29 Burst results for "Leila Fadel"

"leila fadel" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:49 min | Last week

"leila fadel" Discussed on WBUR

"Safety in the effectiveness of the vaccines and today's action. I think it's clear evidence. If they're taking every step necessary to ensure the American people have clear and transparent information, Zain said. They hope that transparency will increase trust and avoid heightening any vaccine hesitancy. Hammer. Keith. NPR NEWS The Bite Administration plans to start pulling troops from Afghanistan this month of senior administration official says President Biden plans to formally announce tomorrow that the plan is to complete the military withdrawal by September 11th the 20th anniversary of the terror attacks that led to the war in Afghanistan. Bind is meanwhile, confronting Russian leader Vladimir Putin about Moscow's military build up in the Crimea and on Ukraine's borders. The White House's both leaders had a conversation today during which Biden proposed. Hold a summit to air out some of their biggest differences, including Russia's interference in U. S elections. Well, the U. S intelligence community is that with its worldwide threat assessment reported singles out four countries that it says posed the main national security challenges in the coming year. Their China, North Korea, Iran and Russia. In Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. The police officer who shot and killed 20 year old Dante, right as he tried to flee and arrest has resigned. NPR's Leila Fadel reports. The police chief also stepped down. Dante right, died from a single gunshot wound to the chest. Mayor Mike Elliott has taken command of the police after a vote by City Council at a press conference. Community members demanded that the officer be charged. In response, The mayor called on Minnesota Governor Tim Walz to appoint the state attorney general Keith Ellison, to take the case from the county. Alison is currently leading the prosecution against Derrick Show, Vin. He's the ex Minneapolis police officer accused of killing George Floyd. Community.

Leila Fadel Vladimir Putin Zain Biden Crimea Alison Afghanistan Dante September 11th Ukraine NPR tomorrow George Floyd Derrick Show 20 year old Russia White House today Keith Ellison Bite Administration
"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:29 min | Last week

"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

"Exists in the black community In that environment is real. It's serious, and it's consequential, but it doesn't. We're not justify violence and or looting. The officer is on administrative leave pending an investigation by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Aisha Roscoe NPR news The White House A curfew is in effect there this evening. Within three months after the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol, Congressional lawmakers say they're still trying to figure out how to move ahead and prevent future attacks. Top priority is deciding what to do with the Black fence that surrounded the capital since the incident. Other focuses. The Capitol police were badly outnumbered that day. The House Administration Committee, which oversees the Capitol, police, is holding a hearing Thursday to examine it. Internal agency report looking at mistakes that were made For the past week, Kentucky is vaccinated thousands of incarcerated people against covert 19 Korean border of member station W. E K U Reports announcement comes after the state reported its highest positivity rate in a month. The Kentucky Department of Corrections inoculated 68% of the state's prison population within a week. Positive cases in jails have dropped significantly over the past month. Executive Cabinet Secretary Jay Michael Brown says people who are incarcerated received the one dose Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccination and that was very deliberate because we didn't want to have to be in a situation of having to go back and do Second doses on what might be a transit population. Kentucky officials urged the public to sign up for the thousands of vaccination appointments open across the state after the state's positivity rate increased for NPR news. I'm Corin Boyer and Lexington. The Biden administration says it's reached a deal with the trio of Central American nations to temporarily surged troop to their borders in an effort to reduce the tide of illegal immigration at the U. S southern border. White House press secretary Jen Psaki announcing Mexico will maintain a deployment of about 10,000 troops. While Guatemala has sent 1500 police and military personnel to its border on Doris has deployed 7000 police and military White House officials as Guatemala and Honduras are deploying troops temporarily in response to a large chairman of migrants has been organized. At the end of the month. On Wall Street, the Dow dropped 55 points. The NASDAQ fell 50 points. This is NPR and this is KCRW on a Monday, April, the 12th and Larry Perella. Here's what's happening at 604. Some local movie theaters now the latest victims of the fall out from the Corona virus pandemic. The chain behind are quite cinemas and Pacific theaters say they won't be reopening any of their locations after being closed for more than a year. That's even as movie theaters are allowed to open up in L. A counting. Classic locations that will no longer welcome. Audiences include the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood and deadline. Reports that feeder, one of the highest grossing movie theaters in the nation's for their closure could be a bad sign for the movie industry's recovery. The statement. The chain says they're shutdown was not the outcome anyone wanted, but they have no viable way to move forward. One effort is underway to stop the plan closure of a parochial school in San Fernando State Fernet Ferdinand Catholic School is one of six elementary schools in the archdiocese that are scheduled to close in June because of dropping enrollment school has been open for more than 90 years. Parents and students rallied at the school yesterday to pressure church officials to reconsider that decision. Current Gina Franco was one of the organizers. She told Katie L. A five that knowing they'll have to switch schools has been a blow for students have already been disrupted with the pandemic emotionally and just starting to come back. They find out two weeks into school year that the school's closing, so that's another, their emotional hit for our kids. The archdiocese says that ST Ferdinand was struggling even before the pandemic and Seen more than a 40% drop in enrollment in the last year. Officials say the school is losing 350,000 bucks a year. Franco says she hopes families could be persuaded to come back now that school is returning to in person learning. We like to bring a lot of kids back and a lot of parents to enroll their kids here and give us the opportunity to raise the funds we need to raise. Other schools on the closure list or assumption in Boyle Heights, Blessed Sacrament and Hollywood, ST Catherine of Sienna and received a Saint Francis of Assisi and Silver Lincoln State Madeleine in Pomona. With vaccination rates increasing in the promise of California's economy reopening this summer. Does that mean you consume? Get rid of those masks? You've gotten Lee Riley, professor of Epidemiology U C. Berkeley says Not so fast. Oh, I think this is something that's not going to go away. I think we're gonna have a situation with this virus is always gonna be circulating. So during certain seasons, people are gonna have to continue to wear masks. Really says it would be a cultural adjustment for Americans to periodically where masks throughout the year. Support for NPR come from the Wallace Foundation, working to develop and share practices that can improve learning and enrichment for young people and the vitality of the arts. For everyone, ideas and information of Wallace foundation dot orcs six minutes past the hour. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. It is the 11th day of testimony in the murder trial of Derrick Show Vin. He is the former police officer accused of killing George Floyd. The city is on edge after another black man, 20 year old Dante, right, was fatally shot by police in a suburb of Minneapolis, the night of protests and unrest, which Included looting, damage. Property and tear gas cast a shadow over the proceedings today, just as George Floyd's brother took the stand, NPR's Leila Fadel is in Minneapolis and joins us now Haley left. Heil. So, So.

Mary Louise Kelly Leila Fadel Minneapolis Elsa Chang Aisha Roscoe Lee Riley 50 points 55 points Washington Los Angeles Thursday Katie L. A Gina Franco June George Floyd Wallace Foundation Franco 1500 police 68% Boyle Heights
Jury selection in trial of Derek Chauvin is set to begin after delay

Fresh Air

01:11 min | Last month

Jury selection in trial of Derek Chauvin is set to begin after delay

"Former police officer whom prosecutors say pressed his knee on George Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes. The months since boy's death last Memorial Day video of the Black Man struggling to breathe while pin face down during an arrest has been viewed worldwide. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports. One of the biggest hurdles in this case will be seating an impartial jury. Despite the state's objections. Judge Peter Cahill is moving forward with jury selection today until he's told otherwise, he briefed jurors before the process began. Do not read about this case in the newspapers. We're online and do not listen to news about it on radio or television. The court expects it will take up to three weeks to seat a jury. The challenge will be finding jurors who don't already have strong opinions on the case. The video of George Floyd's killing reignited a movement against police brutality and systemic racism that spread around the world in advance. A call for jury duty was accompanied by a 14 page questionnaire. That included questions on race policing, the black lives matter movement and even podcast. Potential Jurors might listen to Layla Falzon. NPR NEWS Minneapolis The U. S House is expected to take up President Biden's nearly

George Floyd Leila Fadel Judge Peter Cahill NPR Layla Falzon Minneapolis President Biden
"leila fadel" Discussed on WLRN News

WLRN News

02:52 min | Last month

"leila fadel" Discussed on WLRN News

"Least tomorrow. NPR's Leila Fadel is covering the trial in Minneapolis and joins us now. Hi, Layla. Hi. Begin by explaining why the delay what happened? So Sheldon is facing second degree murder and second degree manslaughter charges. But last Friday, a decision by the Minnesota Court of Appeals through the start of this trial in flux because the state wants to reinstate the charge of third degree murder against show Vin and originally the District Court ruled against that, and the appeals court says the lower court made a mistake. So the state is pushing to delay jury selection and really anything else substantive in the case until they know what charges Shobin is actually facial facing, and she opens it. Attorney is appealing the Friday decision. This is Matthew Frank, assistant attorney general in court today explaining why the state wants the delay. Yeah. So concerned about proceeding today. Issue that may Cause On appeal issue later that could result in the reversal of a conviction. The judge disagreed. But he gave the state of data seek guidance from the appeals court. And they filed a motion essentially asking the court to stop jury selection in the district Court. There has been so much in anticipation of this trial, I mean millions of dollars spent to secure the courthouse thousands of National Guard troops. What does it feel like being there in Minneapolis right now? Yeah, I mean, boy buildings are boarded up the entire government center in downtown Minneapolis, where the trial's being held, is surrounded by fencing and barbed wire, Military style vehicles, National Guardsmen People just want to get through it. And remember, even if jury selection starts tomorrow, it's projected to take about three weeks to select a jury in this case, and it will be hard to find jurors who don't have strong opinions. I mean that video of George Floyd reignited a movement for black lives that's being compared to the 1960 civil rights era. The demonstration spread around the world and of course, this is a difficult case to prosecute, and you can see that the state is really worried that Any procedural issues might throw decision in their favor in jeopardy. Given how much security and how much interest in the case there is. Have you been able to talk with people? What folks saying Yeah. Outside. Some protesters gathered on different corners in downtown as close as they could get to this barricaded building. Lisa Kelly was among them. She's an activist. And, she says the hardest part about today was frigging figuring out where to gather where a protest They spent $30 million building a fortress around the government center to keep us out and we don't want we don't want to go in. We just want We just want the freedom to express ourselves. You want the freedom to live in this city peacefully? And that assumption of violence, she says, is part of the systemic.

Leila Fadel Lisa Kelly Matthew Frank Layla George Floyd Sheldon Minneapolis $30 million Minnesota Court of Appeals tomorrow Friday Shobin last Friday today NPR millions of dollars thousands about three weeks third degree second degree
Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

Morning Edition

04:29 min | 3 months ago

Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

"Law enforcement officers were overpowered by that violent mob in the nation's capital. Last week. Disturbing videos show that police officers were kicked and punched and beaten with flagpoles. One police officer was killed and another later died by suicide off duty. But there were also a few police officers that appeared to sympathize with the mob. MPR's Leila Fadel reports that for current and retired black police officers It was particularly upsetting. Last week sharing Blackman Malloy watched her former colleagues try to stave off Attackers of the capital alone. Black officer heroically facing a largely white mob as they first breach the building. A lot of them felt like they were all all along black when Malloy is a retired U. S Capitol police officer and the vice president of the United States Black Capitol Police Association. Which led a class action lawsuit in 2012 against the Capitol police for alleged discrimination. She's also the lead plaintiff in the historic 2001 class action discrimination lawsuit against the Capitol Police board. Our organization is calling for criminal charges against the sergeant at arms of the House and the Senate, as well as the former U. S. Capitol police chief who resigned after the attack because they loved them unprepared. She spoken to black police officers that were at the Capitol that day. They're traumatized. Some of the crowd called him the n word. Some are injured. They're also scared because they saw a few of their white colleagues show sympathy with the mob. Several Capitol police officers were suspended as the department investigates the attack on Congress, among them the officer who took Selfies with writers and another who popped on a mag, a hat and directed Attackers around the building. Blackman. Malloy says black Capitol police officers told her this about inauguration Day and then now you expect me to go stand beside an officer not knowing whether or not he's one of one of the terrorists, that's what that's what we did. Then Maybe there were some off duty police officers from outside D. C in the crowd. Police departments are investigating, and that's not lost on so many police officers around the country, particularly black police officers who faced discrimination on the force. Carl Shaw sued the police division of the city of Columbus for racial discrimination and settled for $475,000. You have good police also said you have actually saucers, and in my case, if it wouldn't have been for white officers standing up and risking their careers, wouldn't have had a leg to stand on. I just think we need to change the way we police and the hiring practices. Also the settlement, which conceded no wrongdoing included to demand that the retaliation he faced for reporting racism by superior be a fireable offense. Char retires next month. If you're trading black officers this way, What are you doing to the general public? Heather Taylor, recently retired sergeant from the ST Louis Police Department was texting with other black officers as she watched the attack on Congress. She thought about many of our fellow officers who made the assumption that Trump flags meant support for law enforcement, even when the crowds were incited by the president's lies and included hate groups. Meanwhile, black lives matter. Protestors demanding racial justice were treated as hostile. I don't know maybe realize that these people who are extremists who are militia Who are a part of these groups or about civil war. They want civil war They want to do away with the government and law enforcement has hair to him. Taylor most recently headed the Ethical Society of Police, a ST Louis police organization that addresses racial discrimination in the police force and the community. Okay, well, they're gonna shake I'm going to say that these people are going to turn on them that the police are going to see that the same people that you supported over African Americans in black lives matter. You're going to see that it's different that they're going to turn on you. Sure enough, it was worse than what we could ever imagine. In Minneapolis Metro Transit Police chief Eddie Frizzell says he did more planning for the Super Bowl in Minneapolis than what he saw in the capital last week. Now he worries about the expected armed protests around the country. This weekend. I served in Bosnia bright after the war to orange n aside, had taken place and we've seen what tyrannical regime will do to a country in Iraq. And all those experiences are all coming to a head right now. It gives me a frame of reference to take my experiences, and we have to actually apply them to the unknown that we're experiencing right now known that we're experiencing right now. Leila Fadel NPR

Leila Fadel Blackman Malloy U. S Capitol Police United States Black Capitol Po Malloy Capitol Police For Alleged Dis Capitol Police Board U. S. Capitol Police MPR Carl Shaw Heather Taylor St Louis Police Department Blackman Congress Senate Ethical Society Of Police St Louis Police Columbus Char
Every 15 minutes someone in Los Angeles County dies from the coronavirus

Morning Edition

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Every 15 minutes someone in Los Angeles County dies from the coronavirus

"In Los Angeles County. Now someone dies of covert 19 every 15 minutes. Here's NPR's Leila Fadel. It took this county 9.5 months to reach 400,000 cases of covert 19. But in the last month that number has doubled to over 840,000 cases. L, A county supervisor Hilda so lease That is a human disaster and one that was avoidable. But I need to underscore that it could be worse. The situation is already beyond our imagination, but it could become beyond comprehension. If the health restrictions in place are not fully obeyed. That number will likely go up after a weekend of New Year celebrations. Despite lockdown rules again, so lease hospitals are declaring internal disasters. And having to open church gyms to serve as hospital units are health care workers are physically and mentally exhausted and sick. Dr. Ornish Mahajan heads Harbor U. C L, a medical center. Were overrun and our emergency room. We're taking care of patients literally in the hallways sometimes because there is just no beds available. We have equipment. That's You know, almost running out, and so it is a really unbelievable situation here. They only have a few ventilators left only a handful of high flow oxygen, a setup that pushes high pressures of oxygen through the nose. You're ordering more, and we will borrow if we need to from our sister hospitals, But every hospital is struggling with this. The ICU is at 150% capacity and the staff is getting exposed not at work, but because there's so much community transmission. Meanwhile, so many hospitals, ers and ICUs are so full. It's prompted new directives from the Los Angeles County Emergency Medical Services Agency. If in a M T can't get a pulse from a person who's had a cardiac arrest after 20 minutes of trying to resuscitate them. The ambulance shouldn't bring them into the hospital because there's basically no chance of survival and that ambulance in bed are needed for someone else.

Leila Fadel Dr. Ornish Mahajan Harbor U. Los Angeles County Hilda NPR Los Angeles County Emergency M ICU
All eyes on Nevada: Election officials won't rush pivotal vote count in presidential race

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

All eyes on Nevada: Election officials won't rush pivotal vote count in presidential race

"Outstanding state is Nevada, where Biden has been leading. If Biden wins Nevada. He wins the election. NPR's Leila Fadel reports. Nevada State officials will resume ballot counting this morning. The secretary of state made the announcement after early votes, Election day vote and mail in ballots received by November, 2nd recounted. What's left account are the mail in ballots the state received on Election Day provisional ballots and mail in ballots that are still arriving in Nevada. Every eligible voter was mailed a ballot in the midst of this pandemic, and the state will accept ballots postmarked by Election Day until November, 10th. President prematurely declared victory in this tight national race, adding he'd go to the Supreme Court to stop ballot counting. It was an unprecedented move that many expected as he once again falsely called fraud. It raised the specter for ugly battles ahead in places like Nevada, where ballots are still being counted. Leila Fadel NPR NEWS Las Vegas

Nevada Leila Fadel Biden NPR Supreme Court Las Vegas
The Trump vote is rising among Blacks and Hispanics, despite the conventional wisdom

Morning Edition

04:38 min | 5 months ago

The Trump vote is rising among Blacks and Hispanics, despite the conventional wisdom

"That President Trump did better than some people expected with black and Latino voters. We say it appears because votes were still being counted. The election results looked very different on Tuesday night than they do right now, and they may look different again, but we can say The president made a bid for black and Latino voters, and some responded, including in the very closely fought state of Nevada. NPR's Leila Fadel reports This year was the first time 29 year old Amanda Sandoval voted. I woke up early. I arranged for my mom to take my kids to school, and I got there half an hour early, and I waited in line and I voted, and it was a huge moment in my life because this election is so important, it's more important than any other election. In history because it's going to dictate so much of our future. She's a trump supporter. So is her husband, and neither of them voted in 2016. But this year, the self described conservative Mexican Americans chose the president because of their anti abortion stance as devout Christians as well as trump supporter of school choice and promises of a better economy. Part of what may be a record turnout in Nevada. And in this purple State. Latino voters have been the backbone to every single democratic presidential win here. Black and Asian voters are also key. And while Biden will win black and Latino voters by landslides across the country, which could deliver him the election and Nevada Trump appears to be getting more not less support in black and Latino communities. Both campaigns have heavily invested in courting communities of color and Latino communities, in particular in Nevada. Musil Harvey is a fellow at Columbia University's sociology department. It's a glaring indictment of the Democratic Party than in the midst of Ah recession and the major pandemic that a lot of minority voters. I did not believe that their lives would necessarily be better off under Joe Biden that Donald Trump Despite the outsized economic devastation, death illness is in the midst of this pandemic for Latino and black communities. There's hardly a better indication of Democrats. Inability to speak toe ordinary people about things. They care about this that in midst of the milieu we find ourselves in they still lost minority voters, Garvey says. Minority voters need to be treated as individuals. They are some conservative, some more liberal, some who want limits on immigration. People are less concerned at the end of the day when they're casting their ballots. Whether or not a politician likes them or with it or gets it or if they're woke or not, versus this person going to make my life my life going to be better or worse in the next sort of four years. We really are not a monolithic group that Sander Dixon she heads empower 3 60. It engages and mobilizes black voters in Nevada. She's hoping for a record turnout. She's a Democrat that runs a nonpartisan nonprofit and believes Nevada will go to Biden because of black and Latino voters. But she says she's a little disappointed that her party hasn't fully figured out how to really engage black voters on issues beyond identity. And so because of that, you can get all of the turn out that you want, but you're seeing the results. Of not putting in the work to engage them when it's off cycle to inform them and educate them about issues to make sure that you're actually connecting to the pain that they're having at the time and you're able to turn that into Democratic results, she says. Voters she engaged said racial justice was important because it's been a fight every generation battles a given, but most important to the voters, she spoke to you on Election Day. We're healthcare education jobs, So the political parties need to engage voters early and often on the issues that matter to them. On Wednesday, she was waiting for election results and paying poll workers in Candice's. You're so welcome. Thank you so much for everything. Among them was Dante Walker. Thie 21 year old almost didn't vote. He jokes that he was like the people he end up trying to convince to cast their ballots. Like I don't think I will have a voice or my wish would be heard if I did vote or it mattered if I voted, so that's one. He describes himself as very churchy his work to engage voters the Lord's work. I came to my decision because I passed in my church, she said. Whoever spoke unity at the election is the one who's supposed to vote for Bytom was the first person who was said immunity, so he chose Biden, his cousin, just six months older shows trump his family, not a monolith and political parties need to understand that because even if Democrats take the overwhelming majority of black and Latino voters, thes elections come down to a few 1000 votes in places like Nevada. Leila Fadel.

Nevada Leila Fadel Amanda Sandoval Musil Harvey Biden Donald Trump Sander Dixon NPR Joe Biden Columbia University Garvey Democratic Party Dante Walker Candice Bytom
Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

"President Trump is holding steady or doing better with Latino voters that he did in 2016, according to polls. That may be surprising. The president has called Mexican immigrants, rapists and drug dealers and his presidency. Is haunted with images of immigrant Children separated from their parents and crowded detention centers. NPR's Leila Fadel reports. His support is not waning, and most of it comes from men.

President Trump Leila Fadel NPR
Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:14 min | 6 months ago

Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. President Trump is holding steady or doing better with Latino voters than he did in 2016, according to polls. That may be surprising. The president has called Mexican immigrants, rapists and drug dealers and his presidency is haunted with images of immigrant Children separated from their parents and crowded detention centers. NPR's Leila Fadel reports. His support is not waning, and most of it comes from men. Raimondo Torres is a staunch supporter of this president. The initially attracted me and keeps me tied to him is that he has taught Republicans how to not just win but no longer throw our faces and bodies in front of every punch that the left is willing to throw. Torres is Arizonan, ethnically Mexican and a devout Catholic, he says. What he likes is that Trump doesn't take any mess from Democrats or what he calls establishment Republicans. So on Election day he's voting for the president. Top of mind for him is the courts and the more than 200 judges trumps appointed in his time in office. My family's been in Arizona for more than 100 years. We don't see ourselves as immigrants. Sweets they are so very much is Arizonans and Americans to continue to treat us as if we're all still just fresh across the border, which most Republicans and a lot of Democrats would like to think we are just easily encapsulate us. To something that is not resounding and Torres is part of about or just over a quarter of Latinos who are strongly or somewhat in support of this president. Michelle May. Orga, a new Mexico based pollster, says the backbone of the support comes from men has many men in particular are a swing vote, their vote that we have to go and get And while Democrats will likely win the majority of Latino votes overall, the margins are narrower with men. A New York Times Sienna College poll found the vice President Joe Biden, leads by 34% points. Latina voters. But with Latino men, his lead is just eight points. Republicans will take a larger margin than maybe they have in the past or enough that you know it is starting to eat into the Democratic margin. The Republican Party has been courting the Latino vote for decades, says historian Geraldo Cadaver, who wrote a book on Hispanic Republicans. President Richard Nixon set the town. Nixon did it through a kind of politics of patronage and High level appointment, he appointed the first Hispanic treasure of the United States, a Mexican American woman and appointed Latinos toe other top positions. The big question is why Why is the number holding steady or in some place is going up slightly? Despite anti immigration policies and offensive language about African and Latino immigrants, I think I would point first to the development over a long period of time of Ah, partisan loyalty to the Republican Party and Latino Republican voters just identify as Republicans above all else, just like many Americans also could. Office says Latino voters vote on issues of religious freedom The economy trumps argument about a strong pre coded 19 economy for Latinos resonates, as does his law and order messaging. Many Latinos are cops, Border Patrol officers or in the military. Meanwhile, the Trump campaign has made a concerted effort to court the vote early. I think it's been kind of amazing to watch. I mean, in some ways, the Latinos for Trump Campaign, which started officially in the spring of 2019 has been relentless in Recruiting Latino voters that they're actually trying to increase and have been trying to increase trumps Latino support, not just kind of hold it, study or depress the turnout of Democrats. That's the first thing. Randall Avila, the executive director of the Orange County Republican Party, talks about when knocking on doors of other Latino voters in Southern California. He points to a low unemployment rates for Latinos, pre pandemic, the party's preference for school choice and lower taxes. I've never seen the Republican Party fight this hard to get Latino on African American votes. I can definitely understand whether some hesitancy based off some past comments or policies. But I don't believe that is the Republican Party of today. You know, we have a number of Latino candidates. A number of Latino Republicans who are really stepping up and taking center stage. A villa says he hopes that resonates because come November, the party will need the votes to flip the four congressional seats they lost in 2018 in Orange County and hold on to their county seat.

Orange County Republican Party President Trump Raimondo Torres Republican Party President Richard Nixon Npr News Scott Simon NPR Leila Fadel Vice President Orange County Arizona Michelle May Joe Biden Orga Arizonan Border Patrol Mexico Randall Avila
Coronavirus travel ban creating chaos at U.S. airports: reports

The Sunday Show

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus travel ban creating chaos at U.S. airports: reports

"There's been chaos this weekend at some of the nation's major airports as Americans return from Europe ahead of new restrictions on travel from Europe photos from inside Chicago's o'hare International Airport show long lines of people packed into tight spaces waiting for hours to be screened for coronavirus NPR's Leila Fadel reports on the situation here international airports one of thirteen airports accepting people returning from Europe and implementing enhanced screening but now many question whether the bottlenecks the screens creating will end up infecting more people than it's protecting similar pictures and videos were shared from the Dallas fort worth International Airport the governor of Illinois JB Pritzker seeds in a tweet at president trump and vice president Mike pence saying the crowds and lines are unacceptable and that the president needs to address it immediately meanwhile the o'hare international airport's Twitter account says it has cooled strongly encourage their federal partners to increase staffing to meet demand will fall down NPR

Europe Chicago NPR Leila Fadel Donald Trump Vice President Mike Pence O'hare International Airport Dallas Fort Worth Internationa Illinois President Trump Twitter
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News this is All Things Considered I'm Mary Louise Kelly and Ahmadi Cornish life in Seattle is changing because of the cove in nineteen now break the elbow bump has replaced the handshake gatherings from women's March yesterday to university classes have moved online in everyday decisions like whether to grab a coffee ride the bus even take prenatal yoga have become more difficult as NPR's Leila Fadel reports there are sixteen pregnant women in this yoga class at a Seattle studio N. as peaceful as it's supposed to feel here there is that underlying tension that runs beneath everything in the city these days before they start objects in the instructor addresses the class I don't mean in a way we thank in due diligence and we do that all the time and and so after you leave if you guys don't mind to save a little extra time right down the box for me corona virus and the disease it causes cove in nineteen is on everyone's mind Jackson spent almost six hours the day before disinfecting because people are still coming is there so much hate there's the anxiety people feel it and so we were calm breathing relaxing in will we can't isolate this thing closer to the sharing circle cobit nineteen dominates that to just the rent I need a lot of encouragement to come here today from my husband and Lena Stockton totally everyone I'm not feeling like crap about the state of the world this week and the fact that he went into this world the state these types of conversations they're happening across the city as Seattleites cautiously go about life despite the outbreak of.

Mary Louise Kelly NPR Leila Fadel instructor Jackson Seattleites Lena Stockton
"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

"This is All Things Considered I'm Mary Louise Kelly and Ahmadi Cornish life in Seattle is changing because of the cove in nineteen outbreak the elbow bump has replaced the handshake gatherings from women's March yesterday to university classes have moved online in everyday decisions like whether to grab a coffee ride a bus even take prenatal yoga have become more difficult as NPR's Leila Fadel reports there are sixteen pregnant women in this yoga class at a Seattle studio N. as peaceful as it's supposed to feel here there is that underlying tension that runs beneath everything in the city these days before they start Obree Jackson the instructor addresses the class I just mean in a way we've taken due diligence and we do that all the time and and so after you leave if you guys don't mind just take a little extra time right down the box for me corona virus and the disease it causes cove in nineteen is on everyone's mind Jackson spent almost six hours the day before disinfecting because people are still coming is just so much hate there's the anxiety people feel it and so we were calm breathing relaxing in really we can't isolate this thing class starts with a sharing circle cobit nineteen dominates that to just the rent I need a lot of encouragement to come here today from my husband and Lena Stockton totally everyone about feeling like crap about the state of the world this week and the fact that human into this world in this state these types of conversations while they're happening across the city as Seattleites cautiously go about life despite the.

Mary Louise Kelly NPR Leila Fadel Obree Jackson instructor Seattleites Lena Stockton
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is All Things Considered I'm Mary Louise Kelly and Ahmadi Cornish life in Seattle is changing because of the cove in nineteen now break the elbow bump has replaced the handshake gatherings from women's March yesterday to university classes have moved online and everyday decisions like whether to grab a coffee ride the bus even take prenatal yoga have become more difficult as NPR's Leila Fadel reports there are sixteen pregnant women in this yoga class at a Seattle studio N. as peaceful as it's supposed to feel here there is that underlying tension that runs beneath everything in the city these days before they start average Jackson the instructor addresses the class I don't mean in a way we thank in due diligence and we do that all the time and and so after you leave if you guys don't mind just take a little extra time right down the box for me corona virus and the disease it causes cove in nineteen is on everyone's mind Jackson spent almost six hours the day before disinfecting because people are still coming is just so much hate there's the anxiety people feel it and so we were calm breathing relaxing in will we can't isolate this thing closer to the sharing circle code nineteen dominates that to just the rent I need a lot of encouragement to come here today from my husband and Lena Stockton totally everyone I'm not feeling like crap about the state of the world this week and the fact that human into this world in this state these types of conversations they're happening across the city as Seattleites cautiously go about life despite.

Mary Louise Kelly NPR Leila Fadel Jackson instructor Seattleites Lena Stockton
Motel Converted Into Quarantine Site Sparks Controversy

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Motel Converted Into Quarantine Site Sparks Controversy

"In another suburb about twenty miles away a motel is being converted into a quarantine centre and as NPR's Leila Fadel reports the move has infuriated the community and then there my name is Jessica and I were get res beans the coffee stands near the quarantines hates when Jessica Salter says near the site she means directly across the busy street from what was an externalized motel until a few days ago the yellow and red sign that dominated her views from the drive up window at the coffee stand is

NPR Leila Fadel Jessica Jessica Salter
Missouri abortion clinic to stay open for now after court order

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:11 min | 2 years ago

Missouri abortion clinic to stay open for now after court order

"Missouri. So remaining clinic that provides abortions will remain open for now. The license for the Saint Louis Planned Parenthood clinic had been set to expire at midnight after the state declined to renew it. But a circuit court, judge has granted a temporary restraining order. Allowing the silly to keep up rating at least until the hearing on Tuesday, Missouri. One of several states were lawmakers have passed restrictions on abortions this year, but Nevada's taking a step in the other direction NPR's, Leila, Fadel reports on an abortion rights measure signed into law Friday. That is democratic governor Steve select signed the trust Nevada women act. It makes more accessible by removing requirements that had been around for decades until now in Nevada, the doctor had to explain the physical and emotional implications of the procedure. Doctors also are no longer required to record the woman's age and marital status. The new law decriminalizes supplying women with medication that induces abortion without the advice of a doctor, the law passed in the Nevada State assembly, the first majority female legislature in the country, and it was a largely party line vote after signing the law governor Cecil said it repealed outdated criminal penalties for

Nevada Saint Louis Planned Parenthood Nevada State Assembly Missouri Fadel Cecil Missouri. Steve NPR
"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back in October two thousand seventeen that's when Stephen paddock killed fifty eight people nearly nine hundred others were injured in the melee. Paddock then shot and killed himself was the single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The FBI could not find any clear motive NPR's Leila Fadel joins us now from Las Vegas and Layla. First of all tell us a little more about the FBI's probe into this. So the FBI shared its key findings from this report from the behavioral analysis unit and experts spent nearly a year pouring over information and evidence, and they still couldn't find a single clear motive shooter wasn't driven by a religious, social political agenda. He acted alone. They didn't find a manifesto a suicide note of video or really anything to explain why he did this. But the. The report also said that often shooters don't have any singular big motive behind these really senseless acts of violence is often a combination of things like in this case. The report found that the shooter was at least in part driven by the desire to die by suicide. And remember he did kill himself at the end of this horrific shooting, and he wanted to be infamous now, what makes the FBI think that he wanted to die. Well, the reports findings depicted man whose physical and mental health were declining. He wasn't a healthy sixty four year old. And apparently, he was making plans that you make at the end of your life, and he wanted to take control of of how he died, and he might have also been inspired by his father who was a Bank robber and fugitive and was on the FBI's top ten most wanted list in nineteen sixty eight this was also very carefully planned the shooter stockpile of weapons and ammunition ammunition, and he went on this year long buying spree at forty seven firearms the day, he opened fire on these people. And he was researching police tactics and response ballistics, and he was going to different sites to figure out where he could inflict the most damage on a lot of people, but he didn't have a particular grudge against the people he shot or the hotel. He chose to do it from. He just wanted to hurt people. And the FBI report found that the shooter didn't have much empathy that he that he saw people through this transactional lens and so- hurting people that were just out having fun matched his personality. So many people were affected by this. What are survivor saying today? Yeah, I spoke with Mendez Smith, and and her sister was shot and killed and her name was Nisha Tong. She was a single mother of three boys. Those boys now being raised by their grandparents here in Las Vegas. And she said she'd rather that the shooter take the reasons he did this to his grave, and he'd be alive. Honestly to not have the answers in exchange for not having to deal with him. I'm okay with that. You know, I truly believe that if he had lived he. He would have just made my parents life miserable. Keeping we would have been caught up in in trials and having to listen to things that he would say the Las Vegas police closed their investigation over the summer also found no motive, no why. So no one's looking into that anymore and a lot a lot of people really do want to know why? But for others, this aftermath has been just traumatizing and emotionally exhausting. And that they're the last thing they're thinking about is the motive that's NPR's. Leila fadel. Thank you. Thank you for having me..

FBI Leila Fadel Las Vegas Nisha Tong Stephen paddock NPR Mendez Smith sixty four year
"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

"Friday, Saturday clouds increase in the meantime, with daytime highs in the mid sixties. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. The FBI says it's completed an analysis of the mass shooting in Las Vegas back in October two thousand seventeen that's when Stephen paddock killed fifty eight people nearly nine hundred others were injured in the melee. Paddock then shot and killed himself. It was the single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The FBI could not find any clear motive NPR's Leila Fadel joins us now from Las Vegas and Layla. First of all tell us a little more about the FBI's probe into this. So the FBI shared its key findings from this report from the behavioral analysis unit and experts spent nearly a year pouring over information and evidence, and they still couldn't find a single clear motive shooter wasn't driven by a religious, social or political agenda. He acted alone that in find a manifesto, a suicide note of video or really anything to explain why he did this. But the report also said that often shooters don't have any singular big motive. Behind these really senseless acts of violence, his says, it's often a combination of things like in this case. The report found that the shooter was at least in part driven by the desire to die by suicide. And remember he did kill himself at the end of this horrific shooting, and he wanted to be infamous. Now, what makes the FBI I think that he wanted to die. Well, the report findings depict a man whose physical and mental health were declining. He wasn't a healthy sixty four year old. And apparently he was making plans that you make at the end of your life. And he wanted to take control of of how he died, and he might have also been inspired by his father who was a Bank robber and fugitive and was on the FBI's top ten most wanted list in nineteen sixty eight. This was also very carefully planned the shooter stockpiled weapons and ammunition ammunition, and he went on this year long buying spree at forty seven firearms the day, he opened fire on these people, and he was researching police tactics and response ballistics, and he was going to different sites to figure out where he could inflict the most damage on a lot of people, but he didn't have a particular grudge against the people he shot or the hotel. He chose to do it from. He just wanted to hurt people. And the FBI report found that the shooter didn't have much empathy that he that he saw people through this trend. Sectional lens and hurting people that were just out having fun matched his personality. So many people were affected by this. What are survivor saying today? Yeah, I spoke with Mendez Smith and her sister was shot and killed and her name was Nisha talk. She was a single mother of three boys. Those boys now being raised by their grandparents here in Las Vegas. And she said she'd rather that the shooter take the reasons he did this to his grave, and he'd be alive. Honestly to not have the answers in exchange for not having to deal with him. I'm okay with that. You know, I truly believe that if he had lived he would have just made my parents life miserable. We would have been caught up in in trials and having to listen to things that he would say the Las Vegas police closed their investigation over the summer also found no motive, no why. So no one's looking into that anymore and a lot a lot of people really do want to know why? But for others, this aftermath has been just traumatizing and emotionally exhausting. And that they're the last thing they're thinking about is the motive that's NPR's. Leila fadel. Thank you. Thank you for having me..

FBI Las Vegas Leila Fadel Mendez Smith NPR Stephen paddock Audie cornish Ari Shapiro Nisha sixty four year
"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KCRW

"Shooting in Las Vegas back in October two thousand seventeen that's when Stephen paddock killed fifty eight people nearly nine hundred others were injured in the melee. Paddock then shot and killed himself. It was the single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The FBI could not find any clear motive NPR's Leila Fadel joins us now from Las Vegas and first of all tell us a little more about the FBI's probe into this. So the FBI shared its key findings from this report from the behavioral analysis unit and experts spent nearly a year pouring over information and evidence, and they still couldn't find a single clear motive shooter wasn't driven by a religious, social political agenda. He acted alone. They didn't find manifesto a suicide note of video or really anything to explain why he did this. But the report also said that often shooters don't have any singular big. Motive behind these really senseless acts of violence his says, it's often a combination of things like in this case. The report found that the shooter was at least in part driven by the desire to die by suicide. And remember he did kill himself at the end of this horrific shooting, and he wanted to be infamous. Now, what makes the FBI I think that he wanted to die. Well, record findings depict a man whose physical and mental health were declining. He wasn't a healthy sixty four year old. And apparently he was making plans that you make at the end of your life. And he wanted to take control of of how he died, and he might have also been inspired by his father who was a Bank robber and fugitive and was on the FBI's top ten most wanted list in nineteen sixty eight. This was also very carefully planned the shooter stockpiled weapons and ammunition ammunition, and he went on this year long buying spree at forty seven and firearms the day, he opened fire on these people, and he was researching police tactics and response ballistics, and he was going to different sites to figure out where he could inflict the most damage on a lot of people, but he didn't have a particular grudge against the people he shot or the hotel. He chose to do it from. He just wanted to hurt people. And the FBI report found that the shooter didn't have much empathy that he that he saw people through this transaction. Factional lens. And so hurting people that were just out having fun matched his personality. So many people were affected by this. What are survivor said today? Yeah, I spoke with Mundus Smith and her sister was shot and killed and her name was Nisha talk. She was a single mother of three boys. Those boys now being raised by their grandparents here in Las Vegas. And she said she'd rather that the shooter take the reasons he did this to his grave, and he'd be alive. Honestly to not have the answers in exchange for not having to deal with him. I'm okay with that. You know, I I truly believe that if he had lived he would have just made my parents life miserable Kiwi. Now, we would have been caught up in in trials and having to listen to things that he would say the Las Vegas police closed their investigation over the summer also found no motive, no why. So no one's looking into that anymore and a lot a lot of people really do want to know why? But for others, this aftermath has been just traumatizing and emotionally exhausting. And that they're the last thing they're thinking about is the motive that's NPR's. Leila bottle. Thank you. Thank you for having me..

FBI Las Vegas Mundus Smith Stephen paddock Leila Fadel Leila bottle NPR Nisha sixty four year
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Point nine FM WNYC from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. The FBI says it's completed and analysis of the mass shooting in Las Vegas back in October two thousand seventeen that's when Stephen paddock killed fifty eight people nearly nine hundred others were injured in the melee. Paddock then shot and killed himself. It was the single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The FBI could not find any clear motive NPR's Leila Fadel joins us now from Las Vegas, and they first of all tell us a little more about the FBI's probe into this. So the FBI shared its key findings from this report from the behavioral analysis unit and experts spent nearly a year pouring over information and evidence, and they still couldn't find a single clear motive shooter wasn't driven by a religious, social or political agenda. He acted alone. They didn't find a manifesto a suicide note of video or really anything to explain why he did this. But the report also said that often shooters don't have any singular big motive behind these really senseless acts of violence his says, it's often a combination of things like in this case. The report found that the shooter was at least in part driven by the desire to die by suicide. And remember he did kill himself at the end of this horrific shooting, and he wanted to be infamous. Now, what makes the FBI think that he wanted to die? Well, the record findings depicted man whose physical and mental health were declining. He wasn't a healthy sixty four year old. And apparently, he was making plans that you make at the end of your life, and he wanted to take control of how he died, and he might have also been inspired by his father who was a Bank robber and fugitive and was on the FBI's top ten most wanted list nine hundred sixty eight this was also very carefully planned the shooter stockpile of weapons and ammunition ammunition, and he went on this year long buying spree at forty seven and firearms the day, he opened fire on these people, and he was researching police tactics and response ballistics, and he was going to different sites to figure out where he couldn't flick the most damage on a lot of people, but he didn't have a particular grudge against the people he shot or the hotel. He chose to do it from. He just wanted to hurt people. And the FBI report found that the shooter didn't have much empathy that he that he saw people through this transaction. Sectional lands and so- hurting people that were just out having fun matched his personality. So many people were affected by this. What are survivor seeing today? Yeah, I spoke with Mendez Smith and her sister was shot and killed and her name was Nisha talk. She was a single mother of three boys. Those boys now being raised by their grandparents here in Las Vegas. And she said she'd rather that the shooter take the reasons he did this to his grave, and he'd be alive. Honestly to not have the answers in exchange for not having dealt with him. I'm okay with that. You know, I truly believe that if he had lived he would have just made my parents life miserable Kiwi. We know we would have been caught up in in trials and having to listen to things that he would say the Las Vegas police closed their investigation over the summer also found no motive, no why. So no one's looking into that anymore. And a lot of a lot of people really do want to know why? But for others, this aftermath has been just traumatizing and emotionally exhausting. And that they're the last thing they're thinking about is the motive that's NPR's. Leila fadel. Thank you. Thank you for having me..

FBI Las Vegas Leila Fadel Mendez Smith Stephen paddock Audie cornish Ari Shapiro NPR WNYC Nisha sixty four year
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. The FBI says it's completed an analysis of the mass shooting in Las Vegas back in October two thousand seventeen that's when Stephen paddock killed fifty eight people nearly nine hundred others were injured in the melee. Paddock then shot and killed himself was the single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The FBI could not find any clear motive NPR's Leila Fadel joins us now from Las Vegas and look first of all tell us a little more about the FBI's probe into this. So the FBI shared its key findings from this report from the behavioral analysis unit and experts spent nearly a year pouring over information and evidence, and they still couldn't find a single clear motive shooter wasn't driven by a religious, social or political agenda. He acted alone. They didn't find a manifesto a suicide note of video or really anything to explain why he did this. But the report also said that. Often shooters don't have any singular big motive behind these really senseless acts of violence his says, it's often a combination of things like in this case. The report found that the shooter was at least in part driven by the desire to die by suicide. And remember he did kill himself at the end of this horrific shooting, and he wanted to be infamous. Now, what makes the FBI think that he wanted to die? Well, the reports findings depicted man whose physical and mental health were declining. He wasn't a healthy sixty four year old. And apparently he was making plans that you make at the end of your life. And he wanted to take control of of how he died, and he might have also been inspired by his father who was a Bank robber and fugitive and was on the FBI's top ten most wanted list in nineteen sixty eight this was also very carefully planned the shooter stockpile of weapons and ammunition ammunition, and he went on this year long buying spree at forty seven firearms the day, he opened fire on these people, and he was researching police tactics and response ballistics, and he was going to different sites to figure out where he could inflict the most damage on a lot of people, but he didn't have a particular graduates the people he shot or the hotel. He chose to do it from. He just wanted to hurt people. And the FBI report found that the shooter didn't have much empathy that he that he saw people through this trend. Factional lens. So hurting people that were just out having fun matched his personality. So many people were affected by this. What are survivor sand today? Yeah, I spoke with Mendez Smith, and and her sister was shot and killed and her name was Nisha Tong. She was a single mother of three boys. Those boys now being raised by their grandparents here in Las Vegas. And she said she'd rather that the shooter take the reasons he did this to his grave, and he'd be alive. Honestly to not have the answers in exchange for not having to deal with him. I'm okay with that. You know, I I truly believe that if he had lived he would have just made my parents life miserable. Kiwi know we would have been caught up in in trials and having to listen to things that he would say the Las Vegas police closed their investigation over the summer also found no motive, no why. So no one's looking into that anymore. And a lot of people really do want to know why? But for others, this aftermath has been just traumatizing and emotionally exhausting. And that they're the last thing thinking about is the motive that's NPR's. Leila fadel. Thank you. Thank you for having me..

FBI Las Vegas Leila Fadel Nisha Tong NPR Stephen paddock Audie cornish Ari Shapiro Mendez Smith Kiwi sixty four year
Muslims Are Having A Hollywood Moment

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:44 min | 2 years ago

Muslims Are Having A Hollywood Moment

"Is changing on American television and online streaming services. There are more Muslim characters and more nuanced portrayals of Muslim communities NPR's Leila Fadel starts to story on set in Los Angeles. It's one of the last days of taping for a new web series called east of LA brea, all ROY. It's a show about being your twenties and figuring out life, and it's told through two main characters roommates who are Muslim, but that's not the entirety of their storylines says Samir Gardezi, the creator of the show it's about paying rent. You know, having a dead end job. I'm having issues with you know, your your family life going to families the first project from powder cake, the company founded by director writer and actor Paul fig known for films like bridesmaids and the recent Ghostbusters east of LA brea follows the friendship of two women a black Muslim and Bangladeshi American will slump in gentrifying, Los Angeles Gardezi says, it's one American Muslim story. There's so many different versions, and my hope would be that everyone gets a shot that tell their version of a Muslim Americans story. So it doesn't feel like, oh, this is the one show that needs to make it all the way. We had to the next location for taping an LA mosque the scene deals with racism black Muslims, sometimes face within Muslim communities. The character. I show Hudson played by Geoffrey Maya is praying when her phone starts ringing with a song like this guy. You gain the director tells the other actors how to react and ladies look at her little shady in the next scene. A woman skull Tessin, assuming she's a recent convert and tells her her prayer doesn't count. We have lessons every Thursday one in conflict with it's something that happens an immigrant Muslim, assuming she knows better. And it's one way the show explores identity, and he's still brea creator Samir Gardezi says he's glad there are more projects involving Muslims. But he says there isn't going to be one breakout moment, but hopefully, there will be many moments and the more stuff that's out there, even the bad stuff. The better. That's that is the flexibility and the privilege that I think white communities is that they're allowed to fail and Hollywood and no one really bad tonight. It's like, okay. It's okay. You can you can jump back up and here let's throw millions of dollars again for you to do your next project. So that's the point that we have to get to. It's a struggle a lot of communities of color and minorities face in Hollywood, the two thousand eighteen Hollywood diversity report from UCLA found that despite progress minorities are still under a presented in key jobs from lead actors to director. Two writers right now, there's an appetite for shows about Muslims in parts because Muslim writers like our daisy who's written on modern family and outsourced are creating their own content and their support for it. He got a grant from pop culture collaborative to create the series and some of the interest is Hollywood reacting to anti-muslim and anti-immigrant sentiment from Donald Trump after he announced his candidacy in two thousand fifteen the Hollywood bureau of the Muslim public Affairs Council got a lot more popular the phones were ringing off the hook that sue Abadie. She leaves the bureau and consults with studios and production companies on creating more authentic Muslim characters were up against decades of storytelling. That is inaccurate many times that is racist often and very stereotypical among the tropes women are chattel and don't have identities or Muslims only portrayed as the gas station owner or the taxi driver Obeidi says, it's an uphill battle. But today the list of characters on mainstream television. In is longer than she's ever seen a Muslim third on Grey's anatomy, a superhero on DC legends of tomorrow, a LGBTQ hijab e Muslim on on the bowl type a pork loving alcohol. Drinking Muslim on master of none. When writers come to her for advice. Obeidi reminds them that these Muslim characters might be the only Muslim some people ever meet. She tries to help them. Get the language, right? Like scripts that used the term alot Akhbar, which means God is great. So you've seen many TV and film projects that have LA walkabout being used in very violent scenes how baiting a Goshi it's studios to try to get them to change it translated or offset it with happy scenes like saying God is great at a wedding or a dinner party because for Muslims. It's a beautiful phrase portrayed as ugly. You know? So someone Sears hook bud when they're dining out. And all of a sudden, you know, they're calling nine one one because they think of family is doing. Something bad. When all they're saying is God that was a damn good meal hawk bud. And I've eighties excited by many of the projects now being written by and about Muslims for large audiences. There's soons eight a Palestinian American comic with cerebral palsy writing an autobiographical sitcom for ABC Moammar a comic with the recent Netflix special and Rami Yousef who I met on a night. He's headlining at the Hollywood, improv. He jokes about how in L A's. Suddenly people think Islam is cool juice shot of getting some juices ten song. It's woman I'm telling her about Ramadan. And you know, she works in my God that sounds so I wanted to do with this weekend. She said Coachella. The New Jersey native is following in the path of many comics who've gone from stand up to sitcom like Seinfeld. Rami Yousef is writing ten episodes of show cult Rami for Hulu it will reflect who use of is in gypsy in American a practicing Muslim who like most people wrestles with trying to be good after a stand up performance. He jokes about how he and his friends approach religion a little like a menu. We call it a LA carte where we're all kind of just picking and choosing like wool. This is my deal with God helps Rami reflects how all kinds of people have their deal with God. I like to get dark. I like to get weird. I like to get uncomfortable. And I feel like when an immigrant family, or when a family that is maybe, you know, group that's not well represented when people try and put them on television. They go out of their way to make them. Look amazing and look perfect his show do that. I just was really excited about the idea of making Muslims. Look imperfect and not create something that was like some PR thing, but create something that was you know, really just a realistic portrayal of what we go through. How we are. He says that people connect with others when they see their flaws not when their hero of villain or exactly like everyone else

Rami Yousef Hollywood Samir Gardezi Director Muslim Public Affairs Council La Brea LA Obeidi Los Angeles Leila Fadel Paul Fig New Jersey Tessin Donald Trump Ucla Grey ABC Hudson
US Treasury going after Russian bank for North Korea sanctions

Science Friday

04:31 min | 2 years ago

US Treasury going after Russian bank for North Korea sanctions

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Laurie London almost a. Year after the worst mass shooting in US, history Las Vegas police have issued a final report on the investigation into a killing spree that left fifty, eight people dead and hundreds more wounded NPR's Leyla Fidel tells us that police say after the, months long investigation. They still don't know why the shooter did it tar county sheriff Joe Lombardo release a final one hundred. Eighty three page report on the police investigation at a? Morning press conference in Las Vegas without a manifest. Or even or. Not to answer questions the totality of the information has. Been gathered leaves us to only make an educated guess. As to the motives of Stephen paddock, Lombardo called the shooter an, unremarkable man that he had never done anything. To draw law enforcement's attention until October first two thousand seventeen when he opened fire Lombardo said the FBI's behavioral, analysis unit will be releasing In its report by the end of the year Leila Fadel NPR. News the treasury department is going after a Russian Bank and other individuals and businesses accused of helping North Korea evade sanctions the action comes as secretary of state Mike Pompeo is in Singapore foreign Asian, security summit, this weekend as NPR's Michelle Kellerman reports on peyot. Is urging countries, in the region to keep the pressure on North Korea until it gives up its nuclear weapons the, treasury department has added agro say use a Russian Bank to a US blacklists saying. Knowingly facilitated what it calls a significant transaction, at violated US sanctions the US is also imposing sanctions on a Moscow based Representative of North Korea's primary, foreign exchange Bank urging Russia to expel him a Chinese trading company is also being singled out, by the treasury. Department Meanwhile Secretary Pompeo is attending a regional forum in Singapore where he's encouraging Countries to better enforce sanctions on. North Korea he tells reporters quote we still have a ways to go to achieve the outcome we're looking for Michelle Kellerman NPR news Washington the US Labor. Department is reporting that employers added one hundred fifty seven thousand workers to. Their payrolls last month a solid gain but the healthy pace in the first half of the year it was below that and below expectations. JJ can Eoghan is chief market, strategist at TD Ameritrade in Chicago although the headline number itself may not have been fantastic it wasn't so far below some. Expectations that it makes people nervous and if we look at what came out. For the may in June reports they were both. Revised higher the unemployment rate also ticked down to three point nine percent. On, Wall Street the Dow up ninety five points this is NPR news From k. q. e. d. news I'm Tiffany Cam high federal fire officials say flames from the massive Ferguson. Fire have prompted, a, new mandatory evacuation for Yosemite valley this morning park officials say. The blaze which started weeks, ago in, the, Sierra national forest is burning near the Wattana area of Yosemite within, the park's western boundary park spokesman Scott get, him in the, fire has entered the park it is along the highway forty. One corridor along the road where the. Firefighters are doing the backfiring operations park officials shut off the won'the. Area and Yosemite valley to all visitors last week the. Ferguson fire has scorched more than seventy three thousand acres and it's. Forty one percent contained meanwhile a team from the national weather service and Cal, fire have begun investigating the. Large fire world or fire tornado that ripped through, a section of reading a. Week ago in the early stages. Of the car fire As KiKi weedy science editor Danielle vent. And tells us they've released some preliminary, findings winds were in excess of one hundred forty three miles per hour when an out of control. Fire generated its own weather system last week torching neighborhoods and reading that's the equivalent of an f two tornado considered significant on the scale used for tornadoes the, winds, were strong enough to crumple high-tension powerline towers uproot. Trees and tear the roofs off homes the team will be issuing a full report but according to a Cal fire spokesman there is no estimate yet.

United States Treasury Department Joe Lombardo North Korea NPR Las Vegas Yosemite Valley Michelle Kellerman Washington Leila Fadel Npr Singapore Ferguson Tar County Laurie London Mike Pompeo Leyla Fidel Secretary Pompeo Russian Bank Treasury
"leila fadel" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WGTK

"At yale at the whole of graduate studies which building i know very well and in the common room at the whole of graduate studies there was a graduate student at yale black woman who had fallen asleep and one of her fellow students call the cops thinking that she didn't belong there that she was some homeless person who was sleeping inappropriately in a common area look it's problematic stuff and there is a a petition darin martin worked at the obama white house i'm not sure what he did for the obama might house but right now he has launched this hashtag living while black movement and it's covered by layla foll on npr a listen or examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb i black man at one of my neighbor's homes walking outlets luggage at a university campus there are two young men joined and their behavior is just really odd at a starbucks i i have two gentlemen of my cafe refusing to make a purchase or lease targets of these calls where people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race for for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines yeah and by the way this is one of those things where it's not an indictment of the cops when the cops get a nine one one call you respond we all expect that we don't expect people to hang up on you say oh wait i think you're you're have racist intent here i'm not gonna come cops have dining wrong and by the way in that famous case at yale it's you cannot blame the cops for anything that they did they came in they talked to the woman she was extremely put out an angry and they asked for her idea she didn't want to give her id but nothing there was no arrest there was certainly no injury no violence so what do you need to have happen darin martin talks.

yale graduate student darin martin obama layla foll npr leila fadel
"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More than eight thousand starbucks coffee shops in the us are going to be closed this afternoon so employees can go through training on how to deal with racial bias this crash course comes after that now infamous incident when a barista call the police onto black men were walked out in handcuffs since then more examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb boy man my neighbor's homes walking outlets luggage at a university campus sarah to young men that joined our and their behavior is just really odd at a starbucks i i have my cats either refusing to make a purchase or these targeted these calls where people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race but for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines take former white house staffer darin martin he's moving to his new apartment in new york city earlier this month when police show up in response to a report of an armed robbery those hurt i did feel unwelcome points unsafe because i know that there are folks here who were suspect of me what he wasn't was surprised he knew without his business suit on some of his new white neighbors might deem him suspicious even with a u haul and clearly marked moving boxes no matter how early i get up in the morning to leave and my suit or how late i come back in my suit when i take.

npr leila fadel darin martin starbucks airbnb white house new york
"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More than eight thousand starbucks coffee shops in the us are going to close this afternoon so employees can go through training on how to deal with racial bias this crash course comes after that now infamous incident when a barista call the police on to block men were walked out in handcuffs since then more examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb i'm at one of my neighbors on home watching you outlets luggage at a university campus there are two young men that joined us in their behavior is just really odd at a starbucks hi i have my cafe refusing to make a purchase or lease targets of these calls where people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race but for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines take former white house staffer darin martin he's moving to his new apartment in new york city earlier this month when police show up in response to a report of an armed robbery those hurt i did feel unwelcome at a points i'm safe because i know that there are folks here who were suspect of me what he wasn't surprised he knew without his business suit on some of his new white neighbors might deem him suspicious even with a u haul and clearly marked moving boxes no matter how early i get up in the morning to leave and my suit or how late i come back in my suit when i take a pseudo i still wear this.

npr leila fadel starbucks darin martin white house new york
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More than eight thousand starbucks coffee shops in the us are going to be closed this afternoon so employees can go through training on how to deal with racial bias this crash course comes after that now infamous incident when a barista call the police onto blocked men who were walked out in handcuffs since then more examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb right i'm a young black man at one of my neighbors on walking outlets luggage at a university campus there are two young men that joined our choice and their behavior is just really odd at a starbucks i i have to have either refusing to make a purchase or lease targets of these calls where people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race but for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines take former white house staffer darin martin he's moving to his new apartment in new york city earlier this month when police show up in response to a report of an armed robbery those hurt i did feel unwelcome at a points unsafe because i know that there are folks here who were suspect of me what he wasn't surprised he knew without his business suit on some of his new white neighbors might deem him suspicious even with a u haul and clearly marked moving boxes no matter how early i get up in the morning to leave and my suit or how late i come back in my suit when i take a pseudo off i still wear this.

npr leila fadel darin martin starbucks airbnb white house new york
"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Us are going to be closed this afternoon so employees can go through training on how to deal with racial bias this crash course comes after that now infamous incident when a barista call the police on to block men who were walked out in handcuffs since then more examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb i'm at one of my neighbor's homes watching you outlets luggage at a university campus sarah to young men joined us was just really odd at a starbucks i i have two gentlemen on my cats either refusing to make a purchase or lease visit targets of these calls where people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race but for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines take former white house staffer darin martin he's moving into his new apartment in new york city earlier this month when police show up in response to a report of an armed robbery those hurt i did feel unwelcome at at points unsafe because i know that there are folks here who were suspect of me when he wasn't surprised he knew without his business suit on some of his new white neighbors might deem him suspicious even with a u haul and clearly marked moving boxes no matter how early i get up in the morning to leave my suit or how late i come back in my suit when i take that pseudo off i still wear.

npr leila fadel darin martin white house new york
"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"leila fadel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us are going to be closed this afternoon so employees can go through training on how to deal with racial bias this crash course comes after that now infamous incident when a barista call the police onto black men were walked out in handcuffs since then more examples have emerged where white people are calling the police on people of color mostly african americans when there's little to no reason to do so here's npr's leila fadel it starts with the nine one one call at an airbnb i'm at one of my neighbors are watching outlets luggage at a university campus sarah to young men that joined us is just really odd at a starbucks hi i have two gentlemen of my cafe refusing to make a purchase on these targets of these calls were people of color most often black who ultimately were living their everyday lives in some cases the caller and law enforcement denied they had anything to do with race but for many observers especially people of color it was about race they say a flurry of examples over the last couple months are part of a systemic problem of people abusing the nine one one system to police racial lines take former white house staffer darin martin he's moving into his new apartment in new york city earlier this month when police show up in response to a report of an armed robbery those hurt i did feel unwelcome at a points unsafe because i know that there are folks here who were suspect of me what he wasn't was surprised he knew without his business suit on some of his new white neighbors might deem him suspicious even with a u haul and clearly marked moving boxes no matter how early i get up in the morning to leave and my suit or how late i come back in my suit when i take that pseudo off i still wear.

npr leila fadel starbucks darin martin white house new york