35 Burst results for "Lehman"

Podcast Namespace Talk with Andy Lehman

Podcast Help Desk

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Podcast Namespace Talk with Andy Lehman

"Like to welcome. Indie lehman to the podcasts. How you doing. I'm doing real well. Thanks andy does a additional plug in. Or what do you call that. An add on or just a standalone plug in that defending alone. Yeah the depends on the blue blueberry power press plug in right and He knows a lot more about this namespace stuff than i do or at least some of the thinks so. I figured i'd get him on here and we'll talk about You know. I don't have atoms little intro thing but sexy space. Serve space talk there. We go so Are plug in a blueberry. We've added the I believe location locked. Transcript something else but Not value the The funding tag and andy. Here's got a plugin that adds a whole bunch of other ones. Yeah so i originally created my plug. In based on the fact that i knew you guys gonna to it at some point but i wanted to play with it right away so i i developed a plug and it would add these other other tags in so. I'm supporting locked. Funding contact information transcript. Chapters person might season and episode. Those are the tags that i'm currently supporting in my plug in. Okay very good. yeah. I think we. We do season in episode for apple's tags but not the not the podcasting name spacer. It's called officially it's the podcast namespace by podcasting two point. Oh or the podcast. Index names to the same thing

Andy Lehman Apple
Farmers Got A Government Bailout In 2020, Even Those Who Didn't Need It

Environment: NPR

03:48 min | 6 months ago

Farmers Got A Government Bailout In 2020, Even Those Who Didn't Need It

"Back in the spring. Farmers who raise pigs were in panic. Some of their usual customers restaurants weren't buying prices had collapsed. Some hog farmers had no place to ship their animals because workers in pork processing plants. Were getting sick. This is just a grave situation on hot launch. This is nick. Giordano a top lobbyist for the national pork producers council in may on a call with reporters unless there is a large cash infusion from the federal government. We're going to lose a lot of producers lots of different farmers demanded government aid and congress provided thirty five billion dollars in emergency aid to farmers on top of regular farm subsidies which amounted to about ten billion dollars a year. Money went to hog farms but also people raising cattle corn and soybeans fruits and vegetables. Dairy farmers. Joe glauber an economist. At the international food policy research institute had trouble keeping up with at all. You almost lose track of of how much money is going out. Clobber used to be the chief economist at the us department of agriculture. And he finds it a little disturbing because by the time. Farmers got a bunch of those payments in the summer and fall. The problems were going away. Commodity prices have come back up and actually looking better than they've looked in several years. According to usda estimates total farm income this year without that emergency aid would have been about average with the government payments. Twenty twenty looks like it'll be the fifth highest year for farm income in the past forty five years. I think there is a fundamental question at that point. You say well. Why are we providing all this additional aid especially since farmers group are relatively wealthy while millions of other americans are wondering how they will ford groceries. I called up some farmers and got several different answers. Chad lehman is co owner of hog farm in illinois that got more than seven hundred thousand dollars in government payments in twenty twenty according to usda data obtained by the environmental working group which is critic of farm subsidies. Lehman says it's really not much for as big as his. He ran up against a cap on government payments to any single individual or farm. So didn't come close to covering his losses. None of us expect to be made whole but are asked was hey help us get to next year without that money. You don't think you would have made it to next year. What think you would have seen significant fallout from the pork. Industry significant fallout but farmers didn't have to prove that they needed help. They simply got paid based on their previous production of green or pigs or cattle the more crops. They grew the more government. Money they got up to that cap ron roseman farmer in western iowa says his neighbors sometimes made jokes about it. You know all these farmers were getting together and playing cards. These older farmers. I heard one guy say yep got another check from the government today. Didn't need it but boy. Yeah i don't know what to do with it. Roseman got some of money himself and yet i'm not in favor of an overall because it has Disproportionately gone to the largest producers which means those large farmers now have more money to outbid their smaller neighbors when land comes up for rent or for sale and when small farms eventually give up means fewer people in rural communities less life in small towns. We just continue to fight declining and aging population out here. It's a paradoxical result. Rosement says but passing out money to farmers this way can actually hurt farming communities and more money is now on the way. The latest coronavirus relief package contains another eight billion dollars in payments to farmers. Dan charles npr news.

National Pork Producers Counci Us Department Of Agriculture Joe Glauber International Food Policy Rese Giordano Chad Lehman Federal Government Nick Congress Ron Roseman Environmental Working Group Lehman Ford Illinois Roseman Iowa Rosement
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her. Then eventually you take over an hour running freda yes fast forward. What something that people can't find out about you from google earth lincoln that i really you know up until that moment i really was not a risk taker at all. I told the line. I did what was laid out for me and i i would never in a million years have predicted that i would have veered off. Course

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Marlins Mets Amazon Miami Lehman Brothers American Airlines General Motors Burger King Miami Dolphins Burger New York King Florida Football Miami Beach
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:15 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her.

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Mets Amazon Marlins Lehman Brothers Miami American Airlines General Motors Burger King New York Burger Miami Dolphins King Florida Football Miami Beach
2 more positive coronavirus cases on Tennessee Titans

The Rich Eisen Show

01:58 min | 9 months ago

2 more positive coronavirus cases on Tennessee Titans

"There's an organization called news channel five in in in Tennessee NC five, news channel five. In Tennessee and there is a reporter in Nashville News Channel Five Steve Lehman Thank you Don Bowie. On thank you for the follow Steve Lehman sources confirm to news channel five that a group of about fifteen titans players fifteen held a workout at Montgomery Bell Academy last Wednesday one day after the team's facility was shut down by eight positive covid nineteen tests. If in fact, the case against sources confirm to news channel five. Dan The. NFL IS GONNA come down hard. That's just the end of that because that makes a lot of sense as to why would players continue to test positive that after the PRISCILA closed back if it's just like everybody go home and sit on zoom. What's going on? 'cause after two straight days of the titans being covered. Negative on mass two straight days of no positive tests to more popped positive today. Leading the titans next game against the. Bills, by the way. In heavy doubt. Tom Pella Sarah, my colleague from NFL Media Group has been all over this. tweeting out earlier, today that the NFL and the players association are were been more looking into whether the titans working out together off site while the facility was closed. Because again, two more players learned positive test today bringing the total of twenty for the team and staff and you know the NFL is you know as sent out. More stringent. Threats and teeth to their. Penalties for violations of the protocol.

Titans NFL Steve Lehman Nfl Media Group Tennessee Nc Montgomery Bell Academy Don Bowie Tennessee Nashville Tom Pella Sarah Reporter Dan The
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

Morning Edition

04:05 min | 9 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for 82 years, American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they could be paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people. But today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs that they call exploitative and discriminatory. NPR's Alina, sell your reports. Jerry Dagostino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do, like, go out to eat. Sometimes daughter more days go to events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode Island, doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes. Packaging ice packs, assembling boxes for jewelry. If I remember correctly, my first my first paycheck was only 12 box. I just question myself a cz. You know, I really don't want to keep doing that worked for my whole life. Dagostino now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than $12 total. But he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage, thanks to that carve out in the labor law. Centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities in a separate cluster there, pay is estimated to average $3.34 an hour. To calculate individual pay. The center's regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to an experienced non disabled worker half as fast half the pay Now the U. S Commission on Civil Rights says this programme and the law should be phased out. In short. The program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work. Catherine Lehman chairs the commission, she says. Instead of expanding opportunities, the program's limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with regular wages. I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated now over a decade's a federal assumption that people with disabilities Are less capable full employment than people without disabilities. A lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs, including how many people they employ. Estimates range from 100,000 to 4 times that Most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the program's a run by nonprofits. They get state and federal money to support these jobs. Many of them have government contracts. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who want the programs to remain an option, a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother, Linda Howe, from Wisconsin, testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November. We're parents with their son's best interest at heart. Any suggestion that we would allow him to be taken advantage of our discriminated against is an insult. Families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to let the program's B Some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they'd go, Lehman says that is why her agency is recommending a careful, gradual phaseout. Disability rights advocates have wanted such a phase out for years. They point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated thumb A new Lewis. We're now fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the Blind, testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing, And because of that misguided compassion, these individuals been significant part of their lives. Wasting away in that works out making money for our center but wasting away. And I I'm just sitting here really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative. Four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum. Several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed.

Jerry Dagostino Civil Rights Commission U. S Commission On Civil Right Catherine Lehman NPR Linda Howe Alina Rhode Island National Federation Of The Bli Lewis Wisconsin
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:07 min | 9 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for eighty two years American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs they call exploitative and discriminatory NPR's Lena Seljuk reports. Jerry. Douglas Dino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do like go out to eat sometimes. Vase Goto events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode. Island. Doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes packaging ice packs assembling boxes for jewellery. If I remember correctly by I by first paycheck was only twelve bucks I just cautioned myself as you know. I really don't WanNa keep doing what my whole life Doug AC- now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than twelve dollars total but he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage. Thanks to that carve out in the labor law centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities a separate cluster their pay is estimated to average three dollars and thirty four cents an hour to calculate individual pay. The centers regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to inexperienced non-disabled worker half as fast half the pay. Now, the US Commission on Civil Rights says this program and the law should be phased out in short the program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work Kathryn Lehman chairs the commission she says instead of expanding opportunities, the programs limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with rights wages I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated. Now over a decades, a federal assumption that people with disabilities are less capable. Full employment than people without disabilities, a lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs including how many people they employ estimates range from one hundred, thousand to four times that most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the programs run by nonprofits, they get state and federal money to support these jobs many of them have government. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who won the programs to remain an option a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother Linda how from Wisconsin testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November we are parents with our son's best interest at heart. And you suggestion that we would allow him to be taken. Advantage of are discriminated against is an insult families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to lead the programs be some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they go Lehman says, that is why her agency is recommending a careful gradual phase out disability rights advocates have wanted such A. Phase. Out For years the point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated them, and you'll Lewis fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the blind testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing and because misguided compassion these individuals spend significant part of their lives wasting away in that workshop making money for our center but wasting away. And I am sitting here. Really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed. Alina. So you NPR, news Washington.

Civil Rights Commission Douglas Dino Kathryn Lehman NPR Doug Ac Lena Seljuk Jerry Rhode Linda Washington Wisconsin Lewis National Federation Of The
Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

Best Case Worst Case

08:57 min | 10 months ago

Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

"Alone. Welcome to best case worst case this is Jim Clemente retired profiler former New York City prosecutor writer-producer CBS's criminal minds with today's high everybody. It's Francey, Hague's former state and federal prosecutor. Jim. Across the country and if it's possible, I'm even more outraged. Shall I say enraged than I was last week I find it. I. Don't know very believable. Because I know you but I know what you're outraged and enraged about. I agree with you tim I don't understand what's happening. You know we've we've done what is happening I. Don't know we've done. I don't know how many episodes where we've talked about. Hollywood. We've talked about power position predators. We've talked about a Hollywood sexualizing we talked about that movie call me by your name I remember that one member that you and I saw that. and. Just being outraged at the sexualizing of children and in that movie if I'm not mistaken, there was a nineteen year old actor playing a fifteen year old boy I think if I remember correctly. and. That was bad enough because it was depicting. The sexualization of a child even though it wasn't an actual trial here Jim in the newest entry into net flicks Pantheon, we have a movie called well in English. It's called cuties and it was released just last night as you are recording here. So on September ninth here in the US. Anyway it was released on Netflix said it's a French movie I think the original title was something like Lehman Mignon. Which I would. You know I was a French minor but French is a longtime ago for me I, thought meant the little ones but maybe it means cuties regardless. The Americanized is name is called cuties. And Jim. I didn't see the movie yet. But I've seen a clip of a dance from the movie before we get into the discussion of the movie. Let me just tell people who haven't seen the clips and you haven't seen the description of the movie. What is purportedly about? This movie is described by various media critics who've seen it. As a coming of age tale, a young girl fighting against the patriarchy. Now, how is she coming of age how she fighting against the Patriarchy this eleven year old she joins she's a Muslim child and she joins a dance troupe. Wow. That sounds interesting. Right she's breaking out of her cultural barriers whatever they might be or whatever she perceives them to be. She joins a child's dance troupe with a bunch of other eleven year old well, that sounds perfectly innocent. Well not really however. It's really not Jim because you and I have seen the clip why don't you take it from here? Well, for not I did just see the clip and I was shocked I was shocked at two things one the focus of the camera. On the general areas of young girls very deliberately. Very, sustained, very purposefully. But I'm also shocked by the fact that this depicts a dance competition and in the dance competition, these girls are on stage in public. Doing these you know basically dance moves and I'm using those air quotes that are that are basically saying and touching their general areas and a showing off between their legs I mean. They're simulating sex. That's the that's certainly a very. Easy determination or that's an argument that. CAN EASILY BE. Made. So, this bothers me for two reasons. One is that. It's apparently a competition that they're in in which this kind of behavior is actually. Promoted and encouraged. But the documentary style of it. Is that they are showing close ups of these girls is one thing if they're thirty, forty, fifty feet away on a stage, but to have a camera. where the entire screen is filled with the Crotch of an eleven year old girl and the camera is focused on that and again it's sustain it's not just passing. That is part of the definition of child pornography when a child is centralized in a way and they don't have to be naked for it to be child pornography but the image has to be focused on the Genitalia or on sexual activity, and even if that's mimicking sexual activity is putting a child in a sexualize situation and I believe that this does that. In fact, and I, I don't know what the rest of this movie is about but it's scary to think that this is just one scene in movie that that purports to do things like for example. There's a parental warning apparently on imdb would says, one of the many highly sexualize erotic dance scenes. That purposefully exploit an objectify numerous scantily clad underage girls. One of the female child dancers lifts upper crop top to fully display her bare breast. This they're saying. This is supposedly literally pulled from my md be yes. That's pulled from my MTV which they've changed as of now this this has just been a massive explosive controversy over the last twelve hours Jim and you're absolutely right. I. Hate telling you that because God? Usually wrong. But here you're absolutely right. It does fit the definition at least in the United States the federal definition for child pornography, which is the lascivious display of the genitals for the purpose of arousing the sexual desires of the viewer. There is no other way to describe how these children are dancing and that IMDB description minimizes it by saying it's sexualizing or Roddick with underage girls. They're eleven, years, old eleven what is that? Fifth. Grade. Fourth Grade. That's it's crazy that anyone thinks that this is okay. But the most important thing to me is that I think it might be a federal crime. It certainly fits the definition now in federal law in this country, there is an exception if it's art, but that is required to provide a whole bunch of information to the Attorney General of the United States about the age of the actors when there's any depiction. The age of these actors is clearly under eighteen. There's no question about it. Not Right now, typically Hollywood gets away with it by having someone who has just turned eighteen play somebody who's younger but that's not what's going on here and there was among the years ago called kids I think and they did the same thing they had actually young people and although they didn't actually they sort of hit the sexual parts, they suggested it. But this because of the music that's playing in the background that's clearly of a sexualize nature because of the humping that's going on and the touching of the general areas by these girls, and then you know the cutesy sucking on the finger. To, make it seem like an innocent girl is being sexualize. It's all together. It really does make me. Believe that they are they are violating federal child pornography statute and I think that that's something that you know it's not just well, this is a French movie and we're trying to be open minded this this this description goes on to say. Trigger Warning and eleven year old girl watches a female rap music video where naked women role play through dance both heterosexual lesbian sex acts an eleven year old. Female. Dance Group then mimics these sexual moves, the on themselves and on each other while the camera zooms in on their sexual body parts as they erratically rise. This can be highly distressing to many viewers. Covered Hani legal.

Jim Clemente United States Hollywood Imdb Hague CBS TIM Dance Group New York City Netflix Prosecutor Lehman Mignon Hani MTV Roddick Attorney General
Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

Business Rockstars

00:34 sec | 10 months ago

Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

"Of the Ellen DeGeneres Show are without jobs now, after Warner Brothers launched an investigation into the work environment, their variety is reporting. The staff was told about the firing of executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Lehman and co. Executive producer Jonathan Norman on a video call yesterday. The generous is said to have become emotional. While speaking of the investigation into her show, Warner Brothers launched an investigation last month after numerous workers complained of sexual misconduct and racial insensitivity. Among other problems for you is a radio news.

Warner Brothers Ellen Degeneres Ed Glavin Executive Producer Kevin Lehman Executive Jonathan Norman
Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

Colleen and Bradley

01:06 min | 10 months ago

Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

"Show has ousted three top producers after these toxic workplace accusation, so the news was delivered to Ellen staffers. Just yesterday afternoon. Alan spoke via video conference call three senior producers. Executive producers at Glavin and Kevin Lehman and co. Executive producer Jonathan Norman have been ousted following all sorts of nasty allegations about how they were not nice people who worked for them also sexually inappropriate, right sexual misconduct, racial insensitivity, other problems in the work environment. It's along. List, So there are some veterans who are staying with the show. Mary Connolly, Andy last nerve, and Derek Wester Veldt will remain at the show as executive producers alongside host Ellen Do generous. Those three producers have been with the show since it started in 2003. So this has been expected. But there are it'll be interesting to see. What happens moving forward? I'm sure Ellen will be addressing this

Ellen Do Show Executive Executive Producer Derek Wester Veldt Kevin Lehman Glavin Jonathan Norman Mary Connolly Alan Andy
Top producers leave "Ellen" following allegations

Colleen and Bradley

02:30 min | 10 months ago

Top producers leave "Ellen" following allegations

"Ellen de generous producers air out after misconduct allegations So now This goes back to a story you may remember. Some of our listeners may not know this because there's been a lot of other stuff going on in the world. But three senior producers at Ellen Had been accused of sexual harassment and a number of misconduct accusations and those three individuals who have those allegations against them. I have been well, the way they put it is that they've parted ways with the popular Daytime talk show that's like the fancy way of saying they got fired. Yes or well, you know, the thing is, I think when you reach a certain level of power and privilege Your you don't have to be fired. They just look at you and go on and you go and you probably walk away with some. You know, some fat stack? Yeah, they pull the rip cord on the golden parachutes. So let's see how that all plays out. I'm gonna work. Stain my judgment until I find out more. But what we do know is that executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Lehman, the show's had writer as well as a coed executive producer named Jonathan Norman. Those are the people that left now they okay, So here's the thing that you may have not remembered. Okay. These allegations totaled Or or I should say these accusations were made by a total Of 36 employees. Holy buckets. Yes. So thie accusations of sex, not nothing. That's not nothing. The accusations of sexual harassment misconduct against these three were made by 36 former employees to BUZZFEED news. Those accusations Came just two weeks. Two weeks after 11 current and former employees came forward to Buzzfeed, and you might remember this story. To complain about the toxic work environment and Ellen and that included things but not limited to racism, workplace intimidation and other quote mistreatment. So this is like just the tip of a much larger iceberg clearly, but this tip is a very important tip. And that's just the tip. These are three very key players in putting this. You know, behemoth. Of a show together. Yeah.

Ellen De Harassment Buzzfeed Ed Glavin Executive Producer Executive Jonathan Norman Kevin Lehman Writer
Ellen DeGeneres: Three producers fired over 'toxic workplace' claims

Dave Ramsey

00:21 sec | 10 months ago

Ellen DeGeneres: Three producers fired over 'toxic workplace' claims

"The Axis swung at the Ellen DeGeneres Show. Three executive producers named in a Buzzfeed article accused of harassment reportedly fired at Glavin, Kevin Lehman and Jonathan Norman. Variety says generous broke the news to stab in an emotional video call. Monday. The three have been accused of creating a toxic work environment through sexual harassment, abusive behavior and more generous, has apologized for allowing the behavior to go on under her watch.

Harassment Ellen Degeneres Kevin Lehman Glavin Jonathan Norman Executive Buzzfeed Variety
New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

Smashing Security

06:19 min | 11 months ago

New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

"Now Chum, Chum's imagine. For a moment that you're interested in checking book maybe maybe book by celebrated newly published author and you think all I'd love to find out more about that book visit an online bookshop But then you change your mind maybe you're distracted by something else right and then maybe half an hour an hour later. You receive an email saying, hey, we saw you visited our website. How would you feel what's? By giving them my email address. I haven't allowed in or anything like that. I'm just perusing the shop you haven't logged in you haven't given them your email address and yet they know you came to their website and they've contacted you var email we'll surely I mean. If Google facebook of God, a tracking code on the sides then they could tie that together with unless it's technically possible in fighting. So Nice. Say I'm Kinda surprised we haven't crossed that Rubicon yet it's happening. Well imagine they Semaj and you have a particularly niche porn interest may be a bit of a further on the side and you decide to go. Further, you said. You say you mean grab. With A. Reliably. Informed that fervor it's up people who? Like dressing up as very animals like a mascots at a football game. and. They get their kicks from these sort of things. Fit It looks like my husband because he's quite Harry. You must be a secret forever. I can't figure out what would be more disturbing called if he found out attractive or unattractive. So. Imagine you visit the site. You get your fill of wherever you want and they knew receive an email saying, hey, we'll see you're a bit of a fervored. Ejected throws it back in your face. WHOA says we've got even more that kind of stuff. Why don't you come back sometime if you had never give me your email address, you can be stabbed, right? Yes. Considerably, and also, of course, if someone's got your email address, any navigate some is the potential for doc seen or blackmail knows what you'd better tell me how they got our email address. Okay. There's a fascinating article on Jessica Bell. Jessa Bell has written about an outfit could get emails a startup. They claim to be the all new audience growth tool for publishers and they say they can fill up jeff way. They say they can convert anonymous website visitors into names email addresses and even their home addresses boom. And I know sales sorted. posted. Another Chapter Jeff any incredibly they claim they can do surrounded by a third of all US web traffic cheese. Okay. Well, their claims earn press Whoa Kay, let's look a little bit more into this. They say that their services already been used you know that Chap Tucker Carlson on Fox News. Well he is one of the founders of a website quite right wing website surprise you it cooed the daily caller. That is one of the sites which is using exactly this technology right now, this potentially some could find out if your partial particular political views as well. Don't understand Outta sorry you've lost me. Okay. So how is the daily caller this website run by Tucker Carlson, taking advantage of this technology so they are a customer of this firm could get emails. Okay. Get emails is run by a guy called Adam. Robinson right is a former Lehman brothers employee and his girlfriend Helen Sharp. And they've actually put together a video where they explain how that thing works. He can go and check that out on Youtube link but I can explain in very simple. Work. So, there are lots of scammy kind of websites on the Internet surprise surprise. No, there are no a shock. So there are websites which will claim Oh. We can get you better health insurance. So we can get better car insurance just enter your details here. And we will go away and find an answer for you right and what you don't do when you fill out those what most people don't do. They don't read all the terms and conditions and remained the new mock me about every week when. You're one of the unusual people who actually does that crew, but those sites will gather all that information and not really set up to. So you health insurance in countries, they do sometimes or read you. But what they're really doing these crates and a huge database of people's contact details. Okay and they are then selling those two people and that is all apparently legal because people chose to give their information and they agreed to the terms and conditions to be marketed up soon, the I've always thought those sites you know like insurance compare sites or mortgage compare sites I. think that's exactly what a lot of them are doing. I think some of them are legitimate getting A. Lot of the deals, but they say we are sharing this with interested parties on purpose to get you the numbers you want right really have to share that information with third parties. They don't have to give you a list here. Exact people were doing because it's changing all the time and some of them might be you know very bonafide companies. Some might be shade or one of the companies which is buying this kind of information is this company get emails and what they've done is they've generated md five hashes. So check some for all of those email addresses. They reckon they got about half a billion now and they're adding about one million more every day. And they say they've also partnered with mailing lists firms so that when folks click on a Lincoln newsletter and go to website a cookie can be set computer containing that MD five check some for their email address on their computer. And so what they're able to do is when you go to the daily caller cool website or never website, which is running, get email script, they can compare the hash in the Czech some to the hash in get emails database, which they've gathered from these sites around the world and they've got all information which you filled in on that full. Yeah, that's good instincts

Tucker Carlson Jessica Bell Google Rubicon MD Youtube Fox News Football Adam United States Lehman Brothers Jeff KAY Robinson Helen Sharp
"lehman" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:45 min | 11 months ago

"lehman" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Whoever exit doors knowing they say call Lehman was a nickel. So make good money, you know. But this'll get photo. Don't see. And then you take in the big bad. Today. I'm in a hotel in the backcourt. He wanna slack off course you got it. Cavil G. We let them rest because they let in the Mexico don't see lip on a man..

Lehman Mexico
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Freddie China NFL Founder
There's only so much the Fed can do

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:41 min | 1 year ago

There's only so much the Fed can do

"The last time we heard from the Federal Reserve about interest rates between official meetings was October of two thousand eight the collapse of Lehman Brothers was still fresh the hazards of the financial crisis. Perhaps just then really becoming clear and let me be clear here for a second. This is not that markets are functioning. There is no credit crisis. There is plenty of liquidity. But there's also plenty of uncertainty about what the NAVA Corona virus might mean for the global economy. And so this morning for the first time in eleven something years the Federal Reserve cut rates between meetings because said chair Jay Powell. They saw a risk to the global economy and chose to act but PAL added. We do recognize that a rate cut will not reduce the rate of infection. It won't fix a broken supply chain. We get that. We don't think we have all the answers K. But we do believe that our action will provide a meaningful boost to the economy by more specifically it will support accommodative financial conditions and avoid a tightening of financial conditions. Financial conditions are things like stock indexes and bond yields of the value of the dollar. All of which Powell in the federal hoping and it will help boost household and business confidence with the caveat that it's early yet not a whole lot of market confidence was boosted today. Details at the usual spots in this program. But there is a slice of this morning's events that are worth couple of minutes here because before the Fed made its announcement. The Group of Seven finance ministers and central bankers came out with honestly a pretty bland statement. We're keeping an eye on things in essence is what they said so with that background. How then did the Fed go about making the decision to cut? And how audit be red that we call Daniel Torello. He was on the FEDS Board of Governors for eight years. Got There just after that. Two Thousand and eight cut we started with. He teaches now at Harvard. Law Mr Trillo. Welcome back to the program Sir. Good to be with you. Kai with the caveat as I said that you're not there When the Fed made its two thousand eight cut. Could you give me some insight into the mood in the room? Or the mood. I suppose on the conference call when the Fed makes decisions on the precipice of a crisis. So I suspect first off that a lot of preliminary discussions were held last week in advance of Chair. Powell's statement on Friday so I would expect that. This was a relatively brief meeting wedged between that g seven call and the announcement by the Fed in the late morning the mood was probably a fairly somber one and I again. I suspect without knowing that they didn't do anything close to a full go. Round with lots of analysis by all the members and remember the Reserve Bank presidents would would almost all if not all have been participating by video. Conference right Okay so so. The personal subjective question. Were you surprised when you when you read about this? I was a little surprised. A ASSUME THAT. In retrospect that what happened was when they set the G. Seven call. They figured that they were gonNA move. Regardless of what the g seven did. I was more surprised by the outcome of the g seven. Call which was about as little as you could have had such call the well the the markets sorry. Turner up the Marxist. This morning did not care for that. G seven call at all right because the G. seven basically said Yeah. We're watching right. Exactly and and expectations are obviously raised. And so I assume that the Fed intended to do what it did regardless of how that call came out But it probably did take at least a little. Bit of what positives they were looking for a way from the from their own move. Yeah so speaking of the positives they were looking for. They did not get any At at you know so far anyway Out of the market today Reading the tea leaves for me that would Ya. I mean clearly. It looks like people are worried that the Fed knows more than the rest of us. Know there does seem to be a little bit of. I'm just reading the market reaction the way you are but there does seem to be a little bit of that reaction mean to me the questions since in the last couple of weeks since people have been actively talking about this have been a couple one. How much and how does a rate cut at this moment? Actually help given the supply chain issues that the chair referred to and secondly to the degree. That one's munition is limited. Is it wiser to keep most of it to deal with the actual fallout when viruses receded? And you're fighting recession or is it better to kind of preemptively act now in an effort both to signal the markets and also perhaps trying to lay some foam on the runway last thing. And then I'll let you go to words fiscal policy. There is a whole nother apparatus of government that can affect the economy. It's Congress and the White House and taxing and spending. How concerned are you that we haven't seen anything from them yet? Well I mean this is kind of the story of twenty twenty in America right that that the political branches seemed to have more difficulty responding. And I I noticed the Secretary. Mnuchin said he's he's interested in working with Congress but it does seem as though everything is moving awfully slowly. Daniel Tarullo for Eight years a little bit more than that. Actually member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States now professor at the law

Federal Reserve Jay Powell Group Of Seven Finance Ministe Lehman Brothers Feds Board Of Governors Reserve Bank Daniel Tarullo Congress Daniel Torello Mr Trillo Harvard Federal Reserve Bank Official America Secretary
Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

Insureblocks

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

"Man's. Thank you for joining us today for our listeners. Thank you great to be back. It is great to have you back and for our listeners. Who Haven't heard you on our previous podcast. Can you please give them a quick introduction on Yourself Asher So my name is harmon? I'm one of the CO founders of their Hash craft alongside Dr Leeman Baird We've been working together. Lehman I for twenty six years always in deep tack. The we've done reinforcement learning or machine learning research for the Air Force. We talked computer. Science at the Air Force Academy cybersecurity managed massive software program for the Missile Defense Agency and then decided we wanted to become entrepreneurs and this is our third startup we to prior startups in the space of identity and access management and sold one to Fortune. Five hundred the other private equity and Leman wanted to solve a really hard math problems specifically how you can achieve the limits in terms of security in a consensus algorithm distributed consensus algorithm simultaneous to maximizing performance. How you can do both at the same time. And after of hard work he invented the Hash. Graph which is consensus algorithm like blockchain is a consensus algorithm. Has Graph is an alternative approach that has fantastic properties again both in terms of security and performance and we decided to take that tha market and here. We are years later now with their hash graph. Brilliant end in that one answer. You've athlete answered the next two questions. All I can one so fishing deeper interested. Yeah Yeah I mean I think it will be useful is because one of our typical questions is please define what is blockchain and Like we did in the last podcast if you perhaps could have another go at it and at the same time point out the differences between Blockchain and a hash graph. Why Hash crowd is so much more efficient than Blockchain system sure well blockchain as a term refers to two things it refers to a data structure. Which is a chain of blocks of transactions? And it's very serious just like it sounds in the way it's created and it also the the term also refers to a consensus algorithm that enables a community of of participants each of which that holds a local copy of that chain of blocks to come to agreement or consensus on which block to put next on the top of that chain in their by everyone keeps a consistent chain of blocks and often. It's proof of work. You know the use of a really hard cryptographic puzzle into novel ways that makes it possible for the community to to come to consensus on on which blocks you go on top of of the chain. But it's designed to be slow and it. The use of proof of work causes it to be slow and The the fact that there is a single chain that everyone uses also limiting in terms of its architecture hash graph similarly is a term that refers to both a data structure in this case. It's a graph in the mathematical sense. It's a graph that is whose nodes are or verticals are linked together with Hashes gripped graphically in. So it's a data structure in there's also consensus algorithm. That makes it possible for those that have a copy of the Hash graph to calculate how each other how the other nodes in the network would vote on the order of transactions and so they come to to agreement on the order of transactions that get captured in this in this graph because it's a graph rather than a chain all of the transactions. They're flowing into the network can be processed simultaneously. There is no need for proof of work. This process that slows down blockchain to give the community time to come to agreement. There's no need for any of that and so we've basically eliminated the too constraining factors. Proof of work is no is not there. And it's a graph. Instead of a chain and the result of that is fantastic performance in it's got some great theoretical properties specifically it does achieve the limit in terms of security at something called a synchronous. Byzantine fault tolerance. It's the best one can do and in its novel in those ways Brilliant thank you very much for that and we had actually gymnasts or very recently. Come on our show. He's the CEO of core and he was telling us about how he build his colonel virus tracker using Darah Hash craft for exactly the same properties. You just described now. We've had you on this show for about ten ten eleven months ago. What industries and geographies are we seeing the most adoption of our has graph? Well I wouldn't say that there's geography necessarily. That is adopting. Maybe more than than another and the industry's when thinking about the industries. It's it's also it's more like this. It's not really that there is necessarily one industry. That is adopting faster than another but the way I would sort of segment the market or break it down in terms of what is adopting versus. Not Is that. There are a lot of enterprise use cases that are being presented in that. We're you know we're working on with partners and council members that are kind of boring in nature in some ways. What I find interesting is that while most of the market is looking for a really sexy killer. Commercial consumer focused use case. You know everybody's looking for that killer APP. That is primarily focused on building a big consumer focused use case. Our experience is just the opposite. It's for example as a category just audit based applications where you WANNA take some information in get a consensus time stamp on it and use that in various ways maybe their regulatory related. Maybe you need to be able to to just store information improve that it. It was what you claim. It was on a on a given date. There's just a whole broad range of business to business process optimization focused use cases that I think are the ones that are going to end up being the ones that take the whole market Mainstream or result in its mass adoption. And so that's the distinction that I'm seeing. It's it's not a one particular industry or one geography is more focused on B. Two B. process optimization versus consumer focused applications

Blockchain Dr Leeman Baird Harmon Lehman Missile Defense Agency Air Force Air Force Academy Leman CEO
"lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

"You know, I think in retrospect, given the fallout that immediately occurred upon the filing of that bankruptcy. Maybe we should have been more creative. We could have voiced losses on the shareholders. We could afford it. It is. Well, we had a bankruptcy. You know, we could've achieved the kind of, you know, anti moral hazard problem with bailouts potentially in the way, we structured alone to the broker dealer. So as to avoid the kind of adverse impacts that. I mean that the finally Lehman Brothers created a panic. Well, okay, I'm not going to disagree with that. And so you know, that the whole the whole script of the rescue from, you know, the beginning of Bear Stearns to the opening of the FX lines to make sure that the European banks didn't default against their on their own dead and therefore default on their American counterparts. Which would have created a liquidity crisis here to the putting Fannie and Freddie into conservative ship this saving ahe the series of emergency. The alphabet soup of emergency lending programs. The fed instituted, you know, the prime dealer credit facility the talents that. Half. The you know, commercial paper facility. I mean, you know, there was a every market that had frozen up. They intervened in tried to restart in order to provide liquidity to the system. And so the question is, you know, in the midst of that just Stu NAMI of credit support and liquidity you decide to take one company now. My my pet thesis is dick fold said no to Warren Buffett's offered to inject capital over the summer. And I I wish it was a fly on the wall in that room because I have to imagine between Paulsen and Burnett making Geithner someone said this this idiot said no to Warren Buffett. How can we possibly save him? They had an opportunity. He was a pig. I always been a pig and now he should be in an orange jumpsuit, but let's not atomic tons of personalities and personal histories matter. And I so I don't think there's I don't think you're crazy in that thought. So let's talk a little about what's going on. On currently in your career after you leave treasury, you go to work as a background and an investor, and you pretty much decided to hang out your own shingle, Milstein and company tell us about the launch of that firm. And and what the thinking was is opposed to being attached to another giant financial entity. Yeah. I mean, one thing working in the government cures, you of the desire to have a boss. So I decided I would set up my own shop, I really had no grand plans. But we went from, you know, one answering another call to another call to another call him before. I knew it, you know, I had offices in New York and Washington, and we were working on large corporate restructuring since often restructurings again. And and also, you know, reinvesting the profits of the business partners the guys who join me guys and gals who join me, you know, we all agreed that the advisory businesses business that goes up and down revenue volatile..

Warren Buffett Bear Stearns Lehman Brothers fed Stu NAMI Fannie Milstein Paulsen Freddie New York Washington Geithner Burnett
"lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Change the world, perhaps the most thorough and deeply on olitical take on the crisis that any authors producer for if we go back even earlier than Lehman Brothers, the subprime crisis was where this really all started wasn't it fail? And you wrote a lot about that. Have we actually worked through all of those issues and we housing now on the right basis or not depends on the country, of course, in the US house prices in sort of value terms much more reasonable than they were before you still have the system whereby government agencies support the housing market, which you could argue is not very healthy in many other countries, including Britain, house prices very high out of the reach of many people. In that, again, pointing to the political dissatisfaction is a factor. I think more generally assets in total are very highly value. If you had fallen asleep in two thousand six woken up. Now you wouldn't believe that being. Crisis because stock markets a high to low property. Prices are pretty high. It's been in the real economy that the damage of this crisis has been seen in the fact that people's incomes haven't grown significantly and that led to many of the political consequences of the crisis. So yes, where I have some middle ground with Thome is that we did stabilize the system because I think we had to, but we did a lot more for the markets than we did for main street at seemed remember you racing special report on the euro and the eurozone at what a couple of years after Lehman Brothers. That still just an another own going unanswered. Question agrees tottered about seventeen times. You know, then it moves on to somewhere else. We have Brexit is this piece of endless crisis or endless uncertainty of euro produce stabilizing again, I don't think is end of this crisis, but I do think that some of the fundamental issues the reliance of banks on government bonds and banking systems potentially needing to be bailed out by government, sue than borough reducing the value of the bonds, reducing the strength of the Bank that doom loop still exists. And I think what's been revealed in the crisis is that governments. European governments are only prepared to go so far and only when a gun is hell to their heads, which means that I think we can expect to see today's vulnerabilities remain unfixed until the next crisis tests them on. My worry given that Greece's smaller Konomi the my worry. Yeah, looking at how hard it was to cope with Greece is the next time. It won't be a smaller conham. It'll be Italy or something like that, which is a whole order of magnitude harder to cope with an an, I would say at the moment actually impossible to cope with and so that vulnerability hangs over the EU system and feeble attempts to deal with it. The continuing austerity failure to reform is happening against a backdrop of eighty nation of some countries and feeling that the us not working everybody tell me where on Wall Street ten years ago, but you are now what's the mood there people think that it's all fine or are we waiting for the next crisis with that issue of whether things have really been resolved? Huge issue. I mean, we've gone from one system where we had all these products have mentioned people really understand they existed or where they came from to another world where we have, you know, kind of grimmer set of banks, but they're supervised ways that nobody really understands. By models that people really don't understand which was actually true during the financial crisis as well and to make any sort of progress. As we've said before, you probably need very large crisis again, generally would be delighted by high prices and their high prices, the markets and their high prices back in property. In fact, we're pretty close to the property peaks that we were at before, and you have to really think about whether that's a virtue and whether that's a true recovery or that slightly frightening. As we mentioned, the housing agencies support the stuff are still around in the low standards for borrowing three percent down payments on mortgages, for instance, or high low income ratio still exist, and we have these low interest rates, proper values that are really probably not sustainable. Interest rates. This was meant to be a temporary measure, but it just never seems like it's going to go..

Lehman Brothers Greece US producer Brexit Britain Thome Italy EU eurozone three percent ten years
"lehman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"But tarp didn't come until October, which was, of course, after leaving, the third way was temporary loans. But there you've got to have a company which is fundamentally viable. Just short liquidity and Leman was not viable. So that strategy didn't work. So we didn't really have. It wasn't a choice. We didn't have tools to prevent the failure Barney said to Ben. And to me when it went up to see him, he said, we can't get you the emergency. Authority unless you come to congress and scream and yell and say, if we don't get it, lemans gonna fail, we're going to have a disaster. Maybe even then we can't. Of course, if we did that Lehman would have gone down the next day. Do you think it took to get you guys tarp? Is that do you think that is true. Well, that's a gross that's over simplification. But I will say this about Lehman weekend to put it in perspective. We had three institutions going down at the same time. We had Lehman a, I g. and we had Merrill Lynch. Okay. Now it turns out we had one buyer, so we're unhappy. We're having trouble getting be of aid by Lehman, but I tell you be of a had bought Lehman and they wouldn't have bought Merrill Lynch, and there would have been a bigger failure would have been worse. One thing to Leeman shock dead was energized system politically. That was what it ended up taking for us to get these emergency thirties to let us to recapitalize the whole financial system in the catastrophe. So as bad as lame, it wasn't. It was terrible. You know there, this was not the worst alternative. We avoided worse, alternate. Let's make I'm quoting you and politics in the markets. Go head to head the markets win. Who am I. We all believe it. I, I, I used that quote in the book, but we, we all knew it and we, we're watching it. So we weren't trying to convince ourselves. But the other thing which we've all said is it takes a crisis to get congress to act. Sharp beard listeners, and there were many of you when this aired originally back in March. We'll have noticed that I never did get back to the actual first question I was talking about why nobody went to jail a. Yes, I know. Thank you. I've been spoken to about that be. We're working on that story and see you can hear the entire interview with Hank Paulson Ben banenky and Tim Geithner and a special podcast that we put in the marketplace feed, or you can get it and marketplace..

Lehman Merrill Lynch tarp Hank Paulson Ben banenky Barney Leman Leeman Tim Geithner
"lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"Five cents a share. Wall Street's worst day since nine eleven the Dow plunging more than five hundred points the SMP down almost five percents the wreckage on precipated. Ops on Wall Street today, bankrupt. It was an historic day with Wall Street shake into its very foundation today. And even the health of the most trusted firms are now being called into question. Yes. This was the day September the fifteenth, two thousand and eight when Lehman Brothers, the major US investment Bank collapsed loudly because of its huge exposure to a sliding US housing market. It was a calamitous event triggering a series of other failures or near failures, symptomatic of weaknesses across the western banking system. No one it seems was immune from the crash that followed the has not been crisis as dangerous as September. Two thousand and eight looked ever before in the history of capitalism. Full stop ever. It's it was much much more dramatic than any moment in one thousand nine hundred nine hundred thirty three because it was all of the big banks symbol Tena on a huge scale on a timescale of ours. So like a runaway chain reaction in Ikeda pile. We've seen some bad ones say fine, but this is far worse than shown a bowl of Fukushima where any of those things. The words there of Adam twos, he's professor of history, Columbia University in New York City. He's now also the author of a huge all-encompassing study of the financial crisis crashed. How a decade of financial crisis changed. The world is its title today. In this program, I'm going to be describing in the broadest terms what the legacy is with professor twos. He argues the lessons in reverberations of two thousand and eight a still even today defining much of our modern political and economic life in Europe. The impact of the crisis is still felt extremely widely, particularly across the euro-zone, the changes and damage and losses suffered by citizens taxpayers working people across Europe are long lasting in their Fets in the United States. You'd have to say that there's sort of triple movement. On the one hand, we have financial markets which have recovered rather well since two thousand nine under the stimulus of QE we have. A large part of the American population which is not being polluted in that recovery, and we have a political system both on the left underwrite which is showing really unprecedented fracturing of the previous duopoly of the Democratic Party and the Republican party. So the rise of populist politicians, and we talked about them in Europe and America, Donald Trump Brexit, and indeed other parties across Europe. They are a symptom, a direct symptom of the financial crisis. In the case of the United States, particularly clear that the tea party gets. It started in two thousand nine is a protest movement, not against the bailouts, but as a protest against the very idea of assisting other homeowners, it's the feckless mortgage bore next door that they will not person to stew in their own juice and suffer the consequences of their bad decisions. Occupy the origin of Bernie Sanders is phenomenal. Run for the democratic nomination, fifteen sixteen lodged in the fall of twenty eleven symbolically on the park immediately by Wall Street. It's a direct challenge in that case to Obama and the centrist part of the democratic. Party that had managed the stabilization effort. So in the United States particularly clear that this poodle is -ation of politics. I think that's a better way of thinking of it than talk just generally about populism the fragmenting of the deal, which center liberal cetera left parties and center right parties done respectively since the nineteen eight thousand nine hundred ninety s that can be directly traced back to those first couple of years after the financial crisis..

US Europe Republican party Democratic Party Lehman Brothers Ikeda pile Obama Bernie Sanders professor Columbia University New York City Donald Trump Brexit professor of history Adam Fets
"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"The story of the rise in fool of Lehman? What I think what's as we said it takes much longer perspective, which is really interesting because mostly when we think about Lehman Brothers, we think about those books. As we think about those people, we think about evil. We think about about on it goes right right back and it gives you a much because of its own it traces this epic story which you don't expect, and it also tell the story has. Of good which you don't expect. And I think as a play, it's a brilliant piece of theatrical storytelling. Just to go back, we should say that these, these are three brothers who kind of went off to the other emigrate from Bavaria Jewish brothers and of setup. A fabric show up in Alabama. Yes, exactly. So it starts in these sort of deserted Lehman Brothers building. And then in walks, Henry Lehmann followed by his brothers and they kind of create in front of you in that building little tiny shop. They started in Montgomery, Alabama, selling fabric. Then they move onto the Bank and they just you gradually see the whole story. But what's remarkable about it is it style they don't just do dilute. They knew right all the way through. So for instance, Henry Leeman will say, Henry goes to the door and opens the door, that sort of thing. And it's it's a way of driving it forward. So you can get across these hundred and fifty years of history really fast. You just go, hey, we are now in New York and here we on, but it also gives this sort of saga like fail. I think it's like an oral poem. It's going to lease rhythms running through it. I mean, not in itself is remarkable when I first read it, I, how are they gonna. To pull this off on the way they put it off is brilliant stroke. I think of Sam Mendes of just three actors do the whole thing. So the three brothers, Simon Rubio, Ben miles and godly or onstage through the whole thing. And they tell the whole story. So they become all the descendants, all the supernumeraries, all the other people, and they also create the world's so with the boxes that people are going to put their stuff in when they leave the morning of the crash, they create New York City. They create carriages, they create pianos so it up -solutely relies on the inventiveness is not a conventional play at all. I would work in another medium so well, but is in on an inherently flawed piece of storytelling. I was wondering whether this would be an interesting play, weren't a true story. No, playwright I think would ever construct a family saga covering one hundred fifty years. As he say where the last family member to be of any relevant dies at least forty years before the end of the play, we lose interest in the family. Sure. Early and it's well, are we not then actually dealing with completely different company. The point I mean, I would have believed, but then I mean it's equivalent. Surely of MacBeth died halfway in the middle of three ties quite early on in the political, and that's a fluid play tissue. No, absolutely. And I actually think that there is a drawback to the place of how that it starts to wear thin. I think the style, unless you got to to the sixties seventies and we move into trading, we moved further away from the original story that sort of speeds up. And again, it begins to feel kind of skimpy and thin and pull and despite their brilliance, I think you do feel and you begin to miss the drama of real close emotional engagement. But overall, I think is really, and I think that that is source of appropriate. That's where things started to go wrong. I mean, people do argue that the problem with the investment banks was they stopped being partnerships and people stopped being engaged, and they became simply in rent rentiers who siphoned off money. And so in a way the disengagement does capture what went wrong and bring the interesting because it goes from this kind of family drama, and because you've just got these three characters and that plane, that descendants is a kind of visual family line on stage and you go from cotton, which we can imagine Tyrrell's railways, which we can imagine. Suddenly, if you don't know the financial world, you find yourself in this well, which is abstract and hard to picture..

Lehman Brothers building Lehman Brothers Alabama Bavaria Jewish brothers Lehman Tyrrell Henry Lehmann Henry Leeman Sam Mendes New York Montgomery New York City Simon Rubio Henry Ben miles one hundred fifty years fifty years forty years
"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"You then take the mortgages and you squash him together, slice and dice them and sell out slices to other people. But in the late two, thousands people stopped paying back and Liman had done this slicing and dicing and failed to sell off all the pieces. And so when people lost faith that these things were worth any money, they lost faith. Lehman Brothers had any money. Lehman Brothers was not a traditional Bank despite the fact we call it a Bank. It didn't have deposits. It didn't have access to what's known as the Federal Reserve discount window which is emergency money. So. When people lost faith in it, it had nowhere to turn. And so the US government decided not to open the discount window to it and said, go bust. And so when it went bust, it basically took down or would have taken down the entire financial system with it. But it is seen as sort of the final straw that just sent the world into economic tailspin in September. Two thousand and eight is very complex, but also does an inherent drama and you can see why it might have appealed to the theater makers here. Do you think that the play rap was with this complexity? Not at all. It's a play which you could like for lots of other reasons. The play never actually gets to residential mortgage backed securities. The last thing you hear about is somewhere in the sixties and seventies Liman is getting into trading trading is perfectly valid and had nothing to do with what brought down Lehman. I mean, does it in any way, showing new light on the collapse and the kind of the crisis that followed. It reminds you that behind this company that has become a synonym. For evil were people who had worked hard and spent their whole lives building something, and that it wasn't an inherently evil structure. And I think that's worth remembering because investment banking and banking have been so torn ish and people lose side effect that they actually do good in the world. We have banks for a reason in that it is good. It doesn't tell us anything really about the financial crisis does. It don't remain to Cise capitalism. Yeah, I suppose it doesn't mean you see these immigrants arrive and they build something and we are told fundamentally that they're making things happen and helping America grow. But that's actually true. And I think actually to be fair to as they get into riskier things, the thing they refer to as trading, you get the sense that something bad is starting to happen. So I think actually it's not completely unfair Hof way through when Philip says, the flower of all cake is is not money. It's no longer just investing in cotton. Is that not a moment when it becomes it starts coming. Some dock at the doesn't seem if. Money is not inherently sinister. Obviously, you're talking to someone who's covered the banking industry for many years, financialisation and money just to make money is bad, but an awful lot of what they were doing, especially at that moment which was helping people bring money together and then lend it back out again. So you can make functional economy is still necessary. So there is this reference to something has gone bad and they've lost sight of the that banks should serve society as opposed to banks just making money. On the other hand, the thing they were actually doing again at that moment wasn't such a bad thing and Sarah thinking about this as a welcome theater, does it work in the way that it tells.

Lehman Brothers Liman Federal Reserve Lehman US Philip Sarah America
"lehman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lehman go down after the bear rescue then and i went and talked with barney frank at the house financial services committee we went up there and we said you know we we learn something barney we don't have the emergency powers in our regulatory system the dealing with a failing nonbank which is fundamentally viable and just short liquidity and leman was not viable so that strategy didn't work so we didn't really have it wasn't a choice we didn't have tools to prevent the failure barney said to ban and to me when we went up to sam he said we can't get you the emergency loan authority unless you come to congress and scream and yell and say if we don't get it lemans gonna fail and we're going to have a disaster maybe even then we can't of course if we did that lehman would have gone down the next day well that's the gross oversimplification but i will say this about lehman weekend to put it in perspective we had three institutions going down at the same time we had lehman a i g and we had merrill lynch.

Lehman barney frank merrill lynch
"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Lives alive with robin lehman lavin robin lehman liwen robin all right all right everyone you got robin land keeping the lives live i am in the studio right now with tony benefit with the sneak peek at his upcoming show tony tony tony tony benefit what you do humira by your door in our your door grade you're paranoid dubbed ordered armed ruined injured material before you europe bird growing mark breaker garnier a loaded wow wow so what does he do it up in california now la us angeles which deal in which you got going on worried or shower here at the moment with uh with a promoter friend of mine and uh ms fatty course was uh we're we're out here in the pavement promoting this big show i got coming up at original mike in santa ana california this thursday february first okay hi patricia i'm good it's still good to have you guys unmanned you guys is moving and shaking you got tony tony benefited international now there could be take it all the way up now i know that's right now a winner is the event at and what time does it star where can we get tickets okay rear very original ex uh downtown santa ana california in that it starts at eight o'clock pm and uh there's no need to purchase tickets you can um pay it does five dollars at the door and uh we got special guest wichi west ford waiver click on side and we also got king david james out of phoenix arizona's though is going to be a great show we're gonna put it down santa and and that's original mike's santa ana california.

california mike santa ana california tony tony phoenix arizona robin lehman patricia ford david james five dollars
"lehman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Lives alive with robin lehman lavin robin lehman liwen robin all right all right everyone you got robin land keeping the lives live i am in the studio right now with tony benefit with the sneak peek at his upcoming show tony tony tony tony benefit what you do humira by your door in our your door grade you're paranoid dubbed ordered armed ruined or material before you you're europe bird growing mark breaker garnier a loaded wow wow so what does he do it up in california now la us angeles which deal in which you got going on worried or shower here at the moment with uh with a promoter friend of mine and uh ms fatty course was uh we're we're out here in the pavement promoting this big show i got coming up at original mike in santa ana california this thursday february first okay hi patricia i'm good it's still good to have you guys unmanned you guys is moving and shaking you got tony tony benefited international now there could be take it all the way up now i know that's right now a winner is the event at and what time does it star where can we get tickets okay rear very original ex uh downtown santa ana california in that it starts at eight o'clock pm and uh there's no need to purchase tickets you can um pay it does five dollars at the door and uh we got special guest wichi west ford waiver click on side and we also got king david james out of phoenix arizona's though is going to be a great show we're gonna put it down santa and and that's original mike's santa ana california.

california mike santa ana california tony tony phoenix arizona robin lehman europe patricia ford david james five dollars
"lehman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"Some of the great speed flooring see the blue apron lehman on the sidewalk little music from lfm stage though so although go in the doors there for the screen in a from the floor some banks the world and mom some of the again the days williams in the room alone by the end they in her and not com burma okay see this in lutherans feel the arms of bringing down the whole will leave in the new england the dinghy withdrew the dance the newly mooney the paints my of the jazz moon inau the music news sports and more energy yourself on the here on live two on your smartphone.

lehman
"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Does three three three bizarre three three the the danny green the hello you are listening to divide live radio radio rate with robin lehman robin robin lehman lavin robin wow threatening the of us wait accidents luong man when the man mark crossley i have flooded streets good farming merrin the mind.

mark crossley robin lehman robin robin lehman
"lehman" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Better question number six what habit or quality do you think has contributed most to your success um well they tell me i'm easy to talk to people tell me stuff so i think that's the biggest thing people feel comfortable telling me things and i guess because they think i'm going to present it in the way that they feel comfortable with i guess that's that's probably the thing that's worked out the best for me right and a lot of people know if their story is going to be told any way than they might as well be in on it and tell her i someone they bet rust which yeah number 7 what's the thing about yourself you'd most liked to improve i wish i didn't swear so much i hate that i do yeah that's that's like number one because i did it today and i was like going up to the coroner's slipped anyway uh but you know bleep did he believe that i'm wearing this woman was walking by and i'm like uh oh that's unfortunate yeah yeah i hate that abide that way when i swear lehman in my mom blame our business but that's probably not fair yeah i can't blame the business 'cause i do radio every day so if anyone should stops wearing it should we meet just to make it easier not to do it on the air but i don't unilaterally is usually it's for emphasis no no i've i actually i accidentally said the s word once because i was trying to say that bleep crazy instead i said bat bleep insane so i change the wrong word okay but fun i was leading but i james the wrong one night i don't really think i've ever sworn on live television or anything like that which is why i should be able to do it in my own home ray yeah yeah the lesser i think if i stopped right it would be it would make sure it was less likely to happen on the air if i did it less in general but a submarine really need a good wellplaced f bomb it's implant terrible and finally i i've kid and they they're like where and it's my fault.

lehman
"lehman" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

WSJ MoneyBeat

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

"So how i find it fascinating were so you were working for lehman brothers you saw this big storm coming that one year later would would swallow up lehman brothers what happened in the time between when you started to see this happening and september twenty two thousand an eight when lehman brothers declared bankruptcy you know i think though the one thing we should make sure to understand is that we know what brought leman down uh in many ways were some of the same issues that we saw uh unfolding an inkwon equity um the the excess use of leverage the evaporation of liquidity um uh and and you know kind of originating in fixed income um but they were completely different issues uh from what actually happened in quantitative equity fund this and i think the kind of you know i just wanna make sure that everyone understands that kwon equity managers who hunting strategies where no way responsible um for uh the demise of uh of lehman brothers uh i i i was not trying to go there that's not that's not at all what i was trying to push you went to saying so um i just wanna make that very good uh for for for a number of us and i think the problems that we saw a at leman um you know were up around liquidity um and and and were about the uh you know willingness of management to um grappled with those issues in understand them um and and and and how how you respond in a situation where you were you have a lot of that uh kind of going on um what what is almost kind of taboo to say in these these days um is that lien was a great firm.

lehman brothers one year
"lehman" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"Uh i heard that they dropped from trees that attacked people that was looted the limit of my knowledge so i thought the paper was extremely accessible i mean it was very easily understood by this poor lehman are we going to be able to put that in the show notes is is it okay to reprint that article or give me nearly as saying yes yes find excellent okay so in in the context of the paper sorry go ahead and sorry i'm just gonna say have you never seen pictures of them that'll before none of the idea that they've vampirelike with big teeth and blood dripping from things you know i saw the teeth but i didn't automatically assume that that meant they were empirical at on a one so fair enough i don't know i i maker a banal amal educated sir outrace edge would that in his cat speaking how a researcher that with actually conducted lung actually identified two separate derogation varieties of the drop bear now is the common drop bad and the yum the them here on the one that fed more commonly on blood rather than actually um on the on the body of their round of their prime okay yeah that still do you think that some convergent evolution or uh uh a like are they were split at a previous point in the species or some would just decided to tell the story differently were own tank hey if we placed to pitch away if we were going to perpetuate the to drop an urban legend dan we went to suggest that she will be probably habitats shen and.

lehman researcher
"lehman" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on 1A

"Lehman he decided to take the blame in a way to show loyalty test to presidenttrump that he could be trusted and then now trump is sort of entrusted kelly to kind of help with some of this and be able to tell those frontline agents whether it's tsa or ice or whatever migrations and customsenforcementwe how to implement this this out as it goes along so that's part of it i think the other part of it was that that was so sudden that people had already made plans people ready heading to the unitedstates there's been something of a chilling effect from some of those countries now where you have people who are saying that they just don't no that there such uncertainty that they've cancelled their plans or they've decided not to try to come to the unitedstates well the rules the band certainly are complicated the state of hawaii which has been protesting various it rations of donaldtrump's ban on every step of the way reclaim requested clarification before it went to affect yesterday in one a we heard from robbiechowdhry whose an attorney and national security fellow at the new newamericafoundation she raised concerns about implementation of the ban and you're imagine this you have a visa you've gone to the process we already have easing entry the country arrive at the airport having bypass like all the different measures you have to all these statuary require men's and now you've got an officer right there at the border saying show me your bona fide relationships how does the person prove that than that person probably has wrapped up their business back home maybe they've sold her house they've nothing about.

Lehman hawaii robbiechowdhry attorney officer kelly
"lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"Trigger uh in the financial crisis when they let lehman brothers fail uh most of the other uh markets were scared for our fiji i would think that yes term of art the guy acts i'll just make the quickly i would say that the the matter of a socalled systemically important institutions and the matter of um sorted this digital digitalization of banking those are two different issues and that the systemically important institutions like those were just as in systemic in 1930 three at the bottom of the great depression as they were uh in two thousand eight when lehman brothers a blew up in i think it was in in september that like we really want to i think of when we're thinking about this esthetically important situtions is you know the in the room which is the fed but we are starting to take it met direction yet that's not were you guys one take a bullet so i would actually pushback a little bit on bat lake become regardless of the armed with this sort of distribution of the sizes of institutions and can of what that craft structure looks like if you have on use of deary a low leading see communication on that ends up giving you a lot of returns to scale on even even see things her like okay barriers to entry are very low on so you have like a lot of a.

financial crisis lehman brothers fiji great depression fed bat lake