17 Burst results for "Leo Szilard"

"leo szilard" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Careful out there. We got our today in history for November, 11th In 16 20. The Mayflower compact is signed and what is now Provincetown Harbor near Cape Cod. Ah in 16 75 Gottfried lived in its demonstrated inter girl calculus for the first time to find the area under the graph. Of y equals f x. I don't know. I have no idea what that means. Had to take calculus for a semester hated it in 17 50. The F H C society, known as the Flathead Hat Club, is formed at Raleigh Tavern in Williamsburg. That was the first college fraternity in 17 50, the flat hat club. 17 78 Cherry Valley Massacre loyalists in Seneca Indians forces attacked the fort and village in eastern New York during the Revolutionary War, killing more than 40, civilians and soldiers. 18 13 the war of 18 12. The battle of Chrysler's Farm British in Canadian forces defeated a larger American force opposing the Americans to abandon their ST Lawrence campaign. 18 31 in Jerusalem, Virginia. Nat Turner is hanged after inciting a violent slave uprising. Nat Turner 18 39. The Virginia Military Institute was founded in Lexington, Virginia. Better known now, as V M. I. 18 89, the state of Washington has admitted as the 42nd state of the United States. 1921. A Tomb of the Unknowns is dedicated by President Warren Harding at Arlington National Cemetery. And by the way, if you ever go toe Washington that is something It's a must. It's over in Virginia, Arlington. But it's something to behold. And it happens every half hour. They changed the guard. 1926, the U. S numbered highway system was established. I don't know how you told him apart before that. 1930 patent number. Well, it's a bunch of numbers Award of the Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard for their invention. The Einstein refrigerator. 1966 and NASA launched the Gemini 12. 1972 Vietnam War. Vietnamization, the U. S Army turned over the massive long been military base to South Vietnam. I was there several times long Been 1993, a sculpture honoring women who served in the Vietnam War is dedicated that the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. And finally in 2000 for the Palestinian Liberation Organisation confirmed the death of Yasser Arafat from unidentified causes. And Mahmoud Abbas is elected chairman of the P L o that same day, and that's our today in history. November 11th. It's 8 46, and we go to the newsroom and Krist Reichman. Hurricane watches in effect for the Bay Area north to Yankee town and a tropical storm warnings, in effect for much of Florida's west coast as ADA has been upgraded to a Category one hurricane with top sustained winds of 75 MPH. National Hurricane Center says May area residents should be prepared for wind gusts above 40 MPH later today and near hurricane strength tomorrow. Florida Senator Marco Rubio is joining with Republicans on Capitol Hill questioning the results of the election. Rubio is supporting President Trump's efforts to find fraud in last week's vote. Rubio says. If the president elect is inaugurated, he's predicting Joe Biden will appoint a Cabinet full of radicals and extremists. Florida's reporting the highest corona virus percent positivity rate 9.6% since mid August. A state Health department announced 4300 new cases, bringing the state's total to more than 852,000. Since the pandemic began, there were 69 new deaths in the state. Young Chris trunk Man. NewsRadio W F L A Now let's check sports wofl.

Virginia Senator Marco Rubio Washington Nat Turner President Florida Hurricane National Hurricane Center Cape Cod Virginia Military Institute Provincetown Harbor Vietnam Veterans Memorial Gottfried Palestinian Liberation Organis Albert Einstein Mahmoud Abbas Yasser Arafat Flathead Hat Club Joe Biden
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From New York City to visit him in the little village of iconic It is July 12. 1939. Cynthia Kelley, president and founder of the Atomic Heritage Foundation. The cottages of the health from the water, and it's surrounded by trees and sand doesn't know they're coming. But welcome something nonetheless. And so there three men Three scientists talking about nuclear physics, politics and a discovery that is about to change the world, once a large explains a nuclear chain reaction to Einstein and explains that he and fair may have been designing and conducting experiments. Einstein is amazed and alarmed. I haven't thought of that at all is his first answer. Science is exciting to Einstein. Vision is equals M C squared in action. Being a refugee from Nazi Germany and being a committed pacifist and being a politically aware person he sees right away the potential For nuclear weapons in the hands of Germans. Einstein agrees that the situation is urgent. With Germany poised for war, he agrees to sign a letter to Roosevelt to warn him about the German progress. In later life. Einstein calls his vocal support for so large that day, the one great mistake of his life. But whether they like it or not. They're on a quiet summer's day in a modest American house in a typical American town, three men have changed the course of human history. And so, with the answer in letter in hand, Leo Szilard sets off back to New York City. Sweaty palms. Even for one of America's leading economists, a meeting in the Oval Office with the president himself must be pretty scary. The Economist is called Alexander Sacks A month ago, Sax got a call from a fellow European economists.

Einstein New York City president and founder Germany Atomic Heritage Foundation Leo Szilard Cynthia Kelley Alexander Sacks president Oval Office Sax America Roosevelt
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I first on the courage and the desire to begin asking questions. About the grandfather had never known and interested in away secrecy functions on multiple levels. Cultural institutional personal for Leah's A lard secrecy was a way of protecting ideas for keeping them out of the wrong hands. But I suspect throughout the bomb effort at large, in addition to protecting sensitive information from enemy eyes, secrecy served to protect workers like my grandfather from the knowledge of what they were doing if they didn't know the purpose of their work. How could they be held responsible for it? How could they question it? It has haunted me to know that my family helped build weapons of mass destruction, and it's that connection that's brought me again and again. The questions of secrecy, denial, guilt and responsibility. What so fascinating to me about Leo Szilard is that even though he pursued secrecy for his ideas He never used it to excuse himself. He didn't choose to say I didn't know when the consequences of the bomb reached their devastating climax in Hiroshima at each step of the journey, he always chose to take action. He never let himself pleaded ignorance. He never would let himself look away. Well right from the start. The discovery of chain reaction was coupled in his mind with the increasing aggression in Germany and right away. He was desperate to keep what he thought of his his brain storm out of German hands. He had an elaborate sense of the importance of secrecy, and he kept insisting that the patent be made a military secret. In September 1935 he's invited to visit the Woolwich Arsenal. Neither will that Arsenal. He meets with Army researchers and explains to them his idea for creating a new and awesome weapon using atomic energy. After his experiments at ST Barts. What's the lard needs? Next isn't knowledge or a place to work. He needs to keep his patent secret. Patents are like a handbook to his ideas, A step by step guide. German scientists read them. They'll know what he knows. He's offered his idea to the leading physicist in the country. Next he turns to the British army, but they're not interested either. Even after his success at ST Bart's Door after door slam shut, He's alone almost out of ideas. Almost He.

Leo Szilard Leah Woolwich Arsenal British army ST Barts ST Bart Germany physicist Hiroshima Army
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"All of a sudden scientists start to understand the world on a level they've never understood it before. It opens a world of possibilities. Why is this such a big deal? Because what binds those protons and neutrons together is an unbelievably powerful force. There's so much energy contained in an Adam just holding it all together. If scientists can figure out how to release that energy, that would be huge. But this is such a difficult task that it is repeatedly dismissed by the world's greatest physicist. The power of the atom is in the nucleus. To release it. You would somehow have to break the strong bonds. Holding it together. As tiny as an atom is a nucleus is even tinier. Imagine a piece sitting in the middle of a race track. This is how small the nucleus is compared to the atom. It seems crazy to think it would be possible to hit that P with enough power to break the strongest forces in the universe. To split it apart. And yet Leo becomes obsessed with the potential power of atomic energy. Meanwhile, 600 miles away, a nightmare is unfolding in Berlin. Hans Leo Szilard lamp or came in right? What kind of fighting that followed their marches, flags, sirens. Prize. There is still at the epicenter of Nazi power. What was until recently the world's greatest center for modern physics. So large begins to wonder. What if the atomic war was waged by the Nazis? What would become of the world. It's most frustrating to Leo Szilard is that no one seems to take the possibilities and dangers of atomic energy seriously. Except for him. It's while reading through the Times, possibly in the bathtub, where he liked to soak for hours that he comes across the comment that will finally set him off. The newspaper article recounts a lecture to the British Association for the Advancement of Science. In London in September. So large read in the Times about a speech by earnest brother for a Nobel laureate and an expert in all things, atomic. No. Here's what it says. Remember, Rutherford appeared with a crack team of young Cambridge Atom smashers. If we knew more about the nucleus we find it was a much simpler thing. Then we suppose if those who heard him suppose that as a result of Adam stashing steam engines and dynamos would soon be abolished, they were dissolution. There's undoubtedly tremendous energy in the atom. But it takes energy and turn to release it. I am always a believer in simplicity, being a simple person myself. Rutherford dismissed the possibility of releasing atomic energy and said anyone who looked for a source of power in the transformation of Adams was talking moonshine. Moonshine. This English word. It's new Disa lard, but it gets under his skin. He knows exactly what it means. Nonsense, Rubbish madness. And he was annoyed in Seoul arts mind the wheels begin turning so lard always wanted to question the accepted norms of theoretical physics at the time. And was thinking ahead of the curve. And so lard being kind of ever being contradictory, maybe, or just kind of lying to explore and play devil's advocate and seeing well, just because you say it so doesn't mean it has to be so. It is Ernest Rutherford's dismissal that leads to so large a eureka moment..

Leo Szilard Ernest Rutherford Adams Adam physicist Seoul Berlin British Association London Advancement of Science
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the things that really influenced him. He was a very good student. He knew many different languages. This is Anna de Barak, a science historian, read a great number of books that even a lot of adults. I wouldn't be able to comprehend or comprehend fully at a very young age. One of these texts was the tragedy of Man, which is a new 18 sixties epic poem in iambic pentameter. That discusses philosophy and ethics and its lard reads this numerous times, and he references it even into adulthood. The situation was hopeless, according to the narrator of the poem. But not to sell art. He saw that if there's any chance that you can succeed, you should succeed and that hope is something that should carry your forward. The phrase A narrow margin of hope is something that kept Leo Salar going his whole life. As it turns out, Leo Szilard is going to need all the hope again. Muster. As early as 1931 Salon becomes worried that Hitler will get into power. Not because the forces of the Nazi revolution are so strong, but because Public resistance was so weak looking back It seems as if everything is following a prewritten script, an inevitable chain reaction. A brutal dictator sparks a global war and kills millions. Thie Allied forces developed the most terrible weapon the Earth has ever seen and drop it on the civilian population. All in the name of avoiding further.

Leo Szilard Leo Salar Anna de Barak Hitler
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Obsessed with the atomic bomb. I have this vivid childhood memory of visiting my grandmother's house near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, above the bed where I slept on a photo of my grandfather standing in front of a mushroom cloud. It was something my family didn't talk about much. Which makes sense, really, since the whole community was bound by a culture of secrecy. You see during World War two, O'Grady was a top secret site for developing the atomic bomb. My grandfather, George Stressor worked. They're enriching uranium. I never met my grandfather, George. He died before I was born. I'd stare at his image on my grandmother's wall with a sense of unease E offer the bomb he helped to create. As they grew older. I started to feel the need to understand my grandfather. The choices he made. And the work he'd done. But that meant facing up to what had been a part of Facing up to what he'd helped to build. If I'm being honest, I didn't want to. I was afraid of what I would find. Still, I felt compelled by some sense of duty and inherited guilt. So I began to research I began to ask questions. Trying to understand my grandfather and history of the bomb itself led me back to the beginning. Back before her Brochman Nagasaki. Back before my grandfather George got involved in Oak Ridge. It led me to Leo Szilard. Although Germany has been drained by the first World War, 19 twenties Berlin pulses with.

George Stressor Oak Ridge Leo Szilard Tennessee Brochman Nagasaki O'Grady Germany Berlin
"leo szilard" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"There were Several led by Leo Szilard, one of the top scientists who was sort of involved very early on who had had serious doubts about the morality of the bomb, and, in fact, tried to petition rose about when he was filling. Live alive. You know, either to not use it or do a demonstration to try to have wired the bloodletting on and there's a fascinating scene. You know, you talk to a lot of authors citizen, but I and I'm sure a lot of the machine Uzi Azem that you sort of know the story. But obviously when you begin, you don't know all the details, And as you begin to research it you find out about about scenes characters, moments events, details that you know that you didn't know about that just makes the story so much richer and that if you had been a Hollywood screenwriter, you wouldn't ever have dared to write. So in October of 45 2 months after the dropping of the bomb, Robert Oppenheimer About earlier who was the scientific director. And I think if you had to say the single person those responsible for for the creation of a bomb, it would be him. He goes to the Oval Office could meet with Truman, and he at this point is riven with regrets. And he says to Truman, I think I have blood on my hands. And Truman says I'm the one who has blood on my hands. Let me worry about it, and he can't Oppenheimer out quickly enough, and then he turns to his staff. And he says, I never want to see that son of a bitch in this office ever again. Interesting, But we have Oppenheimer in 1945 telling NBC apologies for that, in a documentary about what he was thinking. After witnessing that first test in Los Alamos, let's listen to his own words. The world would.

Truman Robert Oppenheimer Leo Szilard Oval Office Uzi Azem Los Alamos Hollywood NBC director
"leo szilard" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on 600 WREC

"This is really and weaken. Do this without bloodshed, But the nefarious reality wass you mentioned the firebombing. Of Japan in World War two There were cities deliberately spared from the fire bombing here. Oshima was one Kyoto was another. And that was simply because Henry Stimson, the secretary of war in the United States, but it was too beautiful to bomb Kukura, which was the intended second target. Was the third and fourth with the backup target of Nagasaki, and they were set in reserve because the actual military goal Welcome Jeff to bomb do to end the war but to test against actual cities, actual human architecture, actual infrastructure. The effect. Of atomic bombs, the two designs that's why two were dropped. One was the Simple, straightforward uranium gun design, considered so full proof and never even was tested before it was used at Hiroshima and the much more complex implosion design, which was tested at the Trinity test and then subsequently used on Nagasaki. So yes, I don't think we had to do it. Except that horrendous pain. Those experiments that the United States wanted to conduct. And what is most interesting is we were talking earlier. About how timeline could be reversed and how back when. Corona virus first was reported here in the United States. We had a comet that was in the sky. It was common Atlas And it showed up right during the Ides of March. And we were discussing how a comet was a harbinger for something that would be bad and we had the disease come and virus common people were dying. Interesting to note that even when I can theorize about going back in time and reliving March and April over again. What's interesting is there's another comet in the sky. It's from here now again, but this is another comic called Neil Wise or the new wisdom. And when we're looking at the new wisdom, we look at the idea that maybe there's a new wisdom, a new idea or maybe all ideas where we're talking about reparations and repercussions from bad deeds. I worry. Because if we are really in a different timeline, perhaps for a time line were revenge will be served on a plate cold and we can see a nuclear device detonated the United States. What are you thoughts on that? Well, that's a very interesting question. You know, we talked about J. Robert Oppenheimer, the one line from Hindu scriptures that most educated non Hindu Kendra site is off these famous one. Now I am become death. Destroy your world. Oppenheimer was a great believer and follower of the concept of karma that eventually your bad deeds and your good deeds catch up with you. And there's a settling of accounts. Hey, was an atheist in the normal religious sense of the term, but he felt that there was this this karmic balance and I think we were doing this recognition. As you say, right now over enormous injustices that have been bestowed by some fortunes of humanity on other portions of humanity. And you know, Truman felt comfortable using the atomic bomb on Japan because he knew Japan Was going to be defeated an under Western control after that, But he also said he honestly believed, and the Soviets, she said, will never Had atomic weapons. They're not brave enough. They don't have the technological wherewithal. They don't have the uranium while he was wrong. Of course he was robbed. And so yeah, you know, We've had 75 years since the first time atomic weapons were ever used. Only country that ever used was the United States, and they used them against pretty much already defeated foe in Japan. If you're looking for a karmic balance, it's quite conceivable that any number of bad actors North Korea's the one that's got me most worried might decide the law been atomic bomb. Using an I C B M against the United States were also sing Indian Pakistan. There tensions happening we have Ah, ah, number of troops of actually ships gathering in the South China Sea. It's almost like we're on a war footing at the moment ready for that showdown, and we have the nuclear accidents going on in Iran. So I'm worried that you know we are right there on the edge. The I guess you'd call it the not two minutes to midnight, but just a few seconds before midnight, where a bomb or some errand explosion or accident could take place in a country far away where we feel the repercussions of this because I don't think anybody Would understand the power that these bombs have or the power that we are harnessing when we're in certain words, sir. Nor the large Hadron Collider. We're in a time where we have so much power in our own hands where if it gets out and the genie gets out of the bottle again, we could easily create our own. Extinction level event wouldn't It wouldn't be a part of the I guess I guess the fate or the karma if you will. You alluded just a moment ago to the famous doomsday clock. The Bulletin of the atomic Scientists has odd title The atomic scientists have shortened from the original The Bulletin of the atomic scientists of Chicago where Leo Szilard worked And it was this principle origin for discussing concerns about the use of nuclear weapons and the concerns being voiced by those who created right now, the official setting of the doomsday clock is 100 seconds. Amid that, that's how close we are to Doomsday. I remember saying cried my nieces about five years ago. You're lucky you never had to live through. Uh, the specter of global thermonuclear war of nuclear annihilation of dying in atomic fireball. All of that was over. With the fall of the Soviet Union. Well, I just naive or else we did shift time lines because you're exactly right. We are at one of the most precarious times since the first development of atomic weapons ever right now, it's a scary, scary reality coming up. We're going to talk about the Writers of the future, something.

United States Japan Bulletin of the atomic Scienti Nagasaki Henry Stimson J. Robert Oppenheimer Kyoto Oshima Soviet Union South China Sea secretary Jeff Neil Wise North Korea Iran Leo Szilard
"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Excuse me had them Had been sent by Klaus Fuchs through this courier and had been received at the Kremlin. Well, since we're talking about the Kremlin, and I want to get back to politics, because a lot of listeners wanna weigh in and ask you questions on that van that vein as well. But look at Ah listener named Robert says, is even Eisenhower believed dropping the bomb was not a military necessity to defeat the Japanese nor even a mass invasion of the homeland required voice, Chris Wallace, think of the view that the bomb was dropped Maura's a Demonstration and warning to the Soviet Union. Don't you know, I know that That's something that has been argued and particularly started to be argued when the Cold War began in earnest in the 19 fifties. I see no evidence that that was Part of improvements thinking no evidence of that at all. In fact, You know? One of the points I would make a lot of your listeners and I wasn't dropped the bomber do nothing. It was dropped the bomb or invade Japan and on and on. Truman had gotten word from a number of his top. Military people, civilian and military that an invasion of Japan was gonna be a bloodbath at the ward. We're talking now. The summer of 45. The war was going to go on until the end of 46 so another year and 1/2 would be a 1,000,000 Japanese casualties, 1/2 a 1,000,000 American casualties. And you know, a lot of people say Well, they're going to surrender. Anyway. The fact is, we dropped The bomb on Hiroshima on August 6th, and the Japanese didn't surrender and we dropped a second bomb on Nagasaki three days later on August 9th in the Japanese military government still didn't surround her, and it was only a day later on August 10th. When Emperor Hirohito decided to take it into his own hands and arranged a radio broadcast of the nation, the first time the vast majority of the Japanese had ever heard his voice. Say enough that we This will be the destruction of Japan if we keep going on, and so we need to surrender. So you know, this idea of Japan was on the brink of surrender. I don't see much evidence for Let me bring a collar aboard here. Event That's you Join us. Welcome. Hi. I don't know that I have a really a question other than just a comment and tie it back Tio Corona virus that we face now My grandfather was one of the lead science technologist in Oakridge and the state. Both my parents are from there. I was born there and he ran the Kaya Tron spending that uranium and I got to ask him and you know, before he died about what that was like, and he said, we took it very seriously. We knew what we were doing, and we knew it was going to wreak havoc. And we didn't. We didn't want to do it. But we knew it was something that needed to be done and that everyone worked together. You know, to accomplish something greater than themselves, and my mother spoke of that as well. You know, she traveled to North Carolina where my great grandmother lived, and people would ask her where you're from, And she would seize up knowing that I'm old enough to say where I'm from. But I can't because the posters, loose lips sink ships. And that we've lost something somehow between that generation and our generation where it's all about opinion, rather than you know, a scientific facts and things that we conduce a work together and things get way too politicized. Rather than focusing on OK, What is our main enemy? What are we trying to defeat and I feel like is, if we just would commute you Everyone would talk in a way of like, Let's just be smart about things because that's the thing I felt like my grandfather. He just always Look at it things from a very smart, let's let's stop and think a minute and think smartly. And so maybe that's what I was raised on that. And so that's how I'm approaching it. But I feel like we've lost that. Sound like you got a good legacy there from your grandfather. Thank you for sharing that with us. Appreciate it comedy, Chris. Yes, I do is that it was her name. Um, area. No. Lonnie Slover. Okay. I just want to tell you I love this phone call on one of the joys of writing. This book is I've gotten a lot of emails and letters from people. You know, it's 75 years ago this August. It'll be exactly 75 years ago that we dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. But we're so it seems like it's kind of distant history were only one or two generations removed from people. I mean, I But the people whose father or grandfather was a scientist who was on the flight crew of of the Enola Gay and you know what such a joy To hear these stories. You're exactly right. Interestingly enough, the scientist. The politicians, really very few of them have second thoughts, at least that they admitted to over the over the years, the military none other flight crew on the Enola Gay at any second thoughts. A number of the scientists did. In fact, some of them had first thoughts. Leo Szilard and some of the others were very questioning about using and I think was because they had made the scientific breakthroughs they had created the technology that enabled An atom bomb to be dropped. A number of them had grave doubts. And I told you earlier that Einstein have initiated this with his letter in 1939 in 1954 just months before he died, he said, the biggest single mistake he made in his life. Was pushing for the creation of the atom bomb. So there were a number of scientists who have, if not first, bought second thoughts and another You know story you couldn't make up in October of 45. So just a couple of months after the dropping of the bomb, Robert Oppenheimer, who was the scientific director of the Manhattan project comes to the White House to meet with Harry Truman. He said. Mr President, I feel I have blood on my hands, and Truman says, Don't worry about it..

Japan Harry Truman scientist Hiroshima Robert Oppenheimer Chris Wallace Klaus Fuchs Emperor Hirohito Soviet Union Leo Szilard Oakridge North Carolina Maura Nagasaki Eisenhower Lonnie Slover Einstein Mr President White House
"leo szilard" Discussed on Liberaleren Podcast

Liberaleren Podcast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on Liberaleren Podcast

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SUNDSVALL George Lloyd Samatha Bent Tuhan Magno Hollywood Hall Glenn Adecco Martin McNair Dublin Mueller Marcus Obama Bush York Floyd Amir Taylor Kim Dale Batten
"leo szilard" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"You head to the pharmacy as soon as the ball dropped drug prices went up for hundreds of medications major drug makers including Fizer have increased prices on more than two hundred drugs nationwide that's according to the health care research firm three axis advisers on new year's day prices went up on drugs from HIV and M. as treatments to arthritis and as my medications according to drug makers nearly all of the price increases will be below ten percent and around half of them are in the range of four to six percent CBS is mark Liberman says the drug companies drug companies say is to cover the cost of research and development or otherwise known as R. and date so new year's resolutions the number one can you guess lose weight and of course it's a mindset the Salado a molten mass is the author of break out of breaking even he's come up with the amen strategy assessment initiate and motivate and motivate is exactly what Julio does a person like myself or another coach was said you know what let's look at the big picture you actually made some serious progress because now you are having to cream junior ice coffee rather than for creams so give you a high five you're actually now doing ten more minutes walk around the block versus three weeks ago when you didn't want to leave the house so is this behavior modification lifestyle changes the way I approach it would lead to the long term results Khalil lost eighty pounds in twenty nineteen and re sculpted his own body he was transformed by his own plan he says we can do it too I want to give a shout out to everyone and anyone who's thinking I I I I can't do it I I'm thinking about doing it do it today is a day to give it a shot you know works at Leo Szilard was the founder of fitness foundry in Malden mass and a Baker in Rhode Island is turning pizza into something so beautiful you're not going to want to eat it but you will and he says that's how it should be we're not just talking about a smiley face the pancake place makes set of chocolate chips and whipped cream this is art real art Eric Palmieri of depot merry's bakery says at first his pizzas were simple some really sort of basic designs that were basically just outlines and there wasn't any depth or perspective or texture shading or anything and I've kind of developed all those techniques of the last couple of years he says it takes them about an hour for something simple like a patriots logo or three hours for something more complex like Bette Midler's face but after that they're meant to be eaten that's the whole the whole point alternately is that it's it's I want to taste as good as it looks Suzanne saws bill WBC Boston's news radio just.

Fizer
"leo szilard" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KGO 810

"In the nineteen twenties and thirties created the conditions that were possible for the Americans with their cash and the fact that they were outside of the reach of the Hitler right bombs and we're not overwhelmed with starvation and all the problems of fighting of the eyes a fortress against the Hitler writes in the nineteen forties how the Americans over talk the British bomb and that has profound consequences following the war Graham June twentieth nineteen forty two Harry Hopkins in attendance the heat is wilting these remote notes from your wonderful book Graham FDR ad does not dictate a memo all we know is what Harry Hopkins tells us I guess he and Churchill media and other meeting about the two alloys what are the two alloys and what is decided that day to our understanding what do you balance which is the code name for the for the British at project that was old the Americans had a had a different code name for that project walked at a Churchill news that the the the the the work between the British and American scientists need people to be regular I sort of speak and he met as you vividly describes that weeds that read Roosevelt and Harry Hopkins and they pulled that use Churchill folds that they had a way of working together would would would give Britain a decent slice of the of the action so to speak but he did not turn out that way we believe that Churchill believe Churchill heard Roosevelt say will collaborate will share in believe Roosevelt told him that is that correct but they did not anything down yeah well it will result was a very very county politician you'll know better they do and he loved to keep things not internet review pretty quiet what's the word that fluid so they could be interpreted in it at a later date you ways will be that the that he would approve all digit Churchill found it's a bit maddening and and constantly was striving to at the P. N. F. T. all down the city didn't do it in those eight in that instance yes this is June of forty two now and it's after the battle of midway so that both men can imagine they are what they are your first strategy will be successful they can hold Japan and they can proceed in your bot and something we've I've I've not been correct about asking for now Graham at early on they were driven by the fear of the Germans building the bomb for that was that was in everyone's mind they still have it in forty two yes most definitely high spoken to American scientists actually as as some of the possible way now sadly but and who actually working on that project and stage they stressed to me repeatedly that just how frightened they worry citizens as far as an ensign taste that they're brilliant colleagues working in Germany would get that bomb first hi this is forty two now and and recall farming remember he was visited at Columbia University by Leo Szilard who tells him I'm frustrated that we can do this let's talk about nuclear fission they've now moved to building their own by hand out of graphite blocks nuclear reactor in Chicago by the university Stagg field stadium it's winter time in a man named Akers goes and visits them whose Akers because he's the head of the of the at British mission out there he was the person who was rat running at two ballo is in effect he speak he was formally and I see our employee Americans were very very concerned that as someone who was at that time it came out of industry that he would be reaping the benefits of all this for a full for rent for the benefit of my sea ice I always looked at him rather askance he walls in Chicago shortly before the great achievement that you with building up to that where and reconfirm may also a former enemy alien this is December forty two go ahead that's right December the second and what they did was they built the first nuclear reactor the first working you correct and it was a set up the first self sustaining nuclear chain reaction which demonstrated quite clearly in addition you know he's under the under the seats with disuse wash cold in eight in Chicago as the you could in fact get a new direction to go that's not the same thing is building a bomb it has to be said but the nuclear chain reaction was well it was all theory until they did this and they did it with guy with control rods graphite rods and you paid a scene that I'm thinking to myself always that how they did it so a family declares the reaction is self sustaining he says but the rods back in not quite knowing what a meltdown would be like I mean they're standing around drinking tea watching what would have we now now is an extremely dangerous experiment Szilard is present I as well as well this is now the Manhattan Project that's what the Americans call it and it's turned over to the military and then name Leslie groves what we need to know about him and how and how he regarded the British contributions well he he bit just to a Pentagon a real **** kicking see at select the brilliant at getting things done and is route that this is one of the things that characterize him he was a mall anglophone he what he very much soul this this project as something that was an all American venture and he was brutally brutally realistic if that's possible I would but he he he wanted he would use pretty scientist but only when he couldn't get American expertise well that was that was comparable to your knowledge Graham did she know about the origin of the theories that family and Szilard are applying and Chicago did he understand that this was from a Birmingham and from Chadwick and from yeah he knew all that and yeah he was willing to write really because it's routinely well briefed and it was he appointed by this time he deployed to appointed rock Oppenheimer who was a first rate theoretical physicist so that they will all manner of compensation is in a new way that stuff came from that Britain that had many of the the ideas not all of them but most of most of mine to get that to say Bob well I didn't have was that was the with the resources and add to their records on the on the that should have the resources but it in fact this was a collaborative effort to fight the breath the Germans and all that so it seems to me kind of well in any event I don't want to do the lawyer work here but in any event what I see is Leslie grow found an excuse to block the British out and that was all I see I wide what did he say about I see I what was his concern when he was concerned that the British the the the the I see I would walk away we technical know how the Americans had had paid full pay for their and use it to set up a civil nuclear we were taking a patent out Graham did anybody ever talk about this in front of you I mean these businesses all these years later if you were patenting fission the British would own the patent America could have leased it but the but that we you know how Pat law works today yeah no that's right it's a particular it was French colleagues French well after our French friends well that would probably the leaders when the of these cop of nuclear experiment when the war broke out and they will constantly striving to patent they they work in a gross had absolutely no time about told Musei Churchill didn't either and so it is really good at groves was with Louis was someone who really what that was was absolutely determined look like the first rate CEO that he walls in terms of the he knew that he had to produce a deliverable nuclear weapons right and that's what he did he did he was not going to be distracted from this is nineteen forty two now from a total of December forty two now the what they've been told is that they have to build an enormous industrial base forty acres is the estimate and that it will cost like five million pounds a week or some incredible number yeah it eventually because billions however they don't have the space in Britain in the debate why should we build in Britain sure we build in Canada sure we build in America at this point check out a Grove says we're going to build it here and we know now it's Los Alamos it's Oakridge and its hand for they build a free sites we need to flag here before we go any longer the plutonium bomb the plutonium bomb is a separate track from the uranium bomb who have who imagines the plutonium bomb in the implosion well that that that eight Chadwick had full independently of the plutonium weapon but at the by far the most important what came from the Americans from the from Lawrence in because eight in in California so I think it's fair to say that the plutonium side of the story was that with that one and that's the Hanford facility will do the plutonium work where it's actually just going to do the the work with you to thirty five so we don't have and Los Alamos is where Grove sets up the camp for all the scientists and now we're going to turn to Churchill remember this is Churchill's bomb what did he may of this fact that the Americans were overtaking the bomb that started out as a collaboration Graham far mellow is the author Churchill's bombers is the name of the book how the United States overtook Britain in the first nuclear arms.

Hitler five million pounds forty acres
"leo szilard" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on KGO 810

"The John Batchelor show politics current affairs we're talking on the John chancellor show on KGO John this is the John Batchelor show Churchill's the United States overtook Britain the first nuclear arms race Graham far Miller was the author I defer to the author's choice over talk another word would be stole but we're going to plow now into the genius for the idea of splitting the atom it however this is Churchill stories well so we have to begin with a very unusual person someone out of a fairy tale except for he's real his name is Lindemann he's born in Germany his father is of German they emigrate to Great Britain in eighteen seventy by the time he comes on the scene for Churchill he is a very well regarded professor Oxford to Christ Church I believe he was recommended that posed by the great Rutherford Graham how do we tell the story of Linda been quickly what is he took Churchill when he first meets him he is at the end right you say very Singlish scientist he earned his stripes as a as an inventor and as a as a as a visit the new Einstein well he knew all the important people he was a professor of physics at Oxford at we charge we setting up a board free to to rival the rubber fits so he goes to see at Churchill they meet at one of the wealthiest houses in Britain and Lindemann issues Churchill initially to get on that brilliantly but they become southern frightens and display lit Lindemans eccentricities and outrageous social climbing and all of the manner of things to actual does take to him because minimum was beaten and nothing if not extremely loyal and that's what he did he but he worshipped at Churchill private privately and he became he's chief scientific adviser displacing wells in Linda than had no time for toll he becomes his adviser with at the Admiralty and then at at the at the premiership but that's later in the decade that's actually in the forties or this is a period of time when Churchill is wondering the earth discarded actually by his own party I think Baldwin was in power Churchill goes to American twenty nine he's drifting he's looking for a purpose yeah what does Churchill may of science why does he want Lindemann around him well several reasons that one we've already mentioned that at the Lindemann actually briefed him on a lot of articles finds articles which church who became the most prominent journalists in nineteen thirties who was actually writing about to cut nuclear energy this is in the thirties before anyone even heard about bombs a nuclear power more heavy buttons but much more important was that Lyndon was at his side when Churchill was was warning about the about the rise of Hitler and the and the tremendous rearmament all of Germany and walks Lindemann date was at what we was with be his scientific adviser and to add a device Churchill on that Britain's indeed Lindemans opinion slightly to the quicker it self it it in a way that would enable them to handle the German airforce list what if they were to attack Britain the steel walls that Hitler could do a slam dunk attacked the one guy and not count London said the space and what at Churchill very much a dawn and supported by Linda than what they wanted to do was was developed and defenses that became the cool celebra felt for Churchill and then the men in the thirties right in the thirties I learned from grab air attacks by bombers were considered as apocalyptic as we regard nuclear energy now again clear weapons now so but before we get to the air defense committee and Churchill's place on it and thirty five there's an immigration story here as well grab my nose says of the sixty seven physicists who arrived in the United Kingdom before the war all of them refugees from their Hitler rights and the discrimination and the pursuit of them only three found work in Great Britain thirty two emigrated mostly to the US why did Britain turn away these geniuses coming from the continent talk at all to that I'm rather embarrassed hold me off of my country that they did get assistance and support from the academic assistant counsel which were at will which run the third was a leading light but Lindemann played a clever a gate and he went eighty shows the grim rolls Royce in nineteen thirty three into Hitler's Germany and so will tell people he knew were at risk under the under the old full I read and I'm the only full business that regime if you if from my cold others of Hitler and he knew that made it possible to Linda that made it possible for many of those scientists to come to work in all that indeed all of our trees so that so Lindemann at source calls to do good so to speak but also due to do well for himself in recruiting some of the best brains and Eagleson tremendous people people out front to Simon and and even the great quantum physicist we trading so that the office that really dot that was Lindemans thank you a university did very very well from those any great scientists who would desperate uncles them to leave Germany one of the scientists who emigrated who did not I did not enjoy welcome was Leo Szilard the Hungarian I hope I say it correctly that's correct and he is turned away he doesn't find a homies is hard Scrabble in fact he heads to New York at some point having picked up where the English aware the British are with nuclear physics does he have the in him the genius of fission does he Telfair me that it may in Colombia yes what's it all did he he was the person he'd raid the H. G. wells novel we were at that we spoke about earlier and he at least by his account was the first person to dream up the body of a nuclear chain reaction where blight if you could have a client at something like a forest fire among nuclei with it will be one reaction on one fully another following another in the whole thing could go critical and former nuclear bomb and she was became very very concerned that that eat that would be possible to build a fission nuclear fission balm and of the ship that Hitler Fontes could do that and give that weapon to hit let's see tell that to for me when he gets to the Colombian over he was talking to the people in Britain as well and very few people listen to a master he said one of the people that didn't listen to him was wrong I was plenty of people that didn't take that still all that that that that seriously but to me he was a handful still out of the office he was a very much a law unto himself but nonetheless he was ahead of the game email and all on the all right he's turned away along with a lot of other geniuses here who wind up in America by default we need to go to the air defense committee because this air defense research committee Churchill joins it according my note and early thirty five a Tizard sits on the committee and so is Lindemann what's his what's his role what's its mission well yeah it is not if you don't was seen as as the at by his colleagues as Vinne greatest person it and he was a good fight is not as good as an Intamin instantly but you're good very good songs rector of the imperial college generators art that's right and he was seen as someone who was absolutely brilliant at taking at that scientists and modern scientific knowledge and applying it in such a way that was useful to the to the military and he was up in that regard is without here it even in that realm and he was one of the people who was leading the development of ray doll and this is the the thing that Lindemann and also if we bought by by that token Churchill will initially quite skeptical the raid all was the way to go and there was one hell of a fight in the whole not committee is absolute that will be we would now take a blood ball at what wave whereby Lindemann and he's all set out and although they got back together again I also would you be very guys but they they basically which screen the wary of each other and and Linda any particular want to tease all off the plane it's important to watch these fights between the scientists because they're happening all around Churchill will who will become the man who leads yeah and the second war the book is Churchill's bomb how the United States over to Britain in the first nuclear arms.

John Batchelor John Churchill United States Britain Graham John chancellor
"leo szilard" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:46 min | 2 years ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John this is the John Batchelor show Churchill's the United States overtook Britain the first nuclear arms race Graham far Miller was the all I deferred to the author's choice over talk another word would be stole but we're going to plow now into the genius for the idea of splitting the atom it however this is Churchill stories well so we have to begin with a very unusual person someone out of a fairy tale except for he's real his name is Lindemann he's born in Germany his father is of German they emigrate to Great Britain in eighteen seventy by the time he comes on the scene for Churchill he is a very well regarded professor at Oxford to Christ Church I believe he was recommended that posed by the great Rutherford Graham how do we tell the story of Linda been quickly what is he took Churchill when he first meets him he is at the end right you say very Singlish scientist he earned his stripes as a as an inventor and as a as a as a busy new Einstein well he knew all the important people he was a professor of physics at Oxford at we charge we setting up a pork free to rival the rubber fits so he goes to see at Churchill they meet at one of the wealthiest houses in Britain and Lindemann issues Churchill initially the get on back brilliantly but they become firm friends and despite Lindemans eccentricities and outrageous social climbing and all of the manner of things to actual does take to him because minimum was beaten and nothing if not extremely loyal and that's what he did he but he will ship at Churchill private privately and he became he's chief scientific adviser displacing well simply doesn't have no time for toll he becomes his adviser with at the Admiralty and then at at the at the premiership but that's later in the decade that's actually in the forties or this is a period of time when Churchill is wandering the earth discarded actually by his own party I think Baldwin was in power Churchill goes to American twenty nine he's drifting he's looking for a purpose yeah what does Churchill may of science why does he want Lindemann around him well several reasons that one we've already mentioned that at the end of an actually briefed him on a lot of articles finds articles which church who became the most prominent journalists in nineteen thirties who was actually writing about nuclear energy this is in the thirties before anyone even heard about bombs a nuclear power more heavy buttons but much more important was that Lyndon was at his side when Churchill was was warning about the about the rise of Hitler and the real and the tremendous rearmament all of Germany and walks Lindemann date was at what we was with me his scientific adviser and to add a device Churchill on that Britain's indeed intimidating and slightly to equip itself it it in a way that would enable them to handle the German airforce Luftwaffe if I were to attack Britain the steel walls that Hitler could do a slam dunk Pataki one go and not count London said the space and what at Churchill very much a dawn and supported by Linda than what they want to do list was developed and defenses that became the cool celebra felt the Churchill and intimate in the thirties right in the thirties I learned from grab air attacks by bombers were considered as apocalyptic as we regard nuclear energy now again clear weapons now so but before we get to the air defense committee and Churchill's place on it thirty five there's an immigration story here as well Graham my nose says of the sixty seven physicist who arrived in the United Kingdom before the war all of them refugees from their Hitler rights and the discrimination and the pursuit of them only three found work in Great Britain thirty two emigrated mostly to the US why did Britain turn away these geniuses coming from the continent talk at all to that I'm rather embarrassed me off of my country they did get assistance and support from the academic assistant counsel which were and what was wrong with it was a leading light but Lindemann played a clever a gate and he went eighty shows the grim rolls Royce in nineteen thirty three into Hitler's Germany and full house people he knew were at risk under the under the old full red and I'm the only full pissed that regime if you if from my cold that is for us of Hitler and he knew that made it possible to Linda made it possible for many of those scientists to come to work in all that indeed all of our trees so that so Lindemann at source calls to do good so to speak but also due to do well for himself in recruiting some of the best brains and Eagleson tremendous people people out front to Simon and even the great quantum physicist we trading so that all that really does that was Lindemans are you a university did very very well from those any great scientists who would desperate to cause them to leave Germany one of the scientists who emigrated who did not did not enjoy welcome was Leo Szilard the Hungarian I hope I said correctly that's correct and he is turned away he doesn't find a whole meal is hard Scrabble in fact he heads to New York at some point having picked up where the English aware the British are with nuclear physics does he have in him the genius of efficient does he Telfair me that estimate in Colombia yes what's it all did he he was the person he grade the HD wells novel we were at that we spoke about earlier and he at least by his account was the first person to dream up this idea of a nuclear chain reaction we apply it you can have a client at something like a forest fire among UPI with it will be one reaction on one fully another following another and in the whole thing could go critical and former nuclear Bowman's he was became very very concerned that that eat that would be possible to build a fission nuclear fission balm and of the ship that Hitler's Fontes could do that and give that weapon to him to tell that to for me when he gets to the Colombian over he was talking to the people in Britain as well and very few people listen to a master reset one of the people that didn't listen to him was rusted out of plenty of people that didn't take cat fill out that that not not seriously but to me he was a handful salon because the office he was a very much a law unto himself but nonetheless he was ahead of the game email now all night all right he's turned away along with a lot of other geniuses here who wind up in America by default we need to go to the air defense committee because this air defense research committee Churchill joins it according my note and early thirty five I Tizard says on the committee and so is Lindemann what's his what's his role what's its mission well yeah it is our job was seen as as the at by his colleagues as Vinne greatest person it and he was a good sign he's not as good as an end of an incident like that have good very good as rector of the imperial college generators art that's right and he was seen as someone who was absolutely brilliant at taking at that scientists and modern scientific knowledge and applying it is such a way that was useful to the to the military and he was up in that regard as without here even in that realm and he was one of the people who was leading the development of raid all and this is that the things that Lindeman and also by by that token your children will initially quite skeptical the raid all was the way to go and there was one hell of a fight is not on that committee it was absolute that what we would now take a blood ball and what with whereby Lindemann and he's all fell out and although they got back together again I also would be be various guys but they they basically which screen the wary of each other and and Linda any particular want to tease all off the plane it's important to watch these fights between the scientists because they're happening all around Churchill will who will become the man who leads in the second war the book is Churchill's bomb how the United States over to Britain.

John Batchelor Churchill United States Britain Graham Miller
"leo szilard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The country and with him being Jewish and outspoken pacifist there was no question of him returning home and he spent the rest of his life in the United States Janet tell us about the kind of thing that he was working on in his later years because it was in his fifties and he took a job at prince Disney which is one of the most prestigious of American universities Einstein became more interested in quantum mechanics but as a kind of naysayer as a contrarian and he would invent these again remarkable thought experiments trying to show how ridiculous quantum mechanics was not one thing I want to clarify is he he absolutely was comfortable with the atomic behavior was absolutely comfortable that light came in little individual bundles as opposed to just a wave so it's not to be completely discarded the whole quantum mechanics he just felt we were in the area and he was going to keep pushing on it as he always did he was incredibly tenacious and perseverance until he saw through what was obviously an incomplete theory and it does remain the case today that is remarkable as quantum mechanics is it's the most successful paradigm in terms of predictive accuracy we've ever employed in physics and yet it is absolutely also the fact that nobody actually understands it one of the fascinating things says John I was saying is that you find on stern and his adversaries agreeing on the observations agreeing on the experiments agreeing on on what they actually have in front of their eyes but they disagree about the interpretation and this happened in the case of relativity as it did in quantum mechanics unless the what do you say to that it seemed to him that quantum mechanics which he had helped found had drifted into this place where these basic principles about the nature of the universe had come into question and it seemed unacceptable to him right so it seems that even though the theory was fantastically successful in terms of measurements and observations it was no longer it wasn't complete yet there must be something else out there that would bring us back to the sensible kind of universe that he wants and he spends his last years trying to create this unified theory that were hit that he hoped would resolve this problem and in the end she fails well Matthew you referred earlier to Einstein's that pass of his views and it was one of the things about him out from other scientists in the first World War so it's quite surprising them to the that he was involved in a plan to build an atomic bomb tell me how that how that came about and how that how he square that with these views because he wasn't in our of of Gandhi for example it seems possible to Einstein and others that the Germans might be able to build a bomb of extraordinary magnitude so he actually works with another refugee from the the fascists nine it can and Leo Szilard is a large actually the one who holds the patent on the atomic bomb of all things and as a lawyer wants to warn the Americans about this possibility but no one knows who he is but he goes to Einstein and Einstein says I will do this and he writes this letter to president Franklin Roosevelt warning about the possibility of an atomic bomb now inside and this gives rise what eventually becomes Manhattan Project integration nuclear weapons I sign is not allowed to work on the Manhattan Project because his politics are to the left that is he's he's comes under great suspicion of possibly being a communist because he's a pacifist but none the less he sort of initiates this and his work equals MC squared becomes fused with the idea of the bombs so there's this famous cover of time magazine shortly after Hiroshima that has the mushroom cloud with equals MC squared floating in the cloud and if you can imagine the the horror in Einstein's sold if this moment of reflection of realizing that yes he's helped defeat the fascists which she felt so strongly about but at the same time is on leave helped unleash this new thing on the world so he can dedicate two years of his life after the war to try to control nuclear weapons to work for world government to try to bring a new kind of lasting peace the train on do this act that could not be undone okay so that there was a man of principle but none the less a complex man that's the picture we've been building up I have sold to somebody who's been put on a pedestal because because of what he achieved but we want to put him on that pedestal woman was an outcry in twenty eighteen when his private diaries revealed racist remarks about Chinese he treated his first wife in particular eponymously said to him in a what do you think I think that Einstein definitely deserves the label of a genius but he deserves it for two reasons not just one it's not only for his scientific work but it's also for him being responsible for creating the very notion of scientific genius so he deserves double pres and Jenna I think it's important to realize when we talk about discoveries about for instance the general theory of relativity it's not just a single discovery wouldn't tire world opens up the cosmos literally opens up with that and thousands of scientists begin to explore that terrain so he keeps going in that sense we're still working on it we're still figuring it out and that's why it was so huge it wasn't a single discovery in the way that the photoelectric effect was and I think that can't be underestimated and Matthew to you funny when we said several times there's always two to three different people here which is a in terms of his work his achievement his his legacy how would you rate him well as Jimenez said he is our idea of what genius means right so even beyond the sort of tools that John is talking about he changes the way we think about science right it's it's impossible to think about separating him from from the very notion of science and it's a double edged sword though I think his his work is so extraordinary in give us so many tools for thinking about the universe but the same time the image of genius makes us think that science can only be done by a genius since right so you get the kid in middle schools as well I'll never be an Einstein so why should I study science and that I think is a profoundly dangerous thing because science isn't done by a lone geniuses it's done by groups of people all working together on large projects that has room for lots of different kinds of people and different kinds of thinking so in that sense I'd say let's not think about Einstein so much let's think about the friends whose consulted wall he was working on all these different projects because science is a collective enterprise that everyone can participate we could of course say so much more about Albert Einstein but we run out of time thank you all so much for discussing his life and work with me him in a canal is Jenna Levin and Matthew Stanley I Russian Dessa and thank you for listening BBC world service and now sporting witness with me Simon wants to mark this year's edition of the ultra tool do mon blog the biggest ultramarathon event in the world I've been speaking to Britain's Lizzy Hawker she's won the grueling race more times than anybody else it's a locus two thousand and five hundreds of runners gather in the main square in the French mountain resort to Chamonix they're about to take on one of the greatest challenges in sport so I was standing there in the church school S. surrounded by this mass of people and the thought that run through my mind was the quote from Alice in Wonderland just after the beginning go on and then stopped when you come to the end and so that was kind of my mantra Lizzy Hawker would be trying for the first time to race a hundred and fifty five kilometers all the way around the bone belong myself and back to Chamonix the route climbs and fulls eight thousand five hundred meters the equivalent of ascending and descending Everest from sea level I turned up with absolutely no idea if it was something that I could even do I just read an article about the race I turned up with my holy thermals a rucksack it was far too big for me at ordered it from a friend normal heavy will treat jackets and no concept of really what was coming ahead closely followed in Europe the ultra cool do mom belong cool U. T. M. B. is the pinnacle of achievement for mountain run as the alpine called swine free from Switzerland and Italy the athletes use specialized light weight kids and torches to find their way at night most will makes running with walking and grab some occasional sleep but aid stations the challenge starts as dusk fools the number of people on the street just to see the run as well as the stuff to the evening was was incredible it was a long time before.

Janet United States eight thousand five hundred me fifty five kilometers two years
"leo szilard" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"leo szilard" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"At Gillespie field in el Cajon but tipped over on its side no injuries though currently cloudy in sixty eight at Lindbergh field and the Padres host the Dodgers at six ten AM seven sixty talking breaking news now it's Armstrong and Gary the lawyer as he was known as a regular collar on the Armstrong and get a show many many years ago we don't get to the lawyer Tim center for in studio as much as we used to but since you are in the studio today Tim Sandifer yellow what you done with the place you are still beard I am you know it's been eight years that I've been that I've had a beard you ask you know and you're not carrying a trash can size no soda yeah I used to I used to and and time caught up with me I'm off carbonated beverages I'm afraid yeah and then take it happens every a gasket or some the beard and the soda before we get into the substance of our conversation with him about his fabulous new to home and other a constitutional issues in America two things number one and I think this will be a good for you to hear you know those warnings like at a McDonald's pie the hot apple pie this is con to become to caution content in many hot filling maybe on and we've always asked for those four will there for me for the second day in a row I've gotten a brand new hot Cup of coffee gotten into a brief conversation with somebody then swing down an enormous mouthful and burnt my tongue in my mouth and and cried out in pain fury and humiliation so those warnings are for me gotcha I sympathize man I drew blood eating shrimp twice in a row a few weeks ago it was how do you how do you manage to I cut my hand with shrimp tails at two separate meals on two successive days while still there was blood running down my hand how does somebody do that I don't know I've never thought of phones as a weapon why didn't you soon a second thing do you agree with jacket my interpretation of the eighth amendment its prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment if something is merely cruel or merely unusual like being be rated by clowns that would be unusual it's permitted under the eighth MS correct okay all right just a girl and unusual that's okay right also listen I have intentionally ends taken some self control not looked up the name Jacob Bronowski Tim's latest Balkan Tim is the author of a number of absolutely fabulous books about constitutional rights and property rights and and a fairly recently Frederick Douglass self made man which is just horrific about that great great American so when I saw your new book is the ascent of Jacob Bronowski I thought I've never heard of this human in my life I intentionally did not look it up sounds like a Coen brothers character who who is this human and why did you take your valuable time or in a pie I was looking for such a absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with law and so I'm speaking today later today at noon I'm speaking to the federal society about my new book and I'm the assignment is to find someone to related to law which is going to be very challenging but not see need to subject you considered Moses lack but you decided that well his name is almost as exotic taken off he was a scientist and philosopher who lived from nineteen oh eight to nineteen seventy four and those few people who remember him still today will remember him for his classic nineteen seventy three television mini series the ascent of man with a beard yeah on PBS and it's this lavish thirteen hour documentary on the history of science and I I watched it when I was in college I got interested in in pronounced himself and it turned out that he was a fascinating person who knew everybody or was involved with everything interesting that happened in the twentieth century the head of the British mission sent to assess the effects of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki he was best friends with Leo Szilard who invented the atomic bomb but also with Samuel Beckett who was he he the two of them wrote a book together he was friends with people like TS Eliot and and Dylan Thomas he co founded the Salk institute in la Hoya with Jonas Salk he was a fascinating guy he wrote he wrote a radio play that won the equivalent of an Emmy in nineteen fifty he wrote an opera he proved that Australopithecus Afrikaners is a human relative by using a sophisticated mathematical algorithm because that was his that was his specialty was mathematics and he revolutionized the understanding of the eighteenth century poet William Blake so he was one of these these renaissance men who just was a fascinating figure and I thought nobody's ever written a biography of them so I should wow it's interesting how some people I won't regularly when I'm reading history and do it all the time you come across a story or a person you think how come I've never heard of it some things just get lost to history amazing people amazing stories that just for whatever reason don't make the quite the under discussed in over discussed how much do we know about Marilyn Monroe contemporary seriously yeah compare you know somebody Mickey mantle for them amber Noske was a celebrity in his day he was that he was a big enough name in Great Britain for twenty or thirty years that doubt taxi drivers would hail him on the street he's even mentioned in a Monty Python skit the exploding penguin when one character says to another you know why they're paying when on the telly and the other says who my blood doctor bloody Bronski because they don't know wow wow the problem was he died in August of seventy four only months before his show aired in the United States I'm so right when he was on the cusp of becoming a a with a really famous figure in the United States where he had lived for a decade by that time he was gone and so he vanished from the scene and everybody forgot about him and it yeah I think that's a real shame so I thought I'd I'd decided I decided to try and more interest to what he did in it and analyze his philosophical writing and his literary work and stuff the problem was he was involved in so many things I knew so many things that it took that it took a long time for me to learn enough about those things to be able to talk intelligently about it so I've been working on this book for twenty years wow since I was a senior in college and it is finally done and finally published and it's called the ascent of Jacob Bronowski and I hope you all by speaking to getting published was it difficult to go to somebody and say I want to write about this person they said who can't hear about a founding father or something fortunately in Lincoln book I found the publishers who who did remember who burn off he was and that that that worked out but yeah if there was some difficulty in that a lot of the people that he knew are gone now I did have the good fortune of interviewing some of them on the grill the coolest when was I got to have lunch with Francis Crick who won the Nobel in the nineteen fifties for discovering the structure of DNA yeah the only Nobel Prize winner ever to buy me lunch and that was that was by far the coolest part of of the research and did you find the old chap to be stimulating it wonderfully yeah it was this was this was while the OJ Simpson trial was going on and I asked him what he thought about lowering DNA evidence in trials said one he said well I guess you have to know how the American legal system works any have so much scorn in his voice he said the word legal and I didn't mention that I was in law school at the time yeah but he was he was a wonderful wonderful gentleman and he he I remember very distinctly on the way back from the restaurant him explaining to me the then newly discovered eyeless gene which is the John gene that if you knock it out the a fruit fly or whatever will be born without eyes and this is one of the oldest genes in the genome is called hawks Jean it's been around since the dawn of evolutionary time and it's the same gene that we have in our own bodies to control the development of eyes in the embryo so well years later I was reading a book about genetics and I ran across this discussion the I'll sing I thought wait a minute Francis Crick himself explain that to me that that's a really amazing experience of my life yeah that that was a little creek and burn off you were good friends in fact burn on before his death creek was using the same office the prostate use down at the Salk institute in San Diego this is flooded into my head I'm like a fruit fly in terms really to pay attention this just flitted away what do you when you get up in the morning would you would you check news wise like for what's going on the world liquid first thing Twitter that's it and then like I what what how do you structure your feed how many people do you follow I follow quite a lot of people one remember summer and maybe a thousand something like that what what tends to be at the the top of your mercy I fell thirteen hundred like any news publications are people are I I is yeah people primarily in fact it's just I I just this morning I was thinking of writing a tweet about what who I wouldn't I commend for the Nobel prepared for the oculus surprise if I were in charge of the needs of the Pulitzer Prize and the three names are are John Ziegler on Elizabeth Noah brown it reason and Robbie so Ave at retail yeah a lot of the three of them are just a jar the real journalists that are still working today and Kristen Walters since I'm in Sacramento I need to mention the only remaining journalist in the state of California and his legendary he's amazing is the one of the great clear eyed writers I just wish the cornea I just wish his articles will be three or four times as long as they are did you read the the the the the transcript of what the editor there at the New York Times said last week to this crowd yes I guess it's just incredible worried that it might be the most important newspaper in the world or at least formally was and in the direction they're willing to goal it's it's troubling him K. expecting a newspaper that recently ran articles such as women in the Soviet Union had better sex under communism and the Soviet space program it was better for women's equality expecting a newspaper or even calling it a newspaper when it runs articles like that I think is excessive I think The New York Times is clearly gone off the deep end into not just left as partisanship which you know is kind of expected in the media but in the most extreme form of it and the same is true of CNN I mean I love seat I love CNN but it's like day after day it's just it's become a partisan enterprise I act of absurdity it is just you can't even take it and it's as bad for the left as it is for their absolutely absolutely over time of course it is going to be I just it's it's surprising to me that people of that caliber I assume you have to have a you know some pretty good credentials to end up being in the newsroom at The New York Times I would hope but I.

Gillespie field el Cajon Lindbergh field Dodgers Armstrong Gary Padres thirteen hour thirty years twenty years eight years
"leo szilard" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

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"leo szilard" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"That F. U. E. L. I'm John that Sir this is the John basso show it's June nineteen forty king with Graham far mellow who tells the detailed melodramatic on known to mind here's a story of how great Britain's physicists and their genius in the nineteen twenties and thirties created the conditions that were possible for the Americans with their cash and the fact that they were outside of the reach of the Hitler right bombs and we're not overwhelmed with starvation and all the problems of fighting the eyes a fortress against the Hitler writes in the nineteen forties how the Americans over talk the British bomb and that has profound consequences following the war Graham June twentieth nineteen forty two Harry Hopkins in attendance the heat is wilting these remote notes from your wonderful book Graham FDR and does not dictate a memo all we know is what Harry Hopkins tells us I guess he and Churchill media and other meeting about the too shallow as one of the two alloys and what is decided that day to our understanding what Cuba was which is the code name for the for the British that project that was old the Americans had a had a different code name for that project war date Churchill news the the the the the the work between the British and American scientists need people to be regular I said a steak and if he met as you vividly describes that we that repair Roosevelt and Harry Hopkins and they pulled that week's Churchill full to that they had a way of working together would would would give Britain a decent slice of the of the action so to speak but he did not turn out that way we believe that Churchill believe Churchill heard Roosevelt say will collaborate will share in believe Roosevelt told him that is that correct but they did not anything down yeah well it will that result was a very very county politician you'll my bet they do and he loved to keep things not internet review really quite what's the word fluid so they could be interpreted as a at a later date you ways will be that the that he would approve all digit Churchill found it's a bit maddening and and constantly was striving to at the P. N. F. T. all down the city didn't do it in those eight at eight in that instance yes this is June of forty two now and it's after the battle of midway so that both men can imagine they are what they are your first strategy will be successful they can hold Japan are and they can proceed in your bot and something we've I've I've not been correct about asking for now grab at early on they were driven by the fear of the Germans building the bomb for that was and it was in everyone's mind they still have it in forty two yes most definitely high spoken to American scientists actually as as some of the pasta way now sadly but and who actually working on that project and they each they stressed to me repeatedly that just how frightened they worry citizens is as far as in and signed his that they've brilliant colleagues working in Germany would get that bomb first hi this is forty two now and Enrico Fermi remember he was visited at Columbia University by Leo Szilard who tells him I'm frustrated that we can do this let's talk about nuclear fission they've now moved to building their own by hand out of graphite blocks nuclear reactor in Chicago by the university Stagg field stadium it's winter time in a man named Akers goes and visits them whose Akers right because he's the head of the of the British mission out there he was the person who was rat running at two Barlow is in effect he's with he was formally and I see I employee Americans were very very concerned that as someone who was at that time it came out of industry that he would be reaping the benefits of all this for a and so for for the benefit of my see I say we looked at him rather askance he was in Chicago shortly before the great achievement that you with building up to that where and reconfirm me also a former enemy alien this is December forty two go ahead that's right December the second and what they did was they built the first nuclear reactor the first working you correct and it was a set up the first self sustaining nuclear chain reaction hi we demonstrated quite clearly in addition the United under the under the seats with disuse wash cold in eight in Chicago as the you could in fact get a new direction to go that's not the same thing is building a ball may have to be said but the nuclear chain reaction was well it was all searing until they did this and they did it with guy with control rods graphite rods and you paid a scene that I'm thinking to myself always that how they did it so a family declares the reaction is self sustaining he says but the rods back in not quite knowing what a meltdown would be like I mean they're standing around drinking tea watching what would have we now now is an extremely dangerous experiment Szilard is present I as well as well this is now the Manhattan Project that's what the Americans call it and it's turned over to the military and then in Leslie groves what we need to know about him and how and how he regarded the British contributions well he he it just took the Pentagon a real **** kicking see absolutely brilliant I getting thing don and is route that this is one of the things that characterize him he was a mall anglophone he what he very much for this this project as something that was an all American venture and he was brutally brutally realistic if that's possible I would but he he he wanted he would use forty five days but only when he couldn't get American expertise well that was that was comparable to your knowledge Graham did he know about the origin of the theories that family and Szilard are applying and Chicago did he understand that this was from a Birmingham and from Chadwick and from yeah he knew all that and yeah he was willing really because it's really really well briefed adequacy appointed by this time he deployed to appointed rock Oppenheimer who was a first rate theoretical physicist so that they will all manner of compensation is in a new way that stuff came from that Britain that had many of the the ideas not all of them but most of most of mine to get that to say Bob well I didn't have was that was the with the resources and I'd buy recalls on the on the that should have the resources but it in fact this was a collaborative effort to fight the breath the Germans and all that so it seems to me kind of well in any event I don't want to do the lawyer work here but in any event what I see is Leslie grow found an excuse to block the British out and that was all I see are wide what did he say about I see I what was his concern when he was concerned that the British the the the I see I would walk away we technical know how the Americans had had paid full pay for their and use it to settle civil you can see we're taking a patent out Graham did anybody ever talk about this in front of you I mean these businesses all these years later if you were patenting fission the British would own the patent America could have leased it but the but that we you know how law works today that's right it's a particular it was French colleagues French Africa French friends well that would probably the leaders when the of these kind of nuclear experiment when the war broke out and they will constantly striving to patent they they work in a gross had absolutely no time for that I told Musei Churchill didn't either and so it really grows with little it was was someone who really what that was was absolutely determined light the first rate CEO that he Wallace in terms of the he knew that he had to produce a deliverable nuclear weapons right and that's what he did he did he was not going to be distracted from this is nineteen forty two now from a total of December forty two now the what they've been told is that they have to build an enormous industrial base forty acres is the estimate and that it will cost like five million pounds a week or some incredible number yeah eventually because billions however they don't have the space in Britain in the debate why should we build in Britain sure we build in Canada sure we build in America at this point check out a Grove says we're going to build it here and we know now it's Los Alamos it's Oakridge and its hand for they built three sites we need to flag here before we go any longer the plutonium bomb the plutonium bomb is a separate track from the uranium bomb who have who imagines the plutonium bomb in the implosion well that at that age Chadwick had full independently of the plutonium weapon but that doesn't by fall of the most important what came from the Americans from from Lawrence and because in in in California so I think it's fair to say that the plutonium side of the story was that with that one and that's the Hanford facility will do the plutonium work where it's actually just going to do the the work with you to thirty five so we don't have and Los Alamos is where growth stacks up the camp for all the scientists and now we're going to turn to Churchill remember this is Churchill's bomb what did he may of this fact that the Americans were overtaking the bomb that started out as collaboration Graham far mellow is the author Churchill's bombers is the name of the book how the United States overtook Britain in the first nuclear arms race is now nineteen forty three when we come back on John bachelor this is the John about social one of five point.

Graham Britain F. U. E. L. John basso five million pounds forty five days forty acres