2 Episode results for "Leopold Statues"

Scott Budnick - Founder, One Community Films and The Anti-Recidivism Coalition

Art of the Hustle

42:40 min | Last month

Scott Budnick - Founder, One Community Films and The Anti-Recidivism Coalition

"Salesforce helps your company give your customers, the personal experiences they love and when you do that, they tend to love you back salesforce the number one crm, we bring companies and customers together visit salesforce dot com slash learn more. Hi, I'm Brian Huskey I'm bald and I'm Charlie Sanders. I'm also bald and we want to talk to people about Charlie. Did you know that the less hair you have the more interesting you become of course, everybody knows that vitamin then well, on our podcast ball talk, we interview people about being ball is this show just for Baldi's No Hair Os will enjoy this too I. mean the show is about perception insecurity vanity just like human stuff you wouldn't believe the things that come up isn't a ball talk on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Of the Hustle is production of iheartradio. This thing to the the hustle show that breaks down how some of the world's most fascinating people have hustled and learn their way into shaving great things. I'm your host Jeff Rosenthal founder of summit, and on today's show I had the pleasure of. My dear, friends. Scott Budnick. Scott is the founder of one community films. The Anti recidivism coalition is one of the most successful comedy film Producers History, as well as one of most successful recidivism activists alive today. Scott. Was the executive producer of the hangover film franchise and via one community films to producer just mercy the feature film about Bryan Stevenson founder of the equal justice initiative Scott's work with the Anti recidivism coalition began as an annual camping trip bringing together a few dozen formerly incarcerated young people with positive mentors to offer encouragement guidance resources and today a R.. C. Has grown into a support and advocacy network of more than four hundred and fifty members and hundreds of volunteers. Mentors allies committed to helping one another through reentry and advocating for a fair criminal justice system talking with sky is always a great reminder. That luck isn't everything he admits he was quite lucky to land a job with top Phillips early in his career, but it wasn't until he's encounter with the criminal justice system that led down the path to creating some of the most rewarding and fulfilling work of his life. So please enjoy my conversation with Scott, but. Hey. Scott. Thanks for joining me on the podcast Geoff. So happy to be your brother. Thank you course where where am I, reaching you today where do we find you posted up? I am posted up in Los Angeles California just got back from some road trips to Oregon and Colorado, and now we are quarantining and staying indoors. Fantastic Man I. do admire that I saw some of those photos, Scott United old friends. We've been buddies for close to ten years now maybe. A little more, maybe a little less I would love it. If you would introduce the listeners a bit to your work absolutely I'm a bit of a hybrid to say the least I started out I moved from Atlanta Georgia to Los Angeles to get into the film business in got very lucky that my first job was with Todd Phillips on his first movie road trip and it was the beginning of a relationship that lasted sixteen years professionally and still lasts personally i. Started out as a production assistant that is assistant in literally by the second movie was a junior producer and then producing all of his movies after that as well as being the president of his company running his production company there was a great run road trip. Old School starts in high school scoundrels that we rarely talk about Hangover one-two-three day project acts war dogs and I ended up leaving right before we went to shoot ward odds but. Where everything kind of changed for me was after old school a friend of mine that worked on the film with me invited me down to a local juvenile hall in the San Fernando Valley and I sat at a table inside a jail for children with kids. Fourteen fifteen, sixteen years old that we're all facing life in prison I, turn to the young kid next to me and said, how's your week or you're doing? Okay and he said. It's been a really tough week. I just got sentenced to three hundred years to life in prison and I paused I said what happened he said my best friend shot the victim in the bud for standing next to him. and not touching the gun I got three hundred years to live the victim was in out of the hospital in a day. And I realized that does moment jeff that if this was our child, he would be out on bail it wouldn't be sitting in that jail. It would have the best lawyer in Los Angeles and he would get probation and not spend a day in prison for standing next shot someone in the but. But because David didn't have our skin tone or our resources and came from the foster care system and had been victims, of Physical Abuse Sexual, abuse etc David was going to prison for three hundred years to life, and that was completely fucking unacceptable to me. As I heard the stories around that table, it was really hurt people hurt people by alternately told those kids. If they make the commitment to change I'm going to be by their side. The entire time I jumped in to teaching that class every week. After in that same class, there was a kid named Adam. He was going to prison for six years for robbery looked like he was eleven years old. And with his hand shaking, he said, can I get your number when I get out I wanna make my mom proud and ultimately Adam got out called me we were in pre production on the hangover. I said show up internship twelve dollars an hour be early work hard six am tomorrow Adam ended up showing up at three thirty in the morning. And beat everyone to set ran circles run everyone attitude of gratitude every day. And ultimately, our master said, this is one of the greatest kids I've ever hired. I'm putting in the union out on one end of the Union started making two, forty, eight dollars an hour, and now his four brothers are in the union all of making over one hundred thousand dollars a year lifting their families out of poverty buying their family. House. And I. Just became the film producer. It was very involved in criminal justice reform. and. Then after warthogs and really before we shot warthogs and after hangover three and really after being in a theater in saint twelve years a slave. I. Went to Todd Phillips Inside I wanNA leave and start a nonprofit organization and he was gracious. Let me right out my contract and ended up starting a a nonprofit called Air C. to Anti Recidivism Coalition Jeff that you were one of the Founding Board members of. So thank you for that. It's now grown into one of the largest criminal justice reform organizations in the country passed tons of bills in fact. We're able to end life sentences for young people. I got to go into prison in see David who had three hundred years to life. Until David that congratulations we're able to pass Senate bill to sixty, and you now have twenty five to life. And I was able to see him another time Jeff. And let them know that Governor Jerry Brown just decided to commute his sentence and believe it or not David who just had twin girls three weeks ago is going to the pro board in November and is likely going to be home by New Year's Congratulations to you in David One. That's incredible. Thank you brother and we'll talk more about one community. But that's kind of the the the weird hybrid of movie producer in Criminal Justice Reform Guy. You've now refocused both of these things you know making a large impact in the world through your efforts and producing films. I don't want to gloss over that. But talk about that I experience when you were producing these films and you had a pretty unbelievable an enviable career as a producer as a film producer and I remember that when you were going deep into this people thought you were kind of kidding I. Now it's ten years later and it's the issue of our time but I recall like it was a Lotta side I for you correct. I mean, it's not normal for a producer at warner brothers walk the tears of men's central jail six in the morning that'd be in his office by A. But I'll be honest with you jeff when I ended up leaving the movie business. At, starting a nonprofit and taking ninety percent pay cuts, those are the best five years of my life because. The. People in the movie business that were real in cared about more than just profits. Involved in what we were doing it ar see on the huge parks and I was able to really distinguish who are the real ones in who aren't, and that's when everything started happened. Right? It wasn't when I was running in the film business that all of this happened it was when I left to start a nonprofit that President Obama called and asked me to be on his my brother's keeper board it it it's Jerry Brown. was calling to ask to help with criminal justice reform. It was when common John Legend in Kim Kardashian and many others were calling to get involved right and so leaving many many of whom you brought to prison for the first time. Correct. All of whom I brought in Prison J. Cole right like him because they're real ones and it was actually leaving a position of power. That brought them all to me. There was nothing I could do for them. I couldn't cast a movie, I could help them with their album. I couldn't bring a feature to their album. There was nothing I could do for them and to see them come and want to get involved. Because they knew I was coming from the right place and they didn't want anything out of it nor did I was just like an a beautiful thing. It was a great run five years running that non nonprofit in passing sixteen laws in California, that affected twenty, six thousand young people that were in California prisons and sentenced to die in prison now, all twenty, six, thousand have a chance. To come home and proved transformation, I'll tell you jeff like that's what brings happiness. Right like sitting in my in air. Sea you've been there. Jeff. Seeing people come sit on my couch not big actors, writers and directors, but people in their first moments out of prison that just. A new life and I, WanNa Find Housing a mentor or a job or career they want to college it was just the most beautiful thing but. There was so much I learned at AMC that led me to this next step. This overlap between impact and entrepreneurship is something that is you know emergent and our generation where it's really sums it there's there's a there's a mutual benefit to it right? There's a there's a multiplier effect for the outcomes for both when you combine these things thoughtfully but for us personally to be heart connected to an issue to actually experience it on the ground I. Just WanNa you know I just thought it was a story that you know I wanted to give lights here and credence to because you didn't just tell us you. You've you brought us. Yeah, and and that's really jeff like seeing you guys sitting in that hallway in that creative writing class and you know as Bryan. Stevenson. Says that you have to get proximate to human sufferings to change lives and change the world like like it's the truth and. It is no one I ever brought into a juvenile hall or jail or prison who thought one way for maybe forty or fifty or sixty years of their life. Left. Sitting across from children human beings left feeling the same way right? It changed everybody's hearts and minds doesn't matter Democrat doesn't matter. Republican doesn't remember it doesn't matter. Race doesn't matter religion even people who are in law enforcement it change them and I realized Jeff that like I had an enormous power in the film business to tell stories that brought people proximate. Right? You can't bring everybody into a jail or prison to witness what you witnessed, but you can through storytelling right and you can do a film or a television show that moves people. And everything changed jess I met a guy who ran like was one of the guys that ran the political movement for marriage equality and I asked him, how did you literally take the issue of gay marriage off the table? I mean it was a legal in fifty states and ten years later it's legal everywhere. How did you do? What was the game changer? He looked at me without missing a beat and said, will and grace. And Allen and Glee, in modern family end milk and brokeback mountain. It was Ele- vision show about a cute gay couple. That humanize gay marriage to middle. America. That got people who were deeply opposed to soften and opposition or even support. and. That was crucial and a huge part of the movement to legalize gay marriage right and so I realized shit the biggest tool I have in my toolbox to change the way that people think about the people I love in the criminal justice system or immigrants or refugees or people struggling with poverty or people struggling with racism or women and girls struggling with equality or environmental justice by port, Broken Education Systems people struggling with addiction or mental health all issues of inequality that we could make film and Television podcasts to change people's hearts and minds move legislation, increase, philanthropy, etc, and so Jeff, really with your help. And the help at the summit community I went out to raise fifty million dollars for this company in brought in. As you know, Roy Salter who's raised two hundred billion dollars entertainment and created a model which had eighteen percent return. So not an uber twitter instagram embezzlement prefer someone that wants to make a difference it someone that really wants to make an impact alongside and investment and make a little bit of money. It was a good investment and so we were able to bring on. Literally at the end of year one, I had raised zero dollars at the end of your to I'd raise zero dollars couple balls start have you remembered civic capital partners in China was going to be the lead that didn't work out and then we talked for a long time with Kobe. God rest his soul was going to be elite investor and although he didn't invest, he was such as the border and even bought out theaters for justice. Mercy and. Did wonderful things for us and ultimately it was Debbie. Me William Morris Endeavor Endeavor content became our lead investors and behind them a bunch of unbelievable folks came ultimately Michael Rubin. Who owns the sixers and West Edens who owns the box and Mike Novigrad and Dan Loeb in very stern legit started starwood they wanted to invest in something that made them feel great. 'cause they were actually making a difference. We'll be back with more of the hustle after the break. XFINITY X. by is more than just fast. It's Internet that gives you ultimate control with the X. Y. APP. You can pause the Wi fi at the push of a button. Can Your Internet do that? Learn more at extending dot com slash X. by. Do. You know what your online businesses worth. Quiet light is brokerage that's passionate about helping entrepreneur scale and sell their online businesses for six seven or even eight figures. Two Hundred Years of combined experience in a team of honest trusted advisers who take a tailored approach to helping clients quiet light offer some of the most informative in comprehensive business summaries out there. Though provide you with an initial valuation call prepare you with a detailed interview that will highlight every question of potential buyer might ask and then publish you're listening to help you find the right buyer. No matter. What kind of online business you may own ECOMMERCE Amazon as software as a service or content site you WanNa talk to quiet light. If you're interested in the best possible payout for the website you work so hard to build. To. Find out if the businesses sellable asset download quiet lights free twenty five point guide by heading to quiet light brokerage dot. COM SLASH IHEART And Scott I want to talk to you about just mercy. We haven't really cut it up just about this in particular because you you are always doing something for the movement. There's always state senator calling you or an inmate calling you that you're organizing a pickup for it's like no job too big new job too small, and there's like you were describing this huge blend of for profit nonprofit impact and you know in your work but with just mercy in particular, you know like I would love for you to walk us through a bit of that because how has the world changed since there was a full feature that told Brian, story Yeah it was an unbelievable experience. The fact that our first investment, our first co-finance project was in the issue area that I've spent the last. So many years passionate about. Also been enormous Bryan Stevenson fan friend supporter. We've done panels together so to be able to support Brian telling his story was unbelievable. The team was incredible Michael Jordan Jamie Foxx Brie Larson all in this to change the criminal justice system not just make a movie our producers assuring guild, director Destin the Studio Warner brothers, everyone kind of marching in the same direction and the difference between our company and every company in Hollywood. Is really were not just an entertainment company where impact company. Right and we're going to thousand the impact of most anyone else. So obviously, we invested in just mercy as investors right looking for a return but separate from that I raised a nonprofit philanthropic C. Three Fund to run one of the largest social impact campaigns ever around a film a year year and a half long campaign around just mercy. We started by screening the film for over a dozen governors where I was able to sit next to governors who control mass incarceration in their state. Hand Tissues as they were crying at the end of the film. And then sit with them in their chiefs of Staff and their cabinets and talk about what bills on what reform they're willing to do, and now we're actually working in nine states on criminal justice legislation from screenings of just mercy with these governors we created an incredible partnership with the NBA Shoutout to West Edens and Michael Rubin. The Bucks and the sixers shout out to Jeannie Bus and the Lakers and Vivek. Dave. Sacramento Kings the bomber. In the Clippers Dan Gilbert and the Cleveland Cavaliers were able to screen the film for so many NBA teams, owners, players coaches, and that goes teams that wanted to take a deeper dive into a criminal justice reform came inside prisons with us where the players and coaches play basketball with men and women inside prison had deep-healing conversations in. Now, in most of those cities, those teams have adopted criminal justice reform as part of their official platform. And have adopted those prisons being able I really the reason we created it was in looking at places that are predominantly white. When you go to a Utah jazz game, the Rina's entirely white. When you go to Oklahoma City thunder game the arenas entirely widened fact even pray after the national anthem and the cultural influencers in those cities are those players and to be able to engage deeply in this issue, the teams deeply MS issues, coaches deeply miss you than alternately the fans deeply in these issues. That's to me how you change especially in people who haven't experienced the criminal justice system first hand in their lives during in their families lives in film we've normalized and romanticized violent policing. But when you look back at it, we've doubled criminalized criminals culturally in a sense an celebrated this crime and punishment mentality where it's like, yeah. Well, you screwed up and now you're serving your time will even look at the jet. Exactly right even look at the procedural like all the law and order right? Good. Guy. Bad Guy Easy Solutions. Yes. CHICAGO PD or Magnum Pi or I mean I never saw an episode of either. So I can't really say for sure but. I the theme is there and I'm curious. So you have people that you know think they think one way about this issue, and then they have gotten exposed to the content, and then the you know the supporting campaign that you've been building alongside of the content, tell us about like people who have shifted their thinking through this experience. Yeah. I mean it's it's been unbelievable. We've been able to engage an crime victims right? People who have lost loved ones to violence who have been on the other side for the most part about criminal justice reform and then having deep dialogues. Working a organization called healing dialogues than action I think Jeff You've met Havi are starring when you served on the board his organization that has mothers whose children have been murdered set with mothers whose children have committed murder. You can imagine how deep those conversations are. And they ultimately become great friends because. They both experienced loss. Obviously, the survivors loss is more intense than a mother who's lost their child to prison for life. But you see the mothers who have lost their children in the most unimaginable thing you could ever go through soften when sitting with the mothers whose children have done this and to see the remorse that these mothers have for their children's actions. So we've had some incredible work with survivors of crime lawn in. Aren't people like the coke brothers are like huge supporters surprisingly of. Our campaign, the coke, brothers, the American conservative Union we screen just mercy for the National, Association of Evangelical who came aboard and huge support of just mercy people from Pastor, Rick Warren, Bishop, td Jakes to Governor Kevin. Instead of Oklahoma. We're talking about a white Republican Evangelical Governor of a state where every county voted for president trump and had been the largest incarcerator in the world. And this incredible man governor stood it is why to people of faith who live their life in a very faithful way governor stood the largest single-day commutation of sentence of any governor in the history of this country, a him and his wife saw just mercy I was able to speak to the governor's pastor who's an incredible man and we're doing tons and Oklahoma and our on criminal justice reform because of the just mercy screening and because of the governor and when I really talked to the people of Oklahoma. They were many were ashamed of their past many were shamed of being the largest straighter in the world. Many were ashamed of some of the racial bias that existed in the committee in the community decades ago, and all of the Oklahomans that I met wanted to get to a more fair and just system, and so just being able to do this through just mercy and then people who just dove headfirst into the issue like I gotta give it up for Kim Kardashian who's using her platform to try to shine lights on people who are innocent or unjustly sentenced to John Legend a common DJ coal. Incredible Allison Williams who starred in get out. Even supermodels like. Emily Radic Hausky who've gotten so involved in in criminal justice reform. One of the things I wanted to ask you about just because you know here we are. We're GONNA pandemic. There are protests in the streets being led by Jin Z. around the Movement for black lives and really like there's a huge huge movement around just. A rethinking of economic participation on the right and the left, and so you work with this intimately for a long period of time with this community, you've seen where it goes wrong. You've seen the conditions that you can provide for people to make it go right and so I'm curious because there's people coming out of the military. There's people coming out of universities with crippling debt. There's those that didn't graduate from anything in her just trying to get a foothold somewhere in this country and I imagine this will apply to the other areas of focus that one community films now works on like what what are, what are those based blocks? What are? The things that you think we can provide the people that ourselves to. You know, take these steps forward into new lives. We'll jeff you're right when you say that justice and Mercy and redemption are not either Democratic or Republican. Ideals are ideals that most people regardless of political affiliation share right and so huge part of one community. That's the name of our company. One Community is to bring people together under these common values around all these issues of inequality to find solutions, and when you talk about this, not just being a moral issue but also being an economic issue in California to incarcerate one kid for one year, it's three, hundred, ten, thousand dollars. Way Way Way. Qualify that how is that possible? Three hundred, ten, thousand dollars for one juvenile in jail in California I mean the backstory is were ten thousand people in there are now there's a thousand. So just economies of scale they haven't been closing the facilities because they don't want people to lose their jobs and officers do their jobs. So they begin facilities open to a bed. Once accommodated a lot more to accommodate a lot less now. So where they have four facilities now they probably could. Have to cut that costs in half but that's that's really not that relevant. Relevant is we spend three, hundred, ten, thousand dollars. We could send one of these kids to Harvard for four years for that amount. But what's relevant is we don't give them what all the data shows us that you're talking about these opportunities that change lives and get people to leave crime. Ultimately, we spend ten thousand dollars for seven out of ten of the people we released to come right back to prison. When all of the research and all the data shows what they need, which is Love Accountability and mentor ship and a job and a path towards a living wage career and housing and therapy and healing right all things that our children need. Is what they need but we keep them in a dehumanizing system that spends three, hundred, ten, thousand dollars where seven out of ten ended up failing if I was the CEO of that business, I would be fired in the business would be bankrupt but we've done this for one hundred years and so Jeff, what you talk about and what we did it, Air Sea and I thank you, Jeff for. All that you did for our members even bringing some of our members to seven. See I'll tell you this to see one person who was in prison for twenty four years on that summit ship. Another that had done time in the juvenile system in James who worked for us who time the juvenile system on their first cruise in those panels learning so much on their own panel failing like superstars. and talking about social justice in criminal justice reform to the community. That was so beautiful in I know Jeff You saw when you were on the board of Ar See. When you give these folks opportunities, they crush it and. We started the largest Construction Union Training Program for folks coming out of prison have placed hundreds of people into the Construction Union, we had dozens building the Ram Stadium so fi stadium we have placed dozens if not hundreds into the film and Television Unions is like the story about Adam that I told earlier, we started the first fire camp with CDC are and cal fire for people coming out of prison to become cal fire firefighters we have great hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of our members in colleges and universities. Even, some that are in law school and learn to be lawyers, and so you know Jeff when you provide opportunity. When. You set the bar high and let people know that there is nothing stopping them and they have the mentorship and we are able to use our privilege to to help them get to where they WANNA get in follow their dreams it is absolutely the most beautiful thing to see. Couldn't agree with you more on all fronts. In fact, it does remind me I forgot about summit at sea and the members that came on the boat with us, and you know there is an amazing story. There's this like very, Very well-known Entrepreneur investor who has flown around the world and has his own jet and has been on plenty of you know cruise ships and. Ocean liners and whatever else he's ever wanted took a steam auto greatest story, I love pets, and this guy goes into the steam room and it was the you know nineteen twenty year olds from Air Sea who he met in the steam room and ended up hanging out for like three hours. Actually I don't believe the whole time of the steam room as a long steam. Amazing. He told me the story was like, Oh, I have to tell you. This is my favorite experience. I've ever had summit. Because I go into around this corner into this spa, I go inside and I meet these kids who are in their first ever steam on their first ever cruise after taking their first flight outside of California who are like on this ship and you know here I am like. The water wasn't hot enough on my t this morning and woe is me you know what I mean and the perspective that he got. He's like what's incredible about? This is just the beauty of like interacting with people that just don't share your background or your experiences that like their perspective on all the things that you think are absolute troops are different and informed in their own way I remember standing the lounge and this guy who will come Mr K. I. Think if I remember correctly, he had come straight from the steam and was in his robe still at so. Mr K. comes. Up to me and says, I just had the most amazing steam of my life and just like pins against the wall and tells me this story. It was just such. So beautiful because you know that these young air sea members lives are changing with this experience, they're feeling human in part of society and part of the elite in part of power part of genius conversations. Right. But on the flip side Mr, k. was only one of multiple people they came up to me on that trip and said I. Think I just had the deepest conversation of my life and I think these people I just talked to have done more work on themselves. Ninety five of people in society and I think I've learned more about myself today because of this conversation that I've had. So just a beautiful win win and kinship. That happens when you put people together from those various worlds is beautiful. Art of the Hustle we'll be right back after this short break. Mourn and said this away. Of sucker punching new to the day. You don't know. It's they. It is. That's K.. Burnt breakfast no hot water critic female on your. Mood. This morning. Support for this podcast comes from Goldman Sachs companies in the top core tile for ethnic diversity are thirty three percent more likely to have industry leading profitability and those in the top Cortel for gender diversity or twenty one percent more likely to outperform. This data was the catalyst behind launch with G. S. a five hundred, million dollar investment strategy that continues to focus on increasing access to capital for women Black Latino and other diverse entrepreneurs learn more at GS DOT COM SLASH LAUNCH WITH G S. I mean there's so many critical issues in our society today and just what you said about hope really resonates with me. You know because I feel like we're in a pretty hopeless time where people can't really see opportunities to get out of their situations you know often and Often, seeking on this podcast and just in my life is sort of those little nuggets of wisdom that empowered the people that road that road before you in a sense you know. So in for you like when you think about the next issues that you want to apply this work to you personally, where else are you excited to lean into right now? We are a developing film with Ben Affleck Directing. and Martin Scorsese in Harry. Belafonte. Producing. called. King, Leopold's ghost and I am excited about this. So much of what we focused on his domestic, but this is really a global story. Of King Leopold of Belgium who decided that it would be cute to have a his own African continent and went to the Congo and made it his own and pretended to be a missionary. But ultimately was a slave owner and enslaved over a million people to make money off of rubber cut people's arms off murdered people. That's not what the movies about the movie is actually about the first ever human rights campaign a led by Black Congolese Africans white I'm sorry white Europeans Black Europeans White Americans. Black. Americans all teaming up together to expose these atrocities really showed a world's first human rights campaign. It's funny that even after George Floyd I was reading about all of the King Leopold statues in Belgium being toppled and thrown into the river. But really excited to kind of tackle those issues of colonialism, which obviously are part of our country's history as well. Tackling issues of racial justice and bringing people together. Really interested. In in De stigmatizing mental health issues working on issues around creating equity and equality for women and girls looking at our immigration system, I find the rhetoric around immigration right now absolutely disgusting when I do believe that we look at our immigration rhetoric ten years from now it is going to be the next gay marriage. We're going to be in shock that we ever did this to human beings I see it as. I see it what we did around marriage equality, as well as our history with slavery Those are the issues that are really, Kinda Kinda Front, and center for me right now, we also we are in negotiations on a big huge major music film kind of in the vein of Bohemian rhapsody in rocket man and walk the line the deals with issues of racial justice that I'm really excited about. But I can't talk about yet were in negotiations on a really exciting environmental and sustainability film that is really kind of human centered in human based, which I think is exciting were looking at a project that is all kinds of Latino and let nex representation that's awesome. We have a small independent film that is a beautiful mother son immigration story that we're developing I mean, we are going hard. We want. We want to make change in many many different issues but obviously, criminal justice reform was was was my heart or we're going much wider. It's amazing man and when you are building out these these projects and a lot of it is film finance. So it's something that you guys will the often be director or like doctors signed on whatever but I imagine that you're attracting. Now especially that you have a track record in this with combining the impact in the film you know do do actors and producers and directors seek you out or do you find scripts and you're like, Oh, I, happen to know that. So and so is really ended. This specific issue is to say that it was I. it was the outgoing call business were I was just calling everyone. To try to educate them a one community edits now the incoming call business. I think we add I mean any actor we work with we just had such beautiful relationship with. Michael. Jordan on just mercy a not only with him as an actor but also with him as a producer and his whole team Alana. Mayo who runs out liar and his agent Phil Son and his publicist Lindsey Gallon everyone is family at this point and Michael was so interested. Two days before Christmas, which was a few weeks before just mercy came out two days before Christmas. We had the opportunity to go to the Ventura Youth Facility where kids have been incarcerated for three to five years take fifteen kids, boys and girls out of their cells put them in a van. They'd never ridden on the highway years and take them somewhere where they didn't know where they were going we ultimately. Brought them to the Lakers training facility, and this is something that me and Michael B and Linda Rambus and Rob Pelinka and cut Rambus Jeanie Buss kind of schemed on when the Lakers screen just mercy. We brought them to the Lakers training facility and vans pulled in and Michael Jordan walks out and greet them. So that's freak out number one they lost their minds. Then Michael Walks them into the training facility. And, there's fifteen pairs of Lebron shoes in their shoe sizes a note from genius with them, a Jersey. So they all get their shoes on, they get their jerseys on we got stairs and have a deep conversation with Michael, Jordan and genius who owns the Lakers and lender program Best Rob Pelinka. At a couple the Lakers legends Robert Orient Metta world peace. And then they get to go downstairs and play a scrimmage on the Lakers training facility in just when they thought it couldn't get better the entire team comes out and Lebron and Anthony Davis Kyle Kuzma come out and just show that mad love and take pictures and It was incredible but it was really. Is Michael be man it's because of that. Lakers like Kyle Kuzma have stayed involved in this issue Lebron, stepping out and doing stuff on this issue going big on voting and just lending their platforms, change lives and so yeah, seeing. Talents flocked to what we're doing now because of this because Mike keeps talking about the experience in his people keep talking about experienced it's been beautiful. Is there anything else because you know the theme of the show art of the Hustle I think a lot of the listeners are building their own enterprises are on this journey where they're where they're trying to create something where there isn't necessarily a path that's laid out for them. You know anything else that comes to mind for you like it's empowered you on your journey. I'll say this man I would just love. Anyone listening who wants to get involved in criminal justice reform wants to get involved in the film and Television company I want them to reach out my instagram is Scott Budnick one feel free to shoot me a direct message the website for our just mercy campaign than anyone can plug in anywhere around the world is represent justice dot. Org. 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Uprising Updates with a Minneapolis Protester

Worst Year Ever

1:08:00 hr | 4 months ago

Uprising Updates with a Minneapolis Protester

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Listen to behind the bastards on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to worst year ever a production of iheartradio. Buck in my the please obviously talking America. Yeah, a long history of. Picketed law enforcement, violence media that gives people unreasonable expectations and understandings of the efficacy of law enforcement investigations on the necessity of STRUCTURAL INEQUALITIES! and of course, the desire of to protect itself using violence. Those are all the things that are fucking. I. It's the worst. Really Catchy intro. Thank you, that's are saying. I'm going to set. I think it gets it out there. Yeah I have it tattooed on my taint. where I would all true things that sounds painful. It's extremely painful Katie. The Truth Hurts Cetera her. We did it we did. We did great. How are Y'all doing? In Week two of the general. Uprising sort of thing we're all. Rest you speak of. Feeling. Pretty hopeful and positive. I'm also exhausted and I feel like. I feel guilty saying that because that's nothing compared to what Sony people are feeling, but that is the honest truth it's a mixed bag of those things, and and I and I say the exhausted thing though. Because this is a marathon, not a sprint. There is a lot of work sustained effort that needs to be maintained, and so we got to be able to be honest with ourselves, and and keep ourselves healthy. For this you know. Yeah. I am after I the first nine days. I was out eight nights eight hours every night and I'm taking a few nights off to right because we have a new podcast series, we're putting together about the history of the police And like it's this as soon as I stopped I started having like these like mood swings like not violent towards people, but just like Ray I I wound up losing my house, because I have a friend staying with me, and I just needed to like. Get annoyed at traffic and scream at people from inside my car. I didn't want to be around. It wouldn't be like inflicting my personality on other people while I was like, and it's sort of like. It's kind of the when you take a shit load of aggression and I'm sure a lot of people listening right now have been the on the receiving end of extreme militarized aggression for the first time in their lives like win win, that happens. There's a point at which kind of like the anger you feel internally over. That will will generally bubble Adam. I'm going to say that happens to everybody but it certainly like this is not my first time. Dealing with us and it does happen on the other end, so yeah. I'm just trying to like I. WanNa like I'm very frustrated. Because I wasn't out last night and one of my one of my my stringers, one of my m, my team members the journalists that I've been working with on the ground got arrested for asking a police officer. His name and it's on video. Her press passes visible. The whole time like all she's doing is filming an arrest which he has a legal constitutionally guaranteed right to do. And asks a police officer his name because he is again a legally covering his name and he He arrested her now. She just got a citation we got out in. We're GONNA fight the citation his. They had no grounds to arrest her. But It's yeah, and like today our police chief returned, and I think the fact that like there was a shitload of violence against the press over the last couple of days Two of my colleagues got really fucked up. One of them was mason. The is thrown to the ground and other caught. Portland police kneeling on a woman's neck while arresting her, which obviously is the kind of police violence that sparked a lot of this crime. And he started filming that and the police shoved him back knocked him down, and then beat him on the legs with sticks, and this was all filmed by a news helicopter, so it's like. Pretty cool. I said this to you guys before we were recording, but. It's wild. Timmy I guess not while to me not after everything. We've been learning over the past. Many years couple weeks is how some cities are just really doubling down on the fucking bad mistakes I mean the police specifically whereas other cities. Have you know they? They've withdrawn troops and they've taken a step back and the peaceful protests have blossomed and you know the violence looting has subsided. You know, but but other places like. Where you are that is not so yeah, and I have. I have some strong feelings. On kind of the way, these things are framed for one thing. I don't consider looting to. Ease our 'cause property cannot experience violence. Nobody could see me doing. Votes Yeah. Nobody nobody yeah, I. Keep seeing like frame, looting and rioting. All these things are like together evil. Any of those people would call shoplifting evil, no or acts of violence. Shoplifting, but the store is closed. Fever protesters is violent. The fucking CEO of target even came out and was like I'm a billionaire. Literally pay for all the damage done to our stores and wouldn't notice it like it's yeah. It's OK target stores in my pockets right now. Oh, yeah! It's it's it really is fine. Target will be all right. Yes, I, do I. Do feel bad for small businesses that cannot recoup losses completely. But it's not violence it. Not the same as yeah like a young woman died because the police tear gas, and it closed her lungs off, and if you have if you've ever been in a tear gas cloud, that is the the blinding in the pain sucks, but when your lungs close especially, if you're still as I was in a couple of situations, sprinting for awhile without being able to breathe, it's terrifying and disorienting, and sometimes people don't get to breathe again like that's the reality of the fucking tear gas that are police cars dousing streets in. During a pandemic during affects your respiratory system gotta love using Chemical Weapons that target your respiratory system during a pandemic disease that targets your respiratory system very responsible policing. I. It is. Wild to me, also I wouldn't know how violent the Portland police have been during this. If it wasn't for you and the people on the ground with you, because the coverage of it on the news is not there, there's some element to which it starting to be but like. Our local news has been like has been like drying a separation between the this crowd of. Demonstrators who chant peaceful protest repeatedly, and all they do is march from one building across a bridge in hang out and talk for a while, and then march back and nothing happens, and it doesn't relieve and take police resources and this crowd that has symbols in front, and what's been happening for nights. Is this credible a symbol of the justice center? They will heckle and yell at the police. The police have pullback back mostly inside the Justice Center occasionally, people will throw water bottles over what happened the last night I was out. Was the police actually? They announced that they had seen projectiles in the crowd did not define what those projectiles were, and then began firing projectiles into the crowd, and once the police start shooting into the crowd. People start throwing water bottles back at them. And when the police got tired, they started firing heavier munitions into the crowd, and somebody threw a couple of fireworks into the police side to obscure their line of sight to make it harder for them to hit people with the projectile munitions. The rubber bullets in the phone bullets. They were shooting into the crowd at random. And then the police were able to claim it was a violent protests. to to officers got injured by a firework that was thrown at the officers after again, officers were filing firing wildly into the crowd. It's very frustrating, but If you're protest isn't exhausting. The police isn't costing. The manpower isn't running the Department of money. You're not doing anything is is my opinion on the matter if I was? Having opinion as a journalist. Yeah, then it's just a parade. Yeah. Anyway, you're allowed to have an opinion. Is Journalists okay, yeah. So yeah, we're cool times as We're like right on the edge. There's so much like fucking tragedy and hope in the air right now. Because like you're hearing about Minneapolis when we're, we'll be talking to someone for many apple later like Minneapolis talking about just like removing their police department entirely important. We've even made some major changes. They've announced that they're like disbanding the gun violence task force and the gang crime task, force which. I think people who don't know much about law enforcement would be like. Oh, but then there's going to be more gun crime. It's like no the gun crime task force causes more gun crime than it does. Prevent it like they shoot a lot of people Maybe we shouldn't have them. and they've removed Portland police officers from Portland schools, which is good and you're seeing stuff like that on a number of of American cities now you know. Los Angeles is cutting. What is I would say not a huge chunk of the overall police budget because the LAPD budget is fucking outrageous, but it says sliver but. Yes step, it is literally I? In most a lot of large cities, the police funding is as much as the funding for every other city service. Put together. If, not much more so wow, that what is one hundred fifty, two hundred million dollars? Yeah is not an enormous chunk of the LAPD, but it's a huge chunk of the money that goes to other things that the city of La provides share and it's a start. You know we should trim. Let's say one hundred percent of the budget, but. I do think that progress has to be a take what you can get sort of thing as long as not like. Oh, we got a little bit now. Let's all start at stop agitating. If that is what happens then then it's a failure well. That was a fear. I don't see that happening. Yeah. I, mean it's it's. It's early to tell but yeah. Yesterday Hollywood got like what ten thousand people marching through fucking Hollywood and I and Saturday I mean everywhere. I mean over the weekend in Los Angeles, you could drive to every different neighborhood and find community action happening. You could find protests. Being organized is pretty inspiring. Phillies enormous. Yeah, even like yeah like little towns. I keep seeing saying before we start recording I was I keep seeing people post like. These small protests in like these smaller towns and Texas and places, and being like I grew up in this town. and. It is fucking wild that people are protesting about this in that town. And more more more and more things like that, if like, not even not just the massive places in these big cities like these little pockets. We wouldn't expect that kind of swell of support. yeah, and today the House Democrats unveiled in me. A knee took a knee, but they also in and. Those sashes. There's a better word for them I don't know they they they. They coach early appropriated shit at us and stuff it was it was coming apparently. Plan by the Black Caucus. But that photo is off. But they. Unveiled police reform bill that has some things in there that have been discussed. Defending the police is not one of them. Hum also this who knows? What this will be received two in the Senate. But it just to show. The different world we're living in. Two weeks of sustained effort. Actual like. An actual F-. Faith in. I remember I just. Just a week ago, there were all these reports of. People trying to get in contact with senators and Senate aides and people in the house. Just like asking like what will what will happen in response to protest. This was early on and every single person scoffed at the idea like there's. Nothing, like no. We're not gonNA. There's nothing there's no actions can be taken like this and so whatever your opinion is on. What the actual legislation is whether or not will pass few days later. They tried to do something. Yeah. And like other stuff like one of the great things that started to happen is like there's these. Richmond is one city in Charlottesville and other where they have these constituencies of confederates. They're starting to get remove now. Just because in this didn't just start with George Floyd's death I know activists there who have been fighting to get these things removed for years now. It's been a discussion like for so young. It feels like every every conversation about it is just on repeat. Yeah, it's just sort of, but this was kind of like. A rising tide lifts all boats thing, and so, and that's not a meaningless Chin that's not a cosmetic cosmetic change like it is cosmetic, and that it's a physical thing that's being removed, but the the lack of a presence of statues commemorating fucking. Traitorous slaveholders in American cities is meaningful. It's meaningful to the black people who live in those cities, and it's also meaningful and kind of the message that it sends Americans in particularly young Americans. Who Grow up around that? It's meaningful that the Marine Corps is banning the use of the confederate flag, and that the army's considering renaming basis named after confederate leaders, which they never should have basis named after confederate leaders. All of this is fucking part of it. You know it's meaningful. fucking crowd in Bristol through the Statue of that Colson guy that slave holder who built the city and Chris Yeah through through it in the fucking river like it didn't didn't wait to have the government say they can remove. It was just like. Yeah. We're just GONNA take it down to throw it in the fucking river. It can. A lot of these issues are have were also erected a like yes. In response to the civil rights movement. Actually huge fuck to people. We're still in charge. Black people thing yeah, like look at look at our statues also start speaking of. Dumping this statue in the river. Some guys are trying to efficient out. Trying to fish it out with like one of those sticks used to clean out a swimming pool. It's amazing. It's beautiful. Yeah it's the best this visual metaphors out there lately, yeah? And like all of this, all of the things that are changing around the country, all of like the it's the kind of thing we're not gonNA get. I can tell you already like is not going to suddenly like sweep trump physically out of the White House and abolish off the police departments, I would be all on board for that if it were, but that's still not the America we live in, but we do now live in an America where a hell of a lot for one thing I think probably a million or two more people. have either been directly assaulted by the police or who have had a loved one directly assaulted the police. Yes, and that's GonNa Change. How some people vote And we like the the the window. We'll talk about this in our interview a little later, but the window of debate on what is appropriate for for us to have in terms of police has shifted massively over the last nine days in a way that I, would have thought impossible ten days eleven, yeah. I I mean people we've talked about this. Everybody's been talking about it, you know. A few weeks ago. Yeah I wanted! Police reform I thought. Most cops are pretty bad, but you'd be hard. Pressed to get me saying all cops are bastards, not true anymore, absolutely not true and that and and even more so. I don't know anybody. Else. Who wouldn't be willing to say that I actually do? I know people, but for the most part I'm really heartened by the shift I've seen just across the board from people in my circles. You know centrists that. are staunchly. Yeah I also. Mentioned America a lot, but it's. It's not just America doing this I mean even that's what the Bristol thing was. Showing. The French writing on are. Taking down those leopold statues, which is whether they're covering it. Have they taken them down? Yet? I know that they've been protesting. There's some then like. Fully chopped. That's nice to see. latches King Leopold. Yeah all the social stuff. People fucking with Churchill statues. And you know the people responding like he's not Hitler Yeah. Yes, you're right. He was half of a Hitler. And at the time that was better than a Hitler, but it doesn't mean we should have statue stems to. Good. Yeah. There's a lot of that shifts. I see everywhere every day more and more like parents of. Conservative parents, even of Friends of mine who were like I didn't realize this. And people responding online, even just being like yeah I used to really support police unions and police like all these like booster stuff and I will never ever vote for. Increasing funding for police again in my life. I've got a good one. Guys have heard me mentioned before. Probably I have a friend that I my best friend from high school. Grew apart, she's. Very conservative now voted for trump. Her husband is a trump supporter, and we don't communicate very often anymore, but. Her husband's started liking. All of my black lives matters posts and the defunding police posts what? Can you tell me that? Wow, that is. Started happening. That's wild folk. Knowing. Cultural Shift Yeah. It's time for an ad I. Think is what we're getting to. Do. Now Hey guys. It's bobby bones. I host Bobby Show and pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later all my friends together we get into a room and we do a radio show. We are alive. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world that we possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends I ninety eight point seven, W. MC q in Washington dc or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. Was Nice. That was a nice pre. Minneapolis is going to get a nice break from having Minneapolis police. Yeah. Although Seattle is you're to have a nice break from? Getting teargassed. No, they're not despite the. Thirty Day. Break from getting tear gas broke that promise on day two, so yeah, it's funny. The police like. The phrase that keeps cropping up that I love because it's brilliant is tear gas lighting. ooh, yeah. Yeah it's. We've been having that in Portland to where like two nights ago. Well three nights ago, the mayor came out mayor Ted Wheeler. Who is also the police commissioner, and thus directly responsible for all the violence? Everyone's been receiving came out to like talk to the community, and like speak with a number of local black and Hispanic activists in the middle of this huge crowd of thousands and everybody just told them what a piece of shit he was. Like. There was no respect. There was no attempt like it was just like. No fuck you. We want you out. Stop using tear gas and he. He committed to not use the sound cannon was breaking people's ears, and then he was like and I'll tell them tomorrow not to use tear gas. Of course that night, the gas the shit out of a slash. Sun Glad we can laugh about it. Yeah, God, A. Hat I I will say watching Ted Wheeler get shouted at by the entire town. Like literally, thousands of people like this huge crowd of thousands arrive while he was already surrounded by a thousand people, and he got so scared I tried to leave immediately and like the active she was talking to like. Are you scared of the people of your town ten? We've all been getting shot by police for the last week. Like why are you scared? What worried is going? Good. I like the next day. mayor fray of Minneapolis. Who made a big show of crying at George Floyd's memorial. When out directly into a crowd to speak to them, and was asked if he supported defunding the Minneapolis police, and said no and everybody said fuck off like. The New York Times described it as like a moment of public shaming. All that it was almost like incomprehensible, the kind of thing you only. Movie, Yes impossibly written you'd be like. Down guys like. It's It's bizarre so wild to see. I'M GONNA admit watching wheeler. Get shouted down like that. I was a little bit hard like that was. Kind. Of, there are a lot of like come. -able moments so that. Robert. Shaming. Zoom zoom calls are missing. Those conversations I keep. I keep thinking about like imagine. If Pete were mayor of southbound right now like what is. A TEAR-GAS o on the lines of. The tear gas lighting. It's really interesting because this is all we keep. We bring up like Ferguson time period. During all of this because it's all like. intensified. Of what we saw during that? and. This is the same kind of thing about tear gas, but I also You keep seeing police. Accounts sharing these tables of items. And it's heartening to me to see people look at those tables of items like protesters through you know, and just everybody going fuck you. Robert. You mentioned already that. We are speaking with somebody from Minneapolis leaving the episode. We sure are. Should we give our listeners a little bit of rundown of what's happening there? Just in case they don't know yeah I mean so the. Minneapolis revolted against their police department after the murder. Of George, Floyd they laid siege to the third precinct, and eventually through sheer weight of numbers, and running the police out of munitions, forced the police to withdraw, and then they fucking birth the precincts down I mean. The National Guard and other police have been called in some areas of Minneapolis. Have like you know are are being essentially policed by everything, but the Minneapolis PD, but uh-huh chunks of the city are kind of letting them be for the most part, because like they made their feelings on being police pretty clear and there's kind of like it was announced. I think yesterday. The news dropped so like Sunday that a veto proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council was going to be disbanding. The Minneapolis police and kind of replacing it with something new a public safety, council, or something like that and I don't think we know exactly. What that looks like But it's kind of acknowledgement from the elected leaders. That like we can't reform the Minneapolis. We have to get rid of them in like obviously, there's in. There's jobs that they do that are necessary like there's people who investigate murder. murders should be investigated, but we can't fix this. It has to be replaced. Yeah, yeah, and radically exciting. Yeah, it's a good move and you're seeing an increasing a lot of a sizeable chunk of the activists in Portland are demanding. The Portland police be disbanded I'm not sure I I I haven't seen you know there's there's I think a larger movement for kind of completely disbanding the police in there has been, but that's still a pretty fringe political statement nationwide, but I think a sizeable chunk of Americans agree with reforming reducing their funding so I do think you're gonNA see like again. kind of different steps taken in different areas, but Minneapolis is going to be kind of on the forefront of. Would if we just tried something totally different, so it's going to be of the stories to continue to be watching in the next year or two, really and more Minneapolis is a really important one to keep an eye on. VK also even just in talking about it. That changes, public opinion and present like Pasta Yeah. Just like simple things like okay. In this situation, it wouldn't be a police officer. It'd be this. Even before you see the effect of it, I think people will open up to it more because when you hear about, it makes sense yeah. And I, you know I'm a police abolitionist. I think we need to figure out something else but I'm also like okay well. If this police department cuts, they're staffed by thirty percent this by twenty five percent, and they removed these weapons, and like that's better than nothing and I'm not going to stop pushing for police abolition, but if I can have thirty percent fewer police and have them be less heavily armed while I'm pushing to get rid of the rest of them that. That strikes me as an an acceptable tactic. You know yeah I have seen people. Push back on because of because of the the. Easily conflate. With defunding and these other plans Out of like this weird fear that like well they do this, and then they'll do the abolishment and stuff. Like even the mayor who got shame fray. He was asked. Will you commit to defunding the police? But his answer was I. do not believe in fully abolishing the police which isn't an answer to the question that she asked so. Yeah. I don't know it's it's interesting how people view both of those things and where one will lead US using the abolition possibility as an excuse to say that we shouldn't do things that everyone agrees are good, yeah. I don't know. Yeah I wanted to talk a little bit about one of the things. That's kind of kind of worrying me is SORTA. There is this element of coopting some of these protests you saw. There's these photos going around. If like one of the guys leading, who's not leading, but he just kind of like stumbled into the front of one of these marches in New, York City, dressed like a black panther with a megaphone, but also like Super Chummy, putting his arm around the police. Inspector! Yeah, yeah, and he turns out. He's like an instagram model and stuff. WHO's not even from New York hasn't lived. There long is just kind of trying to co-opt and we. We've had something like that in Portland to this. Yeah Yeah we had this trump of and one of the problems. Is that when you when you're looking at these massive marches? They're not organized usually like a strict hierarchy like there's just sort of an activist community and it's like Oh. We have people who know how to be the folks on bikes who make sure that the groups as together in who's got ahead. We have folks who knew how to be Mex- we. Have folks who know how to like be in the middle of the group to stop it from panicking if they get gassed into like help people together, we have folks who know how to like lead chance and folks who know how to like help you know. Keep thousands. Thousands of people together as they marched through city and everybody just kind of does their job, but because the people who really know what they're doing are kind of doing their job and watching it for the police you can have sometimes people just sort of like start chanting in the front, and get on a bullhorn and kind of try to make themselves into figureheads of the movement, and we had this happened in Portland, recently to where like these folks, nobody really knew got in front, and started kind of co-opting the march, and doing weird stuff like refusing to try to push past a police barrier when they had the numbers to do it without asking anyone what they wanted to do. And it turns out later that like one of those the the initial folks who was like trying to become the face of this movement, in Portland was a convicted pedophile, raped a five year old, and who has just gotten out of jail and was a model and trying to. He was a young black. He was a model and was trying to like reinvent himself this way and it's like A. Lot Of shady stuff happening. People with like that nobody knows who are kind of like one of the things that's been happening is The kind of activists communities have been trying to like make sure that they're putting the people of color up front and center, which is good and important and a lot of really good activists. Around the country right now are are you know people of color who are of dominating an in leading this movement in a way? That's really important, but it's also the fact that like. They're they're trying to put new voices. Upfront means that like people that. Folks haven't known as well are winding up in the front of some of these movements in some of these people are like. Take like Shady Shit right and it is this problem when you're putting a bunch of new voices up front is that some of them are going to be? Some of them are going to be working with the fucking cops right like that's. That's the situation because it's profitable sometimes to work with the cops in because they I think a lot of them think that they can make a bunch of money out of this once kind of the. The Revolutionary Fervor dies down and I think that's a worry that everybody of of all groups who cares about really making meaningful chains needs to be concerned about is like if you see someone at the front, of one of these groups for one thing like I. Don't trust the phrase. Peaceful protests because peaceful protests never accomplished anything non violent protest is important and I don't think peaceful protests has any fucking value. It's A. I don't go together a non peaceful, but nonviolent protest doesn't have to be looting and burning downtown. Although I'm not gonna say that's never a effective strategy for moving to pursue, but it does need to be you know I do think a valid option is draining the resources in the time manpower of the police in exhausting them and making them hate their jobs, and making them feel unwelcome and kind. Kind of mentally abusing the cops a little bit to get him to quit. I think that that's a valuable I think making them realize I think a big part of why a number of folks become police is because it's been traditionally respected job so I do think that if we're talking about diversity of tactics, one tactic in reducing the number of police is making them hate their job, yes. In addition to cutting their funding, so they make less money in that, there are fewer of them. Yeah. It's changing the way we perceive them. If this job is not perceived as high status, than will not attract the same. Bullies. or or the ability to short? Yeah. So. I. Don't know I think we've kind of gotten through all of this stuff. I wanted to talk about at this stage before we lead into our our interview with a with one voice from Minneapolis. And Yeah. Yeah well. That's perfectly timed with our next ad break so well done. Role in all of this chaos, the one thing that's never changed for me is my my love and appreciation of products and services. Raytheon proud sponsor of black lives matter protests Raytheon. Has Never teargassed. Anybody sure they've helped. Launch a few thousand missiles at a few thousand weddings. Eisley. But what have they done here with? Teargas exactly no. Nothing tackling so support Raytheon. To make sure that every newlywed couple gets a hellfire missile. Directly into their family. That is the beautiful dream of. And that's the beautiful of this podcast. Hey, young world, the world's isues I oversee the producer of the. Show podcast featuring Nancy other than myself and. Ethiopia. Pockets PIPPI, keeping you in the know with the latest he'll, but celebrities, current events and providing pre game. On top of the town because it's going down the baller show podcast baby, don't you? Only cover the latest in entertainment, but we bring you the entertainment directly from the source. That's right. We have celebrity guests. And those down on the. Show podcast. We argued number one source for the culture so like Dj Kelly says don't ever play yourself. Join the conversation a date head on over to the. Show Join Me Ferrari Sim. Thousand and offer do from the OCC on the baller show podcast. iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get podcast. So. PODCAST. The Shaw. We probably will record a- The show separate. No, no, no, this is all stay in. This. Produce the show this is this is worst year ever. The podcast share. We don't find it very tight shit, but neither America. So no, but you know Katie fun fact, this is actually not a ship. It is a podcast, so. Yeah you'd have been. Sale for a for no reason. Throwing up everywhere I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry we. They drafted me doesn't work. Yeah, okay well that fun. Redemption was was our way of getting everybody in with Lash I'm sure like back toward. Center have been tear gassed since the last episode Yeah. We're we're? We're talking about the uprising nationwide against the police and today we have a guest from the epicenter of this Uprising Minneapolis Minnesota Carl. How are you doing today? Doing Great? It's you know just another day in a new world. Yeah, yeah, what do you mean by New World? Well, you know since. Since we watch that murder Things here just so so quickly fell apart and have turned into something completely new that it's. You know it's something. I never thought I would see in my life. Let alone have in my face the very real possibility that we're going to get rid of our police force Sina like all over the city communities turned into something that I never as much as this city is different, a lot of ways in that community vibe. It's never been like this. You, know we. We essentially have taken over. The. A large city and demanded that it changes fundamentally how? We do what we do and go about our daily lives, and we're not, GONNA. Sit in intake platitudes or hollow gestures anymore. It's our world now, so we have this whole mentality that anything's up for grabs and we're seeing that day by day new things new attitudes new views on what we want and it's. It's totally unique I've never in my life experienced anything that felt simultaneously like a candlelight vigil. A! Powerful moment of anger and sadness that had decades of building behind an this other sense of just like hope. And that that sense of hope I think is. Something that. If nothing else is one of the more. Truly. Uplifting things I've ever seen. It beats out any of the corporate manufactured stuff. We've ever seen that supposed to be quote unquote uplifting. And it's it's just it's really in your face. Representation of what it looks like I think when communities had enough and is willing to say you know what I think. It's time for a radical. Change even if that scares the hell out of everyone but us. And you Minneapolis has seen a number of protests in the not too distant future against the police against as a result of the police in absolutely yeah killing black people. Win What was the the moment? If there was a moment when you were like? Oh this one's different. This isn't just going to be people hanging out around a precinct with signs until they get tired. Yeah, so you know it's funny. I was thinking about this. Now is looking back because I've been trying to really keep a running journal in kind of a day by day calendar of both the pandemic when that started and now with the. Were facing and. I was looking in the Tuesday so Monday night that video kind of went live and people here started. Really there was talk. by Tuesday though I gone for a hike at the at the river, which is right near near the precinct. And you know by the time I got home at about five that night on Tuesday was driving home I drove down Hiawatha and was stopped by probably five hundred protesters. And it was everybody wasn't just. BLM activists, it was members of the southside community that lived there. It was members of different groups that have come out for for different events whether it's like the the the city council people from the powder Horn area where you know in like the Cup foods area at thirty eighth any you know these different groups of started to coalesce, and that was maybe three blocks from the precinct and was kind of. You know the beginning of this thing and by email by eight that night. About four or five hours later, it was something already different the police were. You could hear it like I. I was listening to police scanners friends listening to police scanners in you could hear. It was different. The cops sounded. Overwhelmed! I think that's the best. The best, I can put it. You know from there on in. You know. It was only a matter of time until the precinct fell and you know by the time. The cops scattered out of their gated in little parking lot. The whole area had already turned in, too. I mean the closest thing I can say. It looked like the my dawn. Everything I've ever seen from from Ukraine. You know this felt like that. You know by by the time. The News really started picking up. That wasn't Unicorn rioter. Some of the more personal level blogs. It was already so you know people were. The anger was so out. In the forefront, there was just no way it was going to stop, and that was the moment. I really knew that we were somewhere totally new. You know like we've seen protests like you said here. We've seen really tense conflicts between the police in the community, but This, by that point was so far beyond anything. We ever experienced that. You know the minute that I ram park not built in. They started calling the battle of Lake Lake in many ha, ha or the battle of the of the target. Jokingly, it was already thing, and that's nine and that's new. Yeah. and. You're now living essentially in Not An entirely post police, but certainly post Minneapolis police in your definitely definitely post Minneapolis police. You know like I, said today's the first day. I've seen a cop and it wasn't in Minneapolis COP and. And that's two weeks now. Almost were were really were were two weeks and you know that It's so weird because it's just it's normal. There's no out SA-. Okay, and I should say normal in the context of the right wing invasion. That's going on simultaneously on the ground, which isn't being talked about really, but there's that element that's kind of. It really confuses this other situation we're dealing with. Can you elaborate a little bit on that? Wing Right So like in the midst of the. Initial uprising when the precinct was burning when the? When people were kind of commandeering goods from all over to help either protesters or to build a barricade walls there was also this other side that was starting to be of noticed both on social media, and the police were hinting added kind of and and you know it's been hard with them, because they don't save very much, but we also know what we've seen. Which is a huge group? Of kind of unidentified I mean they're saying K.. K. K. The reality is, it seems more like an insurgency force built of a couple different groups. And they're on the ground in it's. It's a very strange thing that's happened here. You know day one after the actual. Of looting and rioting and burning here there was an influx. People noticed kind of. Happening of cars that we notice without license plates. And it sounds really noxious, but it's strange. You notice that in a city like Minneapolis. For some reason, it just started happening, and so you know by the time Friday night that the national. Guard was being kind of called out You know they. Were reporting openly that there were groups of people causing problems the president everyone else's lied through their fucking teeth, and said it was Antiga, but the reality is. We had boogie boys on the ground, so we had the Bugalo boys here for sure for sure. Yes, we have pictures of them I. Watched, them in person. We also have the couple other groups that I am still trying to figure out who they are and I have photos of some of them, but they were all foreign nationals. The two that we confronted directly said they were Duchesne headphones and had out of date. Dutch press passes. a lot of the guys that have been caught here have been caught with either some sort of media, badge or something. That would approximate one. there's a lot of a lot of people don't know about media badges, but most journalists yet just print them. Like you just. Like there's nothing like there's not like a centralized authority that issues your badges. Some city outside of maybe New York, city, or where they have press offices cracked and that's the thing and so. You know when when you confront someone who you see driving a car with no license plates in full of people. and. They stop the car in the middle of the street. Get Out and confront you as to why you're taking photos, you know stuff's going on, and you know I've spent a lot of my. Twenties and early thirties, dodging and reading up on just anything that kind of approximates what that looks like whether it's fascist kind of. Revolutionary stuff to how the spread of propaganda works in how that looks in these guys for the spookiest group of people I've ever encountered in real life and when you have that element. and there are public everyone on your social media. Sphere is kind of saying well, we're finding. Let's say jars of accelerates around town in Bushes or we're finding rags soaked in gas. For example. My neighborhood has one business in it, and it's a LGBTQ owned. Coffee Shop Two nights after the actual fires in the main area stopped, it was lit on fire by someone running down the street. You know like there's stuff that's happening. And I think it's a story that's GONNA. Come out more fully as time passes, but it's one that I think is important and extremely integral to whatever the pushback that we're gonNA. See looks like I. Think you know I think we have to be honest with ourselves that the right. Is Actually GonNa, probably look more and more like an insurgency force like this where it's guys driving trucks shooting randomly lighting things on fire leaving kkk style note I mean truly leaving notes, neighborhoods and say we're watching you, we're gonNA. WE'RE GONNA, burn you alive I. Mean You have a very odd element mixed into this whole other revolutionary. No police thing is word were self policing in the midst of what looks to be an insurgency campaign, so there are these like very odd things going on. And this just happening I mean Minneapolis Yellow, the epicenter of this but yesterday in Seattle somebody tried to drive into a crowd, and then shot into the crowd exact somebody. K. member I believe. There was definitely one that was confirmed. I don't know was from. There have been like twenty different cars that have driven. So at least one confirmed KKK Creek Crow Creek KKK leader like not yet some low level leader so. I think we need to. This is something I've been thinking about for a long time. I think we all have been, but there has to be a conversation about what that is because. That looks a lot more like A. far-right Middle Eastern terrorist campaign than a traditional American Conversation. Interesting that Antigua's the one that they want to designate as a terrorist organization, but that standard operating procedure for misinformation. You know like we're seeing. We're seeing the worst worst when it comes to just outright. Manipulation of reality and I thank you know. A lot of us know what we're looking at. And a lot of people are starting to but I think. This this whole thing that we're witnessing the the uprising the response. Is Cracking. I think the neoliberal shell a little bit it I. Don't think any I know for myself. I never thought I would live to see the day. that. The show shook. Yeah Yeah. His. Remarkable things of the last two weeks. Yeah, it does unbelievable and we kinda seem to be. On the edge of everything, there's so much good and bad news every day like today like the police chief in Portland resigned after a bunch of police brutality. Bennett, the head of the guy in the New York Times editorial board, who let a Senator Tom Cotton right about murdering everybody WHO's protesting The guy had to leave. You Have Minneapolis with veto proof majority of the city council like you know trying to put an end to the. Minneapolis Police Department at the same time. You've got saddle police using tear-gas two nights in a row after the mayor put in a moratorium on the use of tear gas. I was GONNA. Say I believe. They didn't because they said they wouldn't right like. That's how this works now. We didn't do it because we said we didn't don't believe you're fit what you saw. And what the Portland Police is has done is like no, no, when we said tear gas, we just met the the the CS. We can still use the OC tear gas because it's like that that was the problem is the type of the flavor of gas was the yeah there really splitting hairs like? The gay onto us. I think that's the game now is split. Split the hairs as far as you can. Because otherwise they're gonNA. They've already lost control of the narrative for the first time ever at the I. Don't think anyone in any position of power has a response to this that isn't GonNa look either contrived a racist, and that's a very strange place to be for everyone who's used to being able to get in on something and say hey, we'll. Maybe we can do something that's perform tive as we saw with like chuck and Nancy this morning. That shit doesn't fly anymore. We don't none of us care. It just doesn't work. It looks. CRINGES FAULK Said! And that's the reality like that's the thing that we see were were calling it as it is now, and I think that that's a hard thing to people to manage. I have never seen the right. Be this quiet because they can't manage the perception part of this and that social engineering part is integral outside of the racist part of things for them their and I don't know how you. Anyone has a pushback mechanism against a popular uprising. Yeah, I mean we saw Mitt Romney at a black lives matter March yesterday. Yeah, cry, I mean even like yeah, like when you have everyone not only saying like defend the police and things like that and being able to explain it to. Appeal explaining that concept to their family members who are pretty conservative and they say like, and then it made sense to them. All the people talking about this, and then like today Scott Walker tweeted like De Fund, the police or police reform I go with police reform, and it's like okay, so like that's the bare minimum now crack. Has Been That's. The way! God we gotta do something police before. The the window moved so far left so fast like I I have whiplash. I think most of us were kind of worried that we were GONNA Kinda. March off a cliff blindly into some weird fascist twilight zone. 'cause we kind of had been, and now it's just like Yeah, bare minimum is. Reform at at at such a massive level. I don't think you can call them. Reform and the other direction is. No police, we're going to figure out a better a better way because there is a better way and I think. What's interesting about all of this and has struck me eat like A. Sense the beginning of the real. Transformation during the kind of protests in this movement is people really. Are Willing to put in a lot of hard work to build something that works for and reflects their community and I. think that that's going to be you know that kind of thing. We're never going to be able to go back. Like conversations can't go back. Yeah, just because the gravity of this pulled in so much more. And it's unbelievable. And so I kinda a little curious. You know one of the things that made me want to get you on here. We were talking for a little sort of when I was trying to get to Minneapolis. Before Portland broke out in riots. And in the week, sin or in the week and a half, however long, it's fucking been cents. Years Lifetime. Lifetime WIFI yeah. You've started taking part in armed patrols of your neighborhood and I wanted wanted you to talk a little bit more about that about like y y'all are doing that and kind of what what the W-. What sort of purpose you think that's going to serve as things move forward. We'll so I live right in the city essentially like when the military was here were right outside what they called the footprint, which I have feelings about, but that's a different conversation and you know realistically. We didn't get mass with tons outside of that time I said where we had a someone. Run up a building on fire. You know outside of that. We haven't had many issues. We've had people creeping around. We've had weird stuff, but the community here started that on Thursday night. I want to say after things got really heated. We, you know they had organized already probably like fifteen or twenty people. And then it increased and increased again in so there were a number of people, and it wasn't armed at that point, and then it switched over to where a couple of people were definitely ready to go and things kind of progress from there, and now because things have calmed down, we just were kind of reevaluating, so it's interesting up north of here in northern North Minneapolis. That's a wholly different thing what they're doing up there is. I think magic. They've they've figured out. I think how to do a nice balance of both with the community policing because they got. Bombed that's the best way I can describe it. The two nights after the majority of the action in the city in the precinct they were attacked by these right wing extremists, and really what happened up there is they decided. We're not the COPS aren't coming. There's no one here to protect ourselves and they've really organize something that I. Think is a model to export you know. What I'm doing here and what's happened here where I am is I think more of an experiment that started based on a much more peaceful model, and because it's offensive, it's. Different, it's a different concept now that you even are having a conversation like this where we're talking about just people in the public patrolling or watching who are ready to go into action to stop someone from doing something bad, and they're willing to put themselves on the line. It was a strange time. You know. We had armed national guards that would come out in. In convoys of thirty or forty troops at a time plus Humvees plus support vehicles, so you have that, but then you have armed citizens basically at night all night for the a few starring the major parts of the concerning tie in right after that. When we were being told, there were white supremacists running around in their random shootings every night. I mean it. It's become something that feels normal now like that's ten days. I think this is a really easy thing for a lot of people to understand when they're in that moment, but when you've never been faced with the situation that your neighbors who are way more at risk than you'll ever be, are being threatened by people who really have no problem hurting them. Is the whole dynamic you know like for me. It was a simple. Why wouldn't. You know like in. There are so many things. People are going to say well. You know that's that's extreme or something like that and I think what what I'm realizing his yet it looks extreme, but it looks way less extreme than watching someone. Get choked to death on the ground for eight minutes. And and frankly my neighborhood is sweet in the neighborhood to adopt this I. Think we're GonNa. See I think we're going to start to see great numbers when it comes to drops in crime, frankly like when you talk to people who have been. Here as long as I have in different parts of the city. They've already said they don't have issues like they used to. Whether it's because the police were causing more whether it's because people respect a community that takes care of itself. That's to be seen. That's an interesting thing. And when you invest in your community and its safety I think people. are less likely to screw off because they don't think you know. They feel like they're getting something over on friends versus getting something over on the man. Yeah? It's a weird thing like that. That shift alone is. I mean. Unbelievable. Like, I, you know. I want I want to be able to say more, but there's really it's just such. A shocking in abrupt change feels like it went from being a military. Dictatorship on the ground because our police really just our dicks. As we all have seen. But to being something. That's just so different, but it doesn't feel any less safe. You know like your day just doesn't feel different. You don't get parking tickets I mean. You know there are things like that, but like it's weird like it's just subtle stuff, but you notice it where you're just like. Oh! Okay Who does this feel like something that is sustainable? Absolutely, I, think I think the the the question is whether it's sustainable. It's whether the system that we live in can sustain us. We're seeing like right now. I think they're going to be major questions that come from this about universal basic income about giving people the dignity to live a frigging. And see if they're doing that kind of stuff for the community correct exactly. How do you make? What's the trade off here? Well in, how do you? How do you give people some frig? Just a chance? Yeah, like that's all we're asking for I. think that's all anyone wants is a chance and I think that. That's going to become more. You know there's there's an economic component to this social movement and revolution that is going to become more and more I think important. In the conversation about longevity, but also about what it is actually, that's built. The systems were talking about. Yeah, there's a lot going on here. Yeah, and you hear it on the street. You know like those first couple of nights. You've heard people saying out loud. Covid may kill me I'm broke. What else do we have left to do? Yeah, and what do we have to lose? Hear exactly this shit has to change. We have everything to gain like look always. Look at what we've done two weeks I mean. At this point, Pandora has opened a box that's. Between the pandemic, shifting all of the social norms and this. It's a new world yeah. I. Think people are just realizing that. Yeah. Because I I mean hell. We've been living in such a weird thing. This just shifted. The whole thing again, it's just it's bizarre. It's various. Yeah, yeah, like I like normally normally I would try and make some Kinda. Clever well reason I don't think there is one I think we're living through something that is literally so fluid that. None of my guesses. Matter Really I. Don't think any of us know what tomorrow brings and I'm I'm. I'm totally cool with that is the first time I think any of our lives where we can say you know what it's all up in the air, it could go any direction. Yeah and it's kind of up to everyone continuing to be active. At some point, absolutely these the street. Protests will die down and there's there's a chance that they'll die down for just a few weeks, and then the police murder somebody else up again. But it's. This has to be a long haul. You know like the Montgomery bus boycott over a year. You know talking crack like this is a long term project now. and. I think we'll probably see. Obviously. We're seeing Minneapolis starting to experiment with like what if we just got rid of department I? Hope we'll see at least a couple of other. I'm I hope. We'll see that in Portland I. Hope. At least a few other cities attempt something like that in the next. Six months and I think. We will get reforms and other places, and I hope that the examples of the places who do get rid of their police. Departments will lead to that happening more often like I. we're not going to have. This isn't a situation where we're going to have like. The the entire order overturned overnight. It's just not gonna the momentum. The weaponries, not they're like whatever. But I end in reality I don't think you could pull that off your like there's just no. There's no which is what's needed. Yeah, exactly, but I think there is consensus that policing needs to change and I think there's a growing support for that like. Maybe we don't need cops in the sense that cops have existed for all of our lives. Yeah I think that's accurate I think that's absolutely on on on the head. You Know I. Think the people are just ready to try. You know like the American experiment man like this is our experiment. Let's try some cool bold things. Yeah. So let's all try some cool bold things. Good good note to end on. Yeah Do you have anything? You want to direct our audience towards in terms of donations in terms of. Got, an LP, plug no, actually you know, I really don't you know I. I'm on twitter. I'm trying to figure out how to Kinda. Get. Going I'm going to probably try and get together. My thoughts on how propaganda is affected the arguments that were seeing now being brought forward, and I may try and turn that into something, but that's kind of in the planning phases, but you can find me a brain, not on yet on twitter and you know I'm just Kinda here right now. All right well. Okay, that's great. I got US an interview here. All right that does it for us today. Guys, thank you for listening any not for listening. You can check us out online at worst year pod instagram twitter. That's it. Those are the options. Would you to delays. and. He'll find out. How Dental lovely worst year ever is a production of iheartradio for more podcasts from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi, I'm Tom Colegio I'm a chef restaurants are. The kid and host of new podcast called citizens chef on iheartradio. People might turn on the news and see the stories about Derek immigration policy our healthcare. Icy. Stories about. On this podcast will tour the car political. Looking for inroads the food wherever we could find them. From the supply chain, we hear the Tyson might be closing another block Monday in Tennessee Labor. As. An executive order on immigration. We want American Septa jobs who UNAMERICAN Americans have the healthcare. We WanNa take care of our citizens disaster. Our systems can handle shoot disaster despondent. Reality, these are the stories of our food. 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