20 Burst results for "Leland Stanford"

"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:14 min | 3 months ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to innovation Hub and Sarah Miller. This is a story about a family. It's also a story of outrageous fortune, political self dealing and great tragedy. And I'm going to start with the tragedy because that's how the family is largely remembered. Today It happened in Italy, where a California couple was on vacation with their son. They had been trying to have a child for 18 years, and then finally they have Leland and he was, by all accounts, not only a really nice kid, but he was rather precocious in many different ways. A highly intelligent, remarkable child. Anybody would have loved him. Roland Walk is a historian who teaches at San Francisco State University. But while they were on a grand tour of Europe, he succumbed to typhoid at age 15. This was an enormous heartbreak is anybody whose experience or been around anybody who's experienced the death of a child? Can begin to understand is it's It was horrific for them. Jenny and her husband, who like his son was named Leland had everything money could buy. But the death of their 15 year old was devastating. The writer Mark Twain said that Leland Sr at once lost all interest in life. So the couple made a decision that reverberates to this day a decision to memorialize Leland by creating a school named after him, and they had this huge ranch 8000 acres in Palo Alto, California, and that's where they began the university. It is legally. Leland Stanford junior. University, Leland Stanford Jr had been slated to attend Harvard, but instead, his death began a Siri's of events that created a new powerhouse university. And an area around it. Silicon Valley that would change the modern world. Ironically walk, says Leland, Stanford senior who had actually made the piles of money that it would take to start this new university. Was, if anything, an anti intellectual, He was either expelled or he dropped out of three successive Secondary schools, so he didn't have what we would have today's the equivalency of a high school diploma. He was an absolute failure. There's no way that he was gonna even be able to be allowed to take a tour of the Stanford University campus today, but just because the elder Stanford seemed ill suited to start a university That didn't stop him. Being Underqualified had never stopped him. It hadn't stopped him from embarking on a scandalous political career or an exploitive business career. It hadn't stopped him from becoming a technological pioneer so powerful, he fundamentally change this country. This was the absolute not only high tech of the time, but the massively so you could think about is Google Apple Facebook all rolled into one. What Leland Stanford did through a bunch of shifty means, which we will get Teo. Is Nick the country together with railroads. At the time, it seemed impossible laying tracks through mountain ranges all the way out to the West that would have created a network country. But the technology seemed about his remote is the Internet. Stanford, though, got it done. The federal government was completely well, certainly the northern forces of the federal government completely behind financing a transcontinental railroad. Not only because the civil war was taking place, and they were afraid of losing the West to become a slave state that also they were concerned about their was a Mormon insurrection, and they worried about another separatist movement there. The story of Leland Stanford is not well known, but it says a lot about how much and in some ways how little America has changed. Roland Walk, is the author of the book American Disruptor, The scandalous Life of Leland Stanford, and he says Stanford would come to be worth more than the state he was helping to mold California. And he would do it in part by truly being a self made man and in part by stealing from Californians and from federal taxpayers. Stanford was from New York he'd lived in Wisconsin, but his life got really colorful when he arrived in San Francisco during the gold rush. Where things were a little different from how they are now think of a dystopian back in all, if you will. We're talking about a place. Where was 95% men who are here to make a quick buck and we're making quick bucks. The fortunes that were rolling into San Francisco from the Goldfields were enormous, so the spending of money on particularly gambling And some of the gambling was really horrific. For example, the original mission mission Dolores, here in San Francisco, was the site of where they would bring in grizzly bears and bulls and put him in a marina and let them fight to death. And they would all be cheering and throwing bets down. The streets were just completely filthy, that rats everywhere. Fires were taking place engulfing the entire little Pueblo, which became a huge boom town on a very regular basis. There were prison ships off the coast, where they use the abandoned ships of people coming around the horn and across the Pacific from China, for example. It wasn't the kind of place that you would want to bring your mother in law into this world steps. Stanford, A man who by this time had failed at a lot. His brothers were already out in California, and they decided Stanford should open a store catering to gold miners. Which is when things started to get sketchy and very, very lucrative. So he goes up there, and he opens up a little Stanford brother store where he starts selling cigars and liquor and and mining equipment and stuff like that. But Stanford had managed to become a lawyer when he was Wisconsin. So he went to the county supervisors. They're in that county, which would been plaster county at the time, and he said to them, You know what you need a justice of the peace. Why don't you appoint me justice of the peace? And they said, Okay, sure, You could be justice of the peace, So they're showing his first rials. Signs of being able to be not only an entrepreneur but conflating. Public office with his ability to make money ran his courtroom in Hiss Saloon, He opened up a saloon. Where better, Where better to run a courtroom really than in a saloon. You would have looked forward to that is a former reporter. I think that would have been a great story, but perhaps by today's standards, even by The standards of those days. That was a pretty remarkable and brazen thing to dio. But obviously he made a lot of money, and it taught him an important lesson. You know, putting these two things together. Having political power using that leveraging a little bit for my own private fortune seems to work pretty well. And that was a profound lesson for him. That lesson would become most helpful when a young engineer named Theodore Judah came a lot. Duda had pitched the venture capitalists of San Francisco, though they probably didn't call themselves that then on a great discovery he had made he had found a pass through the Sierra Nevada Mountains. A past that could complete the network of railroads linking the U. S. But for a while, no one seemed to care. So then he goes up to Sacramento, and he goes to a small group of businessman and he says, Hey, you know, here's this great plan, and they all say thanks, but no thanks. But in the back of the room There's this guy named Collis Huntington and call us Huntington to say, very wily trader who also came out right after the beginning of the gold rush and call us Huntington had a store right next to Stanford store. And he saw Stanford is a guy who made a really great front man. If they were going to get some government money, maybe Stanford could be going to some political office. So they said, Hey, you want to be my partner, Leland Stanford and a couple of the guys. Hopkins and Crocker. And come up to the office like tomorrow night and tell us about your plan. This way. Leland Stanford was introduced to the possibility of cashing in on this marvelous big high tech. Entrepreneurial enterprise of the Early part of 18 late 18 fifties. So you know, I've heard all my life as I think Many people have about robber barons like Vanderbilt and Carnegie. You say, Though Stanford might have been more successful than many of the people that we've heard of as having sort of built America, Um, you know, in the sort of second half of the 18 hundreds Why was he more successful? And and then? You know, why isn't he in that pantheon? Well, of course, we have to define success. And everybody has a completely different idea of success, right? But if we're going to measure business success, I sort of an Ah Normative, you know, standard way He had many more employees than any Carnegie's or any Rockefeller, said 12 15. Some estimate the 20,000 employees working under him..

Leland Stanford Stanford Leland Leland Stanford Jr California San Francisco Stanford store Roland Walk San Francisco State University Leland Sr Wisconsin Sarah Miller federal government America Europe Italy Google Palo Alto China Harvard
"leland stanford" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:05 min | 5 months ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Monthly donors. Charlie, KIRK DOT COM, slash report. Okay, Laurie from Texas. She says Charlie I love the idea that president, trump, Ford in his executive order about creating a statue garden of American heroes. What statute you go in there that he may be missing, maybe yours. I don't think so. Thank you so much lower. That is very very kind. Okay so. I saw the list. It's pretty amazing. I think babe. Ruth is in their Amelia Earhart, so many I don't know Frederick Douglass made it in there but Frederick Douglass one of my favorite figures in American history. He was an abolitionist, and he was a Republican Black man is incredible thaddeus Stevens. I hope in there. If you didn't make it, I, sure hope you would one of the original abolitionists that was an incredible guy, and really loved his country and fought for abolition, even when it was so difficult and so hard. Let me, think who else that would be missing in the United, states hoped Dwight D. Eisenhower would be there one of the most complete. People in our country's history Arnold Palmer I've always liked Arnold Palmer and it's not just a drink. He was very admirable and a variety different ways. Vince Lombardi. I live always loved Vince Lombardi. He's terrific and he helped. Start the the sports as we know it the National Football League, and of course the. Merging of two two leagues, the AFL NFL Alexander Graham Bell of course, the founder of the telephone, the great inventors I think throughout our country's history need to be recognized Jonah Sulk, who came up with the polio vaccine in the nineteen thirties. And Not Henry, Ford I do I do have appreciation for the company. He built, but and reported. Let's just say a questionable history in some ways that has been revealed that I don't know if I'd do a statue. A Henry. Ford I don't think Ford should be renamed though I'm not one of those actual I drive a Ford around because they didn't. Take government money when the Chrysler and GM did side on appreciate that as much. No I. Don't think Mister Producer said. Do you think there should be a statute now? I don't think there should be a statute to Yale. Nor do I think there should be a staff statue to Leland Stanford. Leland Stanford helped build the American railroads of which was an admiral taking, but he did use a lot of. Let's say questionable. Slave Labor quasi slave labor, Chinese Labor Jonathan. Edwards who was a preacher of the American Revival I. Think would be incredible. Jonathan Edwards and that Jonathan Edwards now the John Edwards that was preaching. The American awakening helped really contribute to the founding of our country. Andrew Jackson. I would hope be there just because I'm a big Andrew Jackson Fan despite his. Let's say moral misteps I think. He was a terrific president. Generally a phenomenal President United States of America Teddy Roosevelt, but he's already got his face on. Mount Rushmore so I think he's. He's off to a pretty good start. I don't think you need another statue..

Ford president Vince Lombardi Arnold Palmer Frederick Douglass Charlie I Jonathan Edwards Leland Stanford Laurie President United States Dwight D. Eisenhower Henry Texas Teddy Roosevelt National Football League Alexander Graham Bell Mount Rushmore Andrew Jackson Amelia Earhart trump
The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

Casefile True Crime

04:39 min | 10 months ago

The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

"The Californian city of Stanford laws in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County just under an hour drive from San Francisco covering any land area of two point. Eight Square Miles Stanford is adjacent to Palo Alto one of the principal cities of the affluent and progressive Silicon Valley which is served as an incubator for many prominent and influential technological enterprises. Over the years including Apple Google facebook and Tesla Stanford is home to the prestigious eight thousand Dak- Stanford University a private co educational and Non Denominational College and Research Institution. Many of the city's residents students faculty members who live on or Iran campus in a range of accommodations including Goma. Trees Co ops. Row Houses Fraternities sororities single family homes and condominiums established in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The university was founded by railroad magnate and California Senator Leland Stanford and his wife Jane. In memory of their only child Leyland junior he died of typhoid fever. At Age Fifteen. The land began as the stock farm with OAK dotted fields and soon developed into one of the largest university campuses in the United States despite sustaining heavy damage from two separate earthquakes in nineteen. I seek since and nine hundred ninety nine. The university has managed to maintain its original California mission architecture from the light. Eighteen hundreds characterized by embellished yellow sandstone long low and wide colonnades open arches and two red terra cotta tiled roofs at the heart of the campus is the main quadrangle the university's oldest structure stretching. Iva seventeen acres. The main quad is raised Vira Mile Long Palm Tree lined road and has an inherent data section. Both of which feature sprawling lawns courtyards and interconnected buildings housing. Various departments classrooms and administration offices regarded as a national center for Research Stanford Phages More Than One hundred and twenty research. Institutes exploring a range of topics from particle physics to International Studies Given it's proximity to silicon valley and it's impressive academic and athletic performance records. It is renowned as one of the top universities of the world. Many students go on to have a lustrous careers in their field of expertise with past alumni including noble laureates Pulitzer Prize winners and Presidential Medal of freedom recipients. One hundred and fifty thousand visit as drawn to the faint grants annually to explore it too many features including apiaries shops and gardens as well as a stadium. Golf course satellite dish and church liking trials around the campus outskirts off of use of the rolling countryside and attract by more than fifty thousand visitors a year in the early nineteen seventies. Just over eleven thousand students were enrolled at Stanford University and the Kanta coach in these men that had started in the mid nineteen sixties was still a major aspect of college lawf- students fighting for social and political change would often stage protests scenes and formed community action groups for issues such as racism. Women's liberation and gay rods. Leslie Marie Po love graduated from Stanford in nineteen seventy two with a bachelors degree in history by the beginning of the following year. The twenty one year old was working as a clerk at the north. Santa Clara Canny Low Library in Palo Alto. Leslie hoped to become a lawyer and recently been accepted into law school at the University of Pennsylvania though classes had yet to begin at three. Pm on Tuesday. February. Thirteen Leslie left work. For the day driving off in her seventy-two Orange Chevrolet Nova the coworkers presumed. She was heading directly to her time in the Los. Altos hills where she lived with her widowed mother Florence. But Leslie never arrived

Dak- Stanford University Leslie Marie Po Stanford Palo Alto Senator Leland Stanford Tesla Stanford Santa Clara County California Santa Clara Canny Low Library Goma Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Row Houses Fraternities Principal Typhoid Iran Apple United States Non Denominational College Leyland
Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

The Past and the Curious

09:09 min | 11 months ago

Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

"Edward Mobridge was born in eighteen thirty and kingston upon teams in England. His birth name was Edward Muggeridge but as he marched through the circumstances dances life he would change his name many times. Such a thing was pretty uncommon in the eighteen hundreds but he was pretty uncommon man. His hometown town was the historical site of coronations where the early British kings were crowned and ceremony and the earliest of. These monarchs were Saxons and perhaps inspired by that the young man would change his name to Mobridge and adopt the old spelling of his first name. Edward The vowel heavy spelling E. A. D. w. e. a. a- are D-. It looks like eat weird but sounds like Edward seeking adventure. He left for America at the age of twenty two telling his grandmother that if he didn't succeed and the lofty goals he had for his own life. He'd never retired. He arrived in New York with a bunch of extra bells and his name and little else he. He worked there for a bit but was thirsty for more. So he left for California soon after it was eighteen fifty-five during the gold rush when scores of people headed west to mind for the valuable metal. He sought his fortune through other means. Though he opened a bookstore in San Francisco the city was growing in the people had money need to spend by most accounts he was mild mannered and his business was pretty successful in the bustling city in eighteen. Sixty he made plans to head back to Europe for. We're a visit and to do some business. But he missed the boat so instead he booked passage on a Coniston goggin across the American continent to head head back east and from there he would sail to his native England. Kind of still go. aggies were the common covered wagon that you see all of the images of westward travel. It was was a fateful trip and the first time that a horse would fundamentally alter his life. These wagons were pulled by horses. The one carrying Mobridge was pulled by a team of six six mustangs but somewhere in Texas the horses pulling his wagon broke loose and started off leaving the wagon cascading on a high narrow trail above Iraqi fall. The driver couldn't get control and the WAGGON tumbled loaded with passengers and their belongings thinking quickly as the accident that was unfolding. Edward tried to cut an escape hole in the wagons cover but in the commotion he was thrown from the vehicle and hit his head on a rock. During the fall he recovered from the head injury in Arkansas. For three months though he had no recollection of the accident. One of the other passengers had to tell oh him what had happened. In addition to some memory problems he now saw everything in a disorienting. Double Vision Edward also displayed definite personality. Finality changes it was a brain injury. And as you might guess these can have a great impact on a person in his case. The injuries came with aggressive episodes. Grandiose thinking and general unusual behavior the people who had known him before noticed a distinct difference in his personality. After recuperating more New York he headed back to England where he stayed for several years when he returned to America in eighteen sixty seven. He considered himself photographer having learned a lot about the new art form and he had acquired some very nice equipment which he had brought with him. It was still a developing art. In fact the I photograph in history was made in France just four years before Edward was even born. By the time he was working eighteen sixties. The technology was still very limited mid and far from the powerful cameras that we carry in our pockets every day. Edwards equipment filled an entire horse cart in addition to the new career as a photographer he also sported an enormous beard and he called himself by a host of new names including Helius. This was not not the same old Edward. His photography made an impact on the world. He had a definite fascination with stopping time. Just a few years after a man named Matthew Brady Changed America by photographing not just the people of the civil war. But the battle scenes and carnage mobridge was documenting in beautiful detail. Some of America's because most amazing and mysterious natural sites. If you've never been to Yosemite Valley you still probably heard about it's staggering beauty. This led to it being being among the first of the land to be designated as national parks but before it welcomed hordes of tourists to gaze at its beauty weighbridge made some of the first and certainly some of the best photographs of the amazing land. Some of them are so amazing. They look like epic landscape paintings soon. Everyone wanted a piece of Edward. Helius Komo Abridge the same year. He came back to America. The Secretary of State William seward negotiated a deal to buy Alaska Lasca from the Russian Empire. But for years this was called seward's icebox or seward's folly because most people thought it was a costly mistake to buy the enormous swath of northern land in an effort to convince people of its value. The government hired Mobridge to join an expedition travel with his immense. It's photo equipment and a darkroom and photograph the Land Resources and native people of the territory. They are some of the most important documents we have of that time time period still today but it was back in California that his fame truly solidified and it was largely. Thanks to a man who would give his name to Stanford University his name was Leland Stanford and he had a problem he was a robber Baron and oh this was a problem for a lot of other people. This wasn't a problem as so called robber. Baron he like several other industrialised of the late eighteen. Hundreds was rich and powerful but he had gotten that way through some pretty shady and morally questionable ways used political influence and connections to get rich not to mention taking advantage of many less fortunate people he had been the governor head of the railroad a Horse Breeder and he owned what was at the time the largest winery in the world on his gigantic estate. He raised eight hundred racehorses. Feeding these horses alone wasn't expensive task in order to do so. He also operated a a sixty acre carrot farm just for food so you may ask yourself what does a guy like this. Have to worry about Mr Muggeridge. I I have a problem. That's not my name. Mr Mobridge have rows riot again. I have gone long again call me. He Leo's Leo's that's right heels as in the ancient Greek personification of the sun being okay. Okay Helius so I have this theory and it's more than a hunch but I just can't prove it and I may or may not have bet money on it so I I need an answer. So how can he LEO's help. Well he'll ios this concerned horses. You see I believe when a horse runs at some point in its stride dried all four of its speed are above the ground so at some point the horse has touching absolutely nothing yet still moving forward but it happened so quickly that I can't be certain. Do you understand yeah. He Leo's digs that. You want me to prove it with Pictures Helius. I'd like that very much which it's going to cost you. Some money got plenty. Don't worry. Coup crackle added now it was actually a pretty common disagreement of the time and Leland with his stable full of horses and pockets. Full of cash was in a unique position to solve it he just needed. Someone like mobridge invest best craziest and most creative photographer in the public eye to solve technical issues when a horse ran. was there ever a moment when all four of its feet were off of the ground many people believed it could not possibly be true. The first tries to capture the airborne image. Each were failures. It was impossible with the cameras of the day to catch the fast horse. At just the right time the beast was just a blur so they went back to the drawing board. The project was derailed by mobridge being the defendant in a murder case which is another story entirely but once that was over they got back to work. More bridge hung white sheets up along the race track. And whiten the track itself with chalk powder this would reflect any an all light which he knew would help. The camera. Camera capture a clear image of the fast horse next. He designed a camera with quick shutter speed. It may have been the first of its kind as most cameras needed a long Exposure to whatever was being photographed people would have to sit still early photographs. So that they didn't show up as a blur that would not work with a galloping horse.

Edward Mobridge Edward America Mobridge Edward Muggeridge LEO England Leland Stanford California New York William Seward Coronations Saxons Europe Arkansas Coniston Goggin E. A. D. Baron Texas San Francisco
America, Jeff Bezos Bill Gates And Fifty Years discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

10:19 min | 1 year ago

America, Jeff Bezos Bill Gates And Fifty Years discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"In the last fifty years the tech industry has reshaped America it's changed how we communicate our economy and our political landscape the captains of this industry mark Zuckerberg Jeff Bezos Bill Gates they've all become some of the richest people in history and it all happened in Silicon Valley a story of high tech a lot the ghosts were daring entrepreneurs found equally daring investors willing to roll the dice on risky new ventures realized by armies of technological whiz kids all remote from and free of the stultifying influence of the federal government that's the line Silicon Valley and its denizens have touted anyway historian Margaret mera says it's a self serving myth that belies silicon valley's humble beginnings as a remote Cold War research and development hub and the deep ties it fostered with the US government how Silicon Valley went from obscurity to global powerhouse is the subject of America's new book the code Silicon Valley and the remaking of America America's a professor of history at the university of Washington and she joins me now it's good to have you on the show it's terrific to be here thanks for having me so you have written a revisionist history of sorts why is that need it your what's the danger of thinking of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs as these loan calculators well I think tech is all around us tech is no longer off to the side it's were using its products every day and to realize how realizing how we got to now and realizing that it's a story not only of entrepreneurship but also of politics and culture is really important understanding where we go next off now that's interesting so and we're gonna get to that but let's go back to the beginning now yeah well I did Palo alto become the hub of all of this tak a and as you point out in the book it was just the sleepy railroad village in the nineteen fifties but you say two things made a big difference the mom and then the southern Pacific railroad tycoon Leland Stanford that's right Leland Stanford who of course is a man of the nineteenth century not the twentieth or twenty first but in in the eighteen eighty five he and his wife and out and found at the university and sixty years later that university becomes the hub of a growing electronics industry in a valley that before that had mostly been a place of fruit production and canneries it was the beginning of a complete transformation and the catalyst for that was not just the fact that Stanford was there and not just the fact that private industries and companies like Lockheed L. A. base Lougheed opened a major division up there but also because the federal government got into the research and development business in a big way for the first time in the nineteen fifties and then there are these two threads run side by side Stanford and and Cold War industry because you write that Stanford helped shift the center of tech away from and my tea in Boston which was historically the first type of technology and innovation so what was it about Stanford that made it so uniquely suited to being that lab of this burgeoning military industrial complex well Stanford did what no other university dead which was it really completely reorganized itself to meet the needs of the burgeoning Cold War and US military industrial complex at then this is a really important thing to understand you know one of the reasons I wrote this book is because I've spent two decades looking at history of tack and having people ask me here and around the world how you know where it's going to be the next Silicon Valley how do I build a silicon something and and often the other regions have looked at the bay area inside a hot if we have a university there then we're just going to you know at we can build a tech cluster adjacent to it not recognizing how distinct Stanford was it was a private university that had an immense degree of latitude to try to change the way it worked and the people who ran the university in the fifties and the sixties and notably it's dean of engineering and then provost a guy named Fred Terman decided to really reorganize the entire curriculum to beef up physics to create these really powerful research labs that were devoted to things like microwave and radar technology as well as small and advanced electronics no other place did that and Fred turn was the guy who lord Hewlett Packard out right yeah that the secret of of Silicon Valley is not just the tack it's the people right and Fred Terman is a really important character in the early parts of this book because he is not only situated at the this key role at Stanford but he is so instrumental and personally bringing out people and encouraging them to start companies there is another important distinction between Stanford and MIT say that Stanford encouraged people to work outside of academia for the for companies you know themselves the that and also that the companies didn't make their employees sign non competes so you have that that flow of labor yes so the non compete is a really important California hallmark of king of why California and my north California because the state of California other let unlike other states including the state of Washington where I where I am does allow people to job pop and doesn't penalize them you know isn't for non compete agreements are are not are not allowed under California state law but there's a I think that Stanford has this get create this model for collaboration with industry and and creating an opportunity as you said for art for both faculty and students to go back and forth between academia and industry and that was not done that that was something that no other university was doing it and other parts of Stanford looked on it with some horror hit has as higher education kind of selling out to an industry yet to give the most bad reputation and union act in the halls of academe another big part of this story is the post nineteen fifty seven the space race by Nick and Kennedy is putting man on the moon at that started or sparked this start up an explosion in Silicon Valley so how did that get more money flowing to individual entrepreneurs and and why were they Sir are often based here in the west yeah well this is a really great part of the store and it's really important to that head of show how the story of the valley is not just big government and it's not just entrepreneurship it's both and it's actually the wait not only the government spending money but how it float so look you come into the nineteen fifties and you have a lot of electronics a lot of air space a lot of military related activity going on up and down the west coast but when you think about both LA in Seattle you think about building big building airplanes building you know aerospace may not exclusively but that that's kind of the dominance that that the characteristic of the industry was you know building building big things the valley was already building small things it was a small place it was building smaller tronic some communications devices well after October nineteen fifty seven when of America's they the white house's hair is on fire metaphorically because the Soviets have been the first one to get a satellite into orbit there's this huge push for more spending on space the space race kicks off again goes into overdrive and with that starts flowing you know what do you need to build more powerful rockets to send a man to the moon you need very small very light very powerful electronics devices and that is exactly what the valley is building and as more startups settled in the west you have the rise of the venture capitalists and it's really interesting to read in your book about the dawn of that whole game didn't early venture capitalists guys actually drive around Palo alto looking for signs of of nerdy men working on something in her garage is that they could invested they they did it's I mean it's amazing the venture capitalists the beginning we're not fees you now rich swaggering they weren't someone many of them were people who had a great deal of their own money they were young smart guys many of them with business degrees who were managing other rich people's money for them and one of the stories I tell the book is one that was told to me by bill draper led to one of these legendary venture capitalists whose father was a VC whose son and other family members have become very prominent venture capitalists and bill draper talks about driving around with his then business partner pitch Johnson another person I interviewed for the book and how they would just go out in the palm orchards and look for these old sheds that used to be used for drying prunes that might have this sort of sign that was tacked up outside with some funny name that can ended in tron or some kind of made up electronic sounding name and they would show up and they would knock on the door and they say Hey what do you do and I'm a venture capitalist and the and the guy would say what's that it's like I'm someone who can invest in it I can give you some money I'm gonna best in you for for some upside in your company and and that the guys in the print shed would often say will come right on in let's look we'll show you what we're doing so quite as it is it's very is very quite as but it's a wonderful image to think about these these young men getting up early in the day and just driving around looking for deals and is another person VC I talked to for the book read dammit Dennis told me like in those early days there was there was just so much there was so much out opportunity out there and there was very little competition no one else was really tracking the stuff none of the big money guys certainly none of the east coast money men were paying any attention to these little companies the California electronics industry in the northern California electronics industry matures you start getting this generation of men who can come out of the work in these industries and I'm I'm saying man AG again and again deliberately okay this this was an all male all white a world at the time and there's still so white and so male I mean not that much has changed looking into this whole history how is that informed why there hasn't been much problems

America Jeff Bezos Bill Gates Fifty Years Sixty Years Two Decades
"leland stanford" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KCBS All News

"It's technically a band mascot or a band member that and you know that the history of stamper mascots and it's one of these guys I love college football because of the lower right for many years Stanford mascot was the Indians well in the early seventies the students decided that was not the way they want to go with that because of their sensitivity towards our native American funds so the students voted at that time to abolish the Indian mascot and to make a robber barons the mask that that's a better I don't know but but the school administration and and and board of trustees mix that why because Leland Stanford who paid to start the school and named after son Leland Stanford junior was in fact a Robert Baer and he was sick he was a real road magnet in the nineteenth century and was known as a robber Baron so they decided no we're not going to go the the the school president said no no Robert so there was they were mascot less for many years and then in the in nineteen eighty two came the tree which as I mentioned it was not authorized by the school with the band does what it wants and so now it's known as the tree and I think it's a fabulous mascots named after obviously Palo alto the city fell out to the tall tree and there's a but there is an actual told three by the railroad station fell out of so it's technically I guess the mascot is the town mascot except it's not really I don't know it's a you know that one of my favorite things and I hate to go on about this but I love this college lore stuff my favorite things in the basketball season like the last home basketball game they have three tryouts guys the funny and the robber barons is hilarious that's mark Purdy he was the San Jose mercury news sports columnist for many years watch time on KCBS is Jeff Ballenger there were steep losses across the board on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrials fell eight.

football Leland Stanford Robert Baer Baron president sports columnist Jeff Ballenger Palo alto basketball San Jose
"leland stanford" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:52 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Edward ball is the author of the inventor and the tycoon, a gilded age murder, and the birth motion pictures, and we will get the motion pictures because may bridge, you might have guessed is the man who has the genius idea of how to make his pictures move. He's a very enterprising photographer. I our we have Edward Edwards of profile of Leland Stanford who becomes part of the central Pacific, the great railroad magnates of the post civil war, period. The, the last bike is driven in eighteen sixty eight and they become wealthy beyond imagination in the latter part of the nineteenth century known as the today. Meanwhile, Edward my bridge has been home with his mother and his family residence until the war's over. And he comes back to ten in that period. He's been trying to invent things like washing machines, but there are a lot of inventors of that, like, good printing techniques. For putting color, and in tagliatelle printing. And he goes off to Paris at one point, and stumbles across photography, which was all the rage in Paris, photography was the new technology, their digital age any immediately takes to Edward it was as if he'd been looking for his whole life. Yes, it seems almost like an accident. That's why would would encounter this, this new technology and embrace it. He was nearly thirty seven or thirty eight years old when he decided he was going to set aside. Everything you've been doing professionally in book, selling, he say, he tried to become a small time inventor for a period of time at thirty seven he changes his career and decided to pick up a camera and become a photographer returns to California in eighteen sixty six. I believe, and with the help of a friend, whom he had met in New York, MRs sell Celik, the man he met when he got there and eighteen fifty. Yes. That's right. He sets himself up as a photographer for higher. And he's not good with people. He's, he's kind of a reclusive man. He's not socially at ease. And so he's not able to get customers in the most conventional way. That's stock did as portrait subjects that was a very lucrative part of early photography and still today, but my was runner bad as a portrait artist and he began to photograph the outdoors and it just happened that you'll sympathy valley in central California had become a destination for small numbers of adventure travelers. To, to enjoy the rapturous beauty of this is twenty five mile this seven mile long. Use me chasm in central California, and my takes some of the most majestic and arresting photographs of this valley, and they've become big selling art objects, they, they're, they're, they're awarded prizes. They he makes a lot of money from these photographs. And he suddenly has his himself a prosperous career as they've landscape photographer. So at this point, he is known in San Francisco, and in central California, as the man who you want to photograph your land, and your property, which is something he, he knows how to do quite well. And he meets this guy, Leland. Stanford who by this time Leland Stanford has has quite a bit of property. He's a one of the richest men in west of the Mississippi, you suppose this is sometime in eighteen seventy two after he had some dealings with Crocker one of the partners in the central Pacific. Eighteen seventy one actually and. So Stanford, who is the prosecutor just men west of the Mississippi. The president of the central Pacific railroad hires. Edward marv's to photograph is house. Just a normal kind of assignments for a photographer here. I have a beautiful piece of property photograph my house for me. Moy CHU is, as I said rather uncomfortable. Somebody eccentric man possibly had an injury from this stagecoach accident, which affected his personality. He dresses shabbily strings on cuffs of his pants and beat up old hats and, and, and dusty black jackets, and Stanford who favors tuxedos even during workdays and top hats and shoes are shined to brightness of mirrors. And everything is, is quite in his in its place in Stanford's world. This odd couple begin to spend time together and begin to socialize together and begin to talk late into the night and become friends, and they become one of the strangest collaborating pairs that you can imagine in, in the history of invention, and it's their friendship that leads to what I believe is the invention of motion pictures, which ensues of some years later when Stanford gives more another photography assignments to photograph is horses, because he keeps the farm, which is his race horses. Specially trotters at a place that we now know as Palo Alto the home of Leland. Stanford university. The tragedy. However, tuck it in here because my bridge live several lives inside and Edward notes, he has distanced himself from people by dressing, shabbily and staying by himself, he marries, a young woman a woman almost twenty years younger than he is flora, he's fascinated obsessed with her. He stares at her. He takes photographs of her outside, however, he doesn't return affection that she can recognize she's a young woman, he sets up in a house, and he tries to give her all the money, and the and the things that she wants, however, he doesn't give her what she finds adequate affection, and this leads to flora after the birth of their son falling in with another man, whose invented himself Larkins, and this was another profile of the nineteenth century inventing itself for me. Although Larkin's will wind up a villain here. He very much could have been at the right place at the right time to and become one of the one of the gilded ages. Sela. Braided ones, and not one of their rascals Edward. Yes. Talking about a guy called Harry Larkins, who was an Englishman with a polished education, who decided to be his prosperous family behind in London and come to the American west, which he does in about eighteen seventy or so. And he is a smart talking beautifully dressed, man, who seems to be adept at persuading people who, give him their money. And so he arrives in, in San Francisco and. And despite his polished, outward appearance, he finds himself in jail for trying to con another fellow out of out of some of his his travel money. And once he springs himself from jail, he invents this guy. Harry Larkins was rather, hand, some and articulate gentlemen, invents himself as the critic he becomes a writer on the inter- for the Cisco chronicle and he's of a man about town in San Francisco, and he meets Edward mortgages young wife flora downs, and he's deuces, flora, more ridge, and they become lovers. While Edwin Weybridge is off on his photography assignments up and down the west coast and mortgage come. Home and becomes quite suspicious of his wife and one thing leads to another and he discovers that his wife has had this lover Larkin's for more than a year, and he decides in a fit of pique and also in some of the sort of notion of western Justice that Larkins has to pay with his life. So he goes at nights at midnight to a house where he knows Larkins is, is spending, the nights knocks on the door demands to see Larkin's Larkin's presents himself, the door and Edward more average pulls out his Smith and Wesson revolver, and shoots. This men dead. And at this point, why is a well-known photographer. He's well known as a friend of leaving Stanford and Stanford, it seems comes to averages aid when the murder trial in sues, and Stanford helps to get a lawyer for mortgage, it appears to be and after a long and, and sensational trial, which fill the American newspapers for a month and a half in eighteen seventy three four mortgage is acquitted of this murder, which is peculiar because he admitted to it. He's acquitted on the basis of something that was once called justifiable homicide at the time and the place in California in frontier, California, there was this notion that AMAN had a right to kill his sexual rival, and he could be acquitted, if he did that it was a husband's rights to defend the marriage bed to use the language of the day and is quit of his murder. And released. And then he goes back to Mr. Stanford and Stanford welcomes him back with open arms and says, listen, we've got to finish this work on my horses. I've got these thoroughbred horses. And I really wanna know whether horses when they're galloping ever leave the ground. The inventor tycoon when we come back, the invention of motion pictures, and we'll try to get Addison in this picture to gilded age murder and the birth of moving pictures. The inventor in the tycoon by Edward ball. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. This is Dr Howard founder and formulator of balance of nature where changing America one life at a time. I've been vitamins, I had to take because post-cancer cancer post, cardiac situation, but the bows nature of I mean that being so condensed on natural. You know is amazing stuff. I haven't told this good in seven or eight years, I would not be able to do a third of anything, give pigging ballots matrix to have more energy. Yeah, it's a godsend really is experienced Valance of nature difference for yourself for a limited time, all new preferred customers will receive an additional.

Leland Stanford Edward Stanford California Harry Larkins John Batchelor Edward ball murder Larkin San Francisco Edward Edwards Edward marv Mississippi Leland New York Paris Moy CHU
"leland stanford" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Of course, it's really difficult to make estimates. Clearly, the California office was doing really well, in spite of the fact that there was something of a financial panic going on in San Francisco that year it didn't seem to impact Strauss by. At the end of eighteen fifty-five. He'd sent more than eighty thousand dollars home in gold. Yeah. One of the things that really made his business. It'll come over and over that, even when they are difficulties they still managed to pull through and even do pretty well, like people will always need dry goods. They always need clothes and linens and household basics. So it was a really smart business to be in the first place in eighteen fifty six continued expansion of the Strauss enterprise, in California, Levi, sister Fogler, who had changed her name to fanny, when she moved to the United States move to San Francisco. With her husband, David Stearns, and their children to assist with the growing responsibilities of the business, and his brother Louis also join them, it is possible though unconfirmed that his mother Rebecca made the journey as well. And for the first time since moving to the US leave, I actually had a home with an address, that was separate from his business, not living above it or within it indicating that there was this ongoing trend of prosperity. The firm also changed names that year. It went from j Strauss and brother to J, Strauss, brother and company maybe to Levi's contribution, but on all records in California. It was listed as Levi, Strauss. Levi sent more than double the amount to New York in eighteen fifty six that he had in eighteen fifty five that amounted to approximately two hundred thousand dollars. Eventually in the late eighteen sixties Levi changed the name of the California branch to Levi Strauss and company, right? He knows his family members contributions. Eighteen fifty six was also the year that Levi Strauss became involved, along with his brother in law in the committee of vigilance, which was vigilante group made up largely of merchants that form to combat the city's growing political corruption and related violence, while business and politics, largely stayed separate up to that point concerns over, how businesses could be impacted by the lawlessness of men. In power led to the committee of vigilance nominating, and eventually electing many of the city's business leaders into political office. So they've picked people that they knew from other merchants and put them in office because they thought that was safer. And while Strauss did not seem to have any political. Ambitions of his own. He did back the political efforts of the committee, those committees. There were several of them in several places at this time period. And in some places their activities were kind of controversial because there was like an extrajudicial violent capacity in this combat of corruption. So it's like there's a whole bigger story there, but his involvement was really about electing business to city positions. And there had actually been a similar committee in San Francisco. Several years prior to this. That was much more of lake of vigilante law force that thought that they would fill the gap between the crime that was going on. And the police that were obviously to their minds, not doing anything about it. So that existed in San Francisco as well although he was not part about time eighteen fifty seven, the Strauss, family experienced, a financial loss and September the Central America which had picked up passengers and freight in Panama. Including a large shipment of gold went down in a hurricane off the US coast in the Atlantic. More than four hundred people died at an estimated one point five million dollars of gold was lost, including seventy six thousand dollars that was on route to j Strauss, brother and company from Levi, Strauss and company. The wreckage of the Central America was found and much of the treasure recovered in nineteen Eighty-eight. Although there was a significant legal battle over who should get that gold. The thinking of the Central America, a financial panic. There was a lot of gold that New York banks had been expecting on that ship. So when it didn't show up that was it was a significant economic disruption. And yet as seems to be the pattern of his life, Levi, Strauss, whether this storm part of this is because his brothers were the ones shipping him goods. So that meant he didn't have to reassure a supplier of his good credit and be like, no, no, I know. I lost some money, but I will make it up to you. They're like, yeah, we'll just keep going. So the Strauss family, continued, businesses usual. And because other entrepreneurs didn't have the credit or the leverage to do the same thing. Levi's business flourished as other shutdown by the end of the year. He was shipping gold to New York once again, and he had expanded to have offices in the city that were actually separate from his warehouse. House. He was also taking shipments of raw materials from suppliers outside the family, which he then leveraged in deals that got him discounts on the goods that were made from those raw materials, as the country found itself in the grip of the civil war, San Francisco's citizens realize they could eventually be impacted by California had entered the union as the Free State as outlined in the compromise of eighteen fifty. But while most of the city was loyal to the union. There were some concerns about some government officials wanting to allied with the confederacy. After a pro union rally in the city on may eleventh eighteen sixty one at the junction of Montgomery market and posts streets, a resolution was put forth formed a union committee of thirty four this is a committee of respected men. He would uphold the ideals of union fill vacant government, posts, and keep an eye out for treason, Levi, Strauss is one of the men named as a member of this group and one of only three Jewish men included. They were very worried that there were people that were infiltrating, California, who were pro slavery, and that it was going to completely cause an upheaval of everything going on in the state, and particularly in a large city like San Francisco, so they really wanted to try to keep an eye out and prevent such a problem. And when the troops that were stationed at the Presidio were sent east to fight it really left. The people of San Francisco a little bit uneasy and they were fearful without protection, Navan tier group known as the home guard was found. Did that consisted of three thousand men and it sort of served as a makeshift, military force, the home guard and the union committee of thirty four actually disbanded though? When Leland Stanford was elected, California, governor, Stanford was a pro union Republican who was very well respected successful and powerful. So the concerns of some sort of pro confederacy uprising that led to the formation of those two groups for pretty diminished under his leadership Strauss, and his California business continued to do well through all of this, and the prosperity of California's merchants helped keep the country of float through the civil war Strauss had recognized the value of real estate fairly early on and had invested in a number of properties throughout the city, which he often sold as a profit after holding them for some time Levi, Strauss and company also moved into a new space that he purchased in eighteen. Sixty seven was a four story building on battery street, but clearly showed the company's success. The company was known for its excellent and speedy. Service and the ability of its employees to satisfy client needs with even the largest orders. There was a write up where they actually used the word empowered to describe the sales people and clerks at Levi, Strauss. As being able like they were empowered to meet the needs agree to deals with clients, which is sort of a weird word to be using in the eighteen sixties. But there it was. Unfortunately, the late eighteen sixties also came with family loss, as Levi's half sister. Mary died in eighteen sixty six and his mother Rebecca past three years later after Rebecca's death Levi traveled back to New York. And he stayed there for a month, presumably to help settle accounts and get her affairs in order. There's also an embezzlement scandal Levi, Strauss and company are in October. Eighteen sixty six when news broke that a bookkeeper had taken five hundred thousand dollars left the country, while the company, not wanting to scare away, business partners, said that there was no money missing. It also made a statement in an advertisement that the man in question, ES Goodman was no longer with the company. It was not authorized to conduct business on behalf of Levi, Strauss and company, this mix of messages seem to below over while Mr. Goodman, never saw any retribution of the fact that he had taken money from his employer. Quite a lot of money from his employer. Neither the company nor Levi, Strauss person. Finally seem to suffer any negative fallout from it either..

Levi Strauss Levi San Francisco California Strauss Strauss enterprise New York j Strauss United States America Rebecca ES Goodman Montgomery David Stearns embezzlement Leland Stanford Atlantic Louis confederacy
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And met up with the Union Pacific railroad line in Utah. The Chinese had some of the most difficult and dangerous jobs. But Quan says all that didn't get them much respect from their bosses. They were thought of as really just another tool, and so they didn't really record the names of those who died and didn't even bother to collect their bodies or search for them. They were found when spring thaw king after the railroad was done the Chinese worker. Contributions were sometimes recognize and sometimes not fifty years ago at the one hundred anniversary a Representative of the Chinese historical society of America was invited to speak. But then the representatives time was inexplicably cut from the schedule. Max Chang is one of the organizers of this year's event to add what I call it the great Salt Lake salt to the wound. John Volpe, the secretary of transportation gave a speech which basically said who but Americans could lay ten miles of track one day who but Americans could dig tunnels to the solid granite of the Sierras and Qantas. It wasn't rich American industrialists. Who did the hard work didn't see Charles Crocker? Leland Stanford Mark Hopkins down in the railroad hammering away setting black powder explosives. It was his Chinese labourers who did it and they were ignored. Not so at this year celebration, one of the speakers was the current secretary of transportation, Elaine Chao,.

Union Pacific railroad secretary Chinese historical society of Elaine Chao Salt Lake Leland Stanford John Volpe Charles Crocker Utah Max Chang Quan Mark Hopkins Representative Sierras fifty years one day
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California? Not the nineteen ninety six earthquake and fire that destroyed much of San Francisco or last false campfire, which devastated the town of paradise. It was a flood as in the great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial. Inauguration by rowboat as the city was ten feet underwater, it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of China. Knees miners drowned when the Yuba river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry count Barnes bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide wiped out nearly every house in ranch. No one knows how many thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch and economy to a farm in one when it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make a floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hold. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys, I'm like the big earthquake. Everyone expects but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance. These atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turn around don't drown with a perspective..

California San Francisco Debbie Duncan Leland Stanford Yuba river Barnes bridges camp Sierra foothills Sacramento China forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California, not the nine hundred ninety six earthquake and fire that destroyed much of San Francisco or last false campfire, which devastated a town of paradise. It was a flood as an a great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial inauguration by robot as the city was ten feet. Underwater it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of Chinese miners. Drowned when the Uber river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry counterparts bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide white dot nearly every house in rant. No one knows how many thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch in economy to a farm in one. When it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make a floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hope. Old. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys yet. Unlike the big earthquake, everyone expects, but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance about these atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turn around don't drown with a perspective. I'm Debbie Duncan, Debbie, Dunkin writes and reviews children's books from her home on the peninsula. And we invite you to share your thoughts on her commentary by going online to kqeDorg slash perspectives. Support for perspectives comes from leaf KEB racer. I'm an and Bernstein seeking Justice for.

California Debbie Duncan San Francisco Leland Stanford Uber river Sierra foothills Sacramento Bernstein Dunkin forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But Debbie Duncan says if history is any guide there's a bigger big one in store. Quick. What was the biggest disaster in the history of the state of California? Not the one thousand nine hundred six earthquake and fire that destroyed much San Francisco or last falls campfire, which devastated a town of paradise. It was a flood as in the great flood of eighteen sixty one sixty two when it rained for forty five days normal seasonal rainfall in San Francisco is twenty two inches that you're forty nine inches fell. Leland Stanford traveled from his Sacramento home to his gubernatorial. Inauguration by rowboat as the city was ten feet underwater, it remained flooded for three months entire towns in the Sierra foothills were obliterated as one storm after another slammed California a settlement of Chinese miners. Drowned when the Yuba river flooded residents reported seeing houses horses poultry count Barnes bridges camp. Stores and saloons swept downstream heels everywhere became landslides, the central valley completely flooded and inland. Waterway three hundred miles long and twenty miles wide white dot nearly every house in ranch. No one knows how many. Thousands of humans died, but at least two hundred thousand cattle drowned it took one season for California to switch from a ranch an economy to a farm in one when it recovered the state declared bankruptcy following the great flood rains like this will happen. Again. Geologists have determined that make floods hit California every one to two hundred years, and that's without climate change. We have better flood control infrastructure now than in the nineteenth century, but dams don't always hold. And there are a lot more people today on those hills plains and valleys yet. Unlike the big earthquake, everyone expects, but cannot precisely predict meteorologist no days in advance about these atmospheric rivers that build on the Pacific pay attention to the scientists don't be surprised when history repeats itself, and whatever you do if you see a flood turnaround, don't drown with a perspective. I'm Debbie Duncan, Debbie, Dunkin writes and reviews children's.

Debbie Duncan California San Francisco Leland Stanford Yuba river Barnes bridges camp Sierra foothills Sacramento Dunkin forty nine inches twenty two inches two hundred years forty five days three months ten feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:17 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Edward ball is the author of the inventor and the Tikoo a gilded age murder and the birth of motion pictures, and we will get to motion pictures because maybe bridge, you might have guessed is the man who has the genius idea of how to make his pictures move. He's a very enterprising photographer. I our we have Edward Edwards a profile of Leland Stanford who becomes part of the central Pacific. The great railroad magnates of the post civil war period. The the last spike is driven in eighteen sixty eight and they become wealthy beyond imagination in the latter. Part of the nineteenth century known as the gilded age. Meanwhile, Edward my bridge has been home with his mother and his family residence until the war's over and he comes back and in that period. He's been trying to invent things like washing machines. But there are a lot of vendors of that like good printing techniques for. Putting color and in tagliatelle printing. And he goes off to Paris at one point and stumbles across photography, which was all the rage in Paris, photography was the new technology their digital age, and he immediately takes to it Edward. It was as if he'd been looking forward his whole line. Yes. A team someone's like an accident. That's why rich would would encounter this this new technology and embrace it. He was nearly thirty seven thirty eight years old when he decided he was going to set aside everything he'd been doing professionally in book-selling, he as you say he tried to become a small time inventor for a period of time at thirty seven. He changes his career and decides to pick up a camera and become a photographer your returns to California in eighteen sixty six I believe and with the help of a friend whom he had met in New York's a Celik the man he met when he got there in eighteen fifty. Yes. That's right. Yes. With the help of a friend file Selleck he sets himself up as a photographer for higher and he's. He's not good with people. He's he's kind of recuse EFF, man. He's not socially at ease. And so he's not able to get customers in the most conventional way, that's stalker. I did as portrait subjects that was a very lucrative part of early photography and still today. But my was was rather bad as a portrait artist and he began to photograph the outdoors, and it just happened that Yosemite valley in central California had become a destination for small numbers of adventuresome travelers to to enjoy. The the rapturous beauty of this is twenty five mile long this seven mile long, excuse me, chasm in central California. And mortgage takes some of the most majestic and arresting photographs of. This valley and they've become big selling aren't objects. They they're they're they're awarded prizes. They he makes a lot of money from these photographs and he suddenly has his himself a prosperous career as landscape photographer. So at this point, he is known in San Francisco, and in central California as the man who you want to photograph your land and your property, which is something he he knows how to do quite well, and he meets this guy. Leland Stanford who by this time Leland Stanford has has quite a bit of property. He's one of the richest men in west of the Mississippi, you suppose, this is sometime in eighteen seventy two after he had some dealings with Crocker one of the partners in the central Pacific. Yes. It's about eighteen seventy one actually and. So Stanford who is possibly the richest man west of the Mississippi, the president of essential civic railroad hires Edward average to photograph is house. Just a normal kind of assignments for a photographer here. I have a beautiful piece of property photographs my house for me. Who is as I said rather uncomfortable? Somewhat eccentric man possibly had an injury from this stagecoach accident which affected his personality. He dresses shabbily strings on cuffs of his pants and beat up old hats, and and and dusty black jackets and Stanford who favors tuxedos even during workdays and top hats and shoes are shined to the brightness of mirrors and everything is is quite in his in its place in Stanford's world this odd couple begin to spend time together. And begin to socialize together. And begin to talk late into the night and become friends, and they become one of the strangest collaborating pairs that you can imagine in in the history of invention. And it's their friendship that leads to what I believe is the invention of motion pictures, which ensues of some years later when Stanford gives more bridge another photography assignments. To photograph is horses because he keeps the farm which is his race horses, especially trotters at a place that we now know as Palo Alto, the home of Leland Stanford University the tragedy, however to tuck it in here because my bridge live several lives inside and Edward notes. He has distanced himself from people by dressing shabbily and staying by himself. He marries a young woman a woman who must twenty years younger than he is flora he's fascinated obsessed with her he stares at her. He takes photographs of her outside. However, he doesn't return affection that she can recognize she's a young woman he sets up in a house, and he tries to give her all the money in the and the things that she wants. However, he doesn't give her what she finds adequate affection, and this leads to flora after the birth of their son falling in with another man whose invented himself Larkins. And this was a. Other profile of the nineteenth century inventing itself for me, although Larkin's will wind up a villain here. He very much could have been at the right place at the right time to and become one of the one of the gilded age is celebrated ones and not one of their rascals Edward. Yes. You're talking about a guy called Harry Larkins who was an Englishman with a polished education who decided to leave his prosperous family behind in London and come to the American west, which he does in about eighteen seventy or so, and he has a smart talking beautifully dressed man who seems to be adept at persuading people to give him their money. And so he arrives in in San Francisco, and and despite his polished outward appearance, he finds himself in jail for trying to con another fellow out of out of. Out of some of his his travel money and once he springs himself from jail. He invents this guy. Harry Larkins was rather handsome. And articulate gentlemen, invents himself as a theatre critic. He becomes a writer on the theater for the Cisco chronicle and he's bit of a man about town in San Francisco, and he meets Edward mortgages, young wife flora downs. And he's seduces flora more average, and they become lovers while Edward marriage is off on his photography assignments up and down the west coast and mortgage comes home and becomes quite suspicious of his wife, and one thing leads to another and he discovers that his wife has had this lover Larkin's for more than a year. And he decides in a fit of pique and also in some of the sort of notion of western Justice that Larkins has to pay with his life. So he goes at nights at midnight to a house where he knows Larkins is is spending the nights knocks on the door demands to see Larkin's Larkin's presents himself for the door average pulls out his Smith and Wesson, revolver, and shoots this man. Dead. And at this point. Is a well known photographer. He's well known as a friend of leaving Stanford and the Stanford. It seems comes to averages aid when the murder trial ensues. Stanford helps to get a lawyer for average it appears to be and after a long and and sensational trial which fill the American newspapers for a month and a half in eighteen seventy three four. Mortgage is acquitted of this murder. Which is peculiar because he admitted to it. And he's acquitted on the basis of something that was once called justifiable homicide at the time and the place in California in frontier, California, there was this notion that a man had a right to kill his sexual rival. And he could be acquitted. If he did that was the husband's rights to defend the marriage bed to use the language of the day and mortgage is quitted of his murder. And released. And then he goes back to Mr. Stanford and Stanford welcomes him back with open arms and says listen, we've got to finish this work on my horses. I've got these thoroughbred horses, and I really wanna know whether horses when they're galloping ever leave the ground, the inventor and the tycoon when we come back the invention of motion pictures, and we'll try to get Edison in this picture to a gilded age murder and the birth of moving pictures, the inventor and the tycoon by Edward ball. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. You're listening to John bachelor odd Caja eight ten. Since nineteen seventy five the human life review has been the only publication of its kind in the world quarterly journal, which is the intellectual backbone of the pro-life movement..

Leland Stanford California Edward John Batchelor Stanford Harry Larkins murder Edward ball San Francisco Larkin Edward Edwards Leland Stanford University Mississippi Paris Edward notes Yosemite valley book-selling Palo Alto
"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show Edward balls. New book is the inventor in the tycoon and Edward has put together two men who will meet each other, and then separate and meet each other and enjoy each other's conversations in the few years there together one invents himself out of small town outside of London may bridge will run into that in the period that he's at home June eighteen sixty and when it comes back to America after the civil war has eighteen sixty five sixty six Leland Stanford on the other hand is well known as the figure of central Pacific southern Pacific and Stanford University named for his son Leland, Stanford junior. Edward Leland Stanford comes from upstate New York modest Protestant background. He does have an education, and he's educated in the law, and he marries and goes off to Wisconsin. I've learned with surprise that always thought he'd gone to California. Why did you go to Wisconsin? I I think that he was not quite adventuresome enough to go to California as his brothers had as you say he was a farmer's boy from outside of Albany. You had six brothers, and he was the one selected by his parents. He was born about eighteen twenty five I think he was selected by his parents to have higher education. The only one that they could educate they didn't have money to do more. And he apprentices in a law firm, and he becomes an attorney and decides. Well, there is a frontier I can take a chance, but I can't really get up the will to go to California his brothers have gone out to California to dig for gold and to try to make a quick buck. So he moved to Wisconsin and becomes a small town lawyer in a little town a hundred miles north of Chicago. Which aspires to be another kind of Chicago. And he sets himself up as a small town attorney handling small time criminals handling real estate transactions and whatnot. And it's it's a rather dull affair because this town that he moves to does not grow. And so after just three years there something happens, and he decides this is not quite enough and his brothers are writing letters come to California, come to California. We're making a thousand dollars a week. And and so he decides he will go he leaves his wife Jenny Lathrop, whom he married in Albany. He leaves her behind. She goes back to live with her mother in town, and he travels after a fire in his books are destroyed. He travels to California because his brothers have a brilliant idea. This is the way you'd write this novel Edward these brothers not gonna look for gold. They're going to sell things to the men who are looking for gold. So they become I think at one point you say they're making two thousand a week. There are two thousand a month. They become hardware and grocery store clerks to the forty Niners. Yes. It was the wise way to make a fast bit of money. So Stanford arrives in Sacramento, which is the capital of California. Of course, San Francisco is the growing city on the coast by this time. Eighteen fifty two it has I don't know ten or twelve thousand people he comes to Sacramento. It has a smaller number of residents perhaps seven thousand and he borrows money from his brothers and sets himself up as a grocer. And this very dusty very reckless very dangerous. But he prosperous because he works all the time. And he was able to sell bags of rice two men who needed to carry those bags of rice up into the Sierras dig out, silver and gold and after a few years he decides. Well, this just may be the best. I can do he's a very successful grocer. But no more than that. And about eighteen fifty nine or so he he makes one good investment. He decides he will buy a bit of land that has sent to have gold on it. And it's called the M L Maduro mine, and he he puts down some money on this bit of land. And then flips it sells it to a minor. And the the result is that he makes a good chunk of change. And he's becomes one of the most prosperous businessman in the in the capital city, and he has money to invest in this new scheme at the end of the decade into eighteen sixty this is right prior to the war. The Republicans have on their platform that year eighteen sixty June of eighteen sixty when they met in Chicago convention to build a transcontinental railroad and so men in Sacramento his partners Huntington Hopkins. Crocker brothers eventually and Sanford there the grocers and the hardware sellers of the town. They have cash Stanford has cash so they formed the central Pacific railroad, they form it, right? Then they issue stock and Edward. It's one of those things where you explain history by who's standing there when something happens. Yes. It is. It's sort of like that there were as you say a number of small businessmen who happened to be in the right place at the right time when something very curious the way these things unfolds the civil war breaks out in eighteen sixty one and simultaneous with that congress decides. Well, despite there being a war on we're going to Bank. We're going to underwrite a transcontinental railroad because we want to keep California in the union and Stanford and his partners set up an entity without any prior experience really in in this kind of construction, and they call it the central Pacific railroad, and they managed to become the beneficiaries of the largest of of congress and. They are the men responsible for the construction of the railroad from San Francisco to Salt Lake City approximately and another company the Union Pacific becomes responsibility for building line from Salt Lake City to Missouri. When we come back, we'll put the two railroads together along with putting the inventor together with the tycoon Edward ball is the author of the inventor of the tycoon. I'm John bachelor this conversation with the author and with all the authors are available on I.

California Leland Stanford Stanford Edward Wisconsin John Batchelor Sacramento Chicago Edward balls Edward ball attorney Albany San Francisco New York Union Pacific America Jenny Lathrop congress Salt Lake City
"leland stanford" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"Okay. I want to shift over just wrap up with just your quick thoughts on annex t we got speaking of women, Shane of basil or future opponent or Rousey. Obviously, at some point, I think a big star for WWE on the March against Kyrie, sane your thoughts on what they've done with those two and x t and both shayna and Kyrie any place where you know. Kirksey there. Sometimes when I watch television that that's man is in charge of its flights, has death settled down as far as he can. And because the is in fact delay that enzymes the car on the highway when he's flying up, ninety five to get to tighten time with he is we see, I've been in the car, then a call and all of a sudden somebody's flies past us. So there's weaving in and out of traffic. And one of the older is like that. We've been literally incident just robot, you know, and that's the way the bucks. It's, it's just show what we going get to what we got, you know, taking around, you know, and it's just wear as inex- too, I think is is just a little more. Is steadier paying, you know, they've been lately by the same TV tipping schedule that they have to commit to. This is what we're doing for this run of TV tapings Saint Saint next week change you. You know, right before we go live. So it's been on. So it's it's the way the there. There's no consistent. And I think senior and I both people have been. As a. Tired and she does that thing and she, you You know. know the the, the. Leland Stanford assist. She's just horrible. She's amazing before I've been. She's the best wrestler in the company. I really do. Yeah. She can do things that no of to do and the haven't even let her do everything that she can't do and her selling the way that she could move her. It looks like she has. I mean, if you're if made with a. Jerry Jones, you'll see their jewelry are concerned with all the points of articulation of the three and three fourths three hundred those guys where you know snip dive into real blocking all that. If you played with those long, you loose in the joints to the point where they would almost like a dollar and you'd move in one direction of the hands and the arms just jiggle around and pose them anymore. When you first got those Jones, oppose them in their students as they got older and more warned, they would just go around like they're, you know, almost like that though that you made Koto Bouche Cato Bouche eager to the the don't with. Maybe. Whenever you're gonna say, when I it's, you sound like you're describing my podcast microphone extension are. Exactly. Yes. Right. Hi, retain moves and cells. Let her joining have nothing in them anymore. No car let your Lou or anything. She just like floating around, you know, I mean, it's. It's dependent. Like when like pretzels thing it, it seems like you could legit Tai Chi recycling up in at like, not get her out. You know her her arms. It's it's it's incredible credible, which is probably the most Limbaugh person I've ever seen in a wrestling right on. With Shingo. It's like, then your booking everyone to their strengths you then and share is probably the best example, because it's just she's, she's got, am I gonna? She's gonna, Kim. They look, you know. And I remember seeing her. She used to gene every single mind. You know. She's always be the shows. You know, she could be your other show a few. She, she loves like. And for the monitor that scene, it's been doing it. He's seen as one of those, you know, she's one of those types of like she gets this. She's not going to get China. Baseball..

Kim Lou WWE Kyrie Jerry Jones Shane Leland Stanford Saint Saint Cato Bouche China Baseball wrestling Limbaugh
"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's an interesting connection to explore here and it has to do with horses Horses horses You mentioned. Railroad companies it just so happens that the owner of the biggest railroad company Leland Stanford Stanford University university, right he's really into speed, any owned a really fast horse and horses name. Was oxidant oxidant I I. Remember that story goes this horse was the subject of a gentleman's back there. Was no gentlemen's bet it's a myth Stanford so far as we know is not, a betting man that's Rebecca Solnit she would now she wrote a, book about this call river. Shadows and the focus of her book is the solver. Of the bed whatever it was an argument there's no evidence that there was money on any case this argument among Stanford and railroad buddy Senate around. The following question when a. Horse gallops do all. Four of its feet lead the ground at once he think I don't know It's not a question I would ask. Anyone, but well at the time it was, a? Big question because they had no way of knowing horses moot faster than eyeballs can see so, Leland Stanford one and to, prove that horse had all four feet off the. Ground at one time and. He was recommended to try Moi bridge as the photographer to capture this along. Comes Edward pitch dark he. Could take a picture of the voice at exactly the, right instinct could see whether all four feet off the ground and, soft bet here's the problem. Cameras in those days very slow a fast exposure would. Be maybe a second or several seconds mortgage was going to push photography to suddenly be able to capture motion in a five hundred of a second. Otherwise you just got lurked Imagine that I step out of the world of the. Blurred Richard stretch to wire across the racetrack attached it to the shutter mechanism on is a camera oxygen divorce. Gallup's, by trips the wire Which freezes the worse Miguel steals him, right, out of the flow, of time Except which doesn't just take one photo he takes twenty four plays twenty four cameras in a line one after. The other with twenty four tripwires stretching across the racetrack Chipped if we want Twenty four frozen. And blurry running horses so what? What, did they see well the pictures formed a series of a horse running and some of those, photos showed oxidant yes with all four. Hundred off the ground so the camera. Here unlocks a secret let's us see something you could never see before because this camera is. Essentially. It stops, time, exactly meanwhile says Rebecca Moi bridge became fascinated with learning more. Secrets of time Secrets locked inside basic human movements a leap a splash a walk pirouette. Wow. How mundane, but they're so, enchanted when you really pay attention to them Bridgehead photograph rushing, water he was, obsessed with, water and his, landscape pictures, so you've sesame has people pour water splash water pour water, over themselves poor pitchers of, water water, into glasses splash water. Out of, basins bathing? Water and you can see all these droplets version in midair There's one particular, photo Robert, work you see, a sheet, of water suspended in the air hovering over the splash Kind. Of like a ghost Kenny I'll take all this frozen moments line them one after the other play them back, and you've got slow again I'll be artificial flow which we call moves Movies But the next time you're feeling stressed, out you said. Yourself I'm stressed and go to a movie to relax what you should know with the technology that made the movies is exactly the thing which sped up the pace of modern life would stress you out which led you to go to the? Movies I. Don't what does that mean when when you live at When the first way's movies were used to film. Factory workers doing repetitive tasks and then find out those tasks more efficient so. If I were pushing the leverage maybe too. Slowly as this. Right they would find the guy who did it the right way film slow the film down and then use that teach everyone else and then when World War Two came this was not just now in the cause of efficiency this was a. Life or. Death matter because this is how you beat Nazis All the scientific devices I'm a scene manufacturing time Victory. All hands must be we.

Stanford Leland Stanford Stanford Unive Rebecca Solnit Leland Stanford Moi bridge Miguel Rebecca Moi Kenny Edward Richard Robert Senate Gallup four feet
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's an interesting connection. To explore here in a hassle with horses Forces You mentioned rarer. Companies it just so happens that the owner of the biggest railroad company Leland Stanford Statham university university, right who's really into speed any owner in fast. Horse horses nameless oxygen accident. Remember that story goes. This horse was the subject of a gentlemen's back there was no gentlemen's bet It's it's a myth Stanford so far as we know. Is not a betting, man that's Rebecca Solnit she would now. She wrote a. Book about this call river of shadows and the focus of for book is the solver of the whatever it was it was an argument there's no evidence that there, was? Money on any case this argument mon- Stanford in Israel, buddy centered around. The following question when, a horse gallops do all four of its feet. On the ground at once I don't know I'm not a question I would ask anyone but well at the. Time it was a big question because, they had. No way of knowing horses mute faster than eyeballs can see so Leland Stanford one and to prove that a horse at all four feet off the ground at. One time and he was. Recommended to try Moi bridge as the photographer to capture this along comes Edward Moines. Pitch dark he could take. A picture of the voice at exactly the right instant could, see whether all four feet were often ground and solve the back here's the. Problem cameras in those. Days very slow a fast exposure would. Be maybe a. Second or several seconds mortgage was going to push photography to suddenly be able to capture motion in a five hundred second otherwise you've just got flirt.

Leland Stanford Leland Stanford Statham univer Rebecca Solnit Edward Moines Moi bridge Israel four feet five hundred second
"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So in all seriousness people fought against this they rebelled against the railroad, there, were time wars in certain towns where. Part of the town would go to railroad time but the other part would determinedly stick, with what used to be local time and then at. Different times in the town wow it's almost like was a personal freedom In, a way represents your own identity and they didn't want. To give up their identity to the railroad at first but in the end Sandusky. Every other town eventually conformed. To railroad time and that is how time became standardized time became zoned time became clock reference. You ask somebody what time is it they don't say oh it's bedtime or it's much time they look up at the. Sun. They look at a standard and the Take time one Relentless Turning of prime There's an interesting connection to explore here and it has to do with horses Horses You mentioned rarer. Companies it just so happens that the owner of the biggest railroad company Leland Stanford University university right he's really, into speed and he owned rim fast horse horses. Name was oxidant oxidant I. Remember that story goes this horse was the subject of a gentlemen's bet there was. No gentlemen's bet it's it's a myth Stanford so far as we know was not a, betting man that's Rebecca Solnit she would now she wrote a book, about this call river of shadows. And the focus of her book is the solver of. The bed whatever it it was an argument there's no evidence that there was money on any case this argument among Stanford and his railroad buddy Senate around. The following question when. A horse gallops do all four of its feet need the ground at once I don't know it's not a question Ask anyone but well at the time it was a big question because they had no way of knowing. Horses mute faster than eyeballs can see so Leland Stanford wanted to prove that a horse at all four, feet off the ground at one time and he was recommended to try Moi bridge as the photographer to capture. This along comes Edward Moines pitch dark he can take a picture of the voice at exactly the right instincts could see. Whether all four. Feet off the ground Here's the, problem cameras in those days were very slow a fast exposure would be maybe a second or several seconds mortgage. Was going to push autocracy to suddenly be able to capture motion in a five hundred second otherwise you've just got blur Imagine I step out of the world of glory Richard stretch. To wire across the race track attached it to the shutter mechanism on his a camera oxygen divorce. Gallup's, by trips the wire Which freezes the horse mid gallop steals him, right, out of the flow, of time Except my which doesn't just take one photo he takes twenty four seed plays twenty four cameras in a line one, after the, other with twenty four tripwires.

Leland Stanford Leland Stanford University uni Sandusky Rebecca Solnit Richard stretch Gallup Moi bridge Edward Moines Senate five hundred second
"leland stanford" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on TechStuff

"Yes and cumbersome because you know, you don't really take this thing out to take shots at the family on vacation. I'm out to the high school football game. Let me carry my Laden jars and wet played care, but. Need the teams help setting up. But he didn't manage to get a a readable photo of the newspaper, shutter speed of one, two thousand of a second. Well, I'm exposure speed. Let's say that I'm not sure actually not. Cutter, right? But you also probably remember, Edward mind bridge. I remember the name. Yes, yes. He, he had a famous experiment where he set up a series of cameras to because there was a challenge. You may have heard of this guy Laden, I'm sorry. Yeah. You may have heard of this guy Leland Stanford. He was the governor of California and he was that was the challenge was does a horse pickup all four of its feet when it's running and he was the one, my bridge and a lot of people have seen this series of photos where they proved that the horse was picking up all four of its feet because he has a series of cameras and the the horse was tripping it as it ran by as the camera, took photos different in different way of doing it, but they'd captured a series of still photos because it has the horses running by it took, you know, each camera and turn took a a still photo and when you put them all together, you get essentially slow motion. Yeah, this horse running. Yeah, yes. It does pick up all of its feet when we'll get. We'll get into that in a little bit because of course, photography does lead into cinematography, but before we do I before we jump into that, I just wanted to mention one other kind because I did mention burst. Photography when we were first introducing this podcast and that that John Fuller editor extraordinaire wrote the article on how burst photography works. First photography works on a similar principle of high speed photography. Now, with high speed photography, you may be talking about taking a single image and then setting up and taking another single image. Right, right. I'm pointing. I'm putting my camera at one hummingbird, and I take one photo, right? The point of the high-speed for, here's to capture a very accurate still. Yeah, yes. Something that's going to be. It's really used a lot in things like sports, you know, trying to catch capture that dramatic moment where the quarterback is releasing the hail, Mary pass up saying that, right, right. Because I don't know anything about football or you know, the people who absolutely positively have to have that shot of the water balloon after the balloon is broken in the water is still in the balloon shape, right? But with the apple with the bullet through it, but clearly this sort of that has to happen. This sort of. The sort of event is, of course really hard to capture on film not just because of the nature of the the mechanics were, you know, you've got to have a camera with that proper shutter speed and film with that proper photochemical reactions speed. You also have to have insane timing even by setting up an automated system where everything's going to happen automatically. You know, as soon as the event happens, it triggers the camera, even that is really difficult to do. So perhaps what if you could have a camera that could shoot a series of photos in a very short amount of time using that same kind of principle? Well, that's what burst photography is all about. These are cameras that have not just the really fast shutter speed and not just the special film that's going to react quickly to a very brief exposure, but also the ability to advance film rapidly as you're taking photos. So with a burst photography camera. It's pulling the film through very quickly and the shutter is opening and closing causing multiple exposures, but you're not not a double exposure because you're the film's being pulled through as you're as you're doing this so that you can take a series of photos in a brief amount of time. So like in a second or two, you might take dozens or more photos and the this way. The nice thing about this is that you can point your camera at whatever the event is, and just start shooting photos until you're out of film and you have a better chance of capturing that icon ick moment you're after as a photographer. Yeah, this is this is one of those times..

Leland Stanford football guy Laden Edward mind bridge California John Fuller apple editor Mary
"leland stanford" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"leland stanford" Discussed on TechStuff

"For a gross story that i'm about to tell you one study that'd be leg lab sites as being an important milestone in the development of legged robots comes from an eighteen thirty six journal and involves dead people the title of this study was mechanic dare mention lincoln i not anatomically physiologically onethird shown formed up rudina ville helm of ever won't edward wet valber eyes are translated english those terrible german i know measurements awful than a strategic cannot digest it turns out it actually means the mechanics of the human an anatomical physiological examination of the brothers wilhelm and edward weber now their work is available to read if you read german but they found that if you took the leg of a corpse and you swung the leg of the corpse so it acted like a compound pendulum the swing motion was very similar to the cadence of a leg with an alive person is walking around dad's cheerful but as it turns out that would actually be one of those fundamental studies that would go on to inform people who were trying to build artificial legs mechanical legs most of the studies the lab sites aren't nearly so grim and don't involved nearly as many corpses so for example another important contribution came from a guy named edward moya bridge now this was an english photographer who developed stop motion photography moi bridge was hired by a fat cat named leland stanford he was a former governor and a railroad tycoon and stanford had this idea and he needed evidence to support his idea his idea was that when a horses in full gallop at some point during its gate it will have all four hooves off the ground simultaneously and moi bridge was essentially contracted to prove that stanford had a leg to stand on as it were so.

lincoln edward weber edward moya bridge moi bridge leland stanford wilhelm stanford