18 Burst results for "Lena Sons"

"lena sons" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 2 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on WTOP

"Vaccine may pose a small possible risk of a rare but potentially dangerous neurological reaction. The CDC says. It's gotten reports of 100 people who got the shot developing an immune system disorder known as G in beret it can cause Muscle weakness and occasional paralysis. We talk more about this development just last hour with Washington Post National Health reporter Lena Son It's been 100 reports out of 12.8 million doses given that comes out to be about one in 128,000, so the cases have been largely reported about two weeks after vaccination. Mostly in men, many of them age 50 and older and it's important to remember that most people fully recover from GM beret. The government says the vaccines used most often in the US made by Pfizer and Moderna show no risk of the disorder. 5 33. Now that lawmakers have returned to Capitol Hill Senate action is about to heat up on President Biden's legislative agenda. W. T. O P's Mitchell Miller today on the Hill, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is dealing with a lot of moving parts on infrastructure. Preparations will quickly move ahead to take up the $1 trillion bipartisan plan. Then there is the more complicated issue of the human infrastructure package, which, um, our hopes to move through by budget reconciliation, avoiding a Republican filibuster. White House press secretary Jen Psaki says the president will be engaged with the process but understands the challenges ahead. It's messy at times, and we fully expect that these negotiations will have Ups and downs were prepared for that. In another development, the temporary security fence around the capital was taken down over the weekend ahead.

Lena Son 100 reports 100 people $1 trillion Mitchell Miller Moderna Pfizer CDC President Biden 12.8 million doses Senate US Jen Psaki today White House Republican Chuck Schumer Washington Post National Healt Capitol Hill 128,000
"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

"News Center Attorney General Merrick Garland, speaking today, saying that the right to vote is the cornerstone of American democracy. He was addressing the Justice Department and said that the protection of voting rights has never been steady speech scheduled amid a growing controversy over efforts in many Republican led states to Craft new voting laws, and Amazon could surpassed WalMart as the nation's biggest retailer in 2022, according to analysts at JP Morgan, Come on news time, 12 16. Flu and lice outbreaks are commonplace among school aged Children. But when kids go back to school campuses in the fall, could they face the threat of diptheria, mumps or other well controlled diseases? A CDC report finds. The Children fell behind on their regularly scheduled shots during the pandemic. And covering this for the Washington Post. Is Lena Son who joins us on the common Newsline. Good afternoon. Hi. How are you doing? Well, thank you. So how bad is this situation? How off track are the nation's Children, so you know, Imagine, Think Back to Last spring, when lots of places were in lockdown. People were afraid to go out because of the pandemic and many well child visits and routine immunizations didn't take place. And that was it was expected, and it was reported, and then it was documented. And now, um CDC has done an analysis where they've looked at 10 jurisdictions around the country just to see how much Those vaccine doses fell off and discovered that in some places depending on the vaccine, and depending on the age group, um that dropped the reduction was, you know 60% 70%. It started to come back up and rebound in June of last year, June through September as places opened, and people felt more comfortable and brought their kids in. But it still has not reached a level yet where kids are caught up. So in this report, they put out they are warning and they're asking a providers to recommend. That when, um when kids go in to get the coronavirus vaccine, you know, now it's authorized for ages. 12 and up that you could get the kids, the Children and teens. Um, caught up on the other vaccines as well because they can all be given at the same time. Otherwise, the fear is if people go back to school, and you haven't been Getting your regular MMR vaccine for measles. Um and you're around all these people and no one's wearing masks. Then you do risk having these outbreaks, especially in certain parts of the country, where there's lower vaccination rates among kids anyway. And measles, as people might not realize is way more contagious than Covid. Is there. One missed vaccination that scares a pediatrician. More than another. You know whether that's for an individual's health or for the sake of herd immunity. They are most worried about human papilloma virus vaccine because in the case of measles or mumps, or whooping cough You know, somebody gets sick from one of those diseases. You see it right away. Right? Um and people know about it with HPV. This is, um something where the disease, Unlike measles doesn't show up immediately, and HPV infections can take years, even decades, develop into cancer and That's not something that people are going to. You're not going to see if somebody hasn't been vaccinated right away. And it is also in many states, Um certain diseases are mandated that you need to have it for school HPV. I think only a few states. Require that so That's something that pediatricians are most worried about. And that's one Vaccine where the drop off has been, um, the largest. It fell almost 64% for Children, 9 to 12 years old. And 71% for teenagers. 13 to 17 Lena Son with US on Common news Health reporter for The Washington Post and her article Online at Washington Post dot com is very much worth read. Lena. Thank you. Thank you Come on news time. 12 20 HOUR Propel insurance Business Update. Here's Jim Tesco has travel continues to skyrocket across the country. The PSA anticipates a labor shortage at airports nationwide. As many as 131 of the country's largest airports may experience labor shortages this month, and employees are being asked to volunteer to help monitor checkpoints. The acting T S a administrator says volunteers are needed to aid in customer services, tasks and management. There have been some 3100 new employees enlisted by the NSA, and the agency hopes to recruit another 3000 by the end of the summer. The good news for chewy hit reported a surprise profit for its latest quarter, with revenue, also exceeding estimates. The not so good news for the e commerce pet company that one of labor shortages and supply chain disruptions That has Chile shares sliding five and a quarter percent today, and that's your money. Now. The market's not much movement in either direction. But it is mixed. The Dow is down, but only by 30 points. The S and P 500 is up, but only by 1.22 point game right now for the NASDAQ, That's about 1/10 of a percent. Money news at 20 and 50 past each hour. We have traffic update Next on ABC NEWS, White House correspondent.

Amazon WalMart 2022 9 71% JP Morgan 1.22 point June 30 points 60% 10 jurisdictions Lena September White House Republican NSA NASDAQ Lena Son 20 50
"lena sons" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:45 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Told lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos, Dan Diamond. Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is Morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. There have been a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the coronavirus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander An email that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent but that Dr Redfield wanted the email to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the email or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the E Mail. Paul Alexander, The Washington Post Lena son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall Politico had a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House and the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seem worse than awas. I should hasten to add there's no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates healthcare politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? Is no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner. Hi, Corey. Sorry. So tell us about what those new studies say what if they found Yes, So earlier this week, McKinsey and company released a report that found when school started this fall. Students of color were several months behind in learning and had been hit harder than white students who were also somewhat behind. Another report last week was a little more optimistic, but many students were missing from their data. The fact is, obviously our way don't know how bad the learning loss has been because The kids who were hardest hit are also the hardest to find right now. But I will say that every expert I've spoken with says this pandemic has absolutely widened, learning gaps for low income kids, homeless students, communities of color and also students with disabilities. And people often described this as being a lost generation of kids. Does that seem like an overstatement or or is that valid? I mean, a zoo reporter who's been covering it for a while. I think it's important to remember that our system even before Cove ID was deeply inequitable, with kids getting lost all the time. Cove. It plugged all of those old inequities around poverty, race and geography into a really loud amplifier. In a school funding, for example, schools in low wealth communities are less able to pay for the things that could help their kids right now. Through this pandemic. There's also a digital divide, which has always been there. It just mattered less because school was in person, You know, new research from U C L A finds that black and Hispanic students are still less likely than white students to have consistent access to a computer or Internet and, you know I was talking about this yesterday with Regina Crider. She runs a parent child Support Group in central Illinois. All kids don't have access to, you know, reliable Internet If we're struggling with paying the bills Internet, maybe one of the first bills to go because it's expensive. The great thing about Regina Crider is she's coordinating an effort through her church to allow students in to do their studies there and use the WiFi. She's pretty amazing, but the fix for all this inequity just cannot fall on the Regina critters of the world. And what about students with disabilities? How are they being served during this pandemic? I've heard from a lot of parents who say when school shut down. So did their child speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, You know, a few months ago, I know many schools were considering reopening just for their kids with disabilities. But because infection rates have been soaring, I honestly haven't seen nearly as much of that, as I thought I would. I also just got a note from a mother whose daughter has autism, and her school in Minnesota just closed again. And Mama's frustrated because her daughter, she says, has been on this roller coaster, you know, between getting services and once again getting nothing. So as long as we're in this pandemic, what needs to happen? So I think it's not just about reopening schools, though that does obviously need to happen. Many parents of color, especially in households with older adults say they worry about sending their kids back to school because their communities have been hit so hard by this pandemic. You know, we're seeing this right now. In New York City, where black students are underrepresented among those choosing to return to in person classroom so short term schools still need to make sure their virtual instruction is as strong as it can be. Longer term. Researchers tell me District's need to consider summer school, maybe extending the school year. Also investing in tutoring But for schools to do any of this, they're going to need Congress's help paying for it. And Ari in this political climate that help may not arrive soon, or at all. That's NPR education correspondent Cory Turner. Thanks, Cory. Sorry..

Robert Redfield CDC Donald Trump politico Paul Alexander Congressman James Clyburn Cory Turner Regina Crider director Dr Redfield White House President Dan Diamond Charlotte Kent McKinsey NPR New York City editor Washington
"lena sons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Closed door testimony are raising questions about political interference at the CDC Democratic Congressman James Clyburn said today that a career CDC employees Hold lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a Trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos. Damn Diamond! Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is Morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. There have been a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the current virus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander Any mail that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent, but that Dr Redfield, one of the E mail to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the E mail or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the E Mail. Paul Alexander, The Washington Post Lena Son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall politico at a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House in the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against. Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seemed worse than awas. I should hasten to add there's no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates health care, politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, Thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? Is no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner..

Robert Redfield CDC Congressman James Clyburn Donald Trump politico E Mail Dr Redfield Charlotte Kent Paul Alexander director President White House Charlie NPR Cory Turner Washington C D. C Lena Son Sara
"lena sons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KCRW

"Of access to technology and in person teaching. Maybe making the problem even worse is for US. Inequality is concerned later on in the program, vaccinating Frontline workers taking care of covert patients has been the focus of who should get the initial doses. They're going to hear, though, from an intensive care unit doctor about why he thinks health care workers Should not receive a Corona virus vaccine before others and as U. S officials raised to roll out the vaccination, researchers warn that false claims about vaccines are spreading on social media. Thanks to well established anti vax groups more on that, as well, when I heard it most recently seems to persist is injecting microchips into people when they get the vaccine, so we'll talk more about that about misinformation. Here on the program right now in Arcadia. The two didn't eastbound before Baldwin Avenue got a crash in the middle lane and traffic is slow from Sierra Madre Boulevard and Boyle Heights, the 10 westbound at Soto Street Sigalert here and see a crash blocking the three left lanes. And that's got to stop and go from about city terrorist drive right now. 57 degrees in Santa Barbara. It's 5 20. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang. New details revealed today from closed door testimony are raising questions about political interference at the CDC Democratic Congressman James Clyburn said today that a career CDC employees Told lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos, Dan Diamond. Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is Morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. There have been a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the coronavirus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander An email that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent but that Dr Redfield wanted the email to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the E mail or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the email Paul Alexander, the Washington Post Lena son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall Politico had a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House in the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against. Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seem worse than awas. I should hasten to add there's no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates health care, politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, Thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? There's no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner. Hi, Corey. Sorry. So tell us about what those new studies say what if they found Yes, So earlier this week, McKinsey and company released a report that found when school started this fall. Students of color were several months behind in learning and had been hit harder than white students who were also somewhat behind. Another report last week was a little more optimistic, but many students were missing from their data. The fact is, honestly are we We don't know how bad the learning loss has been because The kids who were hardest hit are also the hardest to find right now. But I will say that every expert I've spoken with says this pandemic has absolutely widened, learning gaps for low income kids, homeless students, communities of color and also students with disabilities. And people often described this as being a lost generation of kids. Does that seem like an overstatement or or is that valid? I mean, a zoo reporter who's been covering it for a while. I think it's important to remember that our system even before Cove ID was deeply inequitable, with kids getting lost all the time. Cove. It plugged all of those old inequities around poverty, race and geography into a really loud amplifier. In a school funding, for example, schools in low wealth communities are less able to pay for the things that could help their kids right now through this pandemic. There's also a digital divide, which has always been there. It just mattered less because school was in person, You know, new research from U C L A finds that black and Hispanic students are still less likely than white students to have consistent access to a computer or Internet and, you know I was talking about this yesterday with Regina Crider. She runs a parent child Support Group in central Illinois. All kids don't have access to, you know, reliable Internet If we're struggling with paying the bills Internet, maybe one of the first bills to go because it's expensive. The great thing about Regina Crider is she's coordinating an effort through her church to allow students in to do their studies there and use the WiFi..

CDC Robert Redfield Donald Trump Congressman James Clyburn politico Paul Alexander US director Regina Crider Arcadia Dr Redfield Boyle Heights NPR White House Santa Barbara Soto Street Sigalert Ari Shapiro
"lena sons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:49 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KCRW

"Told lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos, Dan Diamond. Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is Morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. There have been a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the coronavirus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander An email that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent but that Dr Redfield wanted the email to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the email or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the email Paul Alexander, The Washington Post Lena Son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall politico at a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House in the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against. Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seem worse than awas. I should hasten to add there's no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates healthcare politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? Is no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner..

Robert Redfield CDC Donald Trump politico Congressman James Clyburn Dr Redfield Charlotte Kent Paul Alexander director Dan Diamond President White House Charlie NPR Cory Turner Washington Lena Son C D. C Sara
"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Told lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos, Dan Diamond. Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is Morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. There have been a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the coronavirus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander An email that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent, but that Dr Redfield, one of the E mail to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the E mail or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the E Mail. Paul Alexander, The Washington Post Lena son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall Politico had a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House in the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against. Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seem worse than awas. I should hasten to add there's no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates health care, politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, Thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? There's no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner. Hi, Corey. All right. So tell us about what those new studies say what if they found Yes, So earlier this week, McKinsey and company released a report that found when school started this fall. Students of color were several months behind in learning and had been hit harder than white students who were also somewhat behind. Another report last week was a little more optimistic, but many students were missing from their data. The fact is, honestly, our way don't know how bad the learning loss has been because The kids who were hardest hit are also the hardest to find right now. But I will say that every expert I've spoken with says this pandemic has absolutely widened, learning gaps for low income kids, homeless students, communities of color and also students with disabilities. And people often described this as being a lost generation of kids. Does that seem like an overstatement or or is that valid? I mean, a zoo reporter who's been covering it for a while. I think it's important to remember that our system even before Cove ID was deeply inequitable, with kids getting lost all the time. Cove. It plugged all of those old inequities around poverty, race and geography into a really loud amplifier. In a school funding, for example, schools in low wealth communities are less able to pay for the things that could help their kids right now. Through this pandemic. There's also a digital divide, which has always been there. It just mattered less because school was in person, You know, new research from U C L A finds that black and Hispanic students are still less likely than white students to have consistent access to a computer or Internet and, you know I was talking about this yesterday with Regina Crider. She runs a parent child Support Group in central Illinois. All kids don't have access to, you know, reliable Internet If we're struggling with paying the bills Internet, maybe one of the first bills to go because it's expensive. The Great thing about Regina Crider is she's coordinating an effort through her church to allow students in to do their studies there and use the WiFi. She's pretty amazing, but the fix for all this inequity just cannot fall on the Regina critters of the world. And what about students with disabilities? How are they being served during this pandemic? I've heard from a lot of parents who say when school shut down. So did their child speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, You know, a few months ago, I know many schools were considering reopening just for their kids with disabilities, but because infection rates have been soaring. I honestly haven't seen nearly as much of that, as I thought I would. I also just got a note from a mother whose daughter has autism, and her school in Minnesota just closed again. And Mom is frustrated because her daughter, she says, has been on this roller coaster. You know, between getting services and once again getting nothing so as long as we're in this pandemic, what needs to happen? So I think it's not just about reopening schools, though that does obviously need to happen. Many parents of color, especially in households with older adults say they worry about sending their kids back to school because their communities have been hit so hard by this pandemic. You know, we're seeing this right now. In New York City, where black students are underrepresented among those choosing to return to in person classrooms, so short term school still need to make sure their virtual instruction is as strong as it can be. Longer term. Researchers tell me District's need to consider summer school, maybe extending the school year. Also investing in tutoring But for schools to do any of this, they're going to need Congress's help paying for it. And Ari in this political climate that help may not arrive soon. Where it all That's NPR education correspondent Cory Turner. Thanks, Cory. Sorry. A 53 year old.

Robert Redfield CDC Donald Trump politico Congressman James Clyburn Cory Turner E Mail Paul Alexander Regina Crider director Dr Redfield White House President Dan Diamond Charlotte Kent McKinsey NPR New York City editor
"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:48 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Told lawmakers on Monday that she had received a directive one she understood had come from CDC director Robert Redfield. That directive ordered her to destroy an email that came from a trump appointee. Email was a demand to juice data that supposedly made President Trump look back for more on these allegations. We're joined now by politicos, Dan Diamond. Welcome. Also, thanks for having me back. So tell us more about this woman who made these allegations And where did she make them exactly? The woman who spoke to the committee is Charlotte Kent, She's editor of the CDC is morbidity and Mortality Weekly reports. These are sacred texts in the scientific community. They come out regularly with updates on the agency's findings. They're going a lot of updates on Corona virus this year understandably, and she made these comments to House investigators on Monday. As part of a larger probe that the committee is doing into the current virus response after her comments, the probe was somewhat put on pause because the Trump administration did not make other officials available. Oh, interesting. Okay, So we're getting all of this through Democratic Congressman James Clyburn. What exactly is he saying? What Congressman Clyburn is saying is that Charlie can't told the committee that the email sent by Trump appointing and Paul Alexander Any mail that we reported on a political about three months ago, instructing the agency to essentially hand over control of these morbidity and mortality reports. To trump appointees to political appointees in the public affairs shop that can't told the committee not only to Dr Redfield make go along with efforts To have these emails BB sent, but that Dr Redfield, one of the E mail to be deleted that when she went to look for it in our own inbox, she couldn't find it. And has Robert Redfield, the CDC director. Has he responded to any of these allegations so far, Dr Redfield put out a statement through the department that he did not Hey, didn't say whether he wanted anyone to delete it. He did say he wanted staff to ignore the email. So I've asked directly haven't gotten any confirmation about whether he said to delete the E mail or not. Okay. Now are these the first allegations that we're hearing about political interference at the C D. C e. I mean and if not have other allegations been proven true about political interference. Also, these are definitely not the first allegations about political interference. This has been going on all year and specifically the gentleman who sent the E Mail. Paul Alexander, The Washington Post Lena son wrote about this in the summer. My colleague Sara over mall Politico had a story about how Paul Alexander was trying to muzzle Tony Fauci, who's not at the CDC, but also a top scientific appointee. There have been consistent efforts and battles between people at the CDC and at the White House in the broader health Department. People at the White House have been convinced that the career scientists at the CDC we're working against. Donald Trump and trying to make the pandemic seem worse than awas. I should hasten to add There is no evidence that that was the case. And diamond investigates health care, politics and policy at politico. Thank you very much also, Thank you. And we have reached out to the CDC and Dr Redfield for comment, but have not yet received a response. Handful of new studies have recently tried to answer one of the most important questions facing K through 12 schools. How much learning have students lost by having to do school remotely? There's no one universal answer, especially because some of the most marginalized students are also the least likely to be back in a physical classroom. At this point in the pandemic to unpack what we know and what we don't we're joined by NPR's Cory Turner. Hi, Corey. All right. So tell us about what those new studies say what if they found Yes, So earlier this week, McKinsey and company released a report that found when school started this fall. Students of color were several months behind in learning and had been hit harder than white students who were also somewhat behind. Another report last week was a little more optimistic, but many students were missing from their data. The fact is, honestly, our way don't know how bad the learning loss has been because The kids who were hardest hit are also the hardest to find right now. But I will say that every expert I've spoken with says this pandemic has absolutely widened, learning gaps for low income kids, homeless students, communities of color and also students with disabilities. And people often described this as being a lost generation of kids. Does that seem like an overstatement or or is that valid? I mean, a zoo reporter who's been covering it for a while. I think it's important to remember that our system even before Cove ID was deeply inequitable, with kids getting lost all the time. Cove. It plugged all of those old inequities around poverty, race and geography into a really loud amplifier. In a school funding, for example, schools in low wealth communities are less able to pay for the things that could help their kids right now. Through this pandemic. There's also a digital divide, which has always been there. It just mattered less because school was in person, You know, new research from U C L A finds that black and Hispanic students are still less likely than white students to have consistent access to a computer or Internet and, you know I was talking about this yesterday with Regina Crider. She runs a parent child Support Group in central Illinois. All kids don't have access to, you know, reliable Internet If we're struggling with paying the bills Internet, maybe one of the first bills to go because it's expensive. The Great thing about Regina Crider is she's coordinating an effort through her church to allow students in to do their studies there and use the WiFi. She's pretty amazing, but the fix for all this inequity just cannot fall on the Regina critters of the world. And what about students with disabilities? How are they being served during this pandemic? I've heard from a lot of parents who say when school shut down. So did their child speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, You know, a few months ago, I know many schools were considering reopening just for their kids with disabilities. But because infection rates have been soaring, I honestly haven't seen nearly as much of that, as I thought I would. I also just got a note from a mother whose daughter has autism, and her school in Minnesota just closed again. And Mama's frustrated because her daughter, she says, has been on this roller coaster. You know, between getting services and once again getting nothing so as long as we're in this pandemic, what needs to happen? So I think it's not just about reopening schools, though that does obviously need to happen. Many parents of color, especially in households with older adults say they worry about sending their kids back to school because their communities have been hit so hard by this pandemic. You know, we're seeing this right now. In New York City, where black students are underrepresented among those choosing to return to in person classroom so short term schools still need to make sure their virtual instruction is as strong as it can be. Longer term. Researchers tell me District's need to consider summer school, maybe extending the school year. Also investing in tutoring But for schools to do any of this, they're going to need Congress's help paying for it. And Ari in this political climate that help may not arrive soon. Where it all That's NPR education correspondent Cory Turner. Thanks, Cory. Sorry. A 53 year old day laborer is.

Robert Redfield CDC Donald Trump politico Congressman James Clyburn Cory Turner E Mail Paul Alexander Regina Crider director Dr Redfield White House President Dan Diamond Charlotte Kent Mortality Weekly McKinsey NPR New York City
"lena sons" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:07 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Needs to stay frozen. And then once you open the container, you can only open it twice. It has to be returned with dry ice. Um, there are a lot of things that go into handling it. And so that limits how quickly they could get it to people. And we're not gonna have that many doses initially. So what happens if you can't meet that minimum order of minimum middle the minimum of 975 doses? If you're a small hospital say, Well, I feel I think a lot of states are trying to figure out a way to let's say if you have let's say your big hospital system and the central hub is in a big city, But there's satellite hospitals or other clinics that are part of your system. Then maybe you organize a clinic. At that campus and people drive to you to get the shots you know from other places, but you know, in simply still went, But when it gets rolled out to a much broader group of Americans Pharmacy will be involved. There will be less vaccination clinics also, and so in Maine, for example, they're thinking, how is that? What's the best way to vaccinate people? In the dead of winter when it's proving outside, right? You wanted people to be outside. So they're thinking about maybe using car washes. Because carwashes have been in and out and the vaccine Jer could stand inside. Well, it's heated and just wear their protective stuff. Not like all the parkers of gloves and stuff and you can drive through. Roll down your window. Get the shot. Drive out. We're speaking with Lena son. Health reporter on the National Staff of the Washington Post. She's got a good story inside old now comes the hardest part getting a Corona virus vaccine from loading dock to upper arm arts. You referenced these front line health care workers in line to get the vaccine also essential workers, which would include him because, he said, they come from a lot of the minority communities right in the sense of workers. So here's how it works. The federal government Is going to set up a list of recommendations for who should get the vaccines first, because when they when they get finally authorized by the Food and Drug Administration, there's not gonna be enough for everybody. Who Who should who should be the priority to get it first. Ah, lot of people think that it will be health care workers on the front line. So these are not just doctors and nurses but custodial folks, people who are in direct contact with patients. And then the other essential workers. You know, every state is going to have different essential workers, right Snowplow driver in Minnesota will be essential. But maybe the mosquito catcher in Florida will be essential. Thanks. Leena Leena, Son Health reporter at the Washington Post. Coming up next, the political turkeys of 2020. This year. Michigan businesses have had to adapt and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation was right there alongside them, hoping to connect businesses to new resource is meet new partners and access the additional capital They needed right from the start. If your business needs support to reach its new potential, the M.

Washington Post Jer Leena Leena Food and Drug Administration Son Health reporter Maine Americans Pharmacy Michigan Economic Development federal government reporter Lena Michigan carwashes Minnesota Florida National Staff
"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:21 min | 10 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

"A couple of days to get shots. The drive thru model has seen T work pretty well for testing. Some say that could work well for vaccines. But with winter weather coming is that something that you think will pan out What states are doing now is they're trying to figure out short term like immediately. How they will do it when they just get you know, maybe tens of millions of doses as the manufacturing capacity ramps up and more doses are available. Then they can vaccinate more people. So in Maine, they're thinking about using Right through sites like car washes, and why our car wash is interesting because that's gotta entrance and exit and the person standing in the middle vaccinating. Can stand there just wearing their personal protective gear because car washes are heated, so they're protected from the snow in the cold so you could drive through. Roll down your window. Stick out your arm get a jab. You drive off and the vaccinators is not out in the freezing weather. That's something for later on when it becomes a little bit more widespread. Pharmacies are also going to be involved in getting the vaccines and the modern. A vaccine on Lee has to be kept at minus 20, which is the same temperature for lots of other medications. So as we move closer into next year middle of next year, more people will get vaccines. They'll be more widely available, and that's where the idea is for pharmacies and doctors offices to be able to give this more readily. Washington Post comments. Lena son. And that's cool. Most Tom Cutler, the World Health Organization is asking for more research and information on why drugmaker AstraZeneca's Corona virus vaccine has such widely different efficacy rates. Vaccine produced with the help of Oxford University reported that it was about 70% 70% effective overall. However, it said it was 90% effective when people were given a half dose first and then a full dose with second shot. One of the issues is that no one over the age of 55 Was in that group. And I'm not privy to the details of AstraZeneca and Oxford University's tests, But I can tell you if you have any older relatives in your family, you know that the senior flu shot is stronger than the ones the rest of us get. So that same idea might and again, I say might Be playing into it. There. It's.

AstraZeneca Oxford University Washington Post flu Tom Cutler Maine Lee World Health Organization
"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 11 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

"Confronts the drive thru model has seen t work pretty well for testing. Some say that could work well for vaccines. But with winter weather coming Is that something that you think will pan out? So what states are doing now is they're trying to figure out short term like immediately how they will do it when they just get, um you know, maybe tens of millions of doses. As the manufacturing capacity ramps up and more doses are available. Then they can vaccinate more people. So in Maine, they're thinking about using Drive through sites like car washes, and why our car wash is interesting because that's got it entrance and exit and the person standing in the middle vaccinating. Can stand there just wearing their personal protective gear because car washes are heated, so they're protected from the snow in the cold so you could drive through. Roll down your window. Stick out your arm. Get a jab. You drive off and the vaccinators is not, you know, out in the freezing weather. That's something for later on when it becomes a little bit more widespread pharmacies are also going to be involved in I'm getting the vaccine and the modern A vaccine does only have to be kept at minus 20, which is the same temperature for lots of other medications. So as we move closer into next year, middle of next year, more people will get vaccines. They'll be more widely available, and that's where the idea is for pharmacies and doctors offices. To be able to give this more more readily. Well as you mentioned at the top. There are several moving pieces that have to be addressed right now and you address a lot of those in your article. Sorry, we didn't have time to get rid, get two more of them. But we do urge folks to read your piece in the Washington post Washington post dot com. That's Lena Son. Nobody's time now. 11 50. It's time to check your money news as we do it 20 and 50 Pass each hour there. Propel insurance Business update. And here once again. Jennifer Kasinga billionaire Walton family that controls the.

Washington Maine Jennifer Kasinga Lena Son Walton family
"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:57 min | 11 months ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

"In front. The drive thru model has seen t work pretty well for testing. Some say that could work well for vaccines. But with winter weather coming. Is that something that you think will pan out? So what states are doing now is they're trying to figure out short term like immediately how they will do it when they just get, um you know, maybe tens of millions of doses as the manufacturing capacity ramps up. And more doses are available. Then they can vaccinate more people. So in Maine, they're thinking about using drive through sites like car washes, and why our car wash is interesting because that's got it. Entrance and exit and the person standing in the middle vaccinating can stand there just wearing their personal protective gear because car washes are heated, so they're protected from the snow and the cold. So you could drive through. Roll down your window. Stick out your arm get a jab. You drive off and the vaccinate er is not, you know, out in the freezing weather. That's something for later on when it becomes a little bit more widespread. Pharmacies are also going to be involved in getting the vaccines and The Moderna vaccine does only have to be kept at minus 20, which is the same temperature for lots of other medications. So as we move closer into next year middle of next year, more people will get vaccines. They'll be more widely available, and that's where the idea is for pharmacies and doctors offices. To be able to give this more more readily. Well as you mentioned at the top. There are several moving pieces that have to be addressed right now and you address a lot of those in your article. Sorry, we didn't have time to get rid, get two more of them. But we do urge folks to read your piece in the Washington post Washington post dot com. That's Lena son. Come on. It's time. 9 50 YEAR Propel Insurance Business Update now billionaire Walton family that controls Wal Mart is among a group of investors backing a startup aiming to design at home. Kobe 19 tests to sell for his little is $10. At the retail giant stores and elsewhere. Now diagnostics incorporated based 20 miles south of Walmarts Corporate headquarters has filed requests for emergency authorization from the FDA for a cup of 19 antibody blood test. Modern meet a Canadian maker of meat substitutes of plans to enter the U. S market has struck a co packing agreement with California based Real Vision Food. Modern Meets offerings include plant based versions of burgers and crab cakes. The Canadian company says the plans to get its products and as many West Coast retailers as possible. That's your money now. Barely mixed on Wall Street. The Dow is up 215 points and NASDAQ now is just actually this moment popped it. Ah, half a point into positive territory, the S and P 500. Is up 10, and if you want to clean your floors and not have to empty the container is often oh, and for less the price to check out low season of savings event and pick up an L G chord. Zero Compressor court. Let's stick Vacuum available and lows. Exclusive vintage wine color. It doubles your cleaning.

Washington Maine FDA Lena son Wal Mart Modern Meets Kobe West Coast Walton family California U. S The Moderna
"lena sons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"lena sons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of the problem has been with political interference from the White House and higher ups at a jet, pressuring the CDC to issue guidance or change guidance or not include things and guidance, so that Those recommendations to the public were delayed and watered down. Joining us now is Lena Son Health reporter at The Washington Post. Thanks for joining us, Lena Happy to be here. Wanted to talk about the CDC and what's been going on throughout this pandemic that we're going through. It's been around for a long time for a while. It was the most admired public health agency. But there's been a series of missteps starting at the very beginning of the pandemic with a botched rollout of testing kits, which kind of put us behind. The latest thing we've encountered was the guidance on aerosols that they had to retract, saying it was kind of a rough draft they working on. There's a lot of things that are going on in the CDC right now. You know, maybe public confidence is not all there right now. Selina. Tell us a little bit about what's going on with the CDC. Well, I think that your last point is definitely true. The trust in CDC is at an all time low, and when you're dealing with a public health crisis, your main weapon is trust and the reason why there's loss of institutional credibility at this time when the United States so desperately needs to know whom to trust. Is, as you mentioned, there's been a series of things. Some are honest mistakes by CDC. The test failure in the beginning of the year really wass, perhaps the original thin, which prevented the United States from being early on how widespread the virus Wass, But then since then, I would say most of the problem has been with political interference. From the White House and higher ups at a jet, pressuring the CDC to issue guidance or change guidance or not include things and guidance so that those recommendations to the public Were delayed and watered down. And then the most recent back and forth was actually an honest mistake. But because there had been this record of Political interference with CDs. His work people didn't believe the CDC when the CDs he says, no, really. This was an honest mistake. Let's talk about Robert Red feeling how he's leading this public health agency right now. When he was appointed to this job he did not have any experience in running a big public health agency is large and his complex as the CDC and in the time of a pandemic In a time of crisis, you need to be having briefing daily to the American public where you say, Here's what we know today about the virus is what we don't know is that we think you ought to do here's what we think works best, but The CDC has been completely silent. There has been no public briefing for three months and I take you back to just last year when we had all those Vaping related lung injury cases. There were briefings several times a week. As soon as they learned something, how it was related to Vaping of vitamin E agitate, and then I take you all the way back to Vika Ebola. The 2009 pandemic, which was a flu pandemic with H one n one was led by CDC the responses they had a briefing almost every day. For six weeks, and we have heard nothing. And when the White House in the briefing, it's trump and you know what he is not a place is exactly Let's talk a little bit about the CDC is role in the rollout of a vaccine once it gets approved, so the CDC is gonna have a major role in that. Obviously, the FDA is going to be approving the vaccine, but from there the CDC is gonna have A lot of influence on how it gets distributed. It's a process that involves multiple agency. So there's been a lot of attention on how safe and effective vaccine will be. That is the job of the Food and Drug Administration, the FDA and it has had its own separate trust issues with its commissioner. And then once the vaccine is approved safe, the CDC has a federal advisory panel that will then decide well pushing to get it first should be health care workers essential workers who among the health care workers should be people who have direct or indirect patient care. Those recommendations are made by the federal advisory panel. To the CDC. The CDC will have almost everything Okay, accepted their recommendations. And then the federal government will let the state know here. The folks we think should get the first initial does because it will be limited numbers of vexing doses. The States will then decide in each of its states of their own states population who among those like four buckets or hide buckets to get it. And then once it comes time to distributing the vaccine, it will be up to the CDC to help lead this very big and complicated effort to get the dose is actually out. Two people. So how does the CDC regain that credibility? One of the issues is Dr Redfield, who has been appointed and the criticism of Dr Redfield is from inside the agency and outside the agency that he has not done enough to stand up for the hard working professionals at Did you see the scientists who are doing the work? But they're not being allowed to talk about it or explain it or when something has changed the guidance. Why did the CDC change its mask guidance? There was nobody from CDC to explain what the science was or why they changed that. So there are some people who say well as a start. Why don't you let the experts talk? That is perhaps not going to be as likely under this administration. So then they're thinking like, come November, 3rd if there is a change, and we have a different director Perhaps that would make a difference. But there are others who feel that the damage has been so deep that the only way to really do reboot is to get rid of the current structure. Seriously. Director is not someone who is Bennett confirmed. Unlike the FDA commissioner or the N i, H director, so that person is appointed by the health secretary, But one thought that is out there is that you replaced. The current leadership structure expediency with a board of governors with staggered terms that last longer than a president, and that's one way to get rid of political interference. Lena Son Health reporter at the Washington Post. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. That's.

CDC White House Food and Drug Administration Lena Son Health Lena Happy reporter United States director commissioner The Washington Post federal government Selina Wass Dr Redfield Director Robert Red president Bennett
"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"lena sons" Discussed on KOMO

"NEWS time, 3 36 As the country continues to battle the Corona virus pandemic President Trump keeps clashing with his top health advisers. Health reporter Lena Son is following this with the for The Washington Post and spoke with Como's Jeff Coachella. This continues to shape up is an administration versus CDC type of situation. What do we know about this? So I recently wrote a story about the pressure that CDC is under and I think it's most illuminating to know about this email that was sent By an adviser at the Department of Health and Human Services, which is the parent agency for City See to the director, and in it, the sender was accusing the CDC of undermining the president because the CDC head Put out a scientific report about the risks. Two pregnant women from Corona virus infection and this is something that really isn't new, because we've seen the president saying the past things like he wanted to slow down testing because he didn't want the numbers to go up. Is this just kind of more of the same in this battle between the administration in the CDC? Well, I think what does it really gives you a window into the kind of political pressure that they're under? This is the nation's premiere Public Health agency. In all past outbreaks, it has been leading the response. It has been out in front, it has been giving briefings daily to the American public. That's what happened in the past. And in this pandemic, which is the worst public health crisis we've had in over a century. They are marginalized. You rarely see top CDC officials giving briefings explaining. Here's what we know about the virus. Here's what we don't know. And this email, I think really shows. The mentality of some folks who work in the administration that you take a scientific report very dry scientific report about the risk of pregnant women and what how they how they could be at risk for severe illness. And then you make the leap to say, because the data is not complete that therefore the agency is undermining the president. So what's it like in the CDC right now? Are the scientists and doctors there? How are they reacting? They're under a lot of pressure. You know, this is also their job, so they're afraid to speak out because they're afraid they're going to lose their jobs. And they also feel demoralized, and they always will also worry that if they release a report if they put out some data How is the White House going to react? And what is the White House going to do with that piece of information? Because we've seen now six months into the pandemic that the administration has really driven more by You know the president's driven more by his instinct and what's going to help his re election and not really the public health recommendations of his Of his top folks, and it's not an either or, you know, reopen the economy or have public health. You know it. It's a balance and you really people don't really feel safe until to come back and go to work and business if they don't have that assurance that they're going to be able to do it safely. That's leader's son. You could read Mohr at washingtonpost dot com. And that's come was Jeff Pooja, Washington State's attorney general will once again take the Trump Administration to court hears comas. Bill O'Neill with more on what's going on. His latest lawsuit challenges the White House that proposed visa rule for international students. The move would revoked visas for international students if their schools decide to hold classes remotely. That rule would take effect July 15th. Ferguson says. Some 27,000 international students attend school in Washington, spending approximately $1 billion in the state each year. California filed a similar lawsuit earlier this week below Neil Camo news. Come on news time is 3 40 times ahead over the Harley exterior sports desk with Como's bill sports looked like the Huskies and kooks will play against Pac 12 opponents exclusively this fall. As we first told you on Comeau News yesterday, the Big 10 conference decided tow have its schools play League only sports scheduled this fall. Nicole are back with athletic reports that Pac 12 will do the same, and that Michigan in Washington football game September 5th has already been canceled. The Huskies also have nonconference games at home against Sacramento State and Utah State. They'll need to replace Seattle Sounders kick off their group competition tonight against San Jose in the MLS is back soccer tournament. Heat and humidity in Orlando, Florida, so the teams will be allowed five substitutes and water breaks. Seattle Mariners first Summer camp Intra squad game going on this afternoon A T Mobile park. Players and coaches tested again for covert 19 and have to stay well distanced in the dugouts. Kyle Lewis swatted along home run off Justin done, but the right hander believes he's ready for real baseball just really now getting back into competing and started like that fire inside understanding understanding that it's time to.

CDC president Department of Health and Human White House Jeff Coachella Public Health agency Trump Huskies Seattle Mariners Lena Son The Washington Post reporter Washington Como Orlando Bill O'Neill Sacramento State director Jeff Pooja
"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"lena sons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That was Cardiff Garcia and Steve and expect this episode was produced by Camille Peterson Lena sons Geary isolator woods was fact checked by Britney credit Amanda Rogic this is NPR thanks for listening Kurtz amazing how helpless unions became so powerful yeah the data here just tells a really interesting and powerful story and the guy what is coming up next on how I built this what kind of today are stories about an entrepreneur whose life completely changed when a good friend was diagnosed with skin cancer so she decided to create her own sunscreen without knowing anything about how to market it or how to distribute it I had created the sunscreen swipes and apparently the stripes were you should so I would go around to stores during that period and swipes were always gone and they were just wiped off the shelf but the problem was I knew that my sales couldn't be great if there were no products on the shelves and so I go into as many stores as I could with swipes in my bag and literally like stock the shelves like I give them products which is crazy right from NPR how I built this show that innovators entrepreneurs keyless stories behind the movements on the show today hello Holly thaggard decided it's strange in the news every day and that every time of year and how that idea grew into a multi million dollar brand supergroup.

Cardiff Garcia Steve Amanda Rogic Kurtz NPR Holly thaggard Camille Peterson Lena Britney
"lena sons" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"lena sons" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

"I'm Alison Aubrey and I cover. Health of them. Uh You know there are a lot of diets out there and we didn't even get to talk about all of them. There's called thirty. Intermittent intermittent fasting meal replacement diets. And for some of you out there. One of these might just be right for you now. This is usually the point point and our episode where we give you some key takeaways and I know we through a lot of information at you but we really just want you to remember these questions when you're trying to choose a diet. What do you like to eat? Who Do you tend to eat with? What sort of fits diet comfortably into your lifestyle? I also hate the idea of making the thing that I love and enjoy. That has happy for me. Which is food making it so regimented words to where it's unhappy? Yeah you know. Why do so many people do that? I don't know now. I'm not about that life. If you like what you hear. Make sure to check out our other life kit guides. NPR Dot org slash life kit there. You'll find guide about how to find money it didn't you had sounds good right and while you're there subscribe to our newsletter so you don't Miss Anything we've got more guides coming out every month on all sorts of topics and here as always is a completely random tip this time from NPR intern. Lena Sons Gabri suffused groucho wooden floor furniture in your house. One good way to cover the scratch is taking a walnut and rubbing it up against the scratch. The oil from the walnut will hide the scratch. If you've got a tip or one is suggested topic for our next guide emails at life kit at NPR DOT org. I'm Alison snobbery. Thanks for listening.

Choose The Best Diet For You

Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

17:51 min | 1 year ago

Choose The Best Diet For You

"I'm Alison Aubrey and I cover. Health of them. Uh You know there are a lot of diets out there and we didn't even get to talk about all of them. There's called thirty. Intermittent intermittent fasting meal replacement diets. And for some of you out there. One of these might just be right for you now. This is usually the point point and our episode where we give you some key takeaways and I know we through a lot of information at you but we really just want you to remember these questions when you're trying to choose a diet. What do you like to eat? Who Do you tend to eat with? What sort of fits diet comfortably into your lifestyle? I also hate the idea of making the thing that I love and enjoy. That has happy for me. Which is food making it so regimented words to where it's unhappy? Yeah you know. Why do so many people do that? I don't know now. I'm not about that life. If you like what you hear. Make sure to check out our other life kit guides. NPR Dot org slash life kit there. You'll find guide about how to find money it didn't you had sounds good right and while you're there subscribe to our newsletter so you don't Miss Anything we've got more guides coming out every month on all sorts of topics and here as always is a completely random tip this time from NPR intern. Lena Sons Gabri suffused groucho wooden floor furniture in your house. One good way to cover the scratch is taking a walnut and rubbing it up against the scratch. The oil from the walnut will hide the scratch. If you've got a tip or one is suggested topic for our next guide emails at life kit at NPR DOT org. I'm Alison snobbery. Thanks for listening.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lena Sons Gabri Intern
"lena sons" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"lena sons" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This message comes from. NPR sponsor. State farm. Why do you need state farm? Renter's insurance that's because it helps protected this stuff. Landlords don't like your furniture that gets drenched by a broken pipe state farm renter's insurance find agents or get a quote at State Eight Farm Dot com support also comes from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi Minnesota. Millions of American businesses are using Google Google tools to grow online learn more at Google dot com slash grow. Dr Lisa Cook got her PhD economics about three decades ago. And she's also one of the OPOKU mentors and lately. Dr Cook says she in Anna have spent a lot of time trying to answer a simple question. Why are black women and missing? There's something happening and there's something that is deterring black women in particular from pursuing this major and this field. This career here is an incredible data point from the American Economic Association by the most recent count. This was in the year twenty seventeen there were one thousand one. One hundred and fifty total economics awarded only seven of those went to black women and that number has barely budged in two decades now in our chats. Dr Cook Anna site a few reasons for this. The first is it. There is a pipeline problem for there'd be more black women as PhD's there. I need to be more black female undergraduates taking economics and preparing for a career in economics. And for that to happen there needs to be more black girls in middle school and in high school taking advanced math classes. And this is where the problem begins says Dr Cook. What we know is that black girls are being under recommended for AP AP Calculus and this is the gateway to doing economics as an undergraduate and certainly a gateway to doing it at the level Anna herself from members that this happened to her when she was in high school and then even after? She got the college when a lecturer question whether she'd be able to do the math required for an economics. I agree someone literally asked me. Are you sure you know about the mathematical rigor. It takes to become an economist. Me Not a whole math major. Yeah what's and this was before I even knew this person. This was a knew. Nothing about me. They just looked at me. They said I don't think you can do this. You should settle for a masters Dr Cook notes that this pipeline problem for black women has hardly made any progress lately and here. There is a distinction to be made with black men who were also heavily under-represented in economics. I mean what we know. Is that between two thousand six and and two thousand fifteen. The number of undergraduates who were majoring in economics who were black men increased by forty four percent. What we know uh-huh about black women is that that number increased over the same period by one percent and that's that's just Jari it's like you know? Did aliens come and still still all these black women who would have majored in economics. Otherwise another reason for the shortage of black women in economics is what they experienced once they do enter for the profession. Dr Cook was on the Committee. At the American Economic Association that recently survey the professional climate within the economics profession and it included long long passages on the experiences of black women they are particularly subject to discrimination for promotion and pay and we see this in the research not just in the a study but also in the research we see that Black women are not retained like their other appears if they get an outside offer for example at a university. They're more likely to be let go. The survey found that sixty two percent of black women had had experienced racial or gender discrimination or both by the way these numbers were high for all women but black women had the highest followed closely by Latina economists. Who who also face similarly high barriers within economics? The survey also found that black women most often reported having to take specific actions to avoid discrimination in or harassment for example by choosing not to attend a particular graduate school or not attending a conference even changing what they teach in class as a someone who wants to get a PhD in economics and a further highlights the survey's finding the published economics papers of black women and of other underrepresented. Groups are are not often cited by other scholars the currency in academia and arguably even in policy and sort of economics research in a broad broad sense is research like if you can't get published or if people don't cite your work or people are acknowledging the contributions that you are making into the field you can be effectively shut out beyond the straightforward injustice of what black women in economics have to face and Dr Cook. Say say there are other reasons why they're small numbers matter for one thing they're under representation can potentially influence policy take the Federal Reserve Board. The Fed that employs four hundred and six economists on its staff. Only one is a black woman and of the seventy-nine economists at the Fed who were officers and have positions of leadership leadership. Not a single one is a black woman. That's alarming because that means that policies are being made monetary policy that affects. Everybody anybody Those policies are being made without a significant input and often Black women and Minority Artis groups are the canaries in the coal mine for For An economy here is one example of what Dr Cook is talking about before the last big recession the one that started about a dozen years ago the unemployment rate for black and Hispanic Americans started rising earlier in more steeply than the unemployment rate for White Americans and also the problems in the housing market. Were disproportionately concentrated in black and Hispanic households. And the Fed. And other policymakers might have recognized these trends ends earlier might have understood that there were signs of what was to come for the rest of the economy if it had more diverse people working for it highlighting them people from those communities cities where the problem started Anna words that a similar dynamic would also apply to the kind of research that economists do within academia and so I think the economics research that would result from a profession that represented the world would be just that research that represents the world that addresses the concerns earns and the issues that people within the world face to help make that happen and has co founded the sadie collective which is named after the first black economics. Phd Sadie Alexander and the group brings together black women at different stages of their careers in economics and for her part. Dr Cook says that those terrible findings from the survey have actually made her more determined to find a solution. I was in a bit of shock. Just weeding some of the The responses and that deepened my resolve to say to people like Anna. Don't leave don't leave. I'm still here. There are many of us still here and people are asking how we we can change doctor cooking and teamed up to read a New York Times. op-ed on this topic a couple of months ago and we'll have a link to it. NPR Dot org slash money we will also linked to the AA professional climate survey into the research of other communists like the near Francis in Rhonda sharp that was cited in our chats with Dr Coast and with Anna special thanks thanks to cloudy Assam. The director of macroeconomic research at equitable growth for sending us the numbers about the Fed. This episode was produced by Lena. Sons Gary fact check by Jared Marcel South and our editor is Patty Hirsch. The indicator is a production of N._P._R...

Dr Lisa Cook Dr Cook Anna Google Fed American Economic Association State Eight Farm Dot NPR Phd Sadie Alexander PhD Dr Coast OPOKU New York Times. lecturer harassment Connecticut California director Federal Reserve Board