4 Burst results for "Leilia Walker"

"leilia walker" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"leilia walker" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Long long ago on her own. Ground the life and times of madame. Cj walker originally came out in early two thousand one and then the paperback came out in two thousand and two and now that there is a netflix series. Star in the amazing octavia spencer. We across south baid. Yes we love her. She was great The publisher my publisher has put together two additions. One is louie tie. In addition with spencer on the cover named south made and the other has a new cover but the original title on her own ground so it is essentially the same book as original. But i've written a new epilogue and i've made a few corrections you know in two hundred ninety three page book. There are few mistakes that you make the first time around so i hope as journalists. I have made a couple of corrections and do more research. Because i'm writing. I'm almost finished with a biography on. Madame walker's daughter l. e. walker. It will be out next year way from wait so yeah. I stuck in a few little things about her that i did that. Were in the first edition This would be your grandmother right. My great grandmother. Great greg greg greg greg out of their lily walker migrate grandmother and then a lilia walker a actually adopted my grandmother my grandmother who may so may appears at the end of the netflix series. She goes to spelman and she becomes president of the company. And then my mother and then may so. They're three lilies. Well okay. that's how i got it. A little crossed up. I knew there was more than three years. We will you know what a lilia number three you say. Some more research. What did you uncover that. You didn't know already so with leilia walker. Even when i was writing on her own ground i was trying to establish the relationship between mother and daughter and my last chapter the sort of end of the book called the after ward i wrote about trying to put her whole life in the twenties into about ten pages because i knew i was going to write another book and i didn't want to get secrets away but one of the things i discovered is that the way she's been written about in the past essentially as madame walker made the money her daughter leila spent the money. She had a lot of parties. The end at i have to say nobody. Is that pathetic right. She was very well educated and they were like that would just be you know but it was kinda short hand that people some you know even some scholars work. I really respect in writing about the harlem renaissance. I guess that was just kind of a neat package to do. And you do a cliche often. It's because you're lazy. I think wars original click bait. You know not for the internet. That exactly. But what i've discovered about her. She truly was a patron of the arts. And she hosted the first Show for a gusta savage. The famous black sculptures. She was very close friends with a lot of the musicians and actors of that period. Because that you know we know langston hughes county collins or no hurston. Even those are lied about her age but by and large the writer about a decade and a half younger than a lilia walker so her contemporaries were more the actors and the uh musicians. Who really were kind of that. I way of talent for the harlem renaissance so those people were at her party's performing in her. Party's doing concerts at her homes. So those kinds of things were interesting to me to really place her as a as a patron of the arts and not just say some people say oh you know. She didn't even read books. But i have library so you with her first addition of find but they just put her in a box and then the other thing that was so fascinating to me. She really wasn't international travel. She loved havana. And in one thousand nine. Twenty one and twenty two. She went to paris london. Monte carlo rome for the coronation of the pope how stein highbrow and then oddest aqaba to to meet the empress of ethiopia. So she was using that she was and she went first class on on the s s era. The only black who is in first class. So you know she. It is a really interesting story. She not her mother. It is absolutely true. She's not as driven a businesswoman as her mother. She still is quite interesting all on her own. Well i can't wait to read it now. We gotta get back to madame. Cj walker and self made first of all. Tell me about that experience. What was it like taking your book. Working with the likes of lebron. James and his team and then octavia spencer and bringing this story to hollywood. What was that like. So i know people think that because lebron james name is listed as an executive producer that i know him but i've never met him and i've never talked to him so i hear you. People are slamming that that sort of added to the You know made it more interesting to people gave some cachet But my book had been optioned a couple of times before and this is kind of a very typical hollywood story in the early eighties. Alex haley wanted to do a miniseries about madam walker. So i did a ton of research for him that died at nine to without having written with that. Was you know in some ways. Okay because it was like. I got a great mentor. And some don't okay stop. It's like black history. I liked take in minute. I wonder what his take would have been like it was. I think some of it is generation. This is what i love about doing in with you is that you have. You always say wait a minute. Yeah journalist too. I love the better. So actually i have the treatment that alex did for the for his original idea off so far as to you know he had this beautiful farm in tennessee. That marian wright edelman children's defense fund now owns and they use it as a retreat. But we went to his farm with A couple of the hollywood producers and directors who had been part of roots and reuben cannon. Who had done the casting who now works with tyler perry and a couple of historians who i invited to come and we talk about how we would develop the story and you know. He saw things that was interesting. He saw composite character. Which is something that i would have done for. This south may be writer hitting really have in her vision but to have a composite character who was a good friend and a mentor to madame walker when she was a washerwoman and the church women at saint. Paul ame church at saint. Louis the people who gave her that vision that she could be something more than an illiterate washerwoman and the person he saw in that role at the time with my angela. Oh this is. So this is not very he was close to quincy jones and pro wintry was part of that mix because they had just done color purple colorful and he and he and of course in an open winfrey in my angela. Were good friends. So that was part of the mix of people who would.

leila leilia walker Alex haley lilia walker James lily walker tennessee lebron next year reuben cannon paris london two hundred ninety three page early eighties about ten pages netflix tyler perry Louis three lilies more than three years first edition
"leilia walker" Discussed on Fanm on Films

Fanm on Films

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"leilia walker" Discussed on Fanm on Films

"Spend. More time. But. It's a real person. are related to that real person. So what am I think I? Think maybe they tried to get I think it's very interesting that the tidal had inspired by as if that's a way to sort of like, sidestep the reality of Madame, Walker's life but people are still looking for the truth, even if they know that it's going to be dramatized account of her life well and especially with our stories I mean it is yes. It is my family, but I was just as bothered by the booker. T. Washington portrayal. Because I know his family I was just as bothered by the FBI ransom portrayal because I, you know his grandchildren are some of my best friends, but I care about the way that our history is portrayed i. mean you know that this would make any difference to? You know to the racist among us whatever it is, we say about ourselves. They will still in this. However, they want us to, but we need to. To know our own reason, people with open minds need to know them so that when you because our stores have not been told widely or seen widely, people don't have any context to be able to say. Oh, well, that part was fantasy, but people don't know. And I mean I had right of of friends who just really didn't know much about Madam. Walker, who said well? I trust that it was historically accurate I'm. No no it's. because. I. Do hope that what whatever you're putting together on her life whether it's going to be a film or TV series series I. Do hope that it has a segment that talks about her travels to Cuba into Haiti into Jamaica because I really am. Fascinated by that relationship and I would love to know more about how she was welcomed mirror what she did while she was there and I. Say this is Haiti and Haitians. We have a complicated relationship with certain hair products and with relaxers. In because we we do have color is in a class issue still to his nine so I do hope that there is a segment that focuses on those travel and. And on those relationships you know I I agree with you. I would love for that to happen because it to just show that there is I mean, and this is something that I just think another sort of missed opportunity is to show what black people were doing. In the grown nineteen hundreds that people were starting businesses they were they had interaction with people in other countries. There was a consciousness in international consciousness. About business and about politics, and about what was going on, and so that is entirely absent from that and and people don't know that I don't know that, but you know black people had any means. Right. that. We knew what was going on around the world, but the black press was constantly writing about what was going on. In other places in what the politics was, and we need to understand that we are connected to the world that the aspe- has always been a part of our consciousness whether it was through religious groups who were traveling whether it was through political people whether it was through educated people and I just think that's a story that needs to be known I. Wish I knew more details about Madam Walker's. Haiti I can just tell from the newspaper accounts. The black newspapers wrote about what she was doing and I know she was entertained by some of the you know the the families, the prominent families there and I know that she visited a prison and was really kind of all by what she saw and brought food for the prisoners. But you know without me. Being able to do research in Haitian newspapers and finding something that's digitized is no, but maybe somebody else will be able to do that research and helped me out. Yeah, that would be great. At I think that would be wonderful. Well a Yo. So when can we expect barring you know being in a pandemic? What's your time line looking like for releasing this project that you're working on? So I'm almost finished writing the first major biography of Leilia Walker, and that I should be finished within October, so that book is scheduled to be published in twenty twenty one, so I'm starting to have some conversations about the next. Next Project I. Think Everybody is kind of on pause at the moment, and not committing, but I know that if there's if nothing else self made has.

Leilia Walker Haiti FBI Madame T. Washington Cuba Jamaica
"leilia walker" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

11:33 min | 1 year ago

"leilia walker" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"So. Let's talk about how on your own. Brown the book you and I worked to get publicity around. How many years ago? Two Thousand and three thousand four something like that has now been brecon. Rename rebound. I believe because there's a new cover to reflect the new Netflix. Show self me right so my book is that we worked on Long long ago on her own ground the life and times madame. Cj Walker originally came out in early two thousand one and then the paperback came out in two thousand and two and now that there is a Netflix series. Star in the Amazing Octavia Spencer. We called staff made. Yes we love her she was great the publisher my publisher has put together two additions. One is a movie tie in edition without Spencer on the cover name South made and the other has an ill cover the original title on her own ground so it is essentially the same book as the original thousand one but I've written a new epilogue and I made a few corrections. You know in a two hundred ninety three page book there are few stakes that you make the first time around so I hope as a journalist I have made a couple of corrections more research. Because I'm writing. I'm almost finished with a biography on Walker's daughter L. E. Walker. It will be out next year away from here so yeah. I stuck in a few little things about her that I did that. Were in the first edition and this would be your grandmother. My great grandmother. Great Greg Greg Kevin Matt Jay Walk or Great-great-grandfather Lily Walker my great grandmother and then a Lilia Walker actually adopted my grandmother. My grandmother who was may so may appears at the end of the Netflix series. She goes to Spelman and she becomes president of the company. And then my mother Leilia and then me well okay. That's how I got it a little crosstalk. I knew there was more than three ali-aliens. We'll throw you ILYA number three. You says more research. What did you uncover that? You didn't know already so a story with a Walker. Even when I was writing on her own ground I was trying to establish the relationship between mother and daughter and my last chapter this sort of end of the book called the after Ward I wrote about tried to put her whole life in the twenties into about ten pages because I knew I was going to write another book and I didn't WanNA get secrets away. But one of the things. I discovered is that the way she's been written about in the past essentially as Madame Walker made the money her daughter Leila spent the money she had a lot of parties the end and I have to say nobody is that pathetic was very well educated and they were like that would just be you know but it was a kind of shorthand that people even some scholars work. I really respect in writing about the Harlem Renaissance. I guess that was just kind of a neat package to do a cliche often. It's because you're lazy so I think I like banning original Click Bait and not for the Internet. That's right exactly but what I discovered about her. She truly was a patron of the arts. And she hosted the first show or against the savage. The famous blacks gawkers. She was very close friends with a lot of the musicians and actors of that period. Because that we know Langston Hughes County Collins Orono Hurston. Even those are lied about her age. But by and large the writers were found a decade and a half younger than a Leilia Walker so her contemporaries were the actors and musicians. Who Really. We're kind of that first. Wave of talent for the Harlem Renaissance. So those people were adver parties performing in her parties and doing concerts on her homes. So those kinds of things were interesting to me to really place her as a as a patron of the arts and not just say some people say oh you know. She didn't even read books. But I haven't library so with her first editions of scientists but just put her in a box and then the other thing. That was so fascinating to me is. She really wasn't international travel. She loved Havana and in one thousand. Nine hundred twenty one and twenty two. She went to Paris London. Monte Carlo Rome for the coordination of the Pope Palestine high row and then Addis Ababa to to meet the empress of Ethiopia so she was saying that she was and she went first class on the on the S S era. The only black who is in first class so you know she is a really interesting story. Now she not. Her mother is absolutely true. She's not as driven a businesswoman. As her mother. She still is quite interesting all on her own. I can't wait to read it now. We gotta get back to Madame. Cj Walker and self made first of all. Tell me about many experienced. What was it like taking your book working with the lights of Lebron James and his team and then and TV Spencer and bringing this story to Hollywood. What was that like? So I know people think that because Lebron James's name is listed as an executive producer that I know but I've never met him never talked to him so I hear splitting paypal dot. Bff that that sort of added to the You know made it interesting to people that are gave some cachet but my book had been option the couple of times before and this is kind of a very typical. Hollywood story in the early eighties. Alex faily wanted to do a mini series about Madam office so I did a ton of research for him that he died at two without having written with that was in some ways. Okay because it was like I got a great mentor and some doors stop. You know what that is like black history. I like take that in four minute. I wonder what his take would have been like. You know it was. I think some of it is generational. This is what I love about doing interviews with you is that you have. You always say now. Wait a minute Minnesota journalist so I actually. I have the treatment that Alex did for the original idea and we so far as to you know he had this beautiful farm in Tennessee. That Marion Wright Edelman Children's Defense Fund now owns and they use it as a retreat. But we went to his farm with A couple of the Hollywood producers and directors who had been part of fruits and Reuben Cannon who had done the casting who now I think works with Tyler Perry and a couple of historians who I invited to come and we talked about how we would develop a story and you know he saw when it was interesting. He saw composite character. Which is something that I would have done for this series that that the writer in really having her vision but to have composite character who was a good friend and a mentor to Madame Walker when she was still a Washer woman and the Church women at Saint Paul Ame Church at St Louis. The people who gave her that vision that she could be something more than an illiterate washerwoman and the person he saw in that role at the time with my Angela. Oh this is so. This is no different people's ferry he was close to Quincy. Jones and Oprah. Winfrey was part of that mix because they had just done Color Purple and he and he and of course an Oprah Winfrey Maya Angelou. We're good friends so that was part of the mix of people who would have been involved but of course now you know thirty years has gone by since then so some of those. Some of those things are older but that was the idea and it was there was more there was a love story with. Cj Walker that he was developing and you know so that was interesting piece and more of her politics and more of her philanthropy which I loved to have seen so we so we get a but Alex. I did all this research for hours. I said nine months off from my job as a producer to be moved to New York for a few months and there were still some of the elders who were living. I went to twelve different cities that these people people work with the company so it was really a very special moment and some people may remember Stanley now since film two dollars and a dream like his very first documentary. You know people know his vials Davis and Hugh Jackman Stanley's a macarthur fellow but his very first documentary with two dollars and a dream about Madam Walker impart because his grandfather was F. B. Ransom Madame. Walker's attorney so same elders for his film and you can see it now on Youtube. He put it up on new to a few weeks ago. And there are the more than four hundred thousand views so this is. Kgo People Participate. This and I know friends but he has since become my friend. I'm no other conversation that I've had on. This show has fascinated so much except for drummer. Please Dr Henry Louis Gates Junior. To what you're sharing with me has a lot to do with ancestry. And that's what we talked about of course but these black history figures that are interacting like in real time in these stories just blowing my mind and these are the types of stories that that skit shares. You know right well. Listen listen this is so much. The story I really want to Redo Spencer was great in an in south main. I think for me. She really embodied the spirit and the courage and the Walker but the story lines were really different than what I would have imagined. It SORTA got stuck on that. Annie Malone Addy Monroe imaginary relationship. That really didn't happen and very little about people like item. Well who Madame Walker new and the way that Booker T. Washington was portrayed and a little bit of wkbd boys. I would have developed those relationships a lot more and a lot more with the philanthropy. Because.

Leilia Walker Octavia Spencer L. E. Walker Madame Walker Netflix Alex faily Lilia Walker Harlem Renaissance Hollywood Lily Walker Madam Walker Lebron James writer Brown publisher Langston Hughes County Collins Greg Greg Kevin Matt Jay Walk Marion Wright Edelman Annie Malone Addy Monroe
"leilia walker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:05 min | 2 years ago

"leilia walker" Discussed on KCRW

"Part of the twentieth. Century in African American neighborhoods in Philadelphia, New York who led that social sexual revolution. Well, it was young black women the book wayward lives, beautiful experiments looks at how these women challenged and transformed ideas about love marriage and family, even before the jazz age before the Harlem renaissance the author of the book is de Hartman. Her specialty is in resurrecting forgotten and race stories. She's a professor at Columbia University and a Guggenheim fellow anti joins me. Now. Welcome. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. It's great to have you. So you wrote this in an unusual way. Right. Yes. This is not like a straight history book or sociological examination. I mean, you employ a lot of interesting narrative techniques a lot of kind of fictionalized versions of of these women's stores. Can you tell us about how you went about writing this book? Basically I wanted to write a history book, but one that had the intimacy and the narrative power of a novel and while I did huge amounts of archival research than novelists. Stick texture has everything to do with the perspective from which I narrated, and it's very close to these women's lives. Will you right in the introduction that you see these young black women as social visionaries innovators, right? As as as people who are in fact, creating a revolution. Yes, I do and for many people that's like a wild assertion. You know, how can that be the case? I think that they were astute social analysts because at the time people migrated to the north often to find a more restricted set of possibilities than existed in the south. So that was the first surprise and for young black women, the overwhelming majority like ninety percent were conscripted to domestic work to housework, which they consider to be a continuation of slavery reformers were saying, well, if you become a more efficient worker than you can get better wages, so the idea was that their circumstances. We're going to be improved if they became better and more efficient servants. And basically they said no to that. They said no to a social script which was trying to make. Them live in accordance with Victorian and middle-class norms that were absolutely unsustainable in the black community black families needed the work, the wages and the labor of all adults in the household households dependent upon renting rooms to strangers. So what the black household was was radically different than a vision of a White House whole with mommy, daddy, and children, and that different form that queer form that anomalous form that different form of the household actually enabled people to survive. So largely this is taking place in the north, and you focus on Philadelphia and New York City, and it's a tractive the attention of sociologists famous sociologists like w e b voice came to check out what was happening and and try to figure out what was driving all this behavior. And then also a friend of his white woman. Named Mary white Overton. She goes and lives in I guess, the Flums, and you know, she's initially seen because co founder of the Lacey pe- as a friend of black people African Americans. And yet, you write that she really had a very condescending attitude towards young black women, and I would, you know, say that she had a a very complex attitude. Absolutely. I mean, Mary white Ovington was definitely an anti-racist co-founder as the NAACP friend of Dubose. But even for, you know, Mary white Ave Cranston the way in which black people in particularly young black women conduct their intimate lives. She judges to be a certain kind of failure rate. She writes in their hours of leisure the surplus women are known to play havoc with their neighbors. Sons even with their neighbors, husbands. I know the the Malindi the hour. I know so it's such an, and I think that what's interesting about Mary white Ave. Tin is that even if she is a totally non traditional woman herself. Right. I mean, one she's not married in all likelihood, she was involved in an extramarital affair herself. She's living in an all black building. So in so many ways she has defied a set of gender prescriptions yet, she seems to have a very different measure or yardstick when it comes to the young black women she's surrounded by and again, Mary white offering ten she is definitely like a friend of the race. So it's not antipathy. That's prompting her to describe her neighbors in this way. Right. It's just a genuine sense that they're failing to meet a certain text of womanhood. Hm? I wanna talk about EDNA Thomas. She was an actress and a singer and his just a little bit of her music from the time song called go down. Moses. Let my people go there. She was the daughter of black woman and a white man who raped her mother, and she was very light skinned. And I guess that was a problem for her growing up. Right. But but then it served her. Well, when she wanted to become an entertainer. You know, again, it's also complex because part of the black elite has always been really fair. I think in her case she was fair for the wrong reasons being fair enabled her to travel and social certain social circles it also worked against her for certain roles because she wasn't considered black enough. So she never passed as white. No. She didn't pass as white. She didn't pass as white. So she marries a black, man. And I guess it's it's not necessarily happy marriage. And then she she falls in love with a British woman aristocrat. Yes. I mean, it's it's a kind of you know, lovely wild story. I mean, I she marries a very intelligent, man. Who's in a circle of artists who loves Chinese poets and often quotes and conversation, but it is a complex in an unhappy marriage. I mean, there were rumors of float that it was a marriage of convenience that are husband was gay. But again, this is these were the rumors she actually said that they had very passionate marriage, even as he was emotionally distant. She meets a levino Wyndham when the three of them are at a party at Olea walkers. So this romance unfolds, which is like a wild pursuit by alluvia Windham with Ed never coiling her constantly for six months and Elise returning to. England. And she comes, you know, by to say goodbye and presumably I would assume to plead her case the last time, and at that moment, something changes as an EDNA finally embraces her, and they live together, not only EDNA and the Livia as a couple, but the the three of them share a household. I mean, Lloyd is a friend of the couple so they're really, you know, living this spooky Mian lifestyle. What I found was interesting is that the way the newspapers of the time would often talk about the three some as they would appear. So everyone probably knew this big open secret. But no one felt the need to kind of to out them in the press that there was I think that that was what was really interesting about the age that there was a lot of freedom that was a part of not disclosing ones. Intimacies even as they were known and accept it. You mentioned she they met at a Leilia walkers who tells about her because she would have these wild parties. I mean, she was you know, the daughter of Madame CJ Walker who popularized straightening comb who invented her own straightened process, and who was the first black woman millionaire, and so a little you would have these amazing Suarez where you know. Rich white people from downtown would come uptown European royalty was there and EDNA was part of the beautiful circle of friends that occupied ali-aliens world. And so they met at one of these, you know, grand parties at ali-aliens house and she had the most beautiful house in Harlem, and it was a lovely double Brownstone. So there's so much, you know, I guess romance about the age, and it was in the context of all of this beauty all of this talent that these. Two unlikely you know that these two unlikely figures encounter one another, and then, you know, fall in love and have a a relationship that lasts for decades. That's astonishing and incredible. Let's talk about another performer. Let's hear clip of song called groundhog blues..

Harlem EDNA New York Mary white Ovington Mary white Overton Mary white White House EDNA Thomas Columbia University Madame CJ Walker professor Philadelphia de Hartman ali-aliens house NAACP Leilia Tin Lacey pe