17 Burst results for "Leonard Cone"

"leonard cone" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

07:22 min | 2 months ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"Good. What is it? Thursday yes. Good. Thursday morning. Mets and Yankees both win the islanders win. So we've got some happy sports fans out there I was chuckling I don't know how the conversation started about Song Lyrics. But now you guys talking innocently about Song Lyrics and then thinking about the biggest hit out there right now in the lyrics that have to do with that song, which what's in which one W AP. Jerry. Good, morning. How are you? How are you? This is not do a leap song no, no no I love Duleep I'm a big. Fan I think she's very classy. He's got a great voice. She's got great songs I'm talking about the the Cardi B. Meghan the stallions song w a jerry that we brought up on the show a couple of days ago. That's been the big hit out there. Play on, you can't play on the radio because the lyrics are so intense and so over the top. So they had to change the entire chorus just to be able to play it. So instead of what WAP stands where they go with whitten cushy instead. So that's now. Growing up instead of American pie in this references, the Beatles the rolling stones and this what does this mean Oh man, the deep lyrics that are out there and Leonard Cone and all these folk artists that were out there with these Bob Dylan lyrics. Now, we've got macaroni in a pot wet and cushy. That's what we've got going on out there. So Tony. Doesn't bother me. It doesn't bother me so much. I'm not one of these like super proves that Al disagrees with that stuff but. It's just funny man. How you depending on who you are when you grew up What was the what was the song of your time? You know I mean for me, you know is the GRUNGE era rock Meteo. Stuff like that. And now there's there's young kids that are growing up on on wet in. Gucci. My God a little different than billy don't be a hero. Yeah I love the fact that this is the first time that you're seeing this like I wish I could be around for everybody's first viewing of those lyrics I really Jerry screen was frozen because he uses. Shock and not moving. No I'm with I'm with Gregg like I don't get offended I don't really care I mean it's whatever they're fine their lyrics and what's happened with the spotify era for me. Now, there's a lot of times I'll and I'll I'll download songs to the phone that are not radio edits and you don't realize even like a band like Maroon five how many songs of theirs that you hear on the radio anything anything of it and then you download a whole bunch of like twenty two Maroon Five songs on my spotify and how many of them are not exactly clean and you're like Whoa we're dot com from. So this might be and I don't think I. Don't know if I know this song on the radio or not listen to those types came out it came out you probably have not heard it on the so let's say I put this one on my spotify because I heard it on the radio which would have been a version. This would have been jarring to hear. By the way, just rating lyrics how do they make this a clean version I have no idea like I understand the chorus part but all these other things well, they bleep it out it's just it's just A bleep then yeah. Well, it's if you go and you watch the youtube video because that was the other part of this when they music video came out, that was a big thing because Kylie? Jenner was in it. So everybody's freaking out about that. So if you watch that the clean version and it just drops out constantly. Do I mean I'm looking at what else talking about I said certified freak seven days a week. BLEEP bleep make that bleep bleep week to Gay Yeah Yeah Yeah you bleep with some bleep bring a bucket and blee plead Gimme everything you got for the bleep. I mean even like. Even, the clean words are suggest, Jess like isn't there a park your car in the garage line in. The. Clean. Up. Sexual things. Yeah. It's great how yeah. I know it's one of those things that even if you are used to the most vulgar things ever hearing the song is actually it'll stop you and your traffic I'm sure it will. Stop he's he's GonNa line about a diabetic. How Now? I'm interested. Exactly. All my Ga. so I'm glad that I introduced you to that. Yeah I mean my wife and I we are people who are not really out of easily offended or anything like that and when it first came out, I said, said to you. This and we said there and we listened to it together and we're just like half mouths dropped wide open half laughing half totally appalled, and then we were like like you know who knows what's going to be the popular song when Sabrina Thirteen or fourteen I thought about that might be tame. Yeah, it may be or maybe like things go back. You know maybe we've gone so far that it goes back I don't think like to like poppy stuff you know and like the the the most. I guess pushing the line type of artists would have been. Britney Spears in her Catholic school outfit on MTV maybe that's what we'll go. Back to who knows I don't know. I'm hoping. So Taylor swift is still popular. giving. Some hope just it'll be writing about breakups and boyfriends you know and. I mean in ten years twelve years from now Cardi B. and Meghan astounding still going to be young, they might put out wap two. Point. In my this might be a classic. You're right 'cause where they can't be what and more than mid to late twenties, right? Yeah. Right. Another ten years the if you think they're still going I mean good Lord. Madonna still putting out music and g sixty three. She got a long way to go before she's done. Up. There you go. Anyway. So how do you feel about Aaron judge this morning yesterday we were we were talking about was ridiculous to pull him out of the game I didn't WanNa, pull them out of the game, and now we know lower body tightness now. What do you believe because the whole I wanted to prevent injury thing that is interesting to me because this is what Aaron Boone said he said I wanted to prevent injury now I've never really heard a manager say that we know that in blowouts pull out stars and all sorts of sports, and that's why keep this guy in there's no point and I understand that and that's sort of it's an unsaid thing I want to prevent an injury. When you see a manager actually here, managers say that you know is that really a mentality change now with the New York Yankees because all the injuries that they had that like the second any. Guy Feels any sort of discomfort that boom you're outlets trying to figure this out because we to prevent an injury because we need to react differently than we did last year because it was a disaster with injuries or are they trying to quiet down what could be another deathblow to them because Aaron? Judge really is not feeling right and this is one of those things where it gets pulled out of a game misses a game, and then all of a Saudis gone for two months and it's very possible two months..

spotify Aaron Boone Jerry screen New York Yankees Cardi B. Meghan Mets Beatles youtube Bob Dylan whitten Britney Spears Taylor swift Leonard Cone Tony Al Madonna billy Jenner Guy Gregg
"leonard cone" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

06:21 min | 2 months ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Good. What is it Thursday? Yes, Good Thursday morning. Mets and Yankees both win the Islanders wins, so we've got some happy sports fans out there. I was chuckling. I don't know how the conversation started about song lyrics. But you guys talking innocently about song lyrics and then thinking about the biggest hit out there right now, in the lyrics that have to do with that song, which, what's in which one W AP Jerry Good Morning. How are you, Man? How are you? This is not a duel. Eep a song? No, no, I love dually Prime, A big dually man. I think she's very classy, and he's got a great voice. She's got great songs. I'm talking about the car to be making the stallion song W AP Jerry that we brought upon the show a couple days ago. That's been the big hit out there. I was in play on. You can't play on the radio because the lyrics are so intense and so over the top, so they had to change the entire chorus just to be able to play it. So instead of what W AP stands for they go with wet and gushy instead. So that's now what kids growing up instead of American pie, And this reference is the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. And what does this mean? Oh, man, the deep lyrics that are out there and Leonard Cone. And all these folk artists that were out there with these and Bob Dylan lyrics. Now we've got macaroni in a pot wet and gushy. That's what we've got going on out there, so it doesn't bother me. It doesn't bother me so much. I'm not one of these like super prudes. I know that the AL disagrees with that stuff. But it's It's just funny, man like out howyou depending on who you are when you grew up. What goes the what was the song? Of your time, You know, I mean, for me, you know is the grunge era rock. There was stuff like that. And now there's Ah, There's young kids that are growing up on on wet and gushy. Oh, my God, a little different than Billy. Don't be a hero. Yeah, I love the fact that this is the first time that you're seeing this like I wish I could be around for everybody's first viewing. Of those lyrics. I really which every screen was frozen because he uses his shock and not moving. No, no, I'm with gone with Greg. Like I don't get offended. I don't really care. I mean, it's Whatever. They're fine. They're lyrics and what's happened with the Spotify era for me Now there's a lot of times I'll go and I'll download songs to the phone that are not radio edits. And you don't really even like a band like Maroon five. How many songs of theirs that you hear on the radio? You think anything of it and then you download a whole bunch of you guys have, like, 20 to maroon five songs on my Spotify. And how many of them or not exactly clean and you're like, Whoa, Where'd that come from? So this might be and I don't think I don't know if I know this song on the radio or not. Don't listen to those types of just came out. It just came out. You probably have not heard it on the air. So let's say I put this one on my Spotify because I heard it on the radio, which would have been a clean version. This would have been jarring to here. Another wrong with it, by the way, just writing lyrics. How do they make this a clean version? I have no idea why I understand the chorus part but all these other things Well, they just bleep it out. It's just It's just all so new to bleep, then. Yeah, well, it's if you go and you watch the YouTube video because that was the other part of this when the music video came out, That was a big thing, because Kylie Jenner was in it, So everybody's freaking out about that. So if you watch that it's the clean version and it just drops out constantly. It has to. I mean, I'm looking at what else talking about I said Certified freak seven days a week. Bleep bleep Make that bleep bleep week to Yeah, Yeah, yeah, yeah, you bleed but some believe, bring a bucket and bleep bleep. Luke, Give me everything you've got for the bleep. Wow. I mean, even even the clean words are suggests. Yes, like, isn't there a you know, Park your car in the garage line in there to clean? Yes, there is a reference to sexual things now. Yeah, I know it's it's It's one of those things that even if you are used to the most vulgar Things ever hearing the song is actually it'll stop in your tracks. I'm sure it will be a line about a diabetic kept now I'm interested. Really? Oh, my God. Ah, yes. I'm glad that I introduced you to that. Yeah. I mean, my wife and I we were people who are, you know, not really. Got it off, easily offended or anything like that. And when it first came out, I said, I said, did you is always that there and we listened to it together, and we're just like half mouths dropped wide open half laughing have, like, totally appalled, and then we were like Like, you know, who knows what's going to be the popular song When Sabrina's like 13 or 14 I thought about that this might be tame. Yeah, it may be, or maybe, like things go back. You know, maybe we've gone so far that it goes back. I don't think I like the like, Ah, Poppy stuff, you know, and like the most I guess Pushing the line type of artist would have been Britney Spears in her Catholic school outfit on MTV. Maybe that's what will go you know, back to Who knows? I don't know. I'm hoping so that our hope Taylor Swift is still popular. Give me some hope. Will. You just will be writing about breakups and boyfriends, you know ours. I mean, in what 10 years, 12 years from now Card Eby and making the stallion are still going to be young. They might put out W AP too. You never know point And I think this might be a classic your eyes where they can't be wanting more than mid to late twenties, right? Another 10 years. If you think they're still going mean good Lord Madonna still putting out music, and she's 63. And she got a long way to go before she's done lap. Yeah. There you go. Web anyway. So how do you feel about Aaron? Judge this morning? Yesterday we were. We were talking about how it was ridiculous to pull him out of the game. I didn't know what I pulled them out of the game. And now we know lower body tightness now. What do you believe?.

Spotify Jerry Good Mets Bob Dylan Beatles Leonard Cone Kylie Jenner YouTube Yankees Rolling Stones Britney Spears Taylor Swift Lord Madonna AL Billy Greg Islanders Aaron Luke Card Eby
"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To Leonard Cohen was a novelist poet singer and songwriter and his work influence generations of artists a new exhibit now at the Jewish museum examines Cohen's life through works of art commissioned specifically for this show, joining us out of talk about the show WNYC. Art critic, Deborah Solomon, ever. Good morning warning, Richard. So first, let's talk a little bit about Cohen in his artistic life. Leonard Cohen, I was one of the great songwriters of the twentieth century. I'm a fan I like to. I don't know if the kids are listening today, do they know Suzanne also Mary and Louisa I hope they're listening, and I hope co doesn't just appeal to age and hippies. He, of course, had a famously deep voice that sometime sound more like a grown or growl and was often described as gravelly, I think he did have a limited vocal range. But for some reason it worked with his music, which was stripped of anything high tech and pounding. And in many ways to me was the voice of the sixties. All right. So how would you describe the show? But when you hear that it's a show about Leonard Cohen, you might imagine a show that is primarily by graphical, and that contains vitrine filled with his music scores and his fedora hat that he always four letters his date books. It's not like that. There's no memorabilia in the show. Instead what we get is a group of thirteen works by different artists that old pay homage to Leonard Cohen, and they range from the frankly, informative meaning documentary about his life or another video about his music to pieces that are entirely whimsical for instance, upstairs on the second floor. There's one room that consists of a humming machine. Basically, you sit down and you Hella Louisa along with some three hundred prerecorded voices that amount to appeal chorused. I founded in. Incredibly beautiful. So how is the exhibit organized at the museum? The Jewish museum occupies the old Warburg mansion which fortunately has not been renovated in two pure blank, whiteness and still has a lot of its own trimming and moldings and in this case each piece by different artists occupies a different room. So it's a beautiful blending of old and new so who are some of the artists on view. Well, the pieces rain from the high tech to the no tech at one piece that is very impressive by Taryn. Simon consist just of the front page of the New York Times from November eleventh twenty sixteen which happens to show on the top of the page. The newly elected Trump meeting Obama and on the bottom of the page and obituary of Leonard Cohn who had just died that week and you feel two worlds colliding think how can the world be large enough to contain the newly-elected Trump and Leonard Cohn who was so much model of. Of authenticity and wounded nece in a way, if you're looking for more high tech piece you can go into a gallery on the main floor and look at multiple screens of Leonard in concert, and I have to say the seating in this show is incredible. If you'd like to sit in museums, this will be your favorite show ever because there were benches. There have been bag chairs, and you're really encouraged to linger which is very nice. I think author museums do not provide enough seething. So I learned this on Twitter. Debra you really like this show. Why I found the show very rousing Leonard cone was very much in touch with the opposing forces of both spirituality and sex. He's longing for women. He's longing to the saved. And I think in his longing he is an inspiration. Maybe we don't long enough anymore. Does it make sense to examine the life of this musician Leonard Cohen in an art museum? Well, normally I am very skeptical about. Out Cemex additions on pop culture, such as shows of electric guitars. There's one that resembles that at the met right now because listening to music is an aural Ayu RL experience. It's not a visual experience. Why do we need to have music and museums and it cuts into their regular programming for art? But in this case works, and I think it represents a new model for shows by bringing together the work of contemporary artists who are paying Amish to cone instead of just rehashing all the stuff of his life. Leonard Cohen, a crack and everything is now at the Jewish museum until September eight Deborah Solomon is WNYC's are critic and author of several books on American art, Deborah, thanks so.

Leonard Cohen Leonard cone Deborah Solomon Leonard Cohn Leonard WNYC Hella Louisa Debra Cemex Richard New York Times Twitter Taryn Trump Suzanne Simon Obama Mary
"leonard cone" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

"Yeah. Leonard gives everyone envy because he's really chill. He just he'd I've actually never heard him. Bark. Like while. I'm looking at it. Yeah. He just walks around his leash and he's like, oh, hey, and he's like really chill almost to the point where you greet him. And he'll give you like a little tag tag tail wag. And like, hey, but he's he's not like all over. He's just like Hello. It's nice. He seems like a much more mature dog than he is the only one or two he's little, but he seems like he's like wise beyond his years where she get him. I don't remember he adopted from a rescue. And I can't remember which one I'll ask her. But it's really fun because it's been a source of bonding for me and hurt, you know, being sort of new I don't know that many people. But it's it's nice because she was asking about like new dog stuff. And I was like this is my favorite thing to talk about it. I love it. Remember, the high of getting a dog is he bypassing the no dogs emotional support. Creeping. They're kind of craving like they're creeping their way slowly back into our not disrupted there. Great. It's what is your emotional wellbeing better after spending time with it's one hundred percent, even though he's not registered me. Yeah. It's way better. Honestly, it's everyone loves it, everyone the first time we all kind of heard embark. We all went what was here like it was a phantom died. We'd like to we is your dog like everyone so desperate to like throw another dog. It's the best. So did you get the origin of his name how she come up with Leonard? Well, I know that her I don't know this was before after, but so he had to have surgery for that condition called cherry. I sure a little a little thing. But after she got him he was in a cone and her friend started calling him Leonard cone on his name was linen already. Or if that's what gave him the name. Okay. I'll get enough to. I like both his Instagram is Leonard underscore cone. If you wanna fall him. Okay. He's real cute, and you do listeners. Let's go ahead and do that. Fortunately. My job if you wanna be angry every day, follow Leonard. Okay. We're going to interject a brand new segment inspired by called tug scoots. So I I have to give I think is a little bit what I perceived to be trouble at his first that I didn't have the best experience. I have now found head then in my new good. It's amazing. So great, and they're so nice. Not only do they have Don cookies at the front desk. They have human cookies. Good mood. We're working working with something. Great. And all so the the don't have to get on the table..

Leonard cone Don one hundred percent
"leonard cone" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Strong need. Leonard Cohen, singing, Hallelujah. And my guest is Leonard cone, son, Adam, cone, and there's, he wrote the introduction to a new collection of posthumously published Leonard cone lyrics, poems notebook entries and drawings, and it's called the flame. So you know. How Louis I think like two hundred people have recorded Hallelujah, and but it didn't become well known until Jeff Buckley recorded at like maybe ten years or more after your father recorded it, which is just so strange, but it's a sign of how I think there was a period of years when your father's genius wasn't fully acknowledged. When you know he had the initial period of hits. And then I think people just a lot of people just kind of drifted away and then rediscovered him. And what was it like for you and for him during that period? One when I think he'd been a little bit forgotten. Yeah. I feel like my father probably felt like his whole life was characterized by that by that description that he'd did been forgotten, forgotten by the angels forgotten by the, you know, cupid forgotten by. I know that he was not satisfied. He was a seeker. I wasn't satisfied with either the position that he had for the most part in society. He wasn't happy with society self, that would bet. Deepened the conflict. He wasn't. He wasn't satisfied with the people aid chosen to be around him. He wasn't satisfied with his role as a father. He wasn't satisfied with his role as a lover and through this layer upon layer of disatisfaction, he somehow mustered an incredible buoyancy and ability to be one of the most delightful people anyone ever came across. And it wasn't with any sense of bitterness or judgment. I think he just felt like he had this shabby little life and his only solace was was the work itself. And that's what made the end of his life that more Stanishev surprising, delicious. He know this unexpected ability to to fill, you know, twenty thousand seats and in any major city in the. World. These reviews from people that were like, you know, the like they were reviewing the Sistine Chapel itself. It was accompanied by commercial success in accolades and. To see him. Take his hat off, you know, and thank the jubilant audiences one after the other, which to see a man who was genuinely surprised and delighted by the reception that he thought he was never gonna get in life. When I saw him probably in the late two, thousands, like two thousand nine. Maybe I can't remember what year it was. It was kind of like being in a church or synagogue. There was this sense of like devote the devotion of his fans to him and his devotion to the music and two things larger. And he ended it with what struck me as a benediction and forget exactly what he said. But you know to those of you who are going home, you know to your families, enjoy your families and to those of you who live alone enjoy your solitude. And I thought like people don't say that that's such a beautiful thing to say. It's a lovely way of sending people home and sending home people who are going home alone. On joy, your solitude. Yeah, me these songs. Find your in your cell. The tude lessons may the blessings actually the exact quote. As may the blessings find you and your solitude. I thought it was just beautiful. This is a man who you know all the, we had a reputation as a ladies' men. You know, he was. He had to grit his teeth at the ten thousand nights. He spent alone. He understood something about solitude. Do you feel protective of his privacy? Because in my opinion, like your father was very elliptical in his writing and a pretty private about his life. He looted to a lot of things and his songs, but never quite came out and said them in a direct way. Oh, I'm not certain. That's that's true in terms of the use of the word direct, but I will say that to speak on his behalf feels like a little bit of transgression. You have a man who has designed his life around trying to not demystify process, and his work really does speak for itself. So you know, of course, I urge people that just consulted if they're interested in it, it's it, yes, it's complete with contradictions. You know, you go from things that are actually quite directed to things that are mysterious and allusive and designed to be transcended because of it. But he was preoccupied with the the broken of things, the asymmetries of things. You know, as he says, forget your perfect offering. There's a crack in everything or in his most famous, Hallelujah and doesn't matter which you heard the holy or the broken holler Louis. So he was always preoccupied with the idea of the imperfection of things yet there's there's a crack and everything that's that's where the light gets in. I don't have the line exactly my fingertips. But I mean, it's the ring, the bills that still

Louis Leonard cone Leonard Cohen Sistine Chapel Jeff Buckley Adam ten years
"leonard cone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. When Leonard Cohen died two years ago at the age of eighty-two, he left behind many unpublished, poems and lyrics, some of his final poems. Lyrics notebook entries and drawings are collected in the new book, the flame, his son, my guest, Adam Cohen wrote the forward, and I'm also produced the album is father recorded shortly before his death called you want a darker. Adam is a singer and songwriter whose album like a man when gold in Canada in two thousand twelve he was born in Montreal in nineteen seventy-two. Adam is going to talk with us about Leonard Cohen as a writer, performer and father and tell us about working closely with his father in the final year of his life. Leonard Cohen's lyrics have a depth few songwriters. Have achieved reflecting reverence and despair his attraction to beauty and his knowledge of broken this lyrics informed by his Judaism his practice of Buddhism. And is doubt some of his many well known songs include Suzanne, so long Marianne famous blue raincoat Chelsea hotel, number two. Everybody knows tower of song. I'm your man. And of course, his best known was frequently recorded and performed song. Hallelujah. Adam Cohen, welcome to fresh air. I just want to start by saying I love your father's music. I left his writing, and I feel privileged to have had the chance to hear him in concert and to talk with him on our show. And I'm grateful for the chance to talk with you today. So thank you for being here. When I interviewed your father in two thousand six after the publication of a book of his poems and songs, he asked to read a poem that he just written that hadn't yet been published. But it's now published in this new book the flame. So I thought it would be a perfect way to start with your father's reading of that poem a street from our two thousand six interview. I used to be your favorite drunk good for one more laugh. Then we both ran out a luck luck with all we had. You put on a uniform to fight the civil war. I tried to join. But no one liked the side, I'm fighting for. So let's drink to win. It's over and let's drink to when we meet I'll be waiting on this corner where they used to be a street. It wasn't all that easy when you up and walked away. But I'll leave that little story for another rainy day. I know your burdens heavy as you will it through the night to guru says it's empty, but that doesn't mean it's light. So let's strength to win. It's over and let's drink to win way. Meet I'll be standing on this corner where they used to be a street. You left me with the dishes and a baby in the bath. And your tight with the militias and you're wear their their camouflage. Will I guess that makes us equal? But I want to March with you. Just an extra in the sequel to the old red white and blue. So let's drink to when it's over, and let's drink to when we meet I'll be waiting on this corner where there used to be a street. It's gonna be September. Now for many years to come many hearts adjusting to that strict September drum. I see the ghost of culture with numbers on his wrist salute. Some new conclusion that all of us have missed so let's drink to when it's over and let's drink to when we meet. Hobie waiting on this corner where they used to be a street. This Leonard Cohen recorded on our show in two thousand six is an atom cone is my guess and the new posthumous collection of Leonard Cone's final poems. Lyrics. Notebooks and drawings is called the flame. It's just been published and includes the poem that we just heard. What does it mean to you to have some much of your father's latest? You know, his work. He did before he died collected in this new book. You know, I I'm just so struck by hearing. My father's voice, which I seem to be listening to almost more than I ever did. Even when he was alive. I love his poetry. I love his words. I love the way. He marshals language. I am. I'm weary of discussing my father. I always have been especially when you have a person who had such an inimitable way of and command of language, so I'm hesitant. And I didn't even know whether I should I am not certain should be. You're speaking about him. But, but it's a stirring subject, and I have been enlisted. I'm enlisted in the. In the campaign to let everybody know how wonderful I think he was. Do you feel protective of his privacy? Because in my opinion, like, your father was very. Elliptical in his writing and a pretty private about his life. You looted to a lot of things in his songs, but never quite came out and said them in a direct way. Oh, I I'm not certain. That's that's true. In terms of the use of the word direct. Okay. But I will say that. To speak on his behalf. Feels like a little bit of a transgression. A man who has designed his life around trying to not demystify a process and his work really does speak for itself. So, you know, of course, I urge people that just consulted if they're interested in it. It's it. Yes. It's complete with contradictions you go from things that are actually quite direct to things that are mysterious and elusive and designed to be transcended because of it. But he was preoccupied with the the broken this of things the a symmetry of things as he says forget your perfect offering. There's a crack in everything in his most famous song. Hallelujah. Doesn't matter. Which you heard the holy or the broken holler Luria. So he was always preoccupied with the idea of the imperfection of things. Yeah. There's there's a crack and everything that's that's where the light gets in. I don't have the line exactly fingertips. But I mean, it's the ring the bells that still can ring forget your perfect offering. There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in. Yeah. Whatever like can get through the crack does you know? I mean, he sees the light. But he sees the thing that only has a crack that lets the light in the always are the duality of everything is I think what I'm trying to say. So I remember him dancing, so beautifully around these kinds of questions, which I think he was irritated by very core. And when I say that I don't mean to be disparaging of the person constructing the questions, I think it's natural for us to be curious. And to articulate our concerns or thoughts or questions, but I think it's also natural for the conclude artist to preserve the kind of mystery and to not talk about the mechanics almost like a porno. You know, this goes in here that goes in there, there's something bigger than the mechanics, and that is the end the end result, the stirring quality of of what is the result of an artist's work and. I think he has he said, you know, put my paper hat on my concussion and dance. He tried on many occasions to to dance around questions or cooperate the be as best he could. And I feel like such a shabby impostor trying to be the valid for him. You know, the ambassador of this particular book, which I had very little to do with frankly other than offering a title for it, or you are a very eloquent introduction, which I will be quoting as time goes on here. Thank you. So I I think you said he left behind like lockers worth of notebooks. What are you doing with them? I mean, you just scrappy like he was always rioting. There's always like cocktail napkins and pages and in his pocket that you found a notebook in the freezer ones. So what are you doing with the findings? What's amazing? There's so much paperwork to go through a from the simplest point of view. There's the archive will work, which is assembling everything and trying to pay homage to it for posterity. Then there's the completion of works of his in. This instance, it's the flame this book. And then there were also some songs, which I was tasked with finishing. You may know produced his last record. The. Called you darker, and while working with him, many, many poems were read sometimes to Amir kick drum just for meter for tempo. And so there's a sense of responsibility to keep the songs alive is he always used to say. I want to play the title song on the final album that was released when your father Leonard Cohen was still alive. It's called you wanna darker, and then we'll talk about working with him on it..

Leonard Cohen Adam Cohen Terry gross Montreal Leonard Cone Chelsea hotel writer Canada Suzanne Hobie Amir Marianne Luria two years
"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Event premieres tonight at nine eight central on PBS this is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is Adam Cohen, and he's the son of Leonard Cohen and others new collection of Leonard Cone's final lyrics poems notebook entries and drawings. And these are all collected in the new book, the flame and Adam Kohn wrote the introduction to it. So you were born in nineteen seventy-two some of your father's most famous songs or already written and recorded by the time. You were born Suzanne selling Marianne. Hey, that's no way to say goodbye. Burn on a wire Chelsea hotel who by fire. So did you hear them? He didn't need me. Did you hear them a lot when you were growing up? I mean, it's like when I was growing up I thought about songs and singers. But I didn't think about songwriters. I just thought about like what's the song? And who's singing it? But but you're you're you're father was a song writer. See must have had an awareness that songwriting was a craft. That's something people actually did. And you must be grown up with these songs. I don't know if he played them around the house. I don't know if you've even heard them when you were, you know, of course, I heard them. Yeah. I was a five year old on the side of stages watching them being performed, of course, into the looking at the faces of a violences in different times and places, and I was a deep deep admirer of of at first, you know, as a child just the melodies the generosity of the melodies. And then as I grew older there was the complexities and the beautiful marshalling of language. And then you grow older need any sort of see I remember, I remember I myself. I was making a record at the time. And I'd scrapped it and asked my father for council. I said dad, you know, meet me me me, I really got to talk to you. I got pick your brain. We were sitting on the corner of Wilshire and libra, and I confessed to him that I was gonna scrap this entire record and was expecting him to put his hand on my shoulder and say like, that's my boy, you know, altruistic values don't ever stop continue refining. But instead he turned to me and said. Scrappy record. That's an amateur move your move. He says, yeah, it's not about how you feel about the record. It's how the songs make them feel. And. At that moment. I realized that. The Lovato's head for his material wasn't just about their construction. But also about their intention. He was holding up this baton that he had been given by the love he had for the people who came before him, and he was holding it up and. Something about the canon of his work that has always maintained that that baton off the ground. How old were you and your parents separated? Five six the door member. So how much did you get to see your father after that? I'm in a relationship now and the imperfection of a union between two people has been demonstrated to me in vivid, colors, and dimensions. And the fact that my father was able to stay in his children's life despite those complications. And then some was remarkable is remarkable to me. My mother moved my sister. And I have to across the world many occasions not just get away from him. In fact, not to get away from him at all but just to follow our own whims. And my father would often even park a caravan at the end of a dirt road just to be near us. He's always been part of our lives. He'd always he always maintained a role. In in our lives, despite my parents separation. So a caravan is like a mobile home. Oh, yeah. The liquidity call those Jetstream kind of thing. Yeah. I remember my mother moved my sister. And I all the way to the south of France where we lived and there's a long dirt road. And he bought one of these serve caravan Jetstream type things put it at the T where the road met the dirt road, and he just lived there. My mother didn't want him on the property. So. Every day after school bus would drop us off. And we'd see dad in his caravan. Do that for. Well, he did that in variations of that trauma on tire life and then. As I say, they could be the intent to be part of his children's live the deliberateness with which he contorted his own life and scheduled to to make sure that he was present in our lives was. Feet. There's something really terrible that happened to you in its own way is maybe responsible for the revival of his career and for his reconnection to people around the world. And that's that he had an accountant or a business manager who like drain your father savings and sold the publishing rights to your father saw that's kinda like stealing his soul to sell all the publishing rights to his songs. I mean, that's just seems like such a transgression. And like, I think your sister who discovered that it happened. Like if I didn't even know. Yeah. You know? As he often joked, I it is hilarious that he thought he could resolve his economic woes with song and poetry incredible. With the canon of his work with his devotion to blackening pages. Melody that that he built the life. He built for himself, and when he experienced this this episode that you're referring to it actually did compel him back out of retirement back onto the road. And that is what was part of what I referred to as the most sort of joyous and unexpected episode of his life, which was to to discover that all this time absence had made the park grew fonder who knew he always benefited from this kind of iconic status, you know, people at Kurt Cobain, and and others would quote him. And but it didn't result in the kind of mass. Appeal and lo and behold from this economic crisis arose this most unexpected and. Festive of periods in his life. I was a festive. I mean, it was incredible to see the. The amount of universities that suddenly started teaching his works studying his works. So even the whole rabbinical clan. Adopting his lyrics says liturgy Madison Square Garden and the oh to twenty thousand seaters suddenly being filled eight never sold more than six thousand tickets. So thank goodness for that economic crisis. So did he ever get the song writes back because not seem really? Yeah. Those are gone. My guests is songwriter and singer Adam Cohen who is the son of Leonard Cohen Adam wrote the forward to a new collection of his father's previously unpublished writings called the flame. We'll talk more after a break. This.

Adam Cohen Leonard Cohen Adam Kohn Leonard Cohen Adam Jetstream Leonard Cone Suzanne Kurt Cobain Wilshire Lovato Madison Square Garden writer Marianne France accountant business manager five year
"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Adam Cohen, a songwriter and singer whose the son of Leonard Cohen Adam has written the forward to a new collection of his late. Father's previously. Unpublished lyrics poems. Notebook entries and drawings. It's called the flame. Adam also produced the final album is father released before his death called you want a darker, Leonard cone was very weak and in pain when he recorded it is their son. You remember from your childhood that sticks in your mind? A song that meant a lot to maybe even a song. You remember your father writing? I mean when I was really young. I remember him composing Hallelujah. Remember him writing it? Oh, yeah. I remember him being it took him twelve years. No it started. It started. When I was very very young adhere here versus I think they're eighty four verses to that song. I remember coming down to the kitchen table, and he was there with an island string guitar in his underwear, and they're always be versus to consult. And I remember even being invited to sing. With a group of people in New York City when he was recording the song for his own album, which by the way, Sony at the time didn't wanna put out. Isn't that amazing? An amazing turn of events to have this man's popularity have grown, you know, he lived in a kind of a conic anonymity. If you buy those two if you buy that unlikely union and two grown in popularity so much at the end of his life and for to get back to your question for me to have set on the side of the stage. You know, watching my old man at five years old and all the way up to into my forties. The whole canon of his work is his living. Inside of me is playing in my head is triggered by conversation. Yeah. So for Hallelujah as you say there there were eighty four versus I don't think he ever recorded all eighty four. But did it take twelve years and eighty four verses before he considered it completed because of dissatisfaction with the versus that he'd previously written or because the still so much and wanted to say in the format of that song as. The popular poem states of poem is never finished. But rather abandoned? Do you think he was frustrated working on it for so long or that it was buying? I think frustration was expected. The success of being able to let it go was was the unexpected. You know, I think he has a very vocational from the early stage. He would wake up earlier than anybody new to black pages, and and gave up an enormous amount or what he would refer to his compromised enormous amount. Go back to that song came so far for beauty a left so much behind my patients in my family. My masterpiece unsigned. You quote, the, you know, some people subscribe to to the philosophy. I thought best thought and that's often attributed to one of the beat writers. But your father believed last thought best thought. Yeah. He edited I take it. He edited his songs a lot. He went through drafts. It was a constant process of filtration and refinement for certain. So why don't we hear Hallelujah? You fathers version. Sure. This is Leonard. There is a moratorium on that song, you know, in my family. So is that right? Transgression? Yeah. Refrain please refrain from playing Hallelujah because. Oh, I think he felt like, you know, who's gonna cause Leonard Cohen fatigue or something, you know, or give gift some other songs of chance to get played. It was a it was partly joke in partly his own exhaustion. I think with with the song. So in spite of the moratorium your family hasn't Hallelujah. I I think we'll play it. Anyways. You're okay with that. Oh god. I'm going to report you to the bully police. Okay. Their heritage..

Hallelujah Leonard Cohen Adam Adam Cohen Leonard cone Leonard Cohen New York City Leonard Sony twelve years five years
"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Chinese loans have bumped up Djibouti's debt ratio from fifty to eighty five percents. So we're talking about a lot of money owed to China. I'm Ari Shapiro. Critics say many African countries are now at risk of a credit crisis. That story this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. Weekdays starting at four on WNYC. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. When Leonard Cohen died two years ago at the age of eighty-two, he left behind many unpublished, poems and lyrics, some of his final poems. Lyrics notebook entries and drawings are collected in the new book, the flame, his son, my guest, Adam Cohen wrote the forward. Adam also produced the album is father recorded shortly before his death called you want a darker. Adam is a singer and songwriter whose album like a man when gold and Canada in two thousand twelve he was born in Montreal in nineteen seventy two is going to talk with us about Leonard Cohen as a writer, performer and father and tell us about working closely with his father in the final year of his life. Leonard Cohen's lyrics have a depth few songwriters. Have achieved reflecting reverence and despair his attraction to beauty and his knowledge of broken nece lyrics informed by his Judaism, his practice of zen Buddhist. Awesome. And as doubt some of his many well known songs include Zan, so long Marianne famous blue raincoat Chelsea hotel, number two. Everybody knows tower of song. I'm your man. And of course, his best known was frequently recorded and performed song. Hallelujah. Adam Cohen, welcome to fresh air. I just want to start by saying I love your father's music. I loved his writing, and I feel privileged to have had the chance to hear him in concert and to talk with him on our show. And I'm grateful for the chance to talk with you today. So thank you for being here. When I interviewed your father in two thousand six after the publication of a book of his poems and songs, he asked to read a poem that he'd just written that hadn't yet been published. But it's now published in this new book the flame. So I thought it would be a perfect way to start with your father's reading of that poem a street from our two thousand six interview. I used to be your favorite drunk good for one more laugh. Then we both read a luck luck with all we had. You put on a uniform to fight the civil war. I tried to join. But no one liked the side, I'm fighting for. So let's drink to win. It's over and let strength to when we meet I'll be waiting on this corner where there used to be a street. It wasn't all that easy when you up and walked away. But I'll leave that little story for another rainy day. I know your burdens heavy as you will it through the night, the guru says it's empty, but that doesn't mean it's light. So that strength to win. It's over and let's drink to when we meet I'll be standing on this corner where they used to be a street. You left me with the dishes and a baby in the bath. And your tight with the militias and you wear their their camouflage. Will I guess that makes us equal? But I want to March with you. Just an extra in the sequel to the old red white and blue. So let's drink to win. It's over and let's strike to when we meet I'll be waiting on this corner where they used to be a street. It's good to be September. Now for many years to come many hearts adjusting to that strict September drum. I see the ghost of culture with numbers on his wrist salute. Some new conclusion that all of us have missed so let's drink to when it's over and let's drink to when we meet Hopi waiting on this corner where they used to be a street. This Leonard Cohen recorded on our show in two thousand six is an atom cone is my guess and the new posthumous collection of Leonard Cone's final poems. Lyrics. Notebooks and drawings is called the flame. It's just been published. An includes the poem that we just heard. What does it mean to you to have some much of your father's latest? Here's the work. You did before he died collected in this new book. First of all, I'm just so struck way hearing my father's voice, which is seem to be listening to almost more than I ever did. Even when he was alive. I love his poetry. I love his words. I love the way. He marshals language. I am. I'm weary of discussing my father. I always have been especially when you have a person who had such an inimitable way of and command of language, so I'm hesitant. And I didn't even know whether I should I I'm not certain I should be here. Speaking about him, but but it's a stirring subject, and I have been enlisted hyme enlisted in the. In the campaign to let everybody know how wonderful I think he was. Do you feel protective of his privacy? Because in my opinion, like, your father was very. Elliptical in his writing and a pretty private about his life eluded to a lot of things in his songs, but never quite came out and said them in a direct way. Oh, I I'm not certain. That's that's true. In terms of the use of the word direct. Okay. But I will say that. To speak on his behalf. Feels like a little bit of transgression a man who has designed his life around trying to not demystify a process and his work really does speak for itself. So of course, I urge people to just consulted if they're interested in it. It's yes, it's complete with contradictions. He knew where you go from things that are actually quite direct to things that are mysterious and elusive and designed to be transcended because of it. But he was preoccupied with the the broken this of things the asymmetries of things know, he says forget your perfect offering. There's a crack in everything in his most famous song. Hallelujah. Doesn't matter. What you heard the holy or the broken Honolulu. So he was always preoccupied with the idea of the imperfection of things. Yeah. There's there's a crack and everything. And that's that's where the light gets in. I don't have the line. Exactly my fingertips. But I mean, it's the ring the bells that still can ring forget your perfect offering. There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in. Yeah. So like. Uh-huh. Whatever like can get through the crack does you know? I mean, he sees the light. But he sees the thing that only has a crack that lets the light in always are the duality of everything is I think what I'm trying to say. So I I remember him dancing, so beautifully around these kinds of questions, which I think he was irritated by. Very core. And when I say that I don't mean to be disparaging the person constructing the questions, I think it's natural for us to be curious. And to articulate our concerns or thoughts or questions, but I think it's also natural for the Concorde artist to preserve the kind of mystery and to not talk about the mechanics almost like a porno. You know, this goes in here that goes in there, there's something bigger than the mechanics, and that is the end the end result is stirring, quality of of what is the result of an artist's work and. You know, I think he has he said, you know, put my paper hat on my concussion and dance. He tried on many occasions to to dance around questions or cooperate the ba- as best he could. And I feel like such a shabby impostor trying to be brought by voted for him. You know, the ambassador of this particular book, which I had very little to do with frankly other than offering a title for it or you wrote a very eloquent introduction, which I will be quoting as time goes on here. Thank you. So I I think you you said he left behind like lockers worth of notebooks. What are you doing with them? I mean, you just scrappy like he was always riding. There's always like cocktail napkins and pages and in his pocket. It's you found a notebook in the freezer ones. So what are you doing with the findings? What's amazing? There's so much paperwork to go through a from the simplest point of view. There's the are the archive will work, which is assembling everything and trying to pay homage to it for posterity. Then there's the completion of works of his in. This instance, it's the flame this book. And then there were also some songs, which I was tasked with finishing. You may know produced his last record the called you want a darker, and while working with him, many, many poems were read sometimes to Amir kick drum just for meter. For tempo. And so there's this sense of responsibility to keep the songs alive. Is he always used to say? I want to play the title song on the final album that was released when you're father Leonard Cohen was still alive. It's called you wanna darker, and then we'll talk about working with him on it. And this.

Leonard Cohen Adam Cohen NPR Ari Shapiro Terry gross Djibouti China Montreal Leonard Cone writer Honolulu Chelsea hotel Canada Amir Zan hyme Marianne two years
"leonard cone" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on The Editors

"Has that right sour note that's why people come to the podcast for recipe tips like that, even listening to the revolutions podcast. Yes. I know that you're a big fan of it to rich. I should have gotten onto this a long time ago because the podcast apparently started in two thousand thirteen, but when my wife and I were recently as ores, we just had a lot of long drives around the islands. And I spent a fair bit of time listening to the and it was a real pleasure on try. Yeah. Really, really bizarre. And the good thing for your wife is that she was in the as the bad thing she had to listen to you or maybe she enjoys the revolutions probably totally into both massive nerd. So it actually works really well. And Mike Dunkin has released a new season that's devoted to the Mexican revolution. It's just gotten started. So this is a perfect time to jump on the Mike Dunkin revolutions bandwagon. So I'm actually I'm going to. I'm gonna out Mike Dunkin you because I was a fan of his history of Rome podcast, which was extraordinarily on I, I listened to that the whole thing, and then I was I was getting going to try to get into the revolutions. And the first one he did was the English civil war in which I, which is a great period which I love and fascinated in. But. I didn't take it didn't take with me, and I got stranded by this stuff, but maybe maybe I'll return, but he's definitely a talented podcast. Oh, yeah. So Charlie, you're quite taken with the start of the college football season. I think Ryan does possess off on raising years. This is images. I took a long time to get into football. It, it takes you an awful lot of games if you didn't grow up with it to see all the things that are going on each play at once. This is an odd comparison, but in some ways is a bit like all pro when you're a kid, it's just noise. There's all these different vocal lines all these different maladies and it just overwhelms you. And then as you grow up, you slowly begin to separate them out in your ears, combine them, and that's what it's like watching a playoff to sort of six or seven years in the country. And now it's not just this indiscriminate explosion every time the Vollers thrown. You really begin to sit and it took me until last year I think ready to get into it, but I just decided to follow in college football too. That's why that's the NFL and I'm, I'm hooked. My light item is as. I kind of picking stuff up as I go working through this book. I'm doing on on nationalism. And I mean that's period where folks a little bit on the South Carolina's secession crisis over the tariff when Andrew Jackson was president, I've always known about his proclamation but actually read through it. The other day is extraordinarily documents deserves to be remembered as one of the greatest state papers in American history. And basically every. Argument that Lincoln used in the first inaugural. You can trace back to Jackson's proclamation. So with that, let's go to our editor's picks Michael. What's your pick? Kevin? Williamson has a piece called the psalmist and the sex dolls, and in his very typical, brilliant kind of Kevin rumination that goes all the way from a song of Leonard cone to these seamy underside of new brothels that offer patrons the services of robots instead of women living women, and it's just a fascinating, beautiful meditation on the meaning of marriage and of what it is as a sacrament of all things. And it's top shelf, Kevin, Williamson itself, right? Handing. I really enjoy Jay costs piece on the weakness of our two major parties and what that portends Charlie. I've just seen this came in this morning from Douglas Mari and is on the topic we were discussing earlier the invitation of Steve Bannon, but it's it's more generally about this invitations and no platforming. It's extremely funny. He asked whether there is any real principle hair tool or whether this is just the product of caprice and power, and does with a with a wicked wicked sins, a Huma. My pig is forthcoming piece in the new print issue by Jane earlier on state fairs, and he went to the New York state fair, which I believe is in Syracuse, and it's just a really deft a.

Mike Dunkin football Charlie Andrew Jackson Kevin NFL Rome Douglas Mari Williamson president Steve Bannon Ryan Syracuse Jay South Carolina Jane Leonard cone Lincoln New York
"leonard cone" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"Elle fanning hodgson live with a song it's a it's a two and a half three minutes all in your you're working on it for months and months and months and months how are you able to hold on to these night of eat the perspective some talk in the relief interests that song because i mean i know i eat a you get so inside something how do you how we're able to keep your perspective on it well request says sometimes you will lose it massively right and then you realize months or years later fucked the idea was there all along and it just you know what we just did that we just were lucky to play this leonard cohen tribute and montreal and um mm learning about him i grew up listening to this out in the future and we played the sunk democracy which is amazing song pertinent even today very much so but he was famous for saying dillon i spent said don't said i love that somehow the yellow undertaken any said two years and he lied it was actually five years and he asked dillon about one of his songs in don't set up fifteen minutes and i'm assuming he owns a superhero armored just moral man and leonard cone always felt like a superhero but the here here of yours say that took me five years to me it gave me permission to obsessed over something and feel like i wasn't making a mistake or i wasn't good enough or something it if if if he takes that long i mean he's genius so for us it's almost like exhaust a lot of possibilities is sometimes you go back to the first idea there's a there's a tom petty documentary where he smashes his he breaks his shattered his hand into a wall because he was writing with running down a dream or something and he.

Elle fanning dillon leonard cone leonard cohen montreal five years fifteen minutes three minutes two years
"leonard cone" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"One so hello the though in regards to live performances cone describes the cycle of anxiety and confidence depending on the reaction from his audience you cycle through these these feelings of anxiety and confidence if you if something goes well one's life one you know feels the the benefits of of of the success when something doesn't go well one one feels remorse so those those activities persist in one's life right right to the hutu this moment i have a strong sense i exist so that's his legitimate as i as i need to to be but when you're out there in front of and from the public you're going to get a lot of responses and at this stage the game i have a pretty thick skin so i prefer praised too to criticism but you know i'm i'm i'm really ready for both and again if your fume he was the top of his game he didn't look worried he looked in command and maybe that's because the audience which is hanging on every word and giving him he giving him the approval all artists to perform moose long for and we leave with dance me to the end of love leonard cone the life of the hour here on our american stories with a through let's see tights pain meds glow do the spain no.

spain
"leonard cone" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The good evening the it begins israel chiasso land being way coups when dealing moldy bailey in this next put leonard cone talks about his unlikely success as a struggling author becoming a successor musician he attributes at all the luck skill and hard work in hindsight seems to be hired height father oh are two two two three resolve your economic crisis becoming a folk singer no i don't know i had not much of a voice either i didn't play that great guitar either so it was i don't know how these things happening in life their luck has so much to do with with a success and failure i always have and i always had the notion that i happen to know a tiny gardens to cultivate i never thought it was really one of the big guys my work the work that was infirm it was just to cultivate this this tiny corner of the field that i thought i knew something a boat which was something to do with the self investigation with without selfindulgence i've never like the the latter too much of them as a mode just pure confession i never felt was really interesting but but but confession filtered through a tradition of uh of skill and a hard work indeed there'd be several albums to follow here is record producer john simon again about how difficult it is for musician to release new music after that successful debut album there's something really extraordinary about a debut album an artist has been writing these songs for quite a number of years generally and so did a criminal crops the best songs and they don't want to save this second the.

economic crisis john simon israel leonard cone producer
"leonard cone" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"You're creating a kind of certainty of areas that you know you won't find disappointment because you choose not to engage in those areas well i guess i also don't know if they're suffering on alfredsson tories planets right there might be you've made a joy amman aware and being unaware is different than certainty so i will be let's dive into certainty because i think that that yet the heart of this creativity thing bob dylan wrote some of the most important songs of all time usually in fifteen minutes each leonard cone has you and i were talking about the other day road howler louis ah in six eight years what's the difference is it that bob dylan has a different clock speed or is it that our creator who stock his stuck because they're seeking certainty that cannot be found that they are in their own head focus grouping it imagining it the failure of the legendary in there are threatening is of repeat that in their own ahead focused grouping it they're not actually focus groupings occurs theft the finish the work in order to focus bigs you're saying that it is i mean it's nothing retirement talks about at the thing that i that hanta me when i i was younger and that i still have to defeat every morning when i try to do the good work permit turning off the internal sensors and the mood the inventions of judgment and wide we invent judgment we invent judgment for the same reason that a chef is angry at a peach.

amman bob dylan leonard cone clock speed theft alfredsson fifteen minutes six eight years
"leonard cone" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"In eastern europe for at hope were in williams smith college's duties graduate work here in the eighties here is your w madison and spends a good part of has spent to be part of his recent decades in eastern europe even want to talk about the these two party stiff if come to power in poland and hungry in their programs because that in their in there actual what what they proposal what they were doing we can see perhaps see i'm a future doom to paraphrase recently deceased leonard cone he talked about i've seen the future brother it is murder and and some of this is murderous yeah well well it the knicks eight not go reckoning murderer yet you know that that need to be stated and of course i think that look that's both no doubt no question a good thing it's all so one of those things that and prevent guts from seeing a lot of similarities with extreme it right wing in the past who were murdered so you know yeah might become that you do it's not that now which is very good some but even without that there are a lot of similarities so you have to but the pro you know the program let's start at the political level that is the this attack on on the institutions of democracy.

europe poland leonard cone murder knicks williams smith college
"leonard cone" Discussed on WAXE 1370

WAXE 1370

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WAXE 1370

"To tell you know it's story that i've never told anyone okay in in the public media wow about because it was as if he could for well for five pick it pretty winded a record in it bumps nineteen seventy four my record company got a call print frank but i'm not because people in the seven before and dave and we want to to hold a bit of color relief so the right can be out for a year later did you do i mean getting so what the didn't know oh and of course they wouldn't not my that guy who for the thoughts over there of my record company that you compete thing we're going to do that no going into that brutal a way i've never told the story until it before i'm glad you got to put in the first but you know what even if you hadn't tell you if i had thank you i know i'm rest assured on that end up but there's a lot of like here good friend to have on one side and just hit well it's the truth i doing the best i do want to bring up on a you've you had your your highs near lowe's and one person that you introduced me to and you introduced the world to why profoundly miss i and that is the genius of leonard cone telling how did you discovered will leonard como that below one of below that is my friend too and didn't happen to quite or their top and having to give it happened within a gun took it with my pen man typical leonard cohen friend.

frank leonard cone dave lowe leonard como leonard cohen
"leonard cone" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"leonard cone" Discussed on WGN Radio

"When you've got all these british invasion no bands coming in like fuck _a_c goals and and with the hair cards and and boy george and there's no place for a deep throw to baritone poet that's singing this song is over little music and so what are going to put be forgotten and then in the he went to give you want to a modest airy became a monk he wound up we made some money in his career and while he was being a monkey found out that he was being ripped off by his manager and almost was was was was bankrupt and over the last ten years or so he came back and was in braced by a whole new audience that had heard holly were you and wanted to find out more about leonard cone so it is late seventies he goes starts during like two thousand eight two thousand nine just sold out arena around the world and if you really want to get a crash course later colon there's an alive album called live in london there's also _d_b deep that goes with it and and you can really get all of his hips you could see it was a i saw him at the chicago theater twenty or not and it was just it was just captivating performance the comes out he's got this for gore in this out you know the suit just really classy in the he's got this deep voice that you know in these after every song he bowers any tips that he was just really cool show and and you really in the to go through to get to really here his lyrics and his poetry and it was well you know a forgettable show and i was really taken with leonard cone and and i've been a fan of his ever since now the first time i ever heard holland and if we can go to the last on then the one by jeff but quick the first time i haven't heard i will lose in on the music i got twenty four thousand songs of my i pot okay and i was i was tibia and i never heard this on how lukas like you said it came out in eighty four it was not with every minute or whatever in the radio it's separate minutes on i was a huge fan in still them of the tv show.

george chicago theater gore leonard cone holland jeff holly leonard cone ten years