36 Burst results for "Lehman"

Fresh update on "lehman" discussed on PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:55 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "lehman" discussed on PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

"This evening, Morgan Lash joins the show and James Berland er on the board, and we've got a lot to get two of the course of the next hour and 1/2. Let's start with Ellen de generous. I have been following this story. As it has continued to unfold. I didn't really start following it at the beginning when these rumors first surfaced, but lately as there's been Maura Maura, talk About whether or not the show is going to survive. I've been reading some of the stories, and essentially, there are accusations against Ellen generous that Her show is just a toxic work environment. It's a nightmare to work there. It's getting a lot harder to explain away all of these different Accusations, too. At first, I feel like there was one or two and it was kind of like, well the entertainment industry. It is a stressful work environment. It could be very cut throat. I'm sure there's a lot of topics but mourn where people are coming forward and saying that they have the exact same experience where there's a ton of really toxic people working there right. The allegations first surfaced in April. Unnamed members of the production team claimed they were left uninformed as to the status of their pay or employment amid the early stages of the Corona virus pandemic. Then some accounts of cold behavior from Ellen started to surface, including from her former bodyguard. And then this week, Buzzfeed published a report based on interviews with 36 members of staff. That's how you know that the situation's really bad behind the scenes because 36 members of his staff come forward. To tell you about how awful it is to work on the Ellen Show, you know something's up. So several of the staffers voiced allegations of sexual misconduct from top producers Ed Glavin. Kevin Lehman and Jonathan Norman. According to the report, a former employee accused Lehman of soliciting aural sects at a company party in 2013 while another ex staffer claim to have seen the exact grab a production assistance Penis on a different occasion. Which I don't That's that's definitely not allowed or you're not going to do that. No. Nearly a dozen employees also stated that it wasn't unusual for Lehman to make crude and sexual jokes in the office disguised as sarcasm. Dozens of employees said that Glavine Glavin, one of the other producers, had a reputation of being hanzee with women, particularly in the control room. Where he would use intimidation to control employees. Three staffers, then corroborated to claim that Norman Groom to former staffer and attempted to perform oral sex on him. Lehman in Norman vehemently denied the allegations. So you've got all of this going on. And then what happens is Ellen basically takes kind of a hands off like I didn't know what was happening. Mind. I didn't know that my executive producers were doing all of this kind of stuff, And that's really I think what pissed off staffers on the show? Because they're like, Come on. You absolutely knew what was going on. You had to relieve some sort of an idea that it was happening. And then there were a lot of reports that she just wasn't very friendly or kinds. To her staff that she kind of just dismissed them. Didn't really pay attention to them. Was there something that you always hear crazy stuff like this in some of these reports when it comes to celebrities, But wasn't there some allegation that like they couldn't look her in the eye? Something I heard. I thought that was one of the things that was dead. I always am a little skeptical when they hear. I don't know how true that is. But on the other hand that like those allegations about her just being Generally cold and not the nicest person I say kind of with a grain of salt, because think I am She's a mega celebrity. How many mega celebrities are really that night? Rolling up that many and her entire brand is built around her being this super bubbly, positive. Upbeat, nice, caring, loving person. She doesn't want to keep that on 24 7 I'm sure serious cameras come off. He's like, Oh, my God. It is gonna complain for a minute. Well, that's where I think she got herself in some trouble, because if you are that bubbly and happy and that's your whole brands If you're not that way off the area look phony, and people are going to call you out. Like if there were reports that surface that I was a jackass. I don't think anybody would Hesitate to believe they'd be like, Yeah, he sounds like a jackass on the radio like that doesn't surprise me one bit. You know, he's not a happy guy. Will we listen to the show? We know that her she's all about happy positivity having fun and then Turn the camera off and not so much. It's It's toxic. You a great example when I was at Disney, and I was a performer, and it was my dumped me smiling and happy and bubbly all the time. Can I just tell you the second that I walked off that? I was done. I'm like no one looked at me. No one smile at me. No one speaks to me. I just had a smile plastered on my face. My cheeks hurt. My throat hurts from talking in a fake. Nice voice for the past hour. I'm not doing it. I can't be nice to anybody else. Morgan. A lot of listeners might not know this. But there is actually a policy in place in the building where you're not allowed to talk to Morgan or look at Morgan. If you're one of the peasants that works, you know for one of the other radio station, so I mean, when you have this kind of star power, you've gotta set rules like that. And I will agree with the point that Sometimes. These celebrities. There are people in their orbit who are for whatever reason, frustrated or annoyed with them. Maybe, like an idea that they had didn't go over well or something like that. And then they'll snipe at the celebrity and make these accusations anonymously in the tabloids, and then it becomes a whole thing. But when you've got 36 stat members and like following very similar issues, right and every single piece is this staffer and that staffer and they're all talking. Clearly, something is amiss on that show and and again, it doesn't match the brand. It's supposed to be the show where everybody dances and, you know smiles and it sounds like It's the Ellen Show. It's not like already not named. Tonight show where there's some other know exactly The fact that he's saying, Well, I didn't know what was going on there. But you're so lady has got your name plastered on it. You have to be willing to take responsibility, right? And look, I can Understand if it's let's say it's a low level staffer. Who Maybe Ellen doesn't interact much with who did some of these? Yeah, but when it's all of your executive producers, like your top people on the show, I mean, come on, Give me you've got to know..

Ellen Kevin Lehman Morgan Lash Glavine Glavin Ellen De Ellen Show Executive Maura Maura Jonathan Norman James Berland Norman Groom Disney
"lehman" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:45 min | Last week

"lehman" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Whoever exit doors knowing they say call Lehman was a nickel. So make good money, you know. But this'll get photo. Don't see. And then you take in the big bad. Today. I'm in a hotel in the backcourt. He wanna slack off course you got it. Cavil G. We let them rest because they let in the Mexico don't see lip on a man..

Lehman Mexico
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | Last month

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | Last month

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

03:58 min | Last month

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Freddie China NFL Founder
PGA Tour returns: Xander Schauffele leads with Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy in contention

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:26 min | Last month

PGA Tour returns: Xander Schauffele leads with Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy in contention

"Challenge in fort worth Texas marking the PGA tour's return after a three month absence Lehman with a five under par sixty five left him just two shots off the lead after which she reflected on the significance of the moment of silence all over the course and the surrounding grounds at colonial at eight forty six AM not just in Thursday's first round but in all four rounds in memory of George Floyd I think everybody needs to feel deeply what happened and then to hurt deeply because of what happened to George Floyd I think everybody needs to understand that that when you have a absolute disregard for the suffering or pain of somebody else or the death of you because on somebody else if you have no regard for that you are a part of the problem you need to get your other so I would say that's probably the thing I took away from Mrs of let's let's just understand that we're all human beings need to care about each other if you can't do that then I feel sorry for you what Tom Lehman did during that moment of silence I prayed I just prayed for our country yeah I pray for that that man's family for George's family I pray for his soul you know pray just pray that guard the chaos that we live in can the be wisely move forward is so that decisions are made that actually are meaningful and

Fort Worth Texas George Floyd Tom Lehman
There's only so much the Fed can do

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:41 min | 5 months ago

There's only so much the Fed can do

"The last time we heard from the Federal Reserve about interest rates between official meetings was October of two thousand eight the collapse of Lehman Brothers was still fresh the hazards of the financial crisis. Perhaps just then really becoming clear and let me be clear here for a second. This is not that markets are functioning. There is no credit crisis. There is plenty of liquidity. But there's also plenty of uncertainty about what the NAVA Corona virus might mean for the global economy. And so this morning for the first time in eleven something years the Federal Reserve cut rates between meetings because said chair Jay Powell. They saw a risk to the global economy and chose to act but PAL added. We do recognize that a rate cut will not reduce the rate of infection. It won't fix a broken supply chain. We get that. We don't think we have all the answers K. But we do believe that our action will provide a meaningful boost to the economy by more specifically it will support accommodative financial conditions and avoid a tightening of financial conditions. Financial conditions are things like stock indexes and bond yields of the value of the dollar. All of which Powell in the federal hoping and it will help boost household and business confidence with the caveat that it's early yet not a whole lot of market confidence was boosted today. Details at the usual spots in this program. But there is a slice of this morning's events that are worth couple of minutes here because before the Fed made its announcement. The Group of Seven finance ministers and central bankers came out with honestly a pretty bland statement. We're keeping an eye on things in essence is what they said so with that background. How then did the Fed go about making the decision to cut? And how audit be red that we call Daniel Torello. He was on the FEDS Board of Governors for eight years. Got There just after that. Two Thousand and eight cut we started with. He teaches now at Harvard. Law Mr Trillo. Welcome back to the program Sir. Good to be with you. Kai with the caveat as I said that you're not there When the Fed made its two thousand eight cut. Could you give me some insight into the mood in the room? Or the mood. I suppose on the conference call when the Fed makes decisions on the precipice of a crisis. So I suspect first off that a lot of preliminary discussions were held last week in advance of Chair. Powell's statement on Friday so I would expect that. This was a relatively brief meeting wedged between that g seven call and the announcement by the Fed in the late morning the mood was probably a fairly somber one and I again. I suspect without knowing that they didn't do anything close to a full go. Round with lots of analysis by all the members and remember the Reserve Bank presidents would would almost all if not all have been participating by video. Conference right Okay so so. The personal subjective question. Were you surprised when you when you read about this? I was a little surprised. A ASSUME THAT. In retrospect that what happened was when they set the G. Seven call. They figured that they were gonNA move. Regardless of what the g seven did. I was more surprised by the outcome of the g seven. Call which was about as little as you could have had such call the well the the markets sorry. Turner up the Marxist. This morning did not care for that. G seven call at all right because the G. seven basically said Yeah. We're watching right. Exactly and and expectations are obviously raised. And so I assume that the Fed intended to do what it did regardless of how that call came out But it probably did take at least a little. Bit of what positives they were looking for a way from the from their own move. Yeah so speaking of the positives they were looking for. They did not get any At at you know so far anyway Out of the market today Reading the tea leaves for me that would Ya. I mean clearly. It looks like people are worried that the Fed knows more than the rest of us. Know there does seem to be a little bit of. I'm just reading the market reaction the way you are but there does seem to be a little bit of that reaction mean to me the questions since in the last couple of weeks since people have been actively talking about this have been a couple one. How much and how does a rate cut at this moment? Actually help given the supply chain issues that the chair referred to and secondly to the degree. That one's munition is limited. Is it wiser to keep most of it to deal with the actual fallout when viruses receded? And you're fighting recession or is it better to kind of preemptively act now in an effort both to signal the markets and also perhaps trying to lay some foam on the runway last thing. And then I'll let you go to words fiscal policy. There is a whole nother apparatus of government that can affect the economy. It's Congress and the White House and taxing and spending. How concerned are you that we haven't seen anything from them yet? Well I mean this is kind of the story of twenty twenty in America right that that the political branches seemed to have more difficulty responding. And I I noticed the Secretary. Mnuchin said he's he's interested in working with Congress but it does seem as though everything is moving awfully slowly. Daniel Tarullo for Eight years a little bit more than that. Actually member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States now professor at the law

Federal Reserve Jay Powell Group Of Seven Finance Ministe Lehman Brothers Feds Board Of Governors Reserve Bank Daniel Tarullo Congress Daniel Torello Mr Trillo Harvard Federal Reserve Bank Official America Secretary
Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

Insureblocks

08:05 min | 5 months ago

Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

"Man's. Thank you for joining us today for our listeners. Thank you great to be back. It is great to have you back and for our listeners. Who Haven't heard you on our previous podcast. Can you please give them a quick introduction on Yourself Asher So my name is harmon? I'm one of the CO founders of their Hash craft alongside Dr Leeman Baird We've been working together. Lehman I for twenty six years always in deep tack. The we've done reinforcement learning or machine learning research for the Air Force. We talked computer. Science at the Air Force Academy cybersecurity managed massive software program for the Missile Defense Agency and then decided we wanted to become entrepreneurs and this is our third startup we to prior startups in the space of identity and access management and sold one to Fortune. Five hundred the other private equity and Leman wanted to solve a really hard math problems specifically how you can achieve the limits in terms of security in a consensus algorithm distributed consensus algorithm simultaneous to maximizing performance. How you can do both at the same time. And after of hard work he invented the Hash. Graph which is consensus algorithm like blockchain is a consensus algorithm. Has Graph is an alternative approach that has fantastic properties again both in terms of security and performance and we decided to take that tha market and here. We are years later now with their hash graph. Brilliant end in that one answer. You've athlete answered the next two questions. All I can one so fishing deeper interested. Yeah Yeah I mean I think it will be useful is because one of our typical questions is please define what is blockchain and Like we did in the last podcast if you perhaps could have another go at it and at the same time point out the differences between Blockchain and a hash graph. Why Hash crowd is so much more efficient than Blockchain system sure well blockchain as a term refers to two things it refers to a data structure. Which is a chain of blocks of transactions? And it's very serious just like it sounds in the way it's created and it also the the term also refers to a consensus algorithm that enables a community of of participants each of which that holds a local copy of that chain of blocks to come to agreement or consensus on which block to put next on the top of that chain in their by everyone keeps a consistent chain of blocks and often. It's proof of work. You know the use of a really hard cryptographic puzzle into novel ways that makes it possible for the community to to come to consensus on on which blocks you go on top of of the chain. But it's designed to be slow and it. The use of proof of work causes it to be slow and The the fact that there is a single chain that everyone uses also limiting in terms of its architecture hash graph similarly is a term that refers to both a data structure in this case. It's a graph in the mathematical sense. It's a graph that is whose nodes are or verticals are linked together with Hashes gripped graphically in. So it's a data structure in there's also consensus algorithm. That makes it possible for those that have a copy of the Hash graph to calculate how each other how the other nodes in the network would vote on the order of transactions and so they come to to agreement on the order of transactions that get captured in this in this graph because it's a graph rather than a chain all of the transactions. They're flowing into the network can be processed simultaneously. There is no need for proof of work. This process that slows down blockchain to give the community time to come to agreement. There's no need for any of that and so we've basically eliminated the too constraining factors. Proof of work is no is not there. And it's a graph. Instead of a chain and the result of that is fantastic performance in it's got some great theoretical properties specifically it does achieve the limit in terms of security at something called a synchronous. Byzantine fault tolerance. It's the best one can do and in its novel in those ways Brilliant thank you very much for that and we had actually gymnasts or very recently. Come on our show. He's the CEO of core and he was telling us about how he build his colonel virus tracker using Darah Hash craft for exactly the same properties. You just described now. We've had you on this show for about ten ten eleven months ago. What industries and geographies are we seeing the most adoption of our has graph? Well I wouldn't say that there's geography necessarily. That is adopting. Maybe more than than another and the industry's when thinking about the industries. It's it's also it's more like this. It's not really that there is necessarily one industry. That is adopting faster than another but the way I would sort of segment the market or break it down in terms of what is adopting versus. Not Is that. There are a lot of enterprise use cases that are being presented in that. We're you know we're working on with partners and council members that are kind of boring in nature in some ways. What I find interesting is that while most of the market is looking for a really sexy killer. Commercial consumer focused use case. You know everybody's looking for that killer APP. That is primarily focused on building a big consumer focused use case. Our experience is just the opposite. It's for example as a category just audit based applications where you WANNA take some information in get a consensus time stamp on it and use that in various ways maybe their regulatory related. Maybe you need to be able to to just store information improve that it. It was what you claim. It was on a on a given date. There's just a whole broad range of business to business process optimization focused use cases that I think are the ones that are going to end up being the ones that take the whole market Mainstream or result in its mass adoption. And so that's the distinction that I'm seeing. It's it's not a one particular industry or one geography is more focused on B. Two B. process optimization versus consumer focused applications

Blockchain Dr Leeman Baird Harmon Lehman Missile Defense Agency Air Force Air Force Academy Leman CEO
"lehman" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:53 min | 5 months ago

"lehman" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Bensonhurst sue Lehman is a far was a witness he says that first responders seem to do everything they could to save the man started giving him the the procedures CPR and you know they were giving him oxygen but there was no reply Antonio Rodriguez tells ABC Eyewitness News that the victim was a friend of his hero he does start doesn't seem to like nothing happened is a mystery buddy please hello to everybody like we need more love in this room come to lived in sunset park reportedly a lifelong resident according to people who knew him wins news time at nine twenty three a vigil in the Bronx today for first responder who lost his firefighter brother on nine eleven and now has died of a nine eleven related cancer himself Daniel Foley spent days at the World Trade Center after the attacks looking for his thirty two year old brother Tommy one of eight heroes rescue three in the south Bronx were lost that day last year Danny was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer linked to his work at ground zero he was forty six rescue three lieutenant Mickey convoy remembers when Danny Foley was first diagnosed almost exactly a year ago Danny could stop working right there not being assigned to rescue three but then he came back each day and will join the company working down at the trade center to find all the Americans that were killed that day Danny was later assigned to rescue three as well just like his older brother before him wins news time nine twenty four as the coronavirus scare continues several countries are now reporting a sharp increase in cases that includes Iran were eight deaths are now reported that's the highest number outside China neighboring countries are now closing their borders with Iran as panic mounts twenty eight countries besides China are now reporting a total of fifteen hundred confirmed patients in Italy a third person has died correspondent Megan Williams says that Italian officials are now taking drastic steps through financing from silence silence silence as an Italian woman into her smartphone issue records the deserted town of Cologna in northern Italy the epicenter of the corona virus spread as a third Italian died of the virus a woman in treatment for cancer authorities closed schools clubs churches and venues including the famed La Scala opera house in Milan's towering to Walmart some fifty thousand people in town southeast of Milan and in the neighboring Venditto region are now under quarantine here in the U. S. a federal judge's temporarily blocked the transfer of American corona virus patients to southern California after the city of Costa mesa filed a lawsuit the suit claims the facility is in a good spot for quarantine because it's too close to residential areas at least nine people dead after a large earthquake in the Middle East this morning the magnitude five point seven quake centered in Iran because devastating damage neighboring Turkey where officials say at least nine are dead including three children and they report over a thousand buildings collapsed in the earthquake so far reports of injuries total over a.

sue Lehman
Amazon’s Jeff Bezos commits $10 billion to fighting climate change

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos commits $10 billion to fighting climate change

"Amazon chief Jeff Bezos's taking financial Lehman climate change hi I'm Gerry non Basil's the world's richest person is committing ten billion dollars to addressing climate change according to his Instagram announcement the Basil's lafond will begin financing grants to scientists activists and non governmental organizations this summer Jeff Basil's calls climate change the biggest threat to our planet says he wants to explore new ways of doing something about it and he says this is the first contribution to the fund that the earth is the one thing we all have in common Gary non CBS

Jeff Bezos Jeff Basil CBS Amazon Gerry Non Basil Instagram Gary
Epidural for Labor: Everything You Need to Know

Kathy Fray's MotherWise Podcasts

05:01 min | 6 months ago

Epidural for Labor: Everything You Need to Know

"Enjoy. Hi everybody. It's kitty for a hit from otherwise and welcome to another within our podcast and today I'm going to talk to you greatly about impede bureaus so these are obviously claim. Very commonly used is pat of child with anesthesia. The interesting thing about them while these interesting things it does not designed signed for child It was just a chocolate adapted a surgical form of anesthesia and spinal anesthesia. Basically though it will we could use this for child Biz and so I think it's important just bear in mind it's not designed for trump with something we've adapted it'd be drills Increase your chances off needing an instrumental assisted deliveries. It's mantras or foresaw so delivery and they also cheese increase your chances of needing N. C. Station or surgical delivering out because of the failure to break race in the lightbulb. Donna tation failure to progress in the distinctive the baby but the pushing stage fetal distress can now the reason that those things all care a kind of obviously a little complicated to give it in the mice simplest tubes it's really because basically they fetal distress tends to count because the whole lane is lengthened right so when you start the process of having any Pedro by the tournament sort sort of Gay and they also attrition Creeps Event and they mother is considered The Nathan to saying she arrives in kits at cited and get it on board and and then she made to pay. Should I refi minutes for the faced little wall to make sure that she's okay from hike. Mike Boating Chen which is a risk factor could be droz and then it takes a Good Soda Fountain Twenty Thirty minutes to actually could come by the time all of they. Typically Look era half is gone by who saw end at that point hit contractions of petered away and she then needs an oxidation drug usually to get going again to get those contractions happening again properly and so so now the baby has had to turn half hours of extra ninety by without actually having extraditation of progress of the. I'm I'm civics reckoning. So Casey by be headed but more light than ideally it would have mind and then what happens. Is that once you get to that that stage when you find our nation you stop pushing because I'm not gonna be Joseph lying horizontally. They have a higher risk of a chance being in Boston. Area the baby being in Syria Line instead of anterior just because of gravity being an all. She's Li- instead of Lehman. Ford which is what will naturally do Without any Pedro inside. The baby has often not least hit well so sipping this that lie the back and that's not really juices to them descending so often wants the woman is fully dilated than she's given up another hour will truth it recalls the phase of dissent and just allowing the baby just to come down to look into hip hop before she stops to Porsche. which would happen a lot coca without drill? That might only happen within a few minutes. So we give a Lotta time in these individual data usually once that woman is what we call it finds or plus one and we get it. It's pushing pushing contained Mojo with any pitcher. Sorry considered that sort of up to like you would say one to two hours for face baby with avenue to three hours. Listening Pedro would be regathered. Who on to to pushing so all together you know sometimes is basically ended up? Having a good five thousand extra labor the highest chance of heaven fetal distress which means their baseline at the heart rate. Going up starting to have some deceleration who lengthy celebrations after contractions sanctions are starting to see some accordion In the water so things like not to appear on leads to in. Sometimes it's sort of Wayne up and said you won't escape is actually reading all three hefty. And it's probably better that we get on deliver the space by Syrian rather than pushing forward with like. We are as to be honest. Honest if the mountain bureau child's is a baby bank delivered or she voted the point not being delivered that she would have given booth today today. Bhai Being Superman

Fetal Distress Pedro LI Child Biz Mike Boating Chen N. C. Station Boston Bhai Donna Tation Casey Joseph Ford Mojo Syria Line Nathan Porsche. Wayne Lehman
Gone From Home: The Disappearance of Susan Mcfarland

True Crime Brewery

09:11 min | 7 months ago

Gone From Home: The Disappearance of Susan Mcfarland

"So huck and and Mary. Elizabeth Smith had three children. There were fifteen thirteen and eleven and then their youngest daughter Susan was born. She was born on New Year's Steve in nineteen fifty eight now because she was born when her mom was forty and a data's forty eight. And there's like eleven years between the third and the fourth worth child. Susan was often tease. She was an accident now. Her response was I was a bonus huck was an FBI agent. And he had received a letter of congratulations for the birth of his daughter. Susan that was signed by the FBI Director J Edgar Hoover as an adult. Susan kept him framed glitter on a wall in her home yes. She grew up in Missouri where her older sister. Anne was responsible for baby sitting her quite a bit but as you got older her and decided it was fun to hang out with her baby sister. She was an easy going child and very affectionate with their family so an sometimes took sue along with her or even under dates. And it wasn't a problem you know at least not for. I don't know maybe the guys didn't like it but her thinking maybe one time time okay. Circumstance are less date well. After an moved away for college she frequently had sue. Come visit her on the weekends. The other students at our school loved sue. She was like everyone's little sister. susie big brother Harley had a daughter named Kristen when Assu was just five years old and when Kristen stayed with her grandparents they paid sued to keep her busy but as they got older the age difference really diminished and soon became good friends with her niece. Kristen Sumit her best friend when she was thirteen years old sandy row. Sandy and sewer inseparable spending spending time hanging out at a local bakery and attending high school classes together. Su worked as a lifeguard at a hotel. Swimming Pool in the Summers and Sandy would sit by the pool with earn play cards when the pool was busy so sue was just an upbeat energetic type of person she was always busy doing something finer bonner. Planning something fun. One thing the girls left to do was to shop. They could shop for hours and not even spend much money they also like go to the movies. Sue Play tennis but Sandy never got good at sport. Even though she tried sue was a really busy kit. She ice skated. She was a hockey cheerleader. And she also served on the student council the PEP club and the French club. She was also a really big reader sometimes sometimes reading one or two novels a week even during the school year but suicide human half draw and certainly far from perfect especially as a teen. She could be rebellious. She sometimes with skipped class or went home for lunch and just didn't bother returning to school after lunch but she got away with a lot. She was talented at making elaborate excuses. That are teachers and parents usually believed so sue and sandy graduated high school together in nineteen eighteen. Seventy seven sue then went to a private girls' college in Fulton Missouri. Sandy stayed in Saint Louis and went to Washington University so they are less. Listen two hours apart. So they're able to visit each other pretty often. Yeah but when sue announce she was majoring in accounting. Her friends were pretty surprised. She seemed to fund fund to be a serious number crunching office person but sue really enjoyed accounting. She was fun and adventurous but she also was very disciplined organized also. She really admired her dad. who had an accounting degree? So after graduating in the top of her class suit took a position with Santa the energy in Amarillo Texas while she was working there she got her. CPA and the next summer. She traveled to Saint Louis to be Sandy's maid definer Sandy's marriage would last only four years but soon would always be there to listen to her and give her advice then ensued took a second job after working for a while with Santa Fe energy. She moved to Midland Texas and had a position with N run run. Yes the notorious company but at the time it was well respected. It was a good company. This is before they had their slippery slide. Yes now after six months of working with Enron. She is transferred to their headquarters in Houston and in Houston. Sue spent a lot of time with her former sister-in-law. Debbie Debbie had had been married and divorced. Sue's older brother Pete. Souza would go to her nephew soccer games and she had shopped the Debbie on the weekends she left to shop for clothing and and she dressed nicely so she set up an exchange with your friends and Murillo so that they ought quadruple their wardrobes by sharing so in nineteen eighty seven. Sue took took a position with southwestern Bell Corporation in Saint Louis her position and the people she worked among their lead her into a more glamorous life if she started attending charity Events Dinner Parties and Gallery openings and she was happy to be back living near her friend Sandy. They began spending more and more time together having lunch taking aerobics classes which was a big thing at the time she was also reunited with her niece Kristin during this time they were only a few years apart and became good friends so they went out on the weekend nights and sue was happy to pay kristen's way because Sumeida good it. Salary and Kristen was still struggling but a suge close to thirty. She began to worry about finding a partner and having a family. She told a French French. She wanted to have kits and she'd like to stay home and raise them while loving husband would work to support them and they live in a nice suburban house and and then she met Rick Mcfarland and he seemed to fit the bill of the Kinda guy she wanted at least to begin with. Yeah so rick was the second son of Dick and and Mona McFarland of Kirkwood Missouri. When he is a young kid the family moved to Saint? Louis he grew up in webster groves with his two brothers. David David and done in high school. He is a big water polo player and he worked on the staff of the school newspaper. He went to southwest South West Missouri State University in Springfield after high school but had difficulty concentrating so while he was here his diagnosed with attention deficit disorder and put on medication. And with the mets he was able to maintain a B average so he graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration nation and got a job with stockbrokerage company. Shearson Lehman. I did pretty well. There drove a beamer. Had a carriage Charles lived in an upscale port town right so from just hearing that you'd say Oh this is a pretty great guy. Why would you because he's got a BMW BMW? Well it seems like a good prospect. He's got a job right. He's having heard anything. Says he's a jerk right. That's what I'm saying but you know like everybody else. He did have issues but he was pretty good at hiding them for most people. He did get in trouble one time in college for stealing but the charges were dismissed. One of his former dates said that rick made her very uncomfortable after they had two dates his because she told him she didn't want to see him anymore but he persisted calling her to the point where she was afraid of him and then she caught him hiding in the bushes outside of her house stalking getting her concern. Yes but of course. Sued doesn't know about any of this right and sue and Rick had actually attended the same high school all but they didn't really meet each other until they bumped into each other at a party in Saint Louis. Rick was much quieter than Su so they seemed like kind of unlikely unlikely couple when they began dating but to sue she felt like she hit it off with him again. Not not to demean sue. But we've already talked about how she's hitting thirty and she's thinking like time is running out so maybe she settled for something not quite the top of her list list. Yeah that's what a lot of people close to her. Actually thought bird. No he review would do in a pinch enough. I'd go that far but I guess she didn't seem like she was head over heels like he was you know her prince charming but thought he would do you would do when he seemed like a nice stable guy but he wasn't nearly as clever or witty. Assu you know sue was really fun but you know. Rick seemed like he could be a good match for her. She could be the outgoing one and he could keep her grounded but still sandy and kristen thought that sue probably was settling a bit with Rick just because she wanted to start a family and she was getting being older

SUE Sandy Kristen Sumit Rick Mcfarland Saint Louis Susan FBI SU Huck Director J Edgar Hoover Elizabeth Smith Debbie Debbie Missouri Hockey Steve Fulton Missouri Houston Anne
A Texas substitute teacher was fired and arrested for allegedly assaulting a student

KNX Programming

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

A Texas substitute teacher was fired and arrested for allegedly assaulting a student

"A substitute teacher was arrested Friday after allegedly assaulting a fifteen year old girl in a classroom just outside Austin Texas K. I. TV reporter Jordan Bon key on the video that's gone viral the Hays county sheriff's office identify the teacher is thirty two year old Tiffany should del Lankford she's been charged with second degree felony aggravated assault Michael Bauer has a son that graduated from women high just last year no matter what a kid says to you I mean short of them pulling a weapon on you I don't see any calls for that sort of reaction the school principal said the statement to parents saying in part under no circumstances is this behavior tolerated at Lehman high school and went on to say that we take the safety and security of our students seriously we took swift action when this incident occurred we will do everything necessary to protect our students

Assault Michael Bauer Principal Lehman High School Austin Reporter Jordan Bon Hays County Del Lankford Thirty Two Year Fifteen Year
Tiger Woods ties Sam Snead's record of 82 PGA Tour wins

Steve Cochran

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

Tiger Woods ties Sam Snead's record of 82 PGA Tour wins

"Tiger Woods got a milestone victory today at the zozo championship in Japan he ended up tying Sam Snead's record PGA tour victories eighty two with them now for tiger after three under sixty seven in the final round about some perspective the only times Tom Lehman one in his career we're famous golfer tunnel sure he wanted did he win a PGA you wanna British open British K. five while in those numbers are you know if you went five times Gulf religion eighty two eighty

Tiger Woods Japan Sam Snead Tom Lehman

How I Built This

08:37 min | 11 months ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

The Energy Gang

12:25 min | 11 months ago

Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

"In the summer of two thousand eight Britta von Essen took an internship with a major investment bank after wrapping up business school. It was considered at the time one of the top places to work it was with a company called Lehman Brothers and it was actually a fascinating summer. I was working in their global power group but focused on renewable energy and you know there was a lot going on at the time. Tax Equity was really ramping up. People were figuring out how the structuring was going to work with that. There are a couple. IPO's that were right on the horizon so it was a fascinating summer from renewables perspective and also what was going on at Leeman. It's been an unnerving week for US financial markets and now the potential collapse of Lehman Brothers once the fourth largest investment firm in the US at at that time. Lehman Brothers was the top investor in renewables it had bought big portfolios of wind and solar projects. It was a leading equity investor and it was helping take companies public it was an exciting time but as the summer war on market conditions worsened investors got nervous in things got grim for Leman analysts say the bank's future is in doubt out afterward reported a loss of nearly four billion dollars in the last quarter. Leman brothers is suffered heavy losses as a result of the US housing slump while I was there. It was just constant reassurance that that these cycles are normal and and you know financial markets go through this occasionally and everything was going behind of course it was not fine be one of the watershed days in financial markets histories. He was a manic manic Monday in the financial markets. The Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street tumbled over the weekend leman brothers or one hundred and fifty eight-year-old firm filed for bankruptcy in the lead up to the Leeann bankruptcy in the fall. IPO's fell apart project financing dried up and cleantech companies beneath loans underwritten by the bank were suddenly exposed to risks. They didn't foresee. BRITTA had a front row seat to all of it. After leaving lemon she picked up and moved to Italy where she helped build wind and solar projects for a German developer soon after she witnessed yet another period of chaos the swift rollback of feed in tariffs the Italian market came to a screeching screeching halt. It did teach me a lot about developer resiliency the fundamental optimism that is required to be of renewable energy developer and and taking the long view on a lot of these projects so British took those lessons and apply them to the next chapter of her career. She now advises clean energy companies knees on how to manage risk so you've managed to witness the collapse of one of the biggest investment banks and one of the biggest European renewable energy markets back to back. That's quite an entrance into the industry well. I swear it's not me I'm not the not the driver and all of this but I think what it taught me was that things change and the markets move and those that are resilient and those that figure out how to work in the new paradigms that they're given are the ones who are successful so I've taken a huge amount of those lessons into my current job and into my current business where I'm basically advising folks how to roll with the ever changing markets that we see in wind and solar. I'm Stephen Lacey in this episode produced in partnership with Cohnresnick and cohnresnick capital talking talking with British Ivano sin about those ever changing market conditions today Britta's a managing director at cohnresnick capital over the last decade. She's seen all kinds of market risk mostly expiring or changing policies that create financial risk you know I it was the sixteen o three grant expiring then it was. ITC expiring PTC's stepping down. What are the safe harbor policies we we didn't even get the IT safe safe harbor policies until fairly recently. I think it's just a fundamental aspect of this industry. It's Salat about planning for the unexpected in British. Job is to help figure out how to get renewable energy deals done in the face of those challenges so I sat down with her to unpack some of those policy uncertainties and what they mean for renewables and I wanted to know how often does policy change derail projects so I have. You've worked on project many projects that were potentially derailed that we manage to work around various policy changes. I think change in tax law was a really interesting time where we had to figure out how to keep the investors active of an investing in two projects that would probably not be commissioned for another twelve months and how to get around the fact that there was a very likely change in tax law to be passed at that time and yet nobody knew exactly what that was going to look like. I think this PG bankruptcy recently and the California I think it was a be ten fifty four the wildfire response bill that has been high in the mind of a lot of California developers at the moment who were focused on contracts with sce NASD Johnnie and whether or not those credit ratings. We're GONNA take ahead that policy was passed and I think both of those organizations are are quite secure and short up and that was that was great news for California winging developers across the board with or without contracts well. Let's walk through some of the big drivers and uncertainties around them so you mentioned. PG Ag any I'd like to talk about PG and understand. What are you now looking for in a bankruptcy proceeding what kind of risks to contracts tracks are there currently what has been sorted out and what's still left to be sorted out that would impact renewable energy developers so I believe there is still still quite a bit of uncertainty as far as the potential for PG any to cancel contracts that are considered out out of market today so these would be some of the earlier vintage. PPA's there are several conversations and I know cohnresnick has been a part of several several of these about trying to restructure this through bilateral negotiations with pg any and kind of nipping in the bud lead and coming to a good solution for all parties but otherwise I think there is still a strong degree of uncertainty here there there are investors who are then making plays in this and trying to pick up these assets making a bet as to whether or not there will be restructuring of the contracts are not as as well as you know. It's an unfortunate situation but it's certainly a very active group of projects and sponsors that are figuring out working working through how to navigate that uncertainty. Let's go to tax equity. The solar investment tax credit is now facing the beginning of its step down schedule this is obviously going to impact the economics of project development but we have had some clarity on this step down unscheduled for for years now how is facing down the IDC GONNA change the way projects are financed and does it present any risks that were not there previously so you're right. There is a very clear step down schedule which I think has been helpful for folks trying to new forecasts what this looks like that being said given the safe harbor provision. I would venture that there is a generic assumption option from those who are procuring. PPA's at the moment that their assets that their projects will be safe harbored many of the major. I pee pees Jason. Strategic are making significant safe harbor place. They are you know doing this both for their own projects jags and under the assumption that there will be Ebony advantages over the next few years which I agree with. I think a lot of these developers that are procuring making this assumption are going to limit themselves to buyers of the assets that can then fulfill the safe harbor in order to meet the Economics Amax. What do you think the chances of an extension of the investment tax credit are. I know that the Solar Energy Industries Association has all of a sudden and put this back on their priorities list. They think maybe there's an opening to extend the federal tax credit. What do you think the chances of that arc given what you know so there's a couple a couple aspects of this that are important absolutely it would be beneficial to the industry right that being said we are months away from the step down last time this extension happened. I think we had a good twelve months of lead time so it allowed loud folks to plan at least partially accordingly in this case you would actually jam up probably some more some of the more major players who have made significant safe harbor plays that would have been capital that was not necessary to deploy a and potentially at pricing that is not beneficial to their assets so there are mixed mixed feelings throughout the industry about this. I think there is a decent chance I also think it's interesting giving kind of the economic markets at the moment and the potential for a downturn. Let's call it in the next twelve to eighteen months renewable such a critical component of job security and job growth in the US economy at the moment that especially if we're facing some type of downturn it may increase congressional and government support for some type of extension here. What about the storage tax credit. That's been floating around Congress for for a long time if there is this renewed push for potential solar. It see where does the storage. I T C fit in there would would it be something separate. Would it be wrapped together. And what do you think the chances of getting this thing finally pastor. I think the storage credit is actually much more critical critical than the than the solar one in the in the near term here I think with Alda we will continue to have murkiness around trying trying to loop storage into either wind or solar tax credits which is is just messy. It's hard for investors to get their heads around it. Just adds a lot of confusion and it also limits what you can do from adding storage onto existing renewable energy projects objects. I think throughout the energy community there is a consensus that storage is a critical component that needs to be deployed on a large scale will in order for renewables to continue on the growth. It is an in order to hit. Some of these are targets hundred percent in California boring. If for example you you have to have the storage component there otherwise you're facing you know a variety of issues on you know intermittent see or demand or any variety of aspects so. I am a little more bullish on the storage tax credit. I I think a standalone tax credit does a lot to simplify and streamline financing aspects for storage whether or not it connected to renewables and whether or not commissioned at the same time as the

Lehman Brothers Developer United States California IPO PPA Britta Solar Energy Industries Associ Britta Von Essen Leeman Pg Ag Leman PTC
Biden unveils criminal justice plan ahead of debate showdown with Harris, Booker

KQED Radio Show

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Biden unveils criminal justice plan ahead of debate showdown with Harris, Booker

"Former vice president Joe Biden released a criminal justice proposal today as part of his presidential campaign and peers Daniel could sleep and reports he aims to reduce the number of people incarcerated in the US one center piece of Joe Biden's plan as a grant program intended to encourage states to investing crime prevention as opposed to incarceration he also says he would allocate one billion dollars per year towards juvenile justice reform the plan reaches across several major policy areas with proposals to decriminalize cannabis eliminate the death penalty at the federal level and expand pre K. access Biden's plans for criminal justice changes also include gun control measures such as universal background checks and a ban on assault style weapons his proposal comes a week ahead of the next democratic debates which will feature twenty candidates he will take part in the second night of the debates Daniel Kurtz Lehman NPR

Joe Biden Cannabis Daniel Kurtz Lehman Npr Vice President United States Assault One Billion Dollars
Scientists Identify Strange New Species of Duck-Billed Dinosaur

Austin's Morning News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists Identify Strange New Species of Duck-Billed Dinosaur

"Of also on earth that the Big Bend national park in southwest Texas in nineteen eighty five has just been identified as a never before seen type of duck billed dinosaur Texas Tech University professor Tom Lehman discovered the fossel with its bones weathered I'm stuck together a report in the journal of systematic paleontology says researchers have determine the fossils are into Janice and species scientists say the duck bill or shovel build were the most common herbivorous dinosaurs at the end of the Mesozoic

Big Bend National Park Texas Professor Tom Lehman Texas Tech University Journal Of Systematic Paleonto
Texas, Tom Lehman And Big Bend discussed on Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Texas, Tom Lehman And Big Bend discussed on Jeff Ward and Ed Clements

"House experts say fossil remains discovered in the nineteen eighties of Big Bend national park in southwest Texas I've been identified as a new genus and species of duck billed dinosaur the journal of systematic paleontology announced the classification of the ocular him this power mentis last week Texas Tech University professor Tom Lehman discovered the fossils which are being examined by researchers at university of Texas at

Texas Tom Lehman Big Bend Journal Of Systematic Paleonto Texas Tech University Professor University Of Texas
NBA free agency: Warriors, Nets may explore sign-and-trade that would net Golden State assets

FOX Sports Radio Weekends

02:41 min | 1 year ago

NBA free agency: Warriors, Nets may explore sign-and-trade that would net Golden State assets

"The start of free agency and all my goodness it never stops Steve this Sager jumping in here with some this figure what's going on we mentioned the nets trading guard d'angelo Russell sign and trade to Golden State to make room Adrian washing around ski ESPN saying the warriors are trading on Greenwood dollar to the Memphis Grizzlies they're sending a protected first rounder twenty twenty four twenty twenty five twenty twenty six unprotected all as part of the deal to make room so Andrea go dollar guy who's been making twelve to fourteen million a year for many years remember he was a score in Philadelphia not with Golden State on that roster but a guy who is a first rounder out of Arizona fifteen years ago has been traded or we'll be traded more accurately to the Memphis Grizzlies let me add something to that Ramona Shelburne said that he could dial a former rob Palenque clients so wouldn't be surprised to see the Lakers somehow get involved so I would be surprised about that either can the Lakers involved as well well ya Dreger dollars getting a bag Scott drug now well I just I mean you're probably going to need someone to take quite a bit of a pay cut because I mean if you especially if you get a call why not if you don't get kawaii you can go I get a few pieces but I mean unfortunately for unfortunately for the Lakers the clippers in the rafters they've gone all in right now on kawaii Lynyrd and whichever Weiss and fortunately it's gonna be a fortune for two of them because Arnie's what army what's left what's left at the markets cousins your Patrick Beverley still out there the lady whether they're not out there not talked about but a greeting to the Max deal as the bay area report to stay with writing state so there's not much there's not much meat on a whole bowl impossible you been told me about all this great talent is in the NBA and that this hall of Famers all over the place surely there's some talent you can sign are you really trying to bring that tape take up after what we've just watched in the last four and a half hours in college I've got to do something I'm here my gosh twenty yes forty percent of the league Ajit instead reaction yes I this is a damn good point if you ask me you want to die on the you're dying on that hill is the unfortunate five died a thousand deaths are ready today what difference does it make what more I I did have to laugh though UCLA Dodger Frank tag this in a note from the and we'll keep who covers the what clippers any tweeted earlier just well earlier a couple minutes ago the warriors don't even have a single finals MVP on their team anymore Lehman well done

Steve Fifteen Years Forty Percent
The Cavaliers Just Stunned the Basketball World by Hiring John Beilein

SportsCenter AllNight

05:11 min | 1 year ago

The Cavaliers Just Stunned the Basketball World by Hiring John Beilein

"John B line is not staying in an Arbor reliant is leaving Michigan. And adding to the NBA where he's taking over as the new coach the Cleveland Cavaliers. He's the winningest coach in the history of the Michigan program para final four appearances in his twelve years there twenty thirteen in two thousand eighteen now he takes over a rebuilding project in Cleveland getting a five year deal with the Cavs ESPN analyst docket. I think that if I'm the Cavs. I would much rather have HIV line in some. I don't know guy. That's never really done a whole lot. Now, there's not a lot of guys in college that you can go to the NBA all that kind of stuff the peelings. Here's a great pamper. My son played form is great temperamental players ended development. The the rules of the game aren't going to hurt his style at all because rules are different very different. But I think it's a great gift of the Cavaliers? But as you will know, you guys will get some players if you don't that's a bad roster. And you may get some players if you if you're gonna make this work, no matter who the coaches, Dan with that being said, this is a big summer. A lot of free agency conversation how excited a player's going to be in the NBA to play for a coach while he's had a lot of success. It's been in college. It's interesting. I think that I am gonna change a little bit. A lot of players were always talking about got playing league for me to play with you. I think I think people have seen that's going to differ way. Look, let's be on if money talks if the Cavaliers have more money than somebody else. Go get who they want. But also city talks, and I couldn't personally I mean, I I'm a big fan of Cleveland. I love going there when I was coaching bowling green is just two hours away. But if I'm twenty two years old, I got pocket full of cash twenty five years old. I put cash I don't really Cleveland would be a destination. No matter who the coaches unless I'm LeBron I'm from there. So, you know, the guys that are truly going to make a difference probably gonna go to New York probably gonna go to LA probably gonna go to those cities, regardless. But I'm saying is as much as coaching can make a difference in the NBA, which you can some John. We'll make that difference. He will. He is a very good basketball coach on all sides. Offense defense transition. He is a perk. Perfect to handle all ages, older, younger whatever but come on. You got you gotta have guys in aging. Kevin love a hopefully for him developing Colin sex. And then who knows what you got in the middle between Tristan Thompson, and and the rest, and then you gotta hope you win the lottery you throw throw Zion with those guys. Maybe you got something but mandate like like, I remember when his was going to go the Cavaliers he desperately. All you wanna do is talk. Lebron James and see what the Brian James was thinking LeBron his people wouldn't talk to him. There's no Brown there. And you know, what if you can come in the same time as I'm Lehman, we really good thing for it'd be let in Cleveland is this a risk worth taking when you're a guy who's got an eight twenty nine to four sixty eight college record has been transformative at Michigan and your sixty six for jar. I think it's a absolute win win. I mean, you know, sixty six years old. He's leaving comfort sixty six five years. Let's say I don't know six seven eight million dollar cost of living. Cleveland's not bad. If you're going to do it. You do it. Now. That's it. Right. I mean, you're not gonna be offered this five years from now. So I I like it for both. I really do. I think John made the only choice that he could make it. In fact, he was going to leave. Now, if he wasn't gonna leave if he was married to Michigan. Then you obviously, don't even entertain it. But if you're thinking about it. And you sixty six five year deal. Let's go and John gets a five year deal to leave in and head to Cleveland. And yes. It was a headline about an MBA coaching higher. But are Stephen a Smith says? And you got job be Lana. Head coach for the Michigan. Wolverines is the new head confident Cleveland Cavaliers, no problem there. It's news. Here's my point. What the hell is the segment about it? Who cares? I'm John Williamson with the draft tomorrow that might be different. But since you announced this before we know whether or not the Cleveland Cavaliers going to have the number one overall pick which undoubtedly is going to be I on Winston in the upcoming NBA who gives a damn about the Cleveland Cavaliers the pros not there anymore. Kevin loved Sydney on his way out. Don't talk to that man by keeping them in Cleveland some someplace where he could compete for championship. He's a damn good player who the hell out this day. Give a damn about Cleveland graduates. Bravo. Gravel. It's so touching confined. And. I'm sorry. Cleveland the bras there anymore. No one cares about you right now. No, no, no. Your day is common

Cleveland Cavaliers Cleveland NBA John Michigan Lebron James John B Kevin Tristan Thompson Analyst Espn New York Zion DAN Stephen A Smith LA John Williamson Brian James Lehman
"lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

"You know, I think in retrospect, given the fallout that immediately occurred upon the filing of that bankruptcy. Maybe we should have been more creative. We could have voiced losses on the shareholders. We could afford it. It is. Well, we had a bankruptcy. You know, we could've achieved the kind of, you know, anti moral hazard problem with bailouts potentially in the way, we structured alone to the broker dealer. So as to avoid the kind of adverse impacts that. I mean that the finally Lehman Brothers created a panic. Well, okay, I'm not going to disagree with that. And so you know, that the whole the whole script of the rescue from, you know, the beginning of Bear Stearns to the opening of the FX lines to make sure that the European banks didn't default against their on their own dead and therefore default on their American counterparts. Which would have created a liquidity crisis here to the putting Fannie and Freddie into conservative ship this saving ahe the series of emergency. The alphabet soup of emergency lending programs. The fed instituted, you know, the prime dealer credit facility the talents that. Half. The you know, commercial paper facility. I mean, you know, there was a every market that had frozen up. They intervened in tried to restart in order to provide liquidity to the system. And so the question is, you know, in the midst of that just Stu NAMI of credit support and liquidity you decide to take one company now. My my pet thesis is dick fold said no to Warren Buffett's offered to inject capital over the summer. And I I wish it was a fly on the wall in that room because I have to imagine between Paulsen and Burnett making Geithner someone said this this idiot said no to Warren Buffett. How can we possibly save him? They had an opportunity. He was a pig. I always been a pig and now he should be in an orange jumpsuit, but let's not atomic tons of personalities and personal histories matter. And I so I don't think there's I don't think you're crazy in that thought. So let's talk a little about what's going on. On currently in your career after you leave treasury, you go to work as a background and an investor, and you pretty much decided to hang out your own shingle, Milstein and company tell us about the launch of that firm. And and what the thinking was is opposed to being attached to another giant financial entity. Yeah. I mean, one thing working in the government cures, you of the desire to have a boss. So I decided I would set up my own shop, I really had no grand plans. But we went from, you know, one answering another call to another call to another call him before. I knew it, you know, I had offices in New York and Washington, and we were working on large corporate restructuring since often restructurings again. And and also, you know, reinvesting the profits of the business partners the guys who join me guys and gals who join me, you know, we all agreed that the advisory businesses business that goes up and down revenue volatile..

Warren Buffett Bear Stearns Lehman Brothers fed Stu NAMI Fannie Milstein Paulsen Freddie New York Washington Geithner Burnett
"lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Change the world, perhaps the most thorough and deeply on olitical take on the crisis that any authors producer for if we go back even earlier than Lehman Brothers, the subprime crisis was where this really all started wasn't it fail? And you wrote a lot about that. Have we actually worked through all of those issues and we housing now on the right basis or not depends on the country, of course, in the US house prices in sort of value terms much more reasonable than they were before you still have the system whereby government agencies support the housing market, which you could argue is not very healthy in many other countries, including Britain, house prices very high out of the reach of many people. In that, again, pointing to the political dissatisfaction is a factor. I think more generally assets in total are very highly value. If you had fallen asleep in two thousand six woken up. Now you wouldn't believe that being. Crisis because stock markets a high to low property. Prices are pretty high. It's been in the real economy that the damage of this crisis has been seen in the fact that people's incomes haven't grown significantly and that led to many of the political consequences of the crisis. So yes, where I have some middle ground with Thome is that we did stabilize the system because I think we had to, but we did a lot more for the markets than we did for main street at seemed remember you racing special report on the euro and the eurozone at what a couple of years after Lehman Brothers. That still just an another own going unanswered. Question agrees tottered about seventeen times. You know, then it moves on to somewhere else. We have Brexit is this piece of endless crisis or endless uncertainty of euro produce stabilizing again, I don't think is end of this crisis, but I do think that some of the fundamental issues the reliance of banks on government bonds and banking systems potentially needing to be bailed out by government, sue than borough reducing the value of the bonds, reducing the strength of the Bank that doom loop still exists. And I think what's been revealed in the crisis is that governments. European governments are only prepared to go so far and only when a gun is hell to their heads, which means that I think we can expect to see today's vulnerabilities remain unfixed until the next crisis tests them on. My worry given that Greece's smaller Konomi the my worry. Yeah, looking at how hard it was to cope with Greece is the next time. It won't be a smaller conham. It'll be Italy or something like that, which is a whole order of magnitude harder to cope with an an, I would say at the moment actually impossible to cope with and so that vulnerability hangs over the EU system and feeble attempts to deal with it. The continuing austerity failure to reform is happening against a backdrop of eighty nation of some countries and feeling that the us not working everybody tell me where on Wall Street ten years ago, but you are now what's the mood there people think that it's all fine or are we waiting for the next crisis with that issue of whether things have really been resolved? Huge issue. I mean, we've gone from one system where we had all these products have mentioned people really understand they existed or where they came from to another world where we have, you know, kind of grimmer set of banks, but they're supervised ways that nobody really understands. By models that people really don't understand which was actually true during the financial crisis as well and to make any sort of progress. As we've said before, you probably need very large crisis again, generally would be delighted by high prices and their high prices, the markets and their high prices back in property. In fact, we're pretty close to the property peaks that we were at before, and you have to really think about whether that's a virtue and whether that's a true recovery or that slightly frightening. As we mentioned, the housing agencies support the stuff are still around in the low standards for borrowing three percent down payments on mortgages, for instance, or high low income ratio still exist, and we have these low interest rates, proper values that are really probably not sustainable. Interest rates. This was meant to be a temporary measure, but it just never seems like it's going to go..

Lehman Brothers Greece US producer Brexit Britain Thome Italy EU eurozone three percent ten years
"lehman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"But tarp didn't come until October, which was, of course, after leaving, the third way was temporary loans. But there you've got to have a company which is fundamentally viable. Just short liquidity and Leman was not viable. So that strategy didn't work. So we didn't really have. It wasn't a choice. We didn't have tools to prevent the failure Barney said to Ben. And to me when it went up to see him, he said, we can't get you the emergency. Authority unless you come to congress and scream and yell and say, if we don't get it, lemans gonna fail, we're going to have a disaster. Maybe even then we can't. Of course, if we did that Lehman would have gone down the next day. Do you think it took to get you guys tarp? Is that do you think that is true. Well, that's a gross that's over simplification. But I will say this about Lehman weekend to put it in perspective. We had three institutions going down at the same time. We had Lehman a, I g. and we had Merrill Lynch. Okay. Now it turns out we had one buyer, so we're unhappy. We're having trouble getting be of aid by Lehman, but I tell you be of a had bought Lehman and they wouldn't have bought Merrill Lynch, and there would have been a bigger failure would have been worse. One thing to Leeman shock dead was energized system politically. That was what it ended up taking for us to get these emergency thirties to let us to recapitalize the whole financial system in the catastrophe. So as bad as lame, it wasn't. It was terrible. You know there, this was not the worst alternative. We avoided worse, alternate. Let's make I'm quoting you and politics in the markets. Go head to head the markets win. Who am I. We all believe it. I, I, I used that quote in the book, but we, we all knew it and we, we're watching it. So we weren't trying to convince ourselves. But the other thing which we've all said is it takes a crisis to get congress to act. Sharp beard listeners, and there were many of you when this aired originally back in March. We'll have noticed that I never did get back to the actual first question I was talking about why nobody went to jail a. Yes, I know. Thank you. I've been spoken to about that be. We're working on that story and see you can hear the entire interview with Hank Paulson Ben banenky and Tim Geithner and a special podcast that we put in the marketplace feed, or you can get it and marketplace..

Lehman Merrill Lynch tarp Hank Paulson Ben banenky Barney Leman Leeman Tim Geithner
"lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"Five cents a share. Wall Street's worst day since nine eleven the Dow plunging more than five hundred points the SMP down almost five percents the wreckage on precipated. Ops on Wall Street today, bankrupt. It was an historic day with Wall Street shake into its very foundation today. And even the health of the most trusted firms are now being called into question. Yes. This was the day September the fifteenth, two thousand and eight when Lehman Brothers, the major US investment Bank collapsed loudly because of its huge exposure to a sliding US housing market. It was a calamitous event triggering a series of other failures or near failures, symptomatic of weaknesses across the western banking system. No one it seems was immune from the crash that followed the has not been crisis as dangerous as September. Two thousand and eight looked ever before in the history of capitalism. Full stop ever. It's it was much much more dramatic than any moment in one thousand nine hundred nine hundred thirty three because it was all of the big banks symbol Tena on a huge scale on a timescale of ours. So like a runaway chain reaction in Ikeda pile. We've seen some bad ones say fine, but this is far worse than shown a bowl of Fukushima where any of those things. The words there of Adam twos, he's professor of history, Columbia University in New York City. He's now also the author of a huge all-encompassing study of the financial crisis crashed. How a decade of financial crisis changed. The world is its title today. In this program, I'm going to be describing in the broadest terms what the legacy is with professor twos. He argues the lessons in reverberations of two thousand and eight a still even today defining much of our modern political and economic life in Europe. The impact of the crisis is still felt extremely widely, particularly across the euro-zone, the changes and damage and losses suffered by citizens taxpayers working people across Europe are long lasting in their Fets in the United States. You'd have to say that there's sort of triple movement. On the one hand, we have financial markets which have recovered rather well since two thousand nine under the stimulus of QE we have. A large part of the American population which is not being polluted in that recovery, and we have a political system both on the left underwrite which is showing really unprecedented fracturing of the previous duopoly of the Democratic Party and the Republican party. So the rise of populist politicians, and we talked about them in Europe and America, Donald Trump Brexit, and indeed other parties across Europe. They are a symptom, a direct symptom of the financial crisis. In the case of the United States, particularly clear that the tea party gets. It started in two thousand nine is a protest movement, not against the bailouts, but as a protest against the very idea of assisting other homeowners, it's the feckless mortgage bore next door that they will not person to stew in their own juice and suffer the consequences of their bad decisions. Occupy the origin of Bernie Sanders is phenomenal. Run for the democratic nomination, fifteen sixteen lodged in the fall of twenty eleven symbolically on the park immediately by Wall Street. It's a direct challenge in that case to Obama and the centrist part of the democratic. Party that had managed the stabilization effort. So in the United States particularly clear that this poodle is -ation of politics. I think that's a better way of thinking of it than talk just generally about populism the fragmenting of the deal, which center liberal cetera left parties and center right parties done respectively since the nineteen eight thousand nine hundred ninety s that can be directly traced back to those first couple of years after the financial crisis..

US Europe Republican party Democratic Party Lehman Brothers Ikeda pile Obama Bernie Sanders professor Columbia University New York City Donald Trump Brexit professor of history Adam Fets
"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"The story of the rise in fool of Lehman? What I think what's as we said it takes much longer perspective, which is really interesting because mostly when we think about Lehman Brothers, we think about those books. As we think about those people, we think about evil. We think about about on it goes right right back and it gives you a much because of its own it traces this epic story which you don't expect, and it also tell the story has. Of good which you don't expect. And I think as a play, it's a brilliant piece of theatrical storytelling. Just to go back, we should say that these, these are three brothers who kind of went off to the other emigrate from Bavaria Jewish brothers and of setup. A fabric show up in Alabama. Yes, exactly. So it starts in these sort of deserted Lehman Brothers building. And then in walks, Henry Lehmann followed by his brothers and they kind of create in front of you in that building little tiny shop. They started in Montgomery, Alabama, selling fabric. Then they move onto the Bank and they just you gradually see the whole story. But what's remarkable about it is it style they don't just do dilute. They knew right all the way through. So for instance, Henry Leeman will say, Henry goes to the door and opens the door, that sort of thing. And it's it's a way of driving it forward. So you can get across these hundred and fifty years of history really fast. You just go, hey, we are now in New York and here we on, but it also gives this sort of saga like fail. I think it's like an oral poem. It's going to lease rhythms running through it. I mean, not in itself is remarkable when I first read it, I, how are they gonna. To pull this off on the way they put it off is brilliant stroke. I think of Sam Mendes of just three actors do the whole thing. So the three brothers, Simon Rubio, Ben miles and godly or onstage through the whole thing. And they tell the whole story. So they become all the descendants, all the supernumeraries, all the other people, and they also create the world's so with the boxes that people are going to put their stuff in when they leave the morning of the crash, they create New York City. They create carriages, they create pianos so it up -solutely relies on the inventiveness is not a conventional play at all. I would work in another medium so well, but is in on an inherently flawed piece of storytelling. I was wondering whether this would be an interesting play, weren't a true story. No, playwright I think would ever construct a family saga covering one hundred fifty years. As he say where the last family member to be of any relevant dies at least forty years before the end of the play, we lose interest in the family. Sure. Early and it's well, are we not then actually dealing with completely different company. The point I mean, I would have believed, but then I mean it's equivalent. Surely of MacBeth died halfway in the middle of three ties quite early on in the political, and that's a fluid play tissue. No, absolutely. And I actually think that there is a drawback to the place of how that it starts to wear thin. I think the style, unless you got to to the sixties seventies and we move into trading, we moved further away from the original story that sort of speeds up. And again, it begins to feel kind of skimpy and thin and pull and despite their brilliance, I think you do feel and you begin to miss the drama of real close emotional engagement. But overall, I think is really, and I think that that is source of appropriate. That's where things started to go wrong. I mean, people do argue that the problem with the investment banks was they stopped being partnerships and people stopped being engaged, and they became simply in rent rentiers who siphoned off money. And so in a way the disengagement does capture what went wrong and bring the interesting because it goes from this kind of family drama, and because you've just got these three characters and that plane, that descendants is a kind of visual family line on stage and you go from cotton, which we can imagine Tyrrell's railways, which we can imagine. Suddenly, if you don't know the financial world, you find yourself in this well, which is abstract and hard to picture..

Lehman Brothers building Lehman Brothers Alabama Bavaria Jewish brothers Lehman Tyrrell Henry Lehmann Henry Leeman Sam Mendes New York Montgomery New York City Simon Rubio Henry Ben miles one hundred fifty years fifty years forty years
"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"You then take the mortgages and you squash him together, slice and dice them and sell out slices to other people. But in the late two, thousands people stopped paying back and Liman had done this slicing and dicing and failed to sell off all the pieces. And so when people lost faith that these things were worth any money, they lost faith. Lehman Brothers had any money. Lehman Brothers was not a traditional Bank despite the fact we call it a Bank. It didn't have deposits. It didn't have access to what's known as the Federal Reserve discount window which is emergency money. So. When people lost faith in it, it had nowhere to turn. And so the US government decided not to open the discount window to it and said, go bust. And so when it went bust, it basically took down or would have taken down the entire financial system with it. But it is seen as sort of the final straw that just sent the world into economic tailspin in September. Two thousand and eight is very complex, but also does an inherent drama and you can see why it might have appealed to the theater makers here. Do you think that the play rap was with this complexity? Not at all. It's a play which you could like for lots of other reasons. The play never actually gets to residential mortgage backed securities. The last thing you hear about is somewhere in the sixties and seventies Liman is getting into trading trading is perfectly valid and had nothing to do with what brought down Lehman. I mean, does it in any way, showing new light on the collapse and the kind of the crisis that followed. It reminds you that behind this company that has become a synonym. For evil were people who had worked hard and spent their whole lives building something, and that it wasn't an inherently evil structure. And I think that's worth remembering because investment banking and banking have been so torn ish and people lose side effect that they actually do good in the world. We have banks for a reason in that it is good. It doesn't tell us anything really about the financial crisis does. It don't remain to Cise capitalism. Yeah, I suppose it doesn't mean you see these immigrants arrive and they build something and we are told fundamentally that they're making things happen and helping America grow. But that's actually true. And I think actually to be fair to as they get into riskier things, the thing they refer to as trading, you get the sense that something bad is starting to happen. So I think actually it's not completely unfair Hof way through when Philip says, the flower of all cake is is not money. It's no longer just investing in cotton. Is that not a moment when it becomes it starts coming. Some dock at the doesn't seem if. Money is not inherently sinister. Obviously, you're talking to someone who's covered the banking industry for many years, financialisation and money just to make money is bad, but an awful lot of what they were doing, especially at that moment which was helping people bring money together and then lend it back out again. So you can make functional economy is still necessary. So there is this reference to something has gone bad and they've lost sight of the that banks should serve society as opposed to banks just making money. On the other hand, the thing they were actually doing again at that moment wasn't such a bad thing and Sarah thinking about this as a welcome theater, does it work in the way that it tells.

Lehman Brothers Liman Federal Reserve Lehman US Philip Sarah America
"lehman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lehman go down after the bear rescue then and i went and talked with barney frank at the house financial services committee we went up there and we said you know we we learn something barney we don't have the emergency powers in our regulatory system the dealing with a failing nonbank which is fundamentally viable and just short liquidity and leman was not viable so that strategy didn't work so we didn't really have it wasn't a choice we didn't have tools to prevent the failure barney said to ban and to me when we went up to sam he said we can't get you the emergency loan authority unless you come to congress and scream and yell and say if we don't get it lemans gonna fail and we're going to have a disaster maybe even then we can't of course if we did that lehman would have gone down the next day well that's the gross oversimplification but i will say this about lehman weekend to put it in perspective we had three institutions going down at the same time we had lehman a i g and we had merrill lynch.

Lehman barney frank merrill lynch
"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Lives alive with robin lehman lavin robin lehman liwen robin all right all right everyone you got robin land keeping the lives live i am in the studio right now with tony benefit with the sneak peek at his upcoming show tony tony tony tony benefit what you do humira by your door in our your door grade you're paranoid dubbed ordered armed ruined injured material before you europe bird growing mark breaker garnier a loaded wow wow so what does he do it up in california now la us angeles which deal in which you got going on worried or shower here at the moment with uh with a promoter friend of mine and uh ms fatty course was uh we're we're out here in the pavement promoting this big show i got coming up at original mike in santa ana california this thursday february first okay hi patricia i'm good it's still good to have you guys unmanned you guys is moving and shaking you got tony tony benefited international now there could be take it all the way up now i know that's right now a winner is the event at and what time does it star where can we get tickets okay rear very original ex uh downtown santa ana california in that it starts at eight o'clock pm and uh there's no need to purchase tickets you can um pay it does five dollars at the door and uh we got special guest wichi west ford waiver click on side and we also got king david james out of phoenix arizona's though is going to be a great show we're gonna put it down santa and and that's original mike's santa ana california.

california mike santa ana california tony tony phoenix arizona robin lehman patricia ford david james five dollars
"lehman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Lives alive with robin lehman lavin robin lehman liwen robin all right all right everyone you got robin land keeping the lives live i am in the studio right now with tony benefit with the sneak peek at his upcoming show tony tony tony tony benefit what you do humira by your door in our your door grade you're paranoid dubbed ordered armed ruined or material before you you're europe bird growing mark breaker garnier a loaded wow wow so what does he do it up in california now la us angeles which deal in which you got going on worried or shower here at the moment with uh with a promoter friend of mine and uh ms fatty course was uh we're we're out here in the pavement promoting this big show i got coming up at original mike in santa ana california this thursday february first okay hi patricia i'm good it's still good to have you guys unmanned you guys is moving and shaking you got tony tony benefited international now there could be take it all the way up now i know that's right now a winner is the event at and what time does it star where can we get tickets okay rear very original ex uh downtown santa ana california in that it starts at eight o'clock pm and uh there's no need to purchase tickets you can um pay it does five dollars at the door and uh we got special guest wichi west ford waiver click on side and we also got king david james out of phoenix arizona's though is going to be a great show we're gonna put it down santa and and that's original mike's santa ana california.

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"lehman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"Some of the great speed flooring see the blue apron lehman on the sidewalk little music from lfm stage though so although go in the doors there for the screen in a from the floor some banks the world and mom some of the again the days williams in the room alone by the end they in her and not com burma okay see this in lutherans feel the arms of bringing down the whole will leave in the new england the dinghy withdrew the dance the newly mooney the paints my of the jazz moon inau the music news sports and more energy yourself on the here on live two on your smartphone.

lehman
"lehman" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Better question number six what habit or quality do you think has contributed most to your success um well they tell me i'm easy to talk to people tell me stuff so i think that's the biggest thing people feel comfortable telling me things and i guess because they think i'm going to present it in the way that they feel comfortable with i guess that's that's probably the thing that's worked out the best for me right and a lot of people know if their story is going to be told any way than they might as well be in on it and tell her i someone they bet rust which yeah number 7 what's the thing about yourself you'd most liked to improve i wish i didn't swear so much i hate that i do yeah that's that's like number one because i did it today and i was like going up to the coroner's slipped anyway uh but you know bleep did he believe that i'm wearing this woman was walking by and i'm like uh oh that's unfortunate yeah yeah i hate that abide that way when i swear lehman in my mom blame our business but that's probably not fair yeah i can't blame the business 'cause i do radio every day so if anyone should stops wearing it should we meet just to make it easier not to do it on the air but i don't unilaterally is usually it's for emphasis no no i've i actually i accidentally said the s word once because i was trying to say that bleep crazy instead i said bat bleep insane so i change the wrong word okay but fun i was leading but i james the wrong one night i don't really think i've ever sworn on live television or anything like that which is why i should be able to do it in my own home ray yeah yeah the lesser i think if i stopped right it would be it would make sure it was less likely to happen on the air if i did it less in general but a submarine really need a good wellplaced f bomb it's implant terrible and finally i i've kid and they they're like where and it's my fault.

lehman
"lehman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We have jellyfish with these awesome umbrella slowly props ano we've got northern lights the gold miners anger health melinda mc adams is the director with a shock of bright pink running through her gray hair she's also parsons mom i have a drawing above my desk made when he was probably like a kindergardner that said st thing isn't double fun and so are you and make adams has no problem breaking the rules of ballet to keep the material fresh instead of whisking maria way to the land of sweets the nutcracker takes or to the far away kingdom of alaska enact too there's a kerfuffle of cruiseship passengers a waltz of the state flower forget me knocks and a slime line where tap dancers and rubber boots process fish to a beats imperative that's an extent the audience recognizes their lives in its they're like you should do the spanish dance with crabs because their little snap her hands will be like the cast in advance so we've done it that way ever since and the biggest two two of the night is worn by a crusty old fisherman on stilts played by dawn lehman he made a snap decision to take ballet classes in his forties as he neared the summit of denali highest peak in north america and in a flash too much to what i should take instead of mother ginger lehman plays father herring his torso is a fishing boats and his enormous hoop dress represents the blue ocean the youngest dancers in the studio swim out from beneath him dressed as herring he's unable to catch at 65 lehman has watched generations of herring dancers grow into ballerinas he fought back tears and said he was sad to be taking his final spread watching approach gf lehman calls it the best nutcracker per capita anyway for npr news i'm emily kwong in sitca alaska the.

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"lehman" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

WSJ MoneyBeat

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

"So how i find it fascinating were so you were working for lehman brothers you saw this big storm coming that one year later would would swallow up lehman brothers what happened in the time between when you started to see this happening and september twenty two thousand an eight when lehman brothers declared bankruptcy you know i think though the one thing we should make sure to understand is that we know what brought leman down uh in many ways were some of the same issues that we saw uh unfolding an inkwon equity um the the excess use of leverage the evaporation of liquidity um uh and and you know kind of originating in fixed income um but they were completely different issues uh from what actually happened in quantitative equity fund this and i think the kind of you know i just wanna make sure that everyone understands that kwon equity managers who hunting strategies where no way responsible um for uh the demise of uh of lehman brothers uh i i i was not trying to go there that's not that's not at all what i was trying to push you went to saying so um i just wanna make that very good uh for for for a number of us and i think the problems that we saw a at leman um you know were up around liquidity um and and and were about the uh you know willingness of management to um grappled with those issues in understand them um and and and and how how you respond in a situation where you were you have a lot of that uh kind of going on um what what is almost kind of taboo to say in these these days um is that lien was a great firm.

lehman brothers one year
"lehman" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on 1A

"Lehman he decided to take the blame in a way to show loyalty test to presidenttrump that he could be trusted and then now trump is sort of entrusted kelly to kind of help with some of this and be able to tell those frontline agents whether it's tsa or ice or whatever migrations and customsenforcementwe how to implement this this out as it goes along so that's part of it i think the other part of it was that that was so sudden that people had already made plans people ready heading to the unitedstates there's been something of a chilling effect from some of those countries now where you have people who are saying that they just don't no that there such uncertainty that they've cancelled their plans or they've decided not to try to come to the unitedstates well the rules the band certainly are complicated the state of hawaii which has been protesting various it rations of donaldtrump's ban on every step of the way reclaim requested clarification before it went to affect yesterday in one a we heard from robbiechowdhry whose an attorney and national security fellow at the new newamericafoundation she raised concerns about implementation of the ban and you're imagine this you have a visa you've gone to the process we already have easing entry the country arrive at the airport having bypass like all the different measures you have to all these statuary require men's and now you've got an officer right there at the border saying show me your bona fide relationships how does the person prove that than that person probably has wrapped up their business back home maybe they've sold her house they've nothing about.

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"lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"Trigger uh in the financial crisis when they let lehman brothers fail uh most of the other uh markets were scared for our fiji i would think that yes term of art the guy acts i'll just make the quickly i would say that the the matter of a socalled systemically important institutions and the matter of um sorted this digital digitalization of banking those are two different issues and that the systemically important institutions like those were just as in systemic in 1930 three at the bottom of the great depression as they were uh in two thousand eight when lehman brothers a blew up in i think it was in in september that like we really want to i think of when we're thinking about this esthetically important situtions is you know the in the room which is the fed but we are starting to take it met direction yet that's not were you guys one take a bullet so i would actually pushback a little bit on bat lake become regardless of the armed with this sort of distribution of the sizes of institutions and can of what that craft structure looks like if you have on use of deary a low leading see communication on that ends up giving you a lot of returns to scale on even even see things her like okay barriers to entry are very low on so you have like a lot of a.

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