5 Burst results for "Leslie Alexander"

"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:40 min | 1 year ago

"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From from from from from the U. S. And then now we have the rise also. The bean. Everything comes from the U. S. And the national production is so low that the quote of the national products are too high for the people to buy an interestingly that is a pattern that also stems back to the to the 19th century. You know Haiti, and it's significant when you think about the size of Haiti that in terms of square mileage, it's a relatively small country. But even in the 19th century, Haiti was the fourth most important trade partner. The United States had Haiti consumed and relied heavily upon, um manufactured goods being exported from the United States. And even while the United States government was refusing to recognize Haiti as a sovereign and independent nation United States, merchants and the United States economy was benefiting in measurably from its economic relationship with Haiti and the economic dependence that Haiti had on United States manufactured goods. But you know, the United States had that kind of neo imperial economic relationship with a lot of countries. But none of them. Were as desperate As Haiti. What's the Haitian difference? 130 years ago, Frederick Douglass said the world would not allow Haiti a place in the sisterhood of nations. Is that just as true today? I mean, you know Guatemala, Honduras, Um Nicaragua All had, um post colonial neo imperial ist, uh, relationships through united fruit and other U. S multinationals. Where U. S interests on the railroads and the port facilities. The United States caused the creation of Panama, carving it out of Colombia and and having the canal built, uh The United States is a huge power, throwing its weight around in a lot of places. What's the Haitian? Difference is it still treated? In differently in the way that Frederick Douglass noted that it would not be allowed to join the Sisterhood of Nations. Evelyn. What do you think I take from the start without being ban Oia? I think from the start, you know, there was a There was a willingness desire to keep 80 you know, like Ah, bad list the example not to follow. I think this traditions of footing 80, you know, side You know, keep you know the actually the contemporary states to pretty differently We have to. You have to images of here You have this image that eighties west countries of the Western universe. And At the symptoms. You have the idea of a nation. That that strength up By swats against Powerful nation of friends at the time, but it was not something Possible. You know, And you have those two images that are fighting all the time. When you talk about 80. I travel a lot and I find you know these people looking at you like you're formality. And it's like, yeah, 80 the image of 80, and at the same time you have the image as a foregone thing. So I think it's something that we are. Uh, we have to. We have to use that as Asian. I'm saying that we have to use those talk to find a way. But my My main problem is not only with the foreign powers, I think The main problem is the A little bitty. There's an Asian elite. That is so Um The line to anything that is not his own interest. Very small. L it very small early, but Uh, very oblivious to anything else. You know, people like die of hunger. People might have nowhere to sleep. They don't care. They just care about their own thinkers, and they are willing to deal with the foreign countries. Whatever the demands to stay with their benefits and the advantage and that is the main problem of a so Leslie Alexander. Let's close by looking ahead. Is there anything that you can see in the offing that would allow Haiti to break this cycle to get the kind of traction it needs to Rebuild its economy rebuild its civic society rebuild a polity where presidents leave office when their term expires rather than when they're assassinated. If I could. I'd like to just say I would like to address that. But if I could, I'd like to say something just quickly about the Frederick Douglass speech that you just cited because I think at the core of that speech is something really important, um, for your listeners to grasp, he delivered that speech in 18 93 at the Chicago Chicago's World Fair. And it was more than 30 years after the United States government had finally agreed to recognize Haiti diplomatically, And yet Douglas is still very frustrated about the fact that Haiti was being excluded from what he described as the Sisterhood of nations. But what's significant about what he says in that speech is the reason why Haiti is being excluded from the sisterhood of nations. And what he says in that speech is Haiti is black. And we have not yet forgiven Haiti for being black. And I think that really goes to the core of what is significant about this story that American United States independence. Can be celebrated. And the American Revolution every July. 4th. You know, we have cookouts and fireworks and we celebrate. Um this the the United States Quest for Freedom and liberty. And yet when black people Formerly enslaved people seek the same liberty and freedom for themselves. They are demonized and continue to be to this day. And I think at the core of this story is one in which The white Western world has still not forgiven Haiti for being black for being a nation that had the courage and the bravery and the audacity. To be a sovereign black free, independent nation. And I think that that is really at the core of the story in terms of thinking about going forward, and Evelyn is probably more qualified to speak to this than I am. But I would say that I think really, what needs to happen is that Haiti actually finally needs to be allowed to govern itself and that the Haitian people need to be able to have the sovereignty of self governance and true self governance without foreign intervention, and that the Haitian people speaking to her point about the elite that the Haitian people need to have the ability and the freedom To be able to fully, um, govern themselves and to be self determining, um about their own destiny. I would say from my perspective, I would also really like to see black activists in the United States have the same commitment to Hades freedom and autonomy and sovereignty as they did in the 19th century. And I would like to see black folks are around the diaspora rallied behind Haiti in the way that they did in the 19th century. But I really think at the core of this is a question of whether Haiti is going to be forgiven for being black and whether the Haitian people are ever going to be allowed to have the freedom to fully govern themselves. Ever listen to Yo, I think that's the question. That's the question and this is a matter that was that is very, very building it for us relevant for us right now. And that's why you have a lot of young people taking to the states now and asking for the Liberty to talk about the country and to act about photo country to decide what to do. And that's what we've been fighting for. For the last five years, you know, marching and asking for the U. S. For friends for Canada for all those countries, friends already please let us be. Let us be a letter shoes. But I would like to go back to something You said today about the ancient president being assassinated. Four million or four for meeting or six. Let's see. We had four visited as assassinated. And you know the lady no more. No more. And I think the U. S had law. You know, I'm not, you know, talking about all the states men being assassinated in the U. S. But this is part of the Of the media coverage of 80 You know they the focus on that Also, you know they assassinated President Lady to show the violence. But you know, for the amount of poverty.

Leslie Alexander Frederick Douglass 19th century Douglas six Evelyn American Revolution U. S. Colombia United States 80 Four million two images 18 93 Haiti today 130 years ago July. 4th four Canada
"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"19 years until 1934 and the population does not forget that. You know, when you occupy the country, you live a mug and you know the population. Uh, feel it like, uh, like violation. That's what it was. That's why it's very relation. Most Americans don't know that we occupied the country. For 19 years. This is Something in the consciousness of Haitians. Not very much in the consciousness of the countries that actually we're doing this to Haiti. But how does this visit itself as a practical matter on the day to day if you work in the port? If you're a shopkeeper in Porter, Prince What does that have to do with your contemporary reality and the trouble that Haiti has moving forward after repeated setbacks? We had a lot of people living the rural regions to come to the cities and that started with the U. S commissioner meeting because there was no way they were going to work there. Because the U. S occupation the very first people who suffered for me all the business of eating Leslie Alexander. How do you answer that? Same question. Yeah. I just want to absolutely briefly that at the beginning of the U. S occupation of Haiti, 80% of the Haitian government's annual budget was going to pay France. And French banks That's almost 100 years. After the terms of the indemnity had been agreed to And at that point, Haiti's governmental budget 80% of it is still going to pay France for the indemnity. What most people don't know. Is that following the U. S occupation of Haiti The United States essentially became Hades New creditor. So Haiti finally pays off its debt to France. But it does so by borrowing the money from the United States and U. S banks. And so the United States becomes hatred's newest creditor, and in order to pay off that debt now to the United States, they are depleting their gold reserves. They're leaving the country utterly be raft of resources again, just to give you a sense of this in 2010. Shortly before the earthquake, Haiti sent 90% of its foreign reserves to financial institutions in Washington, D. C. To try to pay down its national debt. So the indemnity is not an ancient historic 19th century story only right? It is also a very recent contemporary reality, which is that For centuries now. Haiti has been trying to pay off what should have been its fundamental right which is to simply exist as a free and sovereign nation. The thing is that most people in the U. S. And even in France, they don't know about this. You know, they keep on repeating what you were saying. Professor Alexander like it is the poorest country of the Western universe. It's fair, but they don't know about. They don't know because I had the opportunity to speak. With students from universities in the US the Ivy leagues, they don't know about it. It's not bad of what they teach them Ministery and like Now, there are some efforts being done in France. I know also in the US to talk about it. Mhm and I think that part of the problem about people's ignorance regarding this history. And this contemporary reality about Haiti is that Haiti then somehow becomes apologized. It's like what is wrong with Haiti. But it is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. You know, poor Haiti. It becomes this sort of victimization of Haiti. But it's pathologize in such a way that it's like, why can't those black people govern themselves? And the reality is that we have to come to terms with why Haiti is in the circumstances that it it is in it is by design as the U. S been content. To have a badly run Haiti off its coast of since the revolution, since, uh, the world's first successful slave rebellion. Established the world's first black led republic. I mean, I would go a step farther than that. I would say that Not only has the US been content, but I think the U. S has desired. Haiti to be an unstable, vulnerable nation. Um, from the time of its founding, the United States had the United States government historically and contemporary, Lee Has sought to, um disrupt Hades internal politics to topple leaders and insert people that they felt were more amenable to US economic interests. And it does, in fact, stem all the way back to the 19th century. Um, throughout much of the 19th century, for example, and this is something about US history and US foreign policy that most people don't know. The United States repeatedly over the course of decades, sought to re colonise and reimpose slavery in Haiti. Um some of the most famous attempts at that took place at times when Haiti was internally unstable, and I think again the historical context for this is is important because a lot of the internal Uh, political instability that takes place in Haiti during the 19th century is the result of problematic policies that Haitian leaders put into place in an effort to try to meet the terms of the indemnity right. The Haitian government is finding itself economically strapped Having to pay. The French government but not really having the financial resources in order to be able to do it, and so they impose problematic, exploitative policies. That are naturally undesirable to the residents of the nation. For example, they impose heavy and impossible to meet taxation policies. Trying to find ways to raise money to pay France and then people naturally rebel against that, right, So there's constant upheaval in Haiti. The United States government capitalizes on that instability. And repeatedly attempts to go into Haiti. Take control, seize control over the government and reimpose slavery. They attempted to do it in 18, 45 and 18 51 in 18 54 all the way through 18 56 really all the way up until the outbreak of the U. S. Civil War. The United States government attempts multiple times. To go in, seize control over the Haitian government and reimpose slavery, Um, in the territory and, of course throughout the 20th century. Um, it's something that the United States repeatedly continues to do. We discussed the occupation, the military occupation by the United States of Haiti for almost 20 years. And then, of course, we see in the case of the Duvalier regime and numerous presidencies that have taken place in Haiti. Since then the United States deliberately intervening. And supporting the toppling of various political leaders in an attempt to assert governmental authority in Haiti that they think will best serve US economic interests. Evelyn Toyo, Go ahead, but but from the political, uh, aspects there is also the economic aspects. We are mostly not dependent of the US for everything. We balding things on the U. S. Do guys a idea. The region of money that was, you know, very famous for is life and now most of the guys that we consume Come from the U. S. Hey, the on the products that we have come from the U. S. So the 80 is a body. Also the U. S student production in our national production is all the way below all the way we go. You know. So this is about also of not only the occupation but intervention of the US while the years you know the force us, you know, for example, for the For the book, we had our own box. They teamed them. You know, they on fear and they make us import other.

Evelyn Toyo 2010 90% U. S. US 80% Haiti Washington, D. C. 19th century 1934 Alexander 18 56 18 Lee U. S. Civil War 18 54 20th century Leslie Alexander Porter 45
"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have estimated that it would be close to the equivalent of $20 billion that they were being forced to pay in the 19th century. Even white Americans in the United States at the time. Thought that the French demand was absurd and that the Haitians would never have any hope of paying it off. The legacy of that is that in order to meet the terms Of the indemnity in order to pay the annual installments. The Haitian government found itself in cycles of ongoing debt they had to borrow from French banks. In order to pay the money back at exorbitant, insanely high interest rates that created impossible impossible cycles of debt. Well, certainly there was an attempt to smother the country in the cradle. There was a long long period where it was handicapped by the weight of foreign sanctions. The attempts to Sort of cut it off from, uh, the economic activity of the world. But why is that important in 2021? Well, I think it's important in 2021 because When you look at the media coverage in particular of Haiti, stemming all the way back to the 2010 earthquake. There is this level of accusation that you hear in the American media about Haiti being You know the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. We keep hearing that over and over again. I describe it as a chant of accusation without a broader context of how Haiti became the poorest. Country in the Western Hemisphere in the first place, and it is largely as the result of foreign intervention and exploitation, obviously, first, beginning with France. But More contemporary Lee. It's the United States, right? That is largely responsible for the plight that Haiti continues to face both economically and politically. And if we are not willing to take a look at the historical roots of that, if we're not willing to have an honest reckoning With how and why Haiti finds itself in its current circumstances. We can never really have a healing of the nation that it deserves to have. I spoke with Leslie Alexander about this over.

Leslie Alexander United States 2021 $20 billion 19th century Haiti Lee Western Hemisphere first both Haitian Haitians first place Americans France American French 2010
"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"leslie alexander" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In terms of this long legacy of foreign intervention, in my view goes all the way back to the way in which the white Western world responded to the establishment of Haiti as a sovereign black nation. Leslie Alexander is a historian, activist professor and author. Her latest book is Fear of the Black Republic How Haitian Sovereignty inspired Did the birth of black internationalism. Everyone celebrates 17 76 and you know the aspirations of liberty and freedom and freedom from colonial rule. But when the Haitians demanded and desired the same freedom and liberty and desire to self govern that every other human on the planet celebrated When the Americans wanted it, they were demonized for their actions and then forced through what we would refer to as gunboat diplomacy. To pay an exorbitant amount of money. For those of you who don't follow Haitian history closely. The country basically had to buy its freedom from France. It had two by itself. France demanded 150 million gold francs in exchange for recognizing Haiti's independence. And this put incredible pressure on the country's finances for the entire 19th century. Really, I mean, just so that your listeners have a sense, 150 million Gold Franks in the 19th century, which is what the French demanded that they pay is the equivalent of billions of dollars in contemporary Terms. Most people.

Leslie Alexander 19th century 150 million gold francs Haiti two 150 million Gold Franks billions of dollars Haitian 17 76 Americans Haitians Fear of the Black Republic every France French
"leslie alexander" Discussed on Big Fellas Basketball

Big Fellas Basketball

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"leslie alexander" Discussed on Big Fellas Basketball

"Basically what happened was we learned about like this is the story. That kind of came out our resurfaced may be mine. Came out but Whenever the wholehearted fiasco happened over the off season this year because he was angry with the front office was a little bit of a wishful thinking. From rockets fans of hakeem went through the same thing basically telling ownership. I want out. I don't want to be here and i'm pretty. It was over money but as over the we're losing and you're not paying me well enough. We're not winning games. The way we should be and they gave him a big big deal. Robert ory a second season really stepped up. That's another guy. We drafted sam. Cassell was a rookie that year. He was huge for our championship. Teams at everybody. Houston is a big sam casella fan and so things really just kind of worked out at the right time that first year we portland. In the first round we own be phoenix. The second round. And what's crazy about phoenix right so in that second series phoenix. And this is actually like. It's really cool story because it gets low history about the you know everybody knows those teams as the clutch city teams. And that's where houston really. Got his moniker at a bank. Clutch city does i. Two games against phoenix rockets. Lost by four points in seven points. And there's a huge article with the front sang choke city and the players took You know the michael jordan. I took that personally Like that the michael jordan. Meanwhile they say like i that personally. They took that personally. They wrote choke city on their shoes and like they went out and they beat the sohn's by sixteen. They beat them by eleven. The game after that. Be my twenty three the game after that Phoenix ends obtain game. Six and game. Seven akeem goes offer. Thirty seven seventeen. I think it was by the end of game five. They were talking about like the choke city thing as it's not choke city leslie alexander. Former owner he says not choke city. It's clutch city. I end accompany starts club city entertainment..

Cassell eleven sam casella sixteen seven points michael jordan phoenix Six Two games sam first round second round twenty three leslie alexander four points game five second series this year Phoenix first year