24 Burst results for "Lenore"

Residential building giant posts surprising 3rd-quarter profits

MarketFoolery

02:34 min | 6 months ago

Residential building giant posts surprising 3rd-quarter profits

"Going to start today with homebuilding Lenore corpse third quarter profits came in solidly higher than Wall Street was expecting I know shares are down a little bit but. I don't know Jason I mean Lavar gross margins are improving and the low interest rate environment certainly helps. Yeah it's absolutely helping and I mean we we've certainly seen signs that the housing market is not not only stable but really flourishing, which is kind of interesting to try to square in this in this. Time but but hey, that's that's housing right? It's it's one of those things that everybody needs. These results I was really impressed earnings were up thirty three percent on relatively flat revenue I. Mean Anytime you have a company that can do that I mean you got at least take note and try to figure out what they're doing to see if they can't. Keep on doing it. If you look at the numbers that deliveries of thirteen thousand, eight, hundred, forty tunes that was up just two percent they new orders. Of a little bit better than fifteen, thousand, five, hundred homes that was up sixteen percent. Dollar value of six point, three, billion dollars was up twenty percent and also a strong backlog backlog dollar value of close to eight billion dollars up four percent, and so all in all, what we're seeing what management noted is that the fundamentals in the housing market are very strong in that supported, of course, by record low interest rates. As, well, as a relatively undersupply, relatively continued undersupply of new and existing homes. You know anecdotally I will say like we're in the middle of refinancing our home here and you know what comes with refinancing a home as you get the appraisal to make sure that the value the home is, is there so that the bank and can? Crunch the numbers correctly in in certainly if it seems like valuations in our area are continuing to go up and I would imagine. They're seeing seeing that in a lot of places and then it'll be really interesting to see here as. The pandemic continues as companies start to reassess how they. are handling their workforce I. Mean If more folks start fleeing big cities for suburbia that absolutely has the potential to continue pushing up the demand for for these homes, which ultimately pushes up the prices put pushes up the. Performance for companies like Lenore, in being the largest home builder out there by revenue I mean certainly this another quarter of excellent.

Lenore Jason
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"She <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> thinks that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> works in <Speech_Male> k.? <Speech_Male> Even. With a <Silence> snake in your bottom. <Speech_Male> We'll have to <Speech_Male> test it out <Speech_Male> to test. <Silence> Amsterdam. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> University of Amsterdam. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Arizona, <Speech_Male> state has a reputation <Speech_Male> of being a party <Speech_Male> school but when you imagine <Speech_Male> the Amsterdam <Speech_Male> University being <Speech_Male> the ultimate party <Speech_Female> schools. Yeah. <Speech_Female> But they're just used <Speech_Female> to it. <SpeakerChange> They're <Speech_Male> they're not going crazy <Speech_Male> early are not <Speech_Male> it's only the American <Speech_Male> dingus. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> are like <Speech_Male> falling about the streets <Speech_Male> and stuff. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> was one of them at one point <Speech_Male> two. Did <Speech_Male> you get Shitty <Speech_Male> when you were there? Did You <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Did. <Speech_Male> You marijuana and <Speech_Female> stuff now just <Speech_Male> drinking drink <Speech_Male> you put. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Female> here you know <Speech_Female> sticking <SpeakerChange> Tamara <Speech_Male> Sobriety worth it. <Speech_Male> Also it is <Speech_Male> and I quit dipping <Speech_Male> tomorrow <Speech_Male> you can do <Speech_Male> it. I'M GONNA <Speech_Male> do. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Not. <Speech_Female> About it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> there's a free range <Speech_Female> parenting law in Utah, <Speech_Female> Lenore talked about <Speech_Female> and that was enacted <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> May <Speech_Male> two thousand eighteen. <Speech_Music_Male> Thing <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Tien. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Born. <Speech_Female> It <Speech_Female> really wasn't a Tien <Speech_Female> and just wanted <Speech_Female> it to be. <Speech_Female> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm. GonNa. <SpeakerChange> To get better at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> times <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you do a great job. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And that's all for <Speech_Male> Lenore <SpeakerChange> oh it is. <Speech_Male> Oh. <Speech_Male> I took a <Speech_Male> screen shot of it, <Speech_Male> and then I meant to <Speech_Male> send it to you but now <Speech_Male> just read it out loud that <Speech_Male> with the personal <SpeakerChange> get credit <Speech_Male> for because it was a very <Speech_Male> funny joke. <Speech_Male> Okay, <Speech_Male> you ready. is about <Speech_Male> you. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I'm <Speech_Male> scared Gary <Speech_Male> Howard. <Speech_Male> On instagram <Speech_Male> fantastic <Speech_Male> episode <Speech_Male> Jason Bateman <Speech_Male> is alleged congrats <Speech_Male> on sixteen years <Speech_Male> bub-bubba <Speech_Male> when Monica's <Speech_Male> P baby gets <Speech_Male> in trouble does she <Speech_Male> say <SpeakerChange> urine <Speech_Music_Male> trouble? Urine <Speech_Male> trouble. <Speech_Male> The Rate. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> a really good Gary <Speech_Male> Gary <Speech_Male> really good job. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> you. There's a <Speech_Male> lot of people out there. <Speech_Male> That could brighten <Speech_Male> film and television. <Speech_Male> Agreed <Speech_Male> that's the <Speech_Female> upside of <SpeakerChange> that. Internet <Speech_Female> there are in <Speech_Female> trouble is definitely. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> For sure <Speech_Male> as really. Good. Okay. <Speech_Male> Great while I. Love <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> Happy <Speech_Male> Birthday. Happy <Speech_Male> Sobriety Birthday <Speech_Male> to you. Are <Speech_Male> you gonNa try to not <Speech_Male> drink tomorrow on my <Speech_Music_Male> birthday supposed <Speech_Male> to win off <Speech_Male> Oh right? You're gonNA <Speech_Male> slowly do it <Speech_Male> maybe just like five or six. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Okay Great. <Speech_Male> I'll do half okay. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> To. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Love you. <Music>

Gary Lenore Amsterdam marijuana Arizona Jason Bateman Amsterdam. University of Amsterdam. Utah Monica Howard.
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:44 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So you could arrest him and say he left his child in Pob. An unsafe thing. There's alcohol strangers they were in the bathroom. God. Knows what or you could say these things happen. So I really want us to have a system that might get a call. There was a kid in a pop. It's like well, what happened and you find out the story and you go that's not a story that's not neglect their kids sometimes get out at night a three year old who you don't realize they suddenly have learned. How to turn the DOORKNOB and they go, they're wandering. That's not neglect that's like things happen be a good Samaritan and bring the kid back. Don't call nine one one and say put my neighbor in jail that doesn't make any sense virtually a year ago right now we were a similar situation where we have these two families we pod with and we always travel together and a two year old just left one of the houses and walk down this very, very long driveway in just was in our house like trying to wake people up and stuff it was on his own for I don't know two hours ago Nobel. And then the rest of the day were just like Oh, my God he was. Like? y'know neglect happening just like some shit that happens. Right I feel like the public is on such high alert with this same fear that we have that Oh anytime kid you know by themselves, they could be kidnapped or whatever, and so judgmental that it turns into a nine one, one four also people are told if you see something say something nobody's ever told what something is you know if you see a two year old yes. I would try to figure out whose kid it was but if I didn't no, I would call the cops but I would not want the cops to think, Oh wow I can't wait to arrest that mom it's always the mom. Think. Let's find who this kid belongs to. Let's help her install a lot. Even Tony Blair story. So it's so rife with all the different status issues. So yet because it's Tony Blair, it's kind of a charming funny story that out now visit low-income couple they would be delinquent parents who are addicts and pieces of shit imagine if it's a single mom. Yeah. Well, Lenore what a party. And I think everyone should petition their school districts to implement the Latte grow policies I. think that would be a great idea. It's not just for schools you can go to let grow dot Org.

Tony Blair Pob Lenore
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:44 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"He seemed smart or maybe he seems dumb is just there in the corner with a deck of cards, he's not even playing cards he's not multiplying the numbers of the cars he's just trying to build something, and then you think like while what was he doing? He was learning a little bit of physics patients. Frustration, tolerance, you know they always fall right so kids can like meander too weird entrusts things that seem pointless things that might seem a little dangerous and not terribly dangerous, but a little risky climbing the tree and they will keep pushing themselves because that's what interest kids, right it's no fun to keep doing the same thing that's why we all hate playing go fish it's boring. We know how to do it already. So I won't worry that a kid who likes flipping is going to level out because they don't have a teacher but if they wanted teacher and they wanna go to the next step and you could afford a teacher go ahead. I think that's my thing is just letting them drive that I think the better move would have been to let my daughter play soccer as long as she wanted, and if she said I, want to join a team because my girlfriend's on one. Then now my only push back on all this is, and I actually don't think it's what you're saying but I think for someone that might interpret it this way I want to call it out, which is I. Hate all parenting advice because to me what I hate about it is I have two daughters holy. Shit are they different? The first one learns to ride a motorcycle at three years old the second. One. I was nervous. If she just crossed the living room, you know she had his big old had and not as coordinated she had stitches before she was to the other one. I. Still have yet to see fall of anything and she's seven. So they're just dramatically different. Clearly, I need to have two different game plans for these two kids but I don't think years ignores that but just address I don't ignore that but I actually think that you have the same game plan, which is see what the kid is like right roll with that. So that doesn't strike me as two different game plans. It's just like okay a little more supervision or you know. Whatever you're GONNA do you don't have to do the same thing with both of them and I think that actually recognizing how different your kids are is a way of. A little bit as a parent to because you can see that it's not your parenting that made her coordinator uncoordinated right or enough soccer or hate soccer or reading or not. I mean it's just they come with a lot of parts installed already. Yeah. Okay. So now let grow is the foundation that you have with a few other folks and there's a different components of it. Right so I I don't know if you'd call it a curriculum, but you have advice for schools who want to get involved with let- grow. Yeah right we have a couple of school initiatives yeah, and they're free. One is electro product is the teachers send the kids home with the homework assignment do something on your own, and it really is to make sure that parents finally let their kid use a knife or walk to town or make dinner or something like that. Because for ten years before I started like row, I had started free range kids an electrode around the country talking about why have we gotten?.

soccer coordinator
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"And likes tumbling and she likes doing cartwheels and she's doing them because it's fun and she's practicing because she likes getting better and that's intrinsic. And extrinsic is out. It's Thursday four get in the car we gotta go get to Olympics or whatever gymnastics, and then somebody saying you know we have to start out with fifteen jumping jacks and it becomes a class. It becomes something. So external and wants to get Peter Gray site to study where they asked kindergartners who were given a day of there was circle. Time when everybody shared something and there was reading when the teacher read Aloud Book and there was finger painting when everybody got to finger paint and there was recess and they asked the kids at the end of the day what was working what was play and play was recess and everything else was work because an adult said, now we'RE GOING TO BE IN A. Circle at adult chose the book and adult decided when it started and when finished, and now you have to finger paint with light finger paint or not. So what you're taking his play and you're turning it into nobody would call it work but there's an adult they're you're sorta getting grades you managed you know you're expected to attend. They don't have agency anymore, agency. On the playground, right right. So to me, you know some of childhood can remain childhood without it being taught to them and one of things. That's interesting me lately, and I'm going to ask both of you this question and I don't have a total theory yet but I feel like if you have enough free time in childhood, you discover something that you like to do that. You might still be doing as an adult if you're lucky if you get to pursue it, is there something you? Did as a kid that you still sorta see yourself doing some activity that turned you on Oh a Monaco first acting I started when I was in ninth grade I, guess wasn't wouldn't be kid necessarily no, no vector counts right like thirteen fourteen. So that's still happening almost everything I liked yeah in elementary still do like I raced BMX bikes, announced motorcycles, and a all my hobbies are virtually whatever adding horsepower to fifth grade thing was literally yeah they can I play devil's advocate on this. your role I disagree I really disagree with this because I think it's really you know we had just had Angela Duckworth on Grit I really agree with her on you should be having challenges that are just above your level so that you will attain those with hardware and then you will.

Grit A. Circle Angela Duckworth Peter Gray
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I. Totally love that framing. So let grow we have a slogan we have a bunch of slogans. One of them is when adults step back, kids step up but really our tagline or whatever is independence is critical part of childhood. We've thrown it out the window because it seems so much less important than being with them all the time either to say the three million words war to encourage them or. To make sure that they're safe and independence is this eaten Miss, building block of who you become and to ignore it because we're more afraid of the equivalent of terrorists, which is the kidnapper or a bully or something untoward happening to your kid it's like not feeding them. It's like not giving them air was always a part of childhood like when you were talking about the hunter gatherers, the two year olds shimmying the tree trying to follow the three year olds. There was always an expectation that kids could do somethings on their own they were going to get into scrapes. They were going to have some disappointments and betrayals frustrations, and that was to the good not something horrible happening to them not a real trauma but the give and take of learning to get along in the world I was Gonna read you one seventh grade teacher on Long Island did grow project kids are sent home to do something on their own, and that's to push the parents to let them go and do something. But I wanted to read you what these saddened graders which are twelve and thirteen year olds run on a little sheet of paper what she asked. Them. Is there anything that you were hesitant to do? So troubled thirteen year olds I wasn't comfortable going into a crowded store with a bunch of strangers without my mom I was hesitant to use a sharp knife as my parents had never let me I I was hesitant to try walking my dog along because I was scared he would get loose from the leash. I was afraid to climb a tree these different kids I was afraid to try doing a whealy on my bike because I was scared I might hurt myself I was afraid to try and cook because there's And I could get hurt. So these are parents who have kept their kids safe right safe from the haven't been kidnapped. They haven't been taken in a terrorist attack but to not know how to use a sharp knife must feel pretty damn bad. If you're twelve or thirteen years old and you're looking at, wow, these adults can use sharp knives but not me what I hear in that list is these kids feel so vulnerable, they're afraid to go into a store they're afraid to do this, and then whole point was safety to the opposite they feel incredibly vulnerable. The same truth with when you talk about, you know psychologists use a technique called exposure. If you have a phobia of something like you're afraid of spiders and then they now you're in the same room as a spider I've been pitching immersion therapy for Monica snake fear. Well, you don't want to hear the details in the emergent their. Emerging Their Bruce anyways. Yes..

Long Island Monica
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Your brain actually registered that as another time not in it rationally knows that those towers were the only two there were thousands of them, but you've seen it so much and it's so easy to think of and you get so angry and there's someone to blame versus heart disease you and heart disease his longtime from now and it's Gradual and you can't picture all those people at the time didn't put their pictures on the front page those we have lost. So we really get this very skewed picture and what we've got a really skewed picture of lately is that our kids are in danger whenever there at the bus stop whenever they're walking to school whenever they're at the park, and so that has changed childhood to the point where there always has to be somebody with them, and if you ask about what are the other facts of this, what are the unintended consequences than we? Get back to the idea that kids are kind of depressed and kind of passive and kind of anxious because they haven't realized that they could deal with a mean dog or gotten lost and found their way back or fallen off their bike and had to come home limping, and if you don't know that you can handle anything because there's always somebody there intervening and helping you that is a disempowering distressing demoralizing weight live right so I wanna make a quick analogy maybe that I find helpful which is the amount of fear and thought and energy put into. A napping or molesting or this or that right? None of that thought none of that thought goes into how am I gonNA drive the car today to school. Now driving the car to school today, it will be the most dangerous thing. Your kid does improbably its entire childhood and no one no one lives in fear of driving their car. So the question is why and I believe the answer is because it's a necessity they've gone you know what? Whatever that statistic is fucking dry kid to school. Right so once it becomes, I, have to I think you right size. The fear of the outcome you're shaking your head no, shaking my head. I'm interested in that first of all, it's not an assessing often people are living. So close to the school that the kid could walk two blocks, there's a school in Kansas, the superintendent Moscow Kansas I got in touch with me one of the kids to start his students to start doing things on their own because he said from his office in the school on the town of four hundred, he could see the kids houses and yet the parents were driving them to school. So that's not necessity. So that's a little misconception..

Kansas superintendent Moscow
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:57 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will. You run Monica through the question of if you were to leave your child unintended outside Sure my favorite staff Monica. If for some reason, you wanted your theoretical child to be kidnapped by a stranger. How long would you have to keep?.

Monica
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:16 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So you freak him out and then he'll come. I'll get the rope like A. Step. Did you cro- yeah. We're obsessed with, HOW SMART CROWS My husband will bring in the crow box. That made a crow box, train them with the CHEETOS, so they start coming. I could just get the cheetos easily and then there's a little cover over the cheetos box and they have to stand in a certain place and that. The. and. Then finally they have date there's quarters on the top and they realize like, Oh, I kicked in the quarter and the box open, and there's all the cheetos and then finally you make them find their own tim quarters and quarter like a vending machine. That's. Obsession. Is You want to hang out with your husband Valley. Oh. My goodness what are the odds of this? They're in the millions to one so this is the crow box. This where the cheetos would go. Top across there and the away. On and this is an easy place for them to stand and that. Cover the entire ground like they're cheetos. So they get used to coming to the CHEETOS air and they think that grow their. Own Snickers Farm, and then it turned out that where was spending our summer. We see crow like once every eight days. So it's perhaps not the right place but yes, fabricate that whole thing or is that a key? There's some parts that you get. That are made from Three D. Printer, but you had to put any took him like we have to grows at seem to be taking up residence at our house and I love. Cros. So Monica have been trying to think of what eight step problem we could do that actually benefits but seems like your husband's heinous figure out how to get rich is actually not his genius neighbors genius. So you have to have on your podcast. Next is Josh Klein jace call our local genius do you know him? Okay Google Josh Klein and crows all we ne- we. Josh. So we're GONNA earmark that we're going to hang legit. Okay. What were we talking about before the crew cab? Crows, how to raise itself self-reliant Independent Crows I remember what we were talking about we're talking about boogeyman. Because I did want to own one of my own that in anticipation of talking to you I agree with you across the board. But the one thing I thought of is you know the numbers for be molested again, this is very ego centric in that I was molested. So I have a unique I for. Oh, that's okay. One in five is the least estimate. One in four is another one that there's some consensus around. But let's just say twenty to twenty five percent say far too many. Yeah. Yeah. Like a staggering amount epidemic. At that one in anticipation of talking to you I was like that one is the one I still am crazy vigilant probably overly vigilant about but I anticipated your retort and I feel like you'll tell me. Yeah. But it's ninety percent of that is people you know our trust would that be your response it wouldn't be dismissed it would be I would give you a tip that I think is really helpful. Please by May you know all my information is not right out of my brain. It's just from talking to other people. anyways there's something called the three Rs and Because yes, the vast majority of crimes against kids including molestation will because not by a stranger..

Josh Klein crow husband Valley Snickers Farm Google tim Monica
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:15 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"When people ask me like, would you let your kids play outside or walk to school or whatever I say yeah and then they often they bring up an example from like law and order. Or a terrible case that happened twenty, thirty forty years ago and why aren't you thinking about that I considered a mark of good parenting and kindness to be going to that worst case scenario I I got a ten trillion things I wanna ask you one is there must be corollary between the time invested as as we've evolved society towards less children more concentrated effort in more capital being spent on each child those must correlate. Is that 'cause -ality, I don't think that's a question. We can actually determine I. Don't think the parents cared less when they had more kids back when child mortality was much higher. I'm sure they were more resigned to that horrible fact of life but I don't think they mourned less. You know when you have a few kids have is a lot of resources and I feel like that's the correlation that I think I can make which is that if you have two people working. And maybe one or two kids. That's a lot more money per kid that you can span than if you had a dad working and six kids, and so the marketplace knows where dollars are m dollars are out there to be spent on kids to make sure that they're safe. You know if you can scare apparent about something happening to them, I mean, there is one thing I hate using the name. So I'll try to come up with a fake name. Let's call it the gopher. There's a little device called the gopher, which it really isn't called. It's an electronic sock that you put on your baby when they come home healthy and everything fine from the hospital and it measures they're hall their temperature, their movement level, and their blood oxygen level. Okay I'm going to ask you guys what's your blood oxygen level I hope above ninety, seven I. Now because you're Mr like. As Monica. And you can't use his number by the way I only know this because of covert I know when you're supposed to get yourself from oxygen or some breathing. It's really high though that's the other memorable thing about that numbers. It's like anything below like ninety four you're in trouble I would think doing anything ninety, four percent efficiently your goal. But actually like your dad by plus. Yes, exactly. saw those numbers I was like Oh wow. You really gotta be perfect at this oxygen level thing one other quick question along the investment question. Do you find variation socioeconomically and the thing that immediately popped in my head is I just heard this interesting story about how largely white affluent parents have pulled their children out of football but you're seen still lower income minorities at the same. Rate because again, the reward is so great for them in that position that they've determined it's worth that risk. Wow, I hadn't seen that I have no doubt that there are variations of every stripe among different groups of every stripe by the statistic that most fold Mu over a guess was the New York Times article like two years ago and it's not the only paper I read that..

Monica New York Times football
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Not then. How it wasn't like. Okay. Let's meet up again and it wasn't like he was an older man he was ten, I was five. Stock him it wasn't man in a uniform I, gotTa go get him. It was just that we realize actually after we were married years later. He mentioned that he was a crossing guard. I'm like where and he said the corner of Ramona and look like a great obviously you. Safely can't be alive so you can marry me twenty years later. That's so great. Well, I try to explain this to folks in California because most people that are either from California or have been there for decades like I have, we have an enormous immigrant population that does most jobs like boy gas station attendant seven eleven employees. Blah. Blah. Blah. I'm always reminded and shocked when I returned to Detroit, the whole city is being run by teenagers. No one wants the total gas station shift after five PM. So you'll go in there at two in the morning there's a sixteen year old Ryan or I'll go to dairy queen and there's like three thirteen year olds running the whole, and then of course, the grocery bags are twelve and thirteen year olds I think a lot of people don't have that experience if they live on. On either coast maybe that teenagers are running tons of businesses around the country when there's not a cheap immigrant labor pool, one of the things they think about it's not just Jonathan Height that started like Bro with me it's also momentum. Peter Gray. He's studied the importance of free play in childhood, but he also is a psychology professor and he talks about how kids today especially, teenagers are often depressed and anxious and you've probably seen it. You guys are both nodding in unison. Sex to well, that's at least something that they can do. That's grown but everything else that's grown up is not there for them they can't have responsibility they can't drive. They're not expected to do most things other than to be students often and pretty demoralizing when you feel like you're just feeling your oats and you're ready to take on the world and you're told I have to sign, you're reading logs still I mean how how could you possibly feel empowered when you literally aren't because you can't earn money and you can't get around And, your parents don't want you going out by yourselves and the malls don't want you in the malls and pretty soon you're just stuck doing your homework going.

professor Ramona California Peter Gray Detroit Jonathan Height Ryan
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:51 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Okay. Now, I wrote out your name phonetically. So I'm dyslexic just to give you a precursor so. That's on me. That's not a new but I wrote it out and I wonder I don't know how to write phonetically but I have my own system but lenore skinny I, do I You write it I wrote La Space and. Space S. K. E. H. Guetta and then space in A. Y.. Z.. Y.. Wow That's it. I could get a job at webster breaking down the I think it's calling. That you're pasting your time. First and foremost. How are you doing nervous to be on your show but in general pretty good. Oh wonderful and why are university on our show I feel like I should be flattered for that. Yeah. You should be flattered, right. Because contributions to your I'm doing podcast last week I think we had five hundred listeners. So I'd say yours is a little bigger. Nervous, but that's all to be credited to my wife. People are very interesting. Launched this show with a big fight between us and people seem to like that. It's a union thing where are you from originally suburbs of Chicago? Fellow midwestern. Yeah And what did your folks do? A homemaker she started out as a social worker and I think for the same reason I started out as a reporter just really wanted to be able to like you to meet people and find out what's going on in that house in that House, and my dad had a furniture store and he loved playing tennis and when I when he was fifty, he sold the furniture store started in indoor tennis club, which was totally fulfilling to him and he ran that until he died around age ninety, did it have the big inflatable domes over? One structure I still don't understand what those domes are. It looks like a Bouncy House. Yeah I. Think they're much cheaper. You just inflate them with air like the Pontiac Silverdome and then you're good to go. I think that's my understanding of. You're good student clearly if you got into Yale Yeah and stayed in. And what was the driving force? Was it just your own interested in achieving things or where you driven by parents? You know it was so long ago that it wasn't a thing to start thinking about college until like junior year of high school in New York there was that mom who sued the preschool where her four year old was going to school because the kid was in a class with two year olds he's like, how is my kid going to get into a good soul? My guess she's being held back by this two year old morons. Kid should be stunning the constitution or something. But back in the day, start just went to school and then eventually met with your guidance counselor junior year and they said time to start thinking about college and you did it wasn't a long term plan. I'm in lockstep with you on all the free range parenting in your luck grow foundation. We had Jonathan Height on two years ago and he brought you up and then we referenced you without learning any more about you just simply what he said we parroted everywhere..

webster tennis Bouncy House lenore S. K. E. H. Guetta Chicago Silverdome reporter New York
"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:59 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"K. K. pleasing. Joy lenore skin easy. We are supported by Brooke Glennon falls right around the corner and what better time to refresh your space than a fresh new season. We're talking all new super soft bedding towels and even loungewear because if you're gonNA sit back and admire your new digs might as well be insanely comfortable doing Brooke Linens Labor Day event is happening. This weekend featuring everything you need to outfit your home this season at a fraction of the Price Brooklyn selection is so versatile cool sheets, cozy sheets, plush towels, different colors, imprint my number. One attraction to the product is how good I feel nude in all of their stuff nude in their towels in the sheets nude in the loungewear the bathrobes just heavenly against my skin. Yeah agreed. Now, this year's been teaching us a lot among other things I've learned what a different quality comfort makes in my daily routine. That's what Brooklyn incomes in their labor. Day event is coming up this weekend and it's a big one..

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:40 min | 6 months ago

"lenore" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Blah Blah boom boom boom, boom boom y'all ready for this. Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to armchair expert I'm Dan Jeopardy I'm joined by Monica Monsoon. Emmy nominated miniature mouths. What is your Starbucks Cup say is your name Poser when you go to starbucks, do they ever mess up your name Oh sure yeah. Yeah. They pet Dan DAB. DAX. Da. CK. Dak.. Sure. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of different ones e-e-e-e-no. My move for that is just like whatever they sag. Oh Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. This is so much quicker. Imagine having foreign name like Monica. Well. Okay. Today we have a guest that we've been wanting to have on now for a couple years because good old Jonathan recommended her and we finally made it happen. Lenore skinny. She is a journalist. She spent fourteen years at the New York Daily News and two years at the New York Sun her column Y I let my nine year old ride the subway alone and book free range kids launched the Anti helicopter parenting movement currently the CO founder and president of let grow with Jonathan. Their mission is to create a new path back for parents and schools to let kids have some adventures develop more independence and grow resilient I dig her message. Did you yeah and it's scary. You know I don't have kids but I Can See really having a hard time with this with giving them independent is yeah. Yeah. But yeah, I'm very pro it and I am committed to challenge even myself in this arena..

Monica Monsoon starbucks Jonathan Dan Jeopardy Dan DAB Emmy New York Daily News New York Lenore CO founder president
An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:58 min | 1 year ago

An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part AND WELCOME TO CAPE UP. Long before people started swooning over Congressman. Val demings of Florida as a possible vice president. Joe Biden folks. We're talking about senator. Kamla Harris California back in January twenty nineteen few weeks before Harris announced her own since disbanded presidential campaign. I sat with her in front of a live audience at George Washington University for the kickoff tour. For her the truth we hold because Harris's book is a memoir. Our conversation was heavy on stories about parents upbringing and her career. There's no better way to get to know this possible vice president than listening right now. Senator Harris thank you very much for for being here for choosing Washington to be the kickoff of your book tour and or actually to be correct books tour and as we see the truths we hold an American journey and then also superheroes are everywhere. I'm going to focus on the truths we hold k. And I'm going to focus on something that happens before even page one and I want to clear it up. Okay for anyone who might have done this or still doing this. Despite hearing it said correctly the first time pronounce your name Carmela so just think of like the punctuation Mark Comma and that Adalah and there you got and so then what does communism mean then. So it's a very traditional classic Indian name and it derives from Sanskrit and it's it means the lotus flower and so it's very prevalent and a lot of Asian cultures and the idea the symbolism. Is that the Lotus flowers sits on water but it never really gets wet. The water beats off of it and so the idea being that one can be in the midst of chaos or be in the midst of something happening and and be there and should be there and it doesn't necessarily need to penetrate you but one should be there and equally important Its roots are in the mud meaning. It is grounded and and one must always know where they come from and can still be this thing now. I need you to pronounce another name for me for the life of me. I just I couldn't do it. And that is the name of your mother Shammala. So the why is silent Shama Sharmila what was really Shamlan? Go Gopala tell us about your mom. Caller Mommy Mommy. We always called her. Mommy I am not embarrassed to say she is mommy and She is in many ways. The reason I wrote the book my sister my is here My Mother's one of her best friends from college is here. Lenore POMERANZ I write about in the book and my mother was a force of nature. A drill force of nature. She is someone who all five feet of her. If you met her after you walked away you would have thought she was seven Tom. My mother was a truth teller. She spoke the truth. She was probably the smartest toughest and most loving person I've ever known. She raised her daughters with a belief that we could do and be anything. She taught us that. Don't let people tell you who you are and you tell them who you are. She was a scientist. Breast cancer researcher should goals in her life to end breast cancer and raise her two daughters and she would take us to the lab with her at go after school on the weekends and being around scientists one of the things that I realize now early in my life I learned was that one should see what can be unburdened by what has been because that is science is about. It's the pursuit of those things that will improve the condition of life. That will solve problems. That will make things better. And that's why I'm naturally attracted to also anything that is about innovation understanding that innovation. We do it not because we're bored with things the way they've been but because we should always be in pursuit of being more efficient more effective more relevant and and that's what she is and was your father. Donald Harris also an immigrant born born in Jamaica. Yeah an economics professor at Stanford. And let's David. Mind comes from some BRAINIAC parents. Your mom got her. He H D. The year you were born does put that out there so now your dad comes to the United States from Jamaica. Yeah my father was equally brilliant. And is he was a national scholar and Jamaica. He earned his way and up in out and came to the United States into Berkeley to study economics and My parents met when they were active in the civil rights movement. And it's an interesting story because as you know my mother graduated college when she was nineteen and did and so she so she said to my grandfather who was one of the freedom fighters in India for India's independence and my mother was the eldest of four children. She was the oldest at at a girl obviously and she said to my grandparents. She wanted to study science and she wanted to go to what was considered to be one of the best schools and that was UC Berkeley and my grandparents looked at her and said okay. We will put you on a plane and you can go to a place. You've never been at nineteen years old. This was in nineteen fifty nine. So this young this girl. This young woman got on a plane encouraged by her parents to go and pursue her dream now. The back story is also that it was fully expected she would get that degree and go back and have a good arranged marriage but of course my mother having been raised and being who she was just naturally she when she got to Berkeley was immediately attracted to the civil rights movement. Why do you defend? That's where she met. My father was and but I want to say she met my father and decided to have a love marriage and a marriage based on love which I believe is the ultimate act of optimism. The the question that I interrupted. You're you're Satan with. Why do you think she was so attracted to the civil rights movement she was raised growing up? Would go back to India like every other year and And so I know the family from that that that raised her because they helped raise us and it was always about fighting for independence was about finding justice. It was about fighting to make sure that all people had a say in their future in their government an equal say and that was that was in her blood and of course that's what the civil rights movement was about and the free speech movement and and there are some funny stories. I was just sharing with something backstage. You know so I witness I right about in the book you know from my strollers. I view and there's a a funny family story about how some mothers marching with the extended family. I talk about like aunt Mary and Uncle Freddie and the book and she would tell the story about. How DO THEY MARTIN? And this is back when strollers didn't really have armrest seatbelts. Martin Away and you know shouting and and all of that and then I think Mongol Freddie a look down in the stroller which was empty followed up. My mother tells funny story like one day. She was fussing and and you know so much cuter when she would tell the story but she'd say so then she would look down at me and come on. What do you want? What do you want and I look back up in a said fleet on so glad that story. I wanted to hear you safe. We how I wanted to talk about your your father economics professor Stanford they meet atmospherically. Had you and my And you love going to the park and your mom would correct me. If I'm wrong would put limits on you in terms of how far you go. Whatever and your dad would say to you. Run RUN COM run. That's right he would say. Do not be afraid. Let her go let her go. Let her run. You run as fast as you. Can you run as far as you want and I believe that his whole purpose was to say. Do not be afraid and be

Senator Harris Vice President India Kamla Harris California United States Stanford Berkeley Professor Jonathan Kaye Joe Biden George Washington University Senator Florida Congressman Val Demings Jamaica Shama Sharmila
Lennar Stock Jumps as Pivot to Low-Price Homes Pays Off and Boeing Stock Loses More Support Over the 737 MAX

MarketFoolery

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Lennar Stock Jumps as Pivot to Low-Price Homes Pays Off and Boeing Stock Loses More Support Over the 737 MAX

"Got two very different announcements from the same company. We have a group of economists to consider. But we're going to start today with housing Lanar the number two homebuilder in the US reported fourth-quarter results profit and revenue both came in higher-than-expected Lanar also bumped up their guidance for the number of homes. It expects to deliver in two thousand twenty. This is a really good way to end the fiscal year. It's a boomer of story. They we're supposed to turn they. They were supposed to report expected report about six point. Five billion in revenue and they came in at about seven billion which. That's a lot more. I mean for housing. That's a pretty predictable industry so for them to come in that much higher some of it has to do with the fact that you know interest rates have remained remained so low and people are the housing market has done really well but lenore made a great choice a couple years ago. And it's a really interesting study study in you know in in corporate governance where they kind of leaned into the trend of people renting instead of buying. You know what we're going to go back into low priced and we used to call starter homes. We're going to make that a core of our business and not too many other homebuilders. I did that. And it's paying off in a huge way so shares of Lenora up about three percent this morning. You you look at this strong quarter bumping up the guidance for for twenty twenty I felt like the stock should have been up a little bit more but it had a pretty good run over the past twelve months. It's had an okay run. I mean it's trading get a pe of less than ten even after the run-up and one thing that is definitely true about homebuilders is that sometimes low peas are or not necessarily a signpost that the that the stock is undervalued because because it's such a cyclical industry. And I don't know I. I don't know that people still trust that. Interest rates are going to remain. Low inflation is going to remain. Jack I think people are still a little oh bit shell shocked from what happened a decade ago in this industry. But it's a well run company. I'm and and we In other areas have you know have have looked at this trend of low cost housing and low priced housing stock as well we. We've recommended a company called legacy housing which is very similar. You know has a very similar strategy. So yeah it was a great quarter and the companies You know the company's running on all cylinders but it yet but you're right. The stock didn't seem mm to react in a way that you might expect Boeing shares down a bit this morning in the wake of the crash of Ukraine International Airlines flight. Seven fifty two minutes after taking off in Tehran. The seven thirty seven crash killing all one hundred seventy six people on board of the terrible tragedy the from the business standpoint of a new crisis. Well she's GonNa say you know. This is not a seven thirty seven Max. Because they're all grounded. This is an older model. The seven thirty thirty seven eight hundred but to your point this is yet another thing for For Boeing to respond to. Yeah so the grounding of the seven thirty-seven Max and how Boeing handled that entire situation As cost them about nine billion dollars in revenue so far they were selling about one point. Five a billion dollars in the 737 Max per month and it costs Dennis Muilenburg the former. CEO His job. The seven thirty seven eight hundred is a different beast. According to air safe which is an organization that tracks airline safety you know. So it's very well named organization seven thirty seven eight hundred among the world's safest planes So we don't know as we're recording this what has happened with the flight The Iranian government came out immediately and said that it was an engine. Malfunction The Ukrainian embassy in Tehran came out very quickly. Cleon said that it was not terrorism and then they pulled that report the Ukrainians The governments of France Germany and Netherlands or have have restricted their planes from flying in Iranian airspace as a result the crash. So we don't know it's it's it's it's you know obviously Veasley. My first thought goes out to those affected. Because you know anytime you see something like this. It's it's gut wrenching but there are you know there are implications for for you. Know for for Boeing as well and they're neat new. CEO's going to you know is going to have to address it. When you look at Boeing Stock Doc which is close to a two year low? I don't know there's I feel like they're still so many questions that it's not even something I wanna want to put on my watch list. Even though I completely understand that a reasonable outcome for this business and therefore for this stock is that twenty twenty years the year all of these issues get resolved The the Max's get back online order star bumping up and in the next five years. This is a stock. That's up fifty to seventy. I hope it doesn't sound too cra- crass to say that passenger deaths are apart of the business of making airliners. I mean that's just airplanes. Do something that is bending the laws of physics and occasionally physics wins But given what happened with seven thirty seven Max. They have billions of dollars in potential liability in suits from you know from from from passengers because it does seem like and I'm not making a legal judgment here that there's a case to be made that there was malfeasance or misfeasance or something of that nature. On the part of Boeing. Boeing is still the one half of a duopoly and in the long term. I think that had you know I. I think that the stock is probably a pretty good bargain where it is here but there are going to be plenty of of questions in the near

Boeing Tehran CEO Higher-Than-Expected Lanar United States Ukraine International Airlines Lenora Dennis Muilenburg Cleon Lenore Jack Veasley France Netherlands Germany
"lenore" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"lenore" Discussed on The Current

"She takes us on a trip around the world but the stories she tells is delicious and troubling although food is cheaper more plentiful and more varied than ever before at the same time the specter of extinction is threatening radically changed the menu. Lenore Newman is a Canada research. Chair in food security and the environment at the University of the Fraser Valley in British Columbia. She's the author of lost Feast Culinary Extinction and the future of food. I spoke with her from Vancouver in October. Here's our conversation. I want to start with the story of a creature named Martha who died in nineteen fourteen. Who Was Martha in fact? Yes well Martha in some ways is the ultimate last thing in that she was the last living passenger pigeon and she died in captivity in the Cincinnati Zoo but her species had already been gone for years and she was also the first I animal to die where we knew for a fact that was it for the passenger pigeon. And why why is that important. The thing about Martha Ertha that resonates so much is. The passenger pigeon was the world's most plant full bird. We think at least there were billions of them when the flu across the sky at infamously grew quite dark and When they roosted they would cover you know tens or hundreds of acres with their nests and their org? We eliminated them fairly quickly won. Some we had railways for fast travel where they were roosting and telegraphs chiefs to tell hunters where they were and marketplaces to quickly sell off the dead birds and it is the most striking king extinction in some ways because it happened so quickly from plentiful two zero well. Let's just back it up a little. The passenger pigeons were food. Oh they were most Stephanie and The peoples of North America eight before we got here before settling culture. got here They were very important to the ear qua confederacy in particular around the Great Lakes and yet the hunting at that point wasn't at the level to really eliminate the bird because They only came team in certain years. Much like a salmon run but once settlement had rolled out across the continent. We quickly started to eliminate the mostly for food and they were cheap food. They were plentiful food. They kept a lot of people from starving just because there were so many of them and even even when the species started to get into trouble you could buy them for pennies a piece out the market. What kinds of Dishes were made with the with the passenger pigeon. Well one of the more interesting wresting ones. Is that torture which courses a Canadian classic dish that actually was once made with passenger pigeon was yes. The word torchbearers actually derives from the French word for pigeon and so your original torch here would be full of passenger pigeons and sometimes they would leave the feet sticking king up through the crust so you knew what was in there and so a lot of pies so we roasted them a lot. That was very common dish. You'd get kind of a chafing dish full of little pigeons but there are much larger than the pigeons. You see in the city now. They weren't chicken sized by any means but they're more like a duck. So so what lessons does the passenger pigeon have to teach us about culinary extinction. Well we can draw a lot our technologies just totally totally overwhelm the ability of the natural world to maintain species numbers and because they were flocking species. What it really tells us today is that we need to be very careful with our fisheries and we may want to consider not fishing in the wild tall because fish are very very similar to passenger pigeons in behavior they flock? Why should we even worry about culinary extinction specifically well? There's there's there's a couple of reasons the main one is There is a cultural region. Certainly in our foods are like language they tell us who we are they are way we share our culture and when we lose a food for example when the cod in Newfoundland decrease to the point where they couldn't be be fished commercially it knocks a cultural lay out from under the culture and One of the other things is it's just a symptom of macos system collapse and really if we can't protect the foods we truly care about what hope do other wild all species have. Yeah I know we hold these things dear because I think about In France they have the word terroir which is how the Earth gives flavor to foods and it's very cultural and tidy French wines and foods yes exactly and imagine. If you're your terroir is literally being destroyed piece by piece and one day you wake up and you don't have any wine. Grapes left because Their genetic extend too far or the truffles gone because they were over harvested in the wild and we could see a world where our our food system is much impoverished to where it is now and people will notice those losses. Now as you right we humans have a long history history of actually loving foods to death. When did we start becoming such a threat creatures? Yes track record goes way back. Certainly a right to the time with a mega fauna and the time when we were nomadic. And if we look at the mammoth for example I mean a very charismatic animal. That You know certainly. I know a lot of kids I know with love the mammoth and stories of those kind of animals. We ate them to death breath. We followed them and killed them and the mammoth really didn't have much of a chance against us. Once we invented weaponry because the breed very slowly they take two years to just state Young and we followed them and hunted them until they were gone. And if we look at the world anywhere humans moved the mega-fauna that was big animals disappeared very quickly and the fact that we still have two two of the six species of Bison left is just pure fluke only a few hundred animals of the millions that once roamed the plains actually we survived and everybody and we have now is to send it from that tiny little survival pool but we don't go out into the Canadian wild and see Mamas Si saber toothed tigers or giant armadillos or all the other creatures that We barbecued basically but what. What is it about human human beings that makes us so dangerous to other species? Is it a hunting alone or is there something else that adds into it. We're very efficient. I think officiency in ways are our great strength but also one of our weaknesses in the two were very good at killing and harvesting and harnessing resources sources were very bad long-term thinkers. It's not in our nature to ask questions of if we keep doing this for a thousand dozen years or you know seven generations or even twenty years. Where will we be those questions? We really struggle with. Where as you know? We're very good at getting dinner. And I think there is an evolutionary affects their if someone throws a baseball out. You probably got a good chance. Wants of catching it. We're very good at that kind of thing if climate change starts to impact your ecosystem. We're not so good at that now. There are dire the warnings in this booklet orbit. It's also clear that you love food. Why are you so passionate about food and I do and I do blame my family for that one night grew up in British Columbia fishing family? My Dad and his three brothers and his father all at boats and so I was in the food system system right from the beginning and food was very much part of how we celebrated as a family and we would go out and we would harvest clams. Am some crabs and all the other wonderful things that you could literally just pick cop free for the taking. And so I started early and the SL Trained as a physicist and an environmental studies person I began to realize food is a keystone if we can get food food right if the food system can be sustainable and feed everyone we probably will survive as a species but if food goes if the food system system false part civilization basically is not far behind a had a growing up in a fishing family. Then shape the way that you thought about food later on when you think about food today well it definitely made me very aware of the natural world and we were already in in the eighties and nineties. Beginning to have problems uh-huh with stocks on the West Coast and the fish were getting smaller and less plentiful and you know they would be fished out of areas where they had traditionally leap being common. And so it's sorta planted a bit of worry. I suppose and it's definitely spending so much time in the natural world is why I became so interested in preserving it. I grew up in Vancouver as well and my father used to go out and capture sockeye salmon for dinner. And that's not quite as easy as it used to be. No it isn't an miss those days. Yeah you've traveled though all over the world as well and you've eaten some rare and special foods and I'm wondering what the most delicious thing is that you've been able to try. Oh now that is That is a very hard question but I go to Iceland a place. Where food was it's very scarce for a long time and where they're very dependent on ocean systems and the land and a special breed of cattle and in the travel for this book? I I had this butter made out of Icelandic cattle milk and it was just very good at Hud. This sort of herbaceous. Overtone you know with butter you would. These sent me a big blob of butter and I thought well that's ridiculous. I'm not gonNA eat all this butter and then like a half hour later. The butter was gone. I'm GonNA regret that later and You know I I look at that. And what made that so special and what makes most of the things things specialists. They're about a place and when you travel the world you know sometimes things start feel a bit the same especially now the hotels are sort of all all the same etc but the food. The food is different everywhere. And you meet people so passionate about it so when you think about about the foods that we've lost over the years of the centuries what would you have been most curious to taste. I would have been very interested to try the Roman Assim the most famous herb of Roman cuisine which came from what's now northern Libya and went extinct around the year zero people raved about it and it was in almost all of the dishes where we still have recipe leftover from Roman times and so clearly it was very good although although the Romans also used a lot of fermented fish sauce and their tastes may have not been cars but I would love to at least try it and I also we'll see that you love pears I do and they're such an amazing fruit and one time there were. Thousands sends a pair of varieties and probably ninety percent of those are extinct now. And is there one that you again. That would have just let your fire that you loved well outright. I'm very curious about this. One called the on salt which was described as being so creamy. You could spread it like gem you could could just cut it open and spread it on toast and we know very little about what happened to it too. It was Apparently it wasn't the easiest Orchard Pero en so breeds like the Bartlett out competed it..

Martha Ertha Vancouver Cincinnati Zoo Columbia flu University of Lenore Newman Canada France North America Fraser Valley Great Lakes Iceland British Columbia Stephanie Libya Orchard Pero baseball
"lenore" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"lenore" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"What kind of phone you have it's compatible with android and iphones no excuse is compassion with my Tamagotchi absolutely it will keep your little Nanno pet alive forever number two you can get help on the go with Google spent so you can ask it to play music ask about the weather Matt likes to ask for directions constantly it's we all have to pull her out and go to explorer type in whatever dumb thing where our lady pigeons you don't have to do that fossil watch as you do it on I number three if you are constantly leaving your wallet places you shouldn't no problem you can still pay for your sandwich because it has google pay right on the watch number four gen five improved heart rate sensor is now battery efficient so go ahead and check your heart rate anytime someone is stressing you out and is not going to drain other brands of smart watches out there they look like wrist monitors like you've escaped from a prison but no not fossil fossil looks like a nice nice watch with us automatic symbol dials and interchangeable watch straps so it looks like a real watch the matches your personal style so what are you waiting for go had entreat yourself or your favorite friend to a Gen five smartwatch get your gen five smartwatch now at fossil dot com slash forked up again that's fossil dot com slash worked up to have the world at your wrist welcome back to fort up a thug kitchen podcast our guest today is the Canada Research Chair in food security and environment at the University of the Fraser Valley She's the author of the acclaimed speaking in code tongues Canadian Culinary Journey and has written a new book that we could down lost feast culinary extinction and the future food which is out now is our pleasure to have on the show today Dr Lenore Newman so your book is it's incredibly well written in we both like to think of ourselves as people who are aware both the the perils of like you know the our recent food system and human impact on the planet but we never had to think of the importance save this started out as just curiosity and it turned into a bit of like a personal intervention and researching this book I did fall into some serious depressive spirals as I learn more about how what we'd impacts species extinction but it did make me pastor about it and as I kept writing I started to get a little more positive inserted come out other side so yeah it was almost like I don't know Oh a retreat of some sort where you had to confront your own internal darkness and then moved through it yeah I mean I definitely like I was about maybe halfway through your book and I was like you very positive thank well I kind of had to because certainly definitely talking about the passenger pigeon the depression you sort of each differently now than I did before I started the book that passenger pigeon part like to touch on that that blew my mind so other flocks would black out the sky and they were referred to as living wind they counted it seemed like they were inexhaustible no one could imagine that they could go extinct and once it was really clear something was wrong everyone assumed they could

"lenore" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"lenore" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"Hell yeah fucking eight it needs stared right at him and I was like if you're gonNA salt what did here for dinner I have no idea I think he'd be like fuck you I'm decanting the to not need that evaporation right I needed to a need to breathe king thousand percent more tuna than we did years ago nineteen fifty correct or nine hundred fifty they rate that alarm scientists do the math that's what it comes out to it says right here on my calculator Shit Lewd of fish but this is what the dollar son Boob last night and this is not counting the bycatch which is so fucked up its own episode I'll just rant for a second what explain to people what by-catches by-catches if you are specifically trying to get something like tuna and you cast these massive nets into the ocean and then you drag the net new pulled up on your boat everything that's not tuna you know it's aw dies and they just throw it overboard yeah it was a big deal and like the ninety s the dolphin right now they sit like dolphin free tuneup so you're saying there's a bigger problem than just the dolphins getting caught in the two non I mean there's a lot on Tony we could do we could probably do a whole podcast just on bycatch so estimated that nearly one hundred thousand pounds of Blue Shark are accidentally harvested as bycatch and discarded in the Pacific annually since the nineteen fifties the sharks especially blue sharks can take years to repopulate immature sharks are apex predators which there so all critical to the healthy ecosystem but industrialized fishers are just tossing their carcasses back in the water I mean like I could really do whole episode on this but so we're killing the to like take stain -able rate and then we're also killing all these other things in our quest her if you multiple Jeff if you look at the food chain of the ocean we're snatching out all kinds of levels for one level we're just punching holes not only reading not only are we like tetris clearing one level yeah the whole level it's real satisfied we clear that level incestuous and doing that tuna but we're catching everything else in the food pyramid okay and then we're also bilden island of trash right in the middle about the size of Texas we're GonNa live on one day it's going to be the only habitable land and you're GONNA pay through the teeth for a Condo Yay less than sixty years ago Bluefin tuna from the Indian Ocean used account for thirty six percent of all tuna caught so that was a very popular it wasn't just skipjack it was a very popular kind of tuna correct today accounts for less than one percent because the relations on the brink of collapse thing you're saying we've already done a year not only are we harvesting tuna more than ever but we're chasing them wherever they hide repopulation offshore is no longer an option for tuna schools as industrialized fishing now covers nearly ninety percent of global oceans. I think the key word here being indust- relies because that's usually when we start to bite off more than we can chew like in any field like once we streamline a process of production that that to be the beginning of you end yeah that's what I'm Amazon now we've got people in one hundred fifty degree warehouses dyin because once we saw like chat really efficient once we start making documentaries about it it's a problem same thing with the clothing and fashion was that a big thing is not from sweatshop the elway good shot Miller of the global tuna conservation project at the Ocean Foundation says quote everywhere tuna swim they're being pursued by Suo fisheries that is a major take from this paper another take away from the research was highlighting the lack of public reporting which could directly affect our fisheries manage their operations kind of like how cigarette companies operated before lung cancer research came to public attention just like the dolphins and the ninety s with tuna think they've already adjusted they need to see I mean you don't stop fishing if there's no research says that the fisheries are collapsing I mean even though you notice so what can we use consumers do well a lot actually for starters we can lower demand by consuming less tuna you hear that listens maybe Samari the only girl he dated after me we'll look name or you can even tried tuna alternatives like our homeys over at good catch they create a shelf stable plant-based tuna substitute that you wouldn't even know the difference ed we just think that they make a great product why that's what's crazy is that most tuna consumed is in canned tuna form which is the shittiest way to eat tuna anyway skipjack which is fifty it's fifty percent of tuna collection so why don't y'all just eat fake tuna it's basically faked by the time it gets you can't anyway much so fucking we could do so much more for tonight if we just only ate it fresh occasionally you can also support nonprofits pay attention to our oceans health and push for gnashing regulations like Ocean Conservancy World Wildlife Fund the Nature Conservancy and sea shepherd conservation also homeys and friends the pod GonNa just start praying to Poseidon Fokin I'm going to be on his good side L. and it's caused by nothing to increase in that kingdom y'all Landgraf likes what he sees on land and he's coming for us by every year look reading the story I just like talking about your tune it tuna in you think appetizing his nose off four is that you wrote appetizing appetizing uh the podcast notes yeah you're totally right when have you ever walked into your buddies place and be like Oh shit like the the grossest like a bagel bites tuna anytime tuna melt hot tuna cussing y'all don't need to be like you do tuna is was and always will be nasty yeah and as soon it will be legend it'll be like Griffin's because we're gonNA fucking eat them all y'all got eat them all speaking of exploiting food sources to the point of extinction human beings have been doing this shit for Millennia so excited when we get back it'd be talking to Dr Lenore Newman about the food that we've lost and Nazi cows guys her book the lost feast is so good it's one of the best how and baby pigeons and everything else it she blew our minds left and right and a banana seats and its clones it's a fucking interview all Y'all GonNa stick around for this shit stay tune your we'll be back in a moment with more worked up a thug kitchen podcast ooh wrote what tweet we're really into that somebody was really spot on about somebody who went through a couple of days tweets and like desma show that's mad that's Michelle all but very important favor review it only takes a few minutes and if you're one of the first people to do at podcast one we'll make it worth your time.

indust one hundred thousand pounds one hundred fifty degree thirty six percent thousand percent ninety percent fifty percent one percent sixty years one day
"lenore" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

12:51 min | 1 year ago

"lenore" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"A lot more anxiety free range kids and let grow Lenore Eskenazi so so what let grow is trying to do is change behavior because once apparent sees their kid do something independently and the kid ran an errand and they come back home and they've got the bread or they went outside and they had such a good time that came home a little late but they're sweaty and they're hungry and they met a squirrel and they made a new friend and all of that stuff. The parents are so overjoyed with seeing their kid blossoming that they are rewired. They are literally rewired..

Lenore Eskenazi
Financial analysts warning recession could be in near future

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Financial analysts warning recession could be in near future

"Everybody a word as we begin today one single word that is being thrown around a lot in economic analysis and reporting of late and as such needs a little splaine recession of course recession never a pleasant thing but one in part of a reasonably predictable economic cycle but it occurred does the other day that for a whole lot of people they're only experience with an economy and decline is the great recession and the fact is that is not what most economic slowdowns or like marketplace Jackie Stewart starts us off many people in their twenties and thirties of grownup with the repercussions of the great recession of a decade ago. See it into that Memories Rodney Dunkin from Los Angeles is twenty four. I do remember while I was in school. <hes> a lot of people were losing houses. I remember people losing their jobs. <hes> I remember my uncle. He's got the hospital and he told me these hundred people lost their job there. That recession was a particularly bad one. The subprime mortgage crisis led to repossessions and plummeting house prices. Some of the U._S.'s biggest banks needed bailouts. The stock market dropped white thousands spend spend of people's 4. Savings so yeah something to worry about. It's their natural that the word recession makes us very nervous dome director of Economic Research at the Conference Board. We often say every recession is different although recessions themselves recur and have common sequences so oh just because we had a very deep recession in two thousand eight doesn't necessarily mean the next recession will be <hes> like that some are actually quite brief and then not all violent as the great recession that defined as a period when the economy me stops growing and start shrinking one measure of that is when the gross domestic product declines for six months in a row but economists look at retail sales incomes and employment to measures that Sarah Cohen and Lenore Sanchez can relate to having seen layoffs at work in the last recession. We've been through before we know what to do. What do you do? I think a lot of people would like that. Advice wisely spent what you make. Stay to the necessities not the once. I know that even if there is a recession there is eventually recovery and hopefully the next one won't leave as many long lasting memories. I'm Jack Shoe for marketplace. One reason a lot of people are talking recession right now. Is that while the U._S.. Economy is doing all right. Much of the rest of the world isn't as we've been telling you there are slowdowns brewing in China and in Europe two of our biggest trading partners so as the governors of the Federal Reserve gets it to meet tomorrow and Wednesday with that global economy firmly top mind marketplace's Mitchell Hartman has some context several decades ago a slowdown in Asia or Europe likely wouldn't have spurred the Federal Reserve to try to boost growth by stimulating the U._S. economy but after the global financial crisis and great recession says Paul Ashworth at capital economics we've seen how integrated integrated areas of the global economy within signs of pretty worrying slowdown in Europe. I'm thinking of a slowdown in Asia too. I think the Fed concerns is that could spill over into the U._S.. The U._S. economy he has already been slowing down this year without any help. From the rest of the planet thinks in part to the fading effects of the 2017 tax cuts now says economists Joe Bruce Swell us at our S._I._M.. Consulting the trump administration's nations escalating tariffs on imports and other countries retaliatory tariffs on our exports have exposed U._S.. Farmers and manufacturers to increase economic risk that uncertainty tax caused by trade policy and those tariffs 'cause business investment to contract by five point five percent in the second quarter Bruce Willis says U._S.. Manufacturing is already on the brink of recession and the feds worried the global slowdown could send it over the edge. Meanwhile multinational companies have been scrambling to shift their production away from China to countries facing lower U._S.. Tariffs says Columbia University political economists Sharon o'halloran Lord of those jobs from China moving to Vietnam. Tom Cambodia moving to Mexico all of that churn in worldwide supply chains is disruptive and costs money and maybe one reason for the recent slowdown in global growth. I'm Mitchell Hartman for

Director Rodney Dunkin Federal Reserve China Mitchell Hartman Asia Los Angeles Jackie Stewart Europe Bruce Willis Joe Bruce U._S. Economic Research Tom Cambodia Columbia University
DR Horton, Melissa and Macy discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

02:06 min | 2 years ago

DR Horton, Melissa and Macy discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Welcome back to fast money, despite all the doom and gloom. They're work. You surprising. Bright spots in the beat in this market about Janis at the new York Stock Exchange with a look at them. Hey, bob. Hello, melissa. There weren't a lot of bright spots. But we just love Motown here. So there were a few included retailers like Abercrombie and buckle in Burlington. They were all double digits gap with strong as well. Macy's was up fractionally on the week. And we had the automotive stocks by heavens. We saw a Woosh of buying in the last two days everything from group one auto motive GM and Ford moved up mid single digits. That's amazing. The home building stocks. This is another group that's had the stuffing beaten out of it had a comparatively strong week as well. We had good earnings who pulled to helping with toll Lenore, we're DR Horton all into the green volume has been especially heavy in the home building group. It's down about twenty percent month. In fact, they were buying home builders like crazy at the bottom of this morning. The volume was huge in that has a lot of traitors complaining why? Because traders want to see a tradable bottom. That's what they want. What is it going to be over? And they don't see the signs of it yet. They think the sentiment is still too positive a lot of them and they point to. The huge rally. We had that the s&p rose sixty points in the middle of the day. What the conventional wisdom is the economy is good. A lot of these stocks are oversold it washed out, and it's time to buy them. Well, these guys they won't send them in to be a lot more negative. They want the vix much higher. If not in the fifties. Like it wasn't February. Okay. At least in the mid thirties or higher. That's why most traders I talked today. Felt that today didn't settle anything that it was an indeterminate day. And I'd have to with them on that one having weekend Melissa about one question here on the home builder's the traders are upset because there was heavy volume on the upside in the in the home builder's, and we didn't see that wished to the downside in terms of Chilean. They want even more negative sentiment. Overall. They think people are now picking bottoms when the most beaten up groups like I said, just with the home builder's there and the automotive stocks and that this still to generically positive. Okay. There are the washed out now. Let's buy them. All right. They want. Nobody interested at all

Dr Horton Melissa Macy Janis BOB GM Motown Ford Burlington York Lenore Twenty Percent Two Days
After 5 Years As Pope, Francis' Charismatic Image Has Taken Some Hits

02:19 min | 3 years ago

After 5 Years As Pope, Francis' Charismatic Image Has Taken Some Hits

"To federal authorities for background checks on would be gun buyers sessions is also directing the fbi to identified local governments that are not complying with the reporting requirements for the third time in less than two weeks a major storm is hitting new england as npr's tovia smith reports forecasters say some parts of the region could get as much as two feet of snow it's not unheard of to get three nor'easters so close together the national weather service says just unfortunate as meteorologist lenore korea put it she says this storm may be the most intense of the three the first one was more about wins the second one was more heavy wet snow impact wise and this one is going to be a little bit of both or a lot of bit of both widespread power outages are likely again but coastal flooding is not expected to be as bad schools and government offices around the state are already closed tuesday as officials are warning of near impossible conditions on the roads till via smith npr news boston you're listening to npr news the white house is expressing outrage over the poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in england spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders calls the use of a highly lethal nerve agent on a british citizen inside the uk reckless and irresponsible british prime minister theresa may says it is highly unlikely that it is highly likely however that russia was behind the attack sixtysixyearold sergei score paul and his thirty three year old daughter yulia and then hospitalized in critical condition since they were found unconscious in salisbury england nearly ten days ago it has been five years since pope francis became leader of the catholic church the pope has enchanted believers and nonbelievers alike but npr sylvia full jolie reports that he's also starting to take some hits from critics a champion of the poor disenfranchised and migrants francis has scolded the west for it's greed that is spoiling the earth environment but recently the charismatic reformer has become the target of criticism on several fronts the most controversial is his handling of clerical sex abuse prompting many catholics to accuse the latin american pope of failing to grasp how devastating the scandals have been in some parts of the.

Salisbury England Jolie Sixtysixyearold Sergei Theresa Prime Minister Sarah Huckabee Sanders Lenore Korea Tovia Smith Pope Francis FBI Yulia Paul Russia UK Nerve Agent White House Boston NPR England
Some facts about Pope Francis at the 5-year mark

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 3 years ago

Some facts about Pope Francis at the 5-year mark

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message come from REI. What is your? But that's the question REI co. Op is asking this season with gear classes, expert advice and adventure trips REI can help you overcome any excuses to find your way outside. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump is praising the house intelligence committee's findings on Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election NPR's Ryan Lucas says a draft report by Republicans on the panel concludes, there is no evidence at the Trump campaign. Colluded with Moscow committee. Republicans are wrapping up the panels, Russia investigation after a year on the job, the panel interviewed around seventy people and reviewed hundreds of thousands of pages of documents in its work in GOP draft report Republicans say they found no sign of collusion. They agree that Russia interfered in the election, but Republicans say, Moscow did not intend to help Trump win that conclusion. Contradicts the assessment of US intelligence agencies. The Republican leading the committee's pro. Michael Conway says, Trump associates held inappropriate meetings in displayed bad judgment, but did nothing wrong beyond that. The top democrat on the panel. Adam Schiff criticized Republicans for shutting down the investigation and. Accused the GOP of being more interested in protecting the president than protecting the country. Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington, a White House plan to combat school. Shootings includes a federal commission to study the issue. NPR's Dominica Montinaro says it does not include raising the age limit for some weapons purchases which Trump and a large percentage of Republicans supported just last month when it comes to raising the gun age from eighteen to twenty one. The president has suddenly backed off of that. He tweeted that there's not much political support for that. I would counter frankly, that in our NPR Ipsos poll that we just did on guns eighty two percent of people said that they were in favor of raising the gun purchase age from eighteen to twenty one. And that included seventy two percent of Republicans NPR's Domenico Montinaro you as attorney general Jeff Sessions is telling state and local officials to ensure they're providing key criminal and mental health information to federal authorities for background checks on would be gun buyers sessions is also. Wrecking the FBI to identified local governments that are not complying with the reporting requirements for the third time in less than two weeks. A major storm is hitting New England as NPR's tovia Smith reports forecasters say some parts of the region could get as much as two feet of snow. It's not unheard of to get three nor'easters. So close together. The national weather service says, just unfortunate as meteorologist. Lenore Korea, put it. She says this storm may be the most intense of the three. The first one was more about wind. The second one was more heavy, wet snow impact wise. And this one is going to be a little bit of both or a lot of bit of both widespread Power outages are likely again, but coastal flooding is not expected to be as bad schools and government offices around the state are already closed. Tuesday as officials are warning of near impossible conditions on the roads to via Smith NPR news, Boston. You're listening to NPR news. The White House is expressing outrage over the poisoning of a former Russian spy and his daughter in England. Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee. Sanders calls the use of a highly lethal nerve agent on a British citizen inside the UK reckless and irresponsible. British Prime Minister Theresa may says it, it's highly unlikely that it is highly likely, however, that Russia was behind the attack Sixty-six-year-old Sergei scrapple and his thirty three year old daughter Yulia and been hospitalized in critical condition since they were found unconscious in Salisbury England nearly ten days ago. It has been five years since pope Francis became leader of the Catholic church. The pope has enchanted believers and non-believers alike, but NPR Silvio Pohjola reports that he's also starting to take some hits from critics a champion of the poor disenfranchised and migrants. Francis has scolded the west for it's greed that is spoiling the earth environment. But recently, the charismatic. Former has become the target of criticism on several fronts. The most controversial is handling of clerical sex abuse prompting many Catholics to accuse the Latin American pope of failing to grasp how devastating the scandals have been in some parts of the world and how he will be judged. Another issue. He's accused of underestimating as the status of women, no women whole leadership positions in the church and the Vatican women's magazine carried an expose this month showing how nuns are treated like indentured servants by the prelates they serve suppo Jolie NPR news Rome on Asia market shares closed mixed higher in Tokyo. This is NPR news in Washington.

NPR President Trump Ryan Lucas Washington Smith Npr Donald Trump Jolie Npr Moscow Committee Russia Lucas Npr GOP Dominica Montinaro New England Pope Francis Adam Schiff Lenore Korea House Intelligence Committee