view of an audience so that we could reach them with the the right message at the right time so the first partnership that we place low behold was twitter up and then from there we data surfed and offer that it was facebook book initially the team was based in new york and as the pawnshops began growing the benefit was really apparent. There was a desire for us to branch launch because we had also become at that point in time. A center of excellence of how do you do data partially created oldies frameworks of this how you do and this is. What how are we gonna evaluate partnerships so we were able to do at scale so then after that help support the the landing of or the expansion of data lines indicate in south africa in between johannesburg and cape kicked out right so like it's working and what was beneficial at that time like nick his leadership like has just been brilliant he was like if you've got an idea just make it happen and so came up with this entire structure of how we should do more expansion because we've been getting folks from u._p. India indonesia china all over the world saying we want d._a. We expanded to these regions because we want to. We want to not only leverage data decision systems. We also want to tell stories and we also wanna have relationships across all these sport. Also i mean end to end d._a. We did over twenty two partnerships with spotify horrify facebook twitter. I mean you name it all the big ones and as pure out that supports each one of those so we began so i started off as a director and dan began doing these partnerships and then began doing expansion and then move my web from director to global director managing director than to c._e._o. In about three and a half she is fast but you know i think it was false because it doesn't feel like work right. It was just something so intuitive and so natural to what i wanted to do. I was always the environment that i was in. It was a false failure ebb and they were failures. I mean oh god i mean and and we were supposed to do a music po ship had this big session i can and all this kind of great stuff and <hes> as we're about to go live with it. Just don't work at it died. I gave the analogy of you know you've operated someone stitching them back up and then they just flat on the table and also also my gosh maltin soils involved with this bags and at the time the chief strategy off says scott spirit because i get over it and that was the best advice i've ever received also what he was just go over. It is working on this stuff figure out and through the failure of that was the genesis of our relationship with spotify which like i'm just so proud of the firm as i see them grow and i see them do well like i feel in a small way. I've been able able to contribute to that because the way that relationship even developed was one night in a mobile congress in barcelona myself pete good guide well we can collaborate and a lot of these collisions have come together because of passion right like we. We've got passion for the music. We've got passion for the industry. What can we do that was going to be cool and collective and we ended up being like launch partners in indonesia and asia and have done a variety of work since then interesting so yeah. That's how old game together good all right so you you you're c._e._o. Data alliance and then now you're kantar. Yes what happened so with data alliance. The remits of days alliance grew as well so outside of a data partnerships. We also became a consultancy with clients the supporting our agencies going out there winning pitches. We were we this entire curriculum about data storytelling so eventually this idea of data. It's become commoditised and that's the reality and we're at a point somewhere like we've got like we've got team in indonesia. We've got firm in india south africa u._k. Senor and we were at the mission was that we would up school everyone and be able to have the center of excellence where everyone canal do it and we scaled it so then the next opportunity that came my way. It was like for me professionally as well. I wanted to be closer to the business because through d._a. Had luxury of influencing over two hundred million dollars worth the dayton technology spend and where we can leverage that how we can leverage that by one or two almost go back to my roots being closer to the client right front of house smart house but also.

facebook nick twitter new york chicago indonesia spotify africa partner austin college tim dekalb illinois london michigan president khalil gibran kodak cantor kantar safina
"leslie berlin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

17:51 min | 3 years ago

"leslie berlin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The city of sixty six thousand is in the heart of Silicon Valley and is home to Stanford University. We begin our feature on Palo Alto with a trip to the HP garage where William Hewlett and David Packard started their technology company. Palo Alto resident Bob Cray at the small garage where Hewlett Packard was founded this area pow office called professor Ville because Stanford professors who came in the early nineteen hundred eighteen ninety s who do not want to buy on Stafford campus where they could own their house, but not the land bought in the newly formed town of Palo Alto. And this house garage is where Hewlett Packard did their experiments in one thousand nine hundred thirty eight it's called the face of silicone valley. Paolo Alto is the Bethlehem Silicon Valley. This is the major so this is a national register of historic places plaque, and this is California state historical landmark, but this garage is the birthplace of the world's first high technical technologically region so-called valley, the idea for such a region originated with Dr Frederick chairman Stanford University, professor. Who encourages students to start up their own electronics companies in the area instead of joining a savage firms in the east the first students to follow his advice where William are here that and David Packard who in nineteen thirty eight began developing their first product an audio oscillator in this garage. We continue. Our look at Palo Alto, California, serving as headquarters to a number of high technology companies. We next hear the story of seven influential pioneers of Silicon Valley. Leslie, Berlin, author of troublemakers people think about Silicon Valley, and I think they think so it can valley sort of started with the invention of the iphone maybe or maybe the birth of Facebook something like this and what they don't understand. Although interestingly to people in Silicon Valley understand is that every generation of technology has been built on the generation that came before it troublemakers is about this incredible period in the history, not just of Silicon Valley, but the United States and the world it's this time when we had several major industries launch all in the same little window. So from nineteen sixty eight to nineteen seventy six you had the invention of the personal computer, the invention of the microchip, the invention of video games. The biotech came on the scene yet modern venture capital. Showing up you had the birth of apple Intel Atari to nen tech, the major venture capital firms, the quiet capital and Kleiner Perkins. Caufield Byers had the first internet transmission all of this is happening in the space of about thirty miles and eight years Senate. This book is about how that happened and the people who made it happen. So what was exciting about this time in Silicon Valley was that so many things were happening at once. And I had to figure out how do I tell all these stories between two covers? And I decided the way to do that was to write about seven individuals the first one that I mentioned is Bob Taylor. Bob Taylor is the guy who convinced the department of defense to start the Arpanet that today, we would call the internet and for most people that would be enough. But not for Bob Taylor. Bob taylor. Act two was to start the lab at Xerox. Parc that is the place that Steve Jobs came in nineteen seventy nine and for the first time saw a mouse saw the graphical user interface. Saw screen saw laser printers saw computers talking to each other. All of this was developed at Xerox PARC in the person running that lab was Bob Taylor. That's where Ethernet was invented. And so that's Taylor's impact everyone. Here's apple they think Steve Jobs, and Steve Wozniak what they don't know is that. There was another guy who owned us third of apple at the beginning. And this is a guy named Mike Markula and Mike Markula had been at Intel before it had its ITO and watch that company grow from basically a room or two in a warehouse into this incredibly successful company and Mike. Recruited. Let me tell you who came to apple because of Mike Markula their president that chairman of their board their VP of marketing their VP of spills, their VP of human resources their head of legal and to their two most important investors all were involved with apple because of Mike Markel. And his story is fascinating. Because he is this very quiet man, wonderful guy who was perfectly happy to be back in the shadows. Because he felt like jobs and Wozniak and particularly jobs were just much better front men for this company. And yet he was quietly in the back building this company. So that's Mike Markelle amazing guy a third person. I write about is the fabulous sandy Kurt sick. Sandra Hurtig is the first woman to take tech company public. And she at the time that I'm writing about her is starting this little software company, which is called ask. And she is this double outsider Silicon Valley at that time is all about hardware. It's all about computers. It's all about disk drives. It's all about sophisticated telephone systems. It is not about software. So sandy is trying to do a software company at the time that it's hardware everywhere in Silicon Valley. And the second thing about sandy as an outsider is that she's a woman, and so she didn't start her company in a garage. She started her company at her kitchen table, and she wasn't like jobs and Wozniak where there were experienced people like Mike Markula who would come and say, I can help you. She completely boots. Strap this company. I mean, she would read the Hewlett Packard annual report and try to figure out how they allocated their money for say research versus manufacturing and emulate that for her company. And consequently because she was in software because she was a woman people literally when she said, she sold software thought that she sold lingerie. And she had this story of how someone who starts out that much of an outsider and ends up with an incredibly successful IPO in the early eighties is just such a fascinating story when people hear Atari, they think, of course, they think pong, but if they think people they think a guy named Nolan Bushnell who's a great guy. So I think he's six floor huge head of hair, you know, prone to wearing polkadot shirts, and and. Talking about how he's irresistible to women, and they and they held meetings in hot tubs. And all of this is true. This is all true about Atari. It turns out there was a relationship at Atari between the show men who was Nolan Bushnell. And the engineer who was a guy named Alcorn that is very similar to the relationship between jobs and Wozniak Berlin in Palo Alto, author of the book, troublemakers. So I wrote about Alcorn and studying their relationship was just fascinating because Nolan was one of these guys who had a million dreams day and really no ability to build it at all. And Al was someone who could build anything, but constrained himself all the time. He he you tell him what to do, and he would do it. And what's fascinating about Al stories. First of all, it's the story of how a little Silicon Valley company takes off it ends up getting acquired by Warner Brothers. And what happens when this east coast company gets its hands on this Silicon Valley company, especially when rather up tight and stayed east. Coast company gets its hands on a company that literally held board meetings in hot tubs and getting out perspective on all that is great and. It's it's also really the story of his own development from a guy who had to be told how what to build to realizing wait a second. I can do this and starting his own inventions and his own companies. And so that's Al Al corn. Another person. I write about is woman named fawn Alvarez fun is a fascinating person because she started out. Right out of high school working on the manufacturing line at a company called role now role was role is the origin of everything. Now when you think about Silicon Valley culture, and you and you think of these beautiful campuses, and they're like rooms to play ping pong, and they're subsidized food and their incredible gyms in there. That all started at role like literally people came from all over the world to see this campus and fun is an incredible storyteller. And the story that she tells is about how she went from working on the manufacturing line to being the supervisor on the line to deciding she had to get a job behind the desk is the way she put it. Remember? She didn't have any college degree at all. She ends up rising through the ranks until by the end of her career at role which gets acquired by IBM. She's the chief of staff to the president of IBM Rome tells us about a time that doesn't there's no equivalent to it now in Silicon Valley, which is Silicon Valley used to build things. And that means that there were factories here. And that means that there were people who used to work in the factories, and these people had very good jobs and like. Fun. They could buy houses houses in Silicon Valley with a high school degree, and they were able to work a nine to five type shift and come home to their families and have just really great great lives. And that is all gone now there is no there's no equivalent to that sort of middle class in Silicon Valley. There are no assembly line jobs in Silicon Valley anymore to other people. I write about I think of as a pair, though, they wouldn't have thought of themselves that way the first one is a guy named meals roemer 's Neal's started at Stanford a little office called the office of technology licensing and in this face between when he started that office in nineteen seventy two and now the exact same thing that had in the. Past earn Stanford three thousand dollars, namely the licensing of inventions out of Stanford today that office has brought into billion dollars does fan for the office of technology. Licensing that Neal's started is the reason that Stanford owned a piece of Google. It's the reason that Stanford owned a piece of VM ware. And it's a reason it's the reason that Stanford owned along with the university of California San Francisco, the recombinant DNA patent that's at the heart of the modern biotech industry there. So this is what meals did and his path quickly intersected with that of another troublemaker. I write about who is a guiding Bob Swanson and Bob Swanson is the co founder of genetic with her Boyer. And Bob Swanson is one of these people who was an absolute golden boy who got hired at Kleiner Perkins. Which is this brand new venture capital firm at the time and gets fired as soon as they hit some rocky period, and doesn't know what to do with himself. I mean, this is the one who was succeeded in every single thing he's ever done in his entire life. He literally goes on welfare, and he read scientific American hears about the recombinant DNA process and a conference that had been held at FILA, mar. And literally opens up a phone book and starts calling the different Stein. Tists who had attended the conference to see if they thought there was any chance accompany might be able to come out of this invention. And that that that this could be commercialized enough in a short enough period of time. And one of the first people he reached was her Boyer who agreed to talk to him. And they ended up starting a company that is Genentech one of the most successful biotech companies in history was started by this guy on welfare driving around trying to get biologists to talk to him about this breakthrough process. So that's Neal's roemer, and that's absu Watson. The name troublemakers came from the famous apple add in when Steve Jobs returned to apple in nineteen ninety seven that starts. Here's to the crazy ones. The troublemakers those square pegs in round holes that sort of thing, and I just loved what it can noted which was someone who is a bit mischievous seven one who had sort of a goal in mind that might not necessarily be the same goal is everybody else. It's interesting because if I could put parentheses on the title title's already long enough, I never would I would've called it. Something like troublemakers for a reason. I think that now when we look at the problems that Silicon Valley is facing in a lot of ways in some ways, it can be oil down two trouble making for the sake of troublemaking, and this sort of disruption because there's an industry that could be disrupted. That was not what was going on at this time. When we think about the accusations that Silicon Valley is facing today around being era Ghent thinking that it's above the law kind of going into places where it doesn't belong in messing everything up. I read an analogy. Once that said that Silicon Valley was like the Kool aid man breaking through the walls around sort of wreaking. Havoc in to the into the existing space. When we think about that sort of sense of Silicon Valley today in some ways, it's the troublemakers ideal gone wrong. I think that part of what we've seen is there's a necessary sort of audacity that you have to possess to think that you can build something entirely new, and in some cases, you can build not you can build something new you can build a new company, and you can build a whole new industry, but that kind of necessary audacity can shade into an arrogance that is really problematic, and I think that a lot of the suspicion 's that people have about Silicon Valley right now come from feeling like this is there's there's an arrogance here. A sense of knowing better than anybody else that is. Not. Okay. And that's I think what we're seeing a lot of pushback about. And this troublemakers is about people right on the cusp of that. But they've never crossed that line. Author of the book, troublemakers, Leslie, Berlin. C span cities tour is exploring the American story with visit to Palo Alto. Next, we traveled to the Hoover Institution on the campus of Stanford University as the author of the Vietnam war related book, we shot the war takes us through a museum exhibit of the same name..

Silicon Valley Stanford University Bethlehem Silicon Valley apple Hewlett Packard Palo Alto Bob Taylor Steve Wozniak Steve Jobs Mike Markula Nolan Bushnell Paolo Alto Leslie California David Packard Berlin Atari Neal