35 Burst results for "Leeson"

Vasilevskiy, Cirelli help Lightning end Capitals' streak

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 10 months ago

Vasilevskiy, Cirelli help Lightning end Capitals' streak

"The lightning offended the capital's their first regulation loss of the season the gaps were five oh one three and to Andrei Vasile Leschi stopped thirty one shots in the lightning's three two victory against Washington Anthony Sorell we had a goal and two assists for the balls who also stopped out so that you can see eight game point streak Tampa Bay also got goals from Alex killorn Brayden point Brett Leeson scored his first NHL goal and Conor Sheary also tallied for the capital's juries power play goal got the caps within three two with eight twenty two left on the ferry

Andrei Vasile Leschi Anthony Sorell Alex Killorn Brayden Brett Leeson Conor Sheary Washington Tampa Bay NHL
Here Are Charlie Kirk’s Favorite Scriptures in the Entire Bible

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Here Are Charlie Kirk’s Favorite Scriptures in the Entire Bible

"One of my favorite scriptures in the entire bible is when jesus says and it was kind of a mic drop moment the bible says do not put your lord your gods at the test my favorite pieces of scripture. Satan hates to books more than any other books of the bible. More than its genesis and revelation. Why because genesis tells us nature and revelers revelation tells you how it's going to end satan getting thrown into the pit of fire. All of us must realize that as you get into this fight that you're gonna come across doubt cynicism all of a sudden deaths in yourself all of you are prone targets for satan to try to come after you. I don't talk too much on this. But i could just riff on a little bit more three ways that satan and tries to attack you through your environment the earthly vows and through certain flesh. Leeson's your environment who you hanging around or you're on people that are filled with the spirit optimism that actually wanna to pursue righteousness or people that are negative. People are worried about earthly and worldly things. You are the combination of the people you spend the most time with the five people you spend the most time with. That is who you are number two earthly vows. Jesus says very clearly that you do not make vows let your yes. Be yes in your. Nobody knows why is because if you try to make a valid i will never drink again all of a sudden satan knows exactly what is against you. What's the proper way to say it. Only thanks to the grace and mercy and power of jesus. Christ will never take another drink again. Let jesus fight the spiritual war for you. And then finally flush flash and sends it says varies a now call called satan. It's theologians are divided on this. The god of this world. Jesus never said that he said that satan is the prince of this world that we are in enemy occupied territory and guess what we have to launch a sabotage campaign against. Satan's dominance here in this world. What does that look like being salt and light and it says in romans to love what is good and hate what is evil and so i love all those verses by my favorite of all of it is in the book of titus from that mr jude. Book of jude. Where even the archangel michael himself when he goes to fight satan himself you know what he says lord rebuke you.

Jesus Satan Leeson Mr Jude Archangel Michael
"leeson" Discussed on Hack

Hack

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Hack

"This is an abc podcast. News has generally been pretty depressing the last year and a half but this week has been especially bad the ipc say report and climate change was anxiety induced. That extreme weather will get worse unless governments do something more of the countries in lockdown. And we're seeing privileges rolling out the vaccinated paypal. Hello avenue he on this episode. We're gonna hear triple j. Leeson is in youngest stylings about how they're feeling about this what they do to get through it all and lift spirits because apparently gardening is a thing. Here's what's coming.

abc Leeson paypal
"leeson" Discussed on Journey to Wherever

Journey to Wherever

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Journey to Wherever

"That's also a also one as well. The fact i think for a while it was also one of our top trending episodes. As far as a number of leeson's end up to episode. Eight was also out longest episode at one hour. Sixteen minutes and a whopping thirty nine fat seconds we go we dug through in just like a like a a what are they called a An aunt mind mount. Whatever the cold like just multiple tantalized as flew out of everywhere and just latched onto that episode of what we'd of What we Divulge is about and it was met with a lot of comments mandate Meet me midway production executive choice now. I know we armed called probably about thirty minutes. Depressed time now. Then let's go. Let's go now the tall okay. Good i'm having fun. twelve twelve. Do this leads onto the next question. Which was episode on when we launched on the twenty fifth november and underneath people have called. I'm dropping these dates because we'll crowd consistent with their week to week episodes and we haven't missed a beat. Not one single episode nearing episode. One hundred episode non was do lot coaches at any value. And i think this was off the back of a a a new guest Mental ship conned of coaching role. That you taking on board with of somebody that you a mentoring and wanted to come back to the podcast. Engage alcohol on ask. The audience veteran life coaches at any value. Wow far out this is this seems ages ago yes so to split that up so i was kind of like i'm hearing about whether this invitation to be someone's mental and we were. We were trying to break down in. What's the mental. What's a life coach. And i was adamant that i did not want to accept any money for my time for this that i wanted to mental because i feel being mental was just like a bit more of a.

leeson
"leeson" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Emphasize your age limit. You expand it so. I think that you can create. You can make a day for like a year. Someone sometimes okay. I'm trying to get. I want to know how long. How long should we be waiting. Yes exactly as long as you can wait really the more that i've learned as long as you can wait to figure out the values and vision are aligns very interesting so yes me. This couple. years ago. I'd be like a few weeks a month. Here's you know. So there's something interesting here and i wanna get your take on this so with my wife i was just trying to get laid. Yes that's it hot chick here. We go all present and in fairness quite frankly she was also just looking. She calls it a fling in. It's interesting that she uses that word because she wanted the emotional like flare up of like this pot american guy in like best her words by the way not mine and you know i'm going to have this story to tell that's what it was all about for her and so she was down to just how fun. Yeah and so. That's that was the initial gravitational center that we went around and so that gave us the time to get to know each other and all of that now her dad when i went to ask for his blessing to marry his daughter he was like. Don't do it. you guys don't have shared values. we did he just. He can only see cultural values and from that perspective. It was very much night and day. Yes but leeson is so we do a show called relationship theory together. Which is an amazing people. Need to watch watching. That is extraordinarily kindness. And one thing we talk about their as collision of values is the most dangerous thing between a couple not having shared values not realizing that you have a collision values because once you know what it is. You can negotiate. Ask but if you can't say this is what i think. This is what you think. So steel man each other's argument and the most generous way possible and then it's like okay. I really do understand you. I still think you're crazy. But i do understand right. So now we know. We have a collision of values. And so it's like. What do you do to navigate that. So is your strategy now. Just look for people. Where there's enough alignment or do you think that. There's a way to negotiate around values. I'm in a couple of months not in a relationship. But what. I'm feeling in this time. Is that the reason. I said as long as you can wait. That might be like a couple of weeks. Might be a month two months. It doesn't have to be like you have to wait. You're married or censor You know especially if you're a sexually different person like we are you know it's it may not be that fun. Wait that long. But i always believed that delayed. Gratification is the best and that that chemistry will actually be stronger with the more you wait the longer you wait even if a few days. Wait a little bit longer. It's like the anticipation. But it's really trying to listen to the values you can. I ask you know in the future. I could be asking directly or indirectly. Just the lacey okay. What are their values. And this is a sexual chemistry connection to have this person or is also like some shared values. it's got to be sung and assam shared vision and the vision like what. What kind of vision the vision for the relationship. The vision for what is our live cut. It looked like in the future and the big vision guy like roles. Or what are we trying to. What is our mission. As a relationship shared together aired visions. Don't you bust that out. 'cause like early in the data is doing early. You probably wouldn't do it early..

leeson
"leeson" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Six fifty range was not sufficient enough for many practices in the metro areas. The banks that realized that were able to go to their leadership and advocate for their You know clients like myself that hey we have people who are interested who can make the numbers work at the end of the day. But they need more capital in order to start their business in For the leaderships that listen you know it. Worked out for us for the clients and then for the other ones. The metro areas may not be a priority for them because they're based on the non metro areas. Yeah gotcha okay. Okay so then you decided to go with which bank so a we went with citizens for our lung. I kinda wanna go back to like where this discussion started next. His we started with the concept of how to finance the project all the stuff rape so now we got this money from citizens next is construction costs rate. That is took over fifty percent of our budget right. They're just getting the place fitted out. What was really cool that we learned about was we got a what they call a dark shell. In the construction business no floors no walls. Nothing not even h system. The electrical was like wires. Coming out of the ground in the plumbing was like a few like tapped off hypes in the back of the building. Dark shell so. We constructed our practice from that into a fully operational three operate offertory practice fitted for up to seven off upper tories. Gotcha okay so right now. Right now i now. Currently it's still three plumbed or so. We went from three and we added one opportunity this year. So we're slowly growing into the space but l. Take us a few years. But you know just getting that extra one in there is helping allot alleviate. Some of the pressure. Yeah gotcha okay. So then run back at the construction. That's going on right now. Fifty percent of your loan went to that. Did you guys expect that. Was that already budgeted or were you more like. Oh my gosh. This is what's happening so in terms of like mentality in psychology. Everything that we were doing. We were kids in a playground. Going there for the first time we knew nothing absolutely nothing and the thing is this is where i was advocating for your team of advisors right. We had somebody that was looking at the real estate end of it. Right we lawyer. We had a In real estate specialist rate. Those guys helped us age. What was normal for the market. What to expect from a real estate deal from the leeson in in terms of construction cost..

leeson
Lost Women of Panama: Lisanne Froon and Kris Kremers

Unexplained Mysteries

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Lost Women of Panama: Lisanne Froon and Kris Kremers

"In two thousand fourteen twenty one year old chris kramer's and twenty two year old niece and froun leave in amersfoort netherlands. Shortly after graduating from university. The friends became roommates and co workers. They work together at a nearby cafe as they saved money to go in their dream trip a six week adventure in panama tall and athletic leeson was an experienced mountaineer an amateur photographer. She was interested in exploring panama's lush jungles and beautiful landscapes. More outgoing than li san. Chris apparently wanted to immerse herself in the local culture by meeting new and interesting people half a world away in addition to relaxing and exploring. Both young women planned to do some good during their trip. They arranged a volunteer with children at a local school during their stay on march fifteenth. Two thousand fourteen lee san and chris had bought their tickets booked their hostels and set off or boca. Del toro panama getting to their destination wasn't easy between flights and layovers their journey from amsterdam to costa rica took almost twenty hours from costa rica. They took a taxi and navigated the local bus system to get to the panamanian border. Finally they hopped aboard a ferry and sailed into boca. Del toro on march seventeenth. Though their journey was a hassle. The first two weeks of their trip felt like heaven. Boca's del toro's sat on a small island off panama's east coast surrounded by the crystal blue caribbean sea. It was paradise complete with sun sand and good company. Both lee san and. Chris kept diaries during their trip. Which is how we know about how they spent much of their time. Rather than following strict schedules the two women lingered at meals with fellow tourists and enjoyed the flow of panamanian life. Lee san wrote that they mostly spent their days learning spanish. Though it was difficult lease and felt thrilled every time she recognized a word in conversation.

Chris Kramer Panama Lee San Li San Amersfoort Del Toro Panama Leeson Boca Rica Netherlands Chris Crystal Blue Caribbean Sea Del Toro Amsterdam Costa East Coast
What we know about Tiger Woods' crash, condition and what happens next

ESPN Daily

05:00 min | 1 year ago

What we know about Tiger Woods' crash, condition and what happens next

"Thank you so much for joining me tonight hush. I wasn't pablo so ramona. You have just spent many hours right outside. The hospital where tiger woods is being treated. What was the scene like where you word it you know. It's it's weird you go stand outside. Hospital in the middle of a pandemic is a lot of stuff going on right. And there's a lot of news trucks helicopters everywhere. You know mostly news helicopters hitting a lot of a lot of reporters but i was just. I was out of the hospital. But i was mostly just working the phones all day. And it's you know it's pretty sickening. Pablo it's know as a reporter you you go and you cover something like this and each one of them kinda hits you right because it it speaks to the fragility of it. I'm i'll tell you one man who was a locally said you know he knows somebody who died on that road in that same spot similar area when a coyote jumped out in front of their car swerved and he was just a really dangerous patch road so ramone. I want a time stamp this for the listener right now because it is ten twenty one. Pm eastern time is therefore seven twenty one pm out where you are in l. a. What's the latest right now. What's the latest information that you've received from authorities from medical sources from anyone from tigers camp. Well you know. Tigers camps dot pocket a lot more than the initial statement. But what my understanding was that he had he had his some of his camp was with him. And when i was. When i was there at the hospital just just an hour ago which would have been about. Six o'clock i think is when i left pacific time. My understanding is he was still there. He was either still in surgery or just finished. You know it's kind of hard to get a minute by minute. There's nobody coming outside the update the reporters kinda have to be be be working phone to get information and you know they. They you know the people. I had spoken to said the most important thing. Is that you stabilize these injuries. And you wouldn't wanna move somebody to another hospital. How if they moved them. They'd probably move him to ucla westwood. Which is another world class hospital. And that's probably a little easier to control the scene there. He probably get a private room there. You could probably if he's going to be there for a long time. And and i think this is going to be a a a lengthy stay in the hospital This is the kind of thing that you've gotta you've got to take your time and and You wanna be comfortable and it probably going to be multiple surgeries So to me it's a really it's it's this is going to be unfolding over the next few days and weeks not hours so on those surgeries and about what's required year. It has been reported ramona. That there's a compound leg fracture a shattered ankle. But what do you know. What's the latest about tigers medical status. How serious is all of this. He he he has. He basically had crush injuries. That's putting you you look at the car k. Cars crushed the front of the car so his legs were in the front of the car. one of them is a is a basically shattered ankle. It's the tallus bone. The other is the is a compound fracture of the fibula tibia Sorry that's shinbone. Basically but there's also a vascular component and that's your circulation. That's your that's just your blood vessels that had been really severely impacted the nerves. That's actually a little more dangerous even more dangerous part of this of these injuries that they have to stabilize first before they ever even think about. Okay let's get him walk in or anything like that you just. You've gotta get him stable. It's very it's a very dangerous thing. And then there's then there's issues post up post operative complications of leeson's like this if it's if that was actually open i don't i don't know if it was open i've heard that but we'll wait for the official medical On that but if it was opened infection issues blood clot. There's a lot of post operative conditions that you'd have to look at and work on. And i think that's you know everybody i've talked to whether it's you know in the gulf war all the medical world just in l. a. Because everybody in la is is talking about this today. It's all just concerned for tiger woods. The man not tiger woods golfer as for the

Ramona Tigers Camp Pablo Tigers Ucla Leeson LA
Expand for the sake of Others with Jerome Maldonado

The HeFluence Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Expand for the sake of Others with Jerome Maldonado

"Guys. Welcome to another session of the heap wounds. Podcast it's actually a really nice day here in central florida and my my guest is. It's early for him And and and we were just laughing and talking about that a little bit in and actually it's really funny. I've known jerome for a long time. Right i remember. We met thrive for the first time. We were sitting across the aisle from each other in the vip section. And we just. I just have followed him ever since and and i'll be honest with you. I don't follow a lot of people on social media right and I just i just love. He's a man of integrity. he's a father he's a husband. He's a man of god he what's really good about who he is is the epitome of people that i want to have in my life and and i would say One of the things. I i like to do on my podcast. Is i like to encourage our guests and learn from them but encourage them to and we were just praying beforehand. And i believe that. I believe and i just wanna speak this over my brother be as we get started that i believe that the even though he's had massive success and everything that he does but i believe that god is going to use him to build the kingdom in a greater way in the in the years to come in and that he's going to you know he he's a he's a father. I watched how he interacts with his children. He's a great dad You know and and and the bible very clear about that it says when you raise your children in the ways of god when they they won't forget what department you and i know drome can say this too. We both married up. We have amazing spouses. That encourage us in in in in jerome has met leeson. You knows at lisa. Lisa is kind of You know in in the book of proverbs it talks about a virtuous godly woman. And i always say that. If if i whatever ever turn to proverbs thirty one. I see my wife's picture there. And i see my wife's picture there because she challenges me. She encourages me. She pushes me to be better. And so when. When i when i look at the people that i want to have on my podcast jerome. No is that person. He's you know. I it's really funny. He started in the direct sales industry back in the day. I read that about him. You know he and let me tell you something you learn a lot by being in that industry you you learn to not want things for people they don't want for themselves. You learn leadership skills. There's just a lot of things that you learn and so i dislike it that. He's he's an entrepreneur like he has multiple streams of income. Like i if if i used my dad's term for jerome. My dad would say jerome. Has his roofers card right like back in the eighties when you when you did all of these different things. My en- drum does trump doesn't even know this but my dad was a major construction forman for a large construction company whiting turner one of the largest construction companies in the world. And my dad was just a workaholic. He that's all he did like he would. He would leave it like five in the morning and he would come home at like nine o'clock at night and that's all he did and i think probably out of all the things that my dad is instilled in me. Drome is is that and i see that in you like he and when you think about real estate like he's he's he's a contractor. He's he's a he's likes to build he. He likes to invest he. It was really funny. I was he. He doesn't know this. So he's gonna figure this out now but i. I've been watching some of his videos because And those of you know our story we had somebody still about a half a million dollars from us in two thousand eighteen in two thousand nineteen and then at thrive. We won the monumental business. Award thrive in two thousand nineteen. And now things have started to shift back another direction. So we're i want to be able to learn from jerome in have multiple streams of income be involved in real estate. I was watching one of his videos yesterday. About how to invest without having any money and he's just brilliant like he's he it's really funny. He's gonna laugh so my podcast went live. Today was what daniel quack. Which i saw that you were you guys were just together. I think and and and i saw you visited with him. And so it's it's funny. How god works at out. You have to men of god back to back that are that are that are good friends and We we we we. We don't believe in coincidence. Jerome and so Drown welcome to the he phones. Podcast my friend. I love you. And i appreciate you so much and i'm glad that you're here with me today. Thank you so much really appreciate you having me and yet it's been it's been a few years i it's funny. How fast time flies you know. And i really appreciate everything that you're doing and I knew that. I respected with the first time i met you. Guys you guys were just incredible. People just by the The hands of how you acted and carried yourself from day one from the time i met you guys so i just feel blessed to be here in very very thankful for you having me as a guest today. And yeah sam. Sam clock was just here in albuquerque and he was grateful enough to come out and help me with some training obstacles that we were having with our with our office team and he spent two days down here with us. So we were in fact will be on the phone daniel here in about two hours from

Jerome Whiting Turner Leeson Florida Lisa Daniel Quack Sam Clock Albuquerque SAM Daniel
"leeson" Discussed on Talk Like a Leader

Talk Like a Leader

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Talk Like a Leader

"Doesn't help so let's not blame other people. Fourth deadly said continuing to blame others that also leads to another deadly which is trying to justify our behavior so we blame others unjustified ourselves and i'd say the justification is sort of like blames evil twin. They often go hand in hand. Ultimately blame is kind of a form of justification and justification leads to blame. It's something i said just a minute ago about saint. I yelled at you because you yielded me. I'm justifying the why i yelled blaming. You see how they go hand in hand so often is true that if you're blaming you're also justifying and if you're justifying you're probably blaming so trying to justify your behaviors rather than owning them. Sounds more like making an excuse even though what. We're trying to explain them. Honestly justifying your behavior by blaming someone else is a poor explanation. If i behave badly. I need to own and just move on. Doesn't matter what the person did or didn't do if i behave badly. It's my fault. I have control over my behaviors. So trying to justify. Our behaviors is the fifth that leeson the sixth deadly sin is refusing to apologize or giving a conditional apology. So you can either refuse to apologize completely or phrase the apology in a way that sort of conditional something like this. Well you know. I would apologize. If they would apologize they would stop doing. They would do blank. Whatever so we condition our apology on them. Doing something i and that's just a bad apology. Another sort of bad apology would be to apologize for how the other person feels which is kind of connected to trying to fix their emotions. While i'm sorry you feel that we all know you're not you're may be sorry you did. It did a certain thing. You may be sorry that you're in the situation you're in and part of that is because now that person's feelings are hurt. You're not sorry they feel that way. It doesn't help to apologize for another person's emotional state you don't own it you don't control it so don't apologize for only apologize for things that you can own and control that you can take responsibility for. I am sorry. I said that. I am sorry. I behave the way i am. Sorry i communicated that idea.

leeson
The Seven Deadly Sins of Conflict Resolution

Talk Like a Leader

05:27 min | 1 year ago

The Seven Deadly Sins of Conflict Resolution

"Are this guy harris. Welcome to the talk like leader. Podcast this week's episode titled the seven deadly sins of conflict resolution out. Frankly i'm using. The word sends a bit stronger than his probably legitimate from an actual. What the word send means but i think you get my point. These are basically things not to do. When you find yourself in a difficult or conflict situation. I find that it's better to focus on what to do. I also know that it's helpful to know what not to do. So that if you find yourself doing it you can recognize it and fixture behaviors. So let's talk about the seven deadly sins of conflict resolution. The first is continuing to talk about the past. I have a whole episode on focusing on the future. So won't go into the opposite of this too much. But i will say that one of the problems i see crop up. Many conflict resolution conversation conflict conversations difficult conversations is a heavy emphasis on what has already happened. Well we can't do anything about so let's move on again. Reiterating a point. I made in the focus on the future episode. I'm not saying you never talk about the past. I'm saying you don't want to continue talking about the past okay. Second deadly sin of conflict resolution trying to fix emotions. It's so common. That i i hear people talk about things like what you shouldn't feel that way or a wish. You didn't feel that way or any number of comments about the other person's emotion or frankly even your own and failing to recognize that emotions are primarily the result of how we interpret and respond to world. I don't really want to get into a deep. Psychological analysis of what emotions are not for our purposes for practical application purposes. I'm going to say that emotions are the result of how we interpret and respond to the world and while we can control our behaviors. We probably can't control our emotions. We can control perceptions we can control our interpretations and by that may be indirectly control our emotions but once an interpretation has made it probably triggers an emotion and we can control our behaviors so that we control. How does we can control how we interpret other people so we can exert some influence on her behaviors or excuse me some influence on our emotions that ultimately you can't really directly control emotions or fix them either for the other person or for yourself so while we can't control the motions. We can control our interpretations and our behaviors letter to focus on what you can fix president what you can't fix so trying to fix emotions secondly sent. The third deadly sin is rushing the conflict conversation which kind of flows from the prior con- conversation about fixing emotions. Let's be honest. Conflict resolution conflict conversations difficult conversations are full of emotion ellen. They're full of emotion. You just can't be in a hurry because you. You won't resolve the emotions. I'm gonna say fixed emotions. You won't resolve the emotional component of the conversation quickly. Molise not in most situations so if a conflict conversation has gone to the point where you need a focused and intentional conversation about the conflict. Probably there's enough emotional context at the probably won't get through quickly so plan enough time for the conversation. Don't try to have this conversation the three minutes before you walk out the door or the two minutes before a meeting carve out some dedicated time to talk about whatever conflict you have so you can give the appropriate time. The fourth deadly sin continuing to blame other people. Now we all have our moments when we want to blame other people for our behaviors and the idea here is basically. I'm saying i'm blaming someone else for my behavior. Same basically will high. Did this only because you did that. I yelled at you because you yelled at me. Okay that may actually be true. It's just not helpful. So focusing on the blame component rather than the responsibility component meaning. I own my own behaviors regardless of what the other person did continuing to blame. Others are behaviors does nothing but seed and feed the conflict. It doesn't help so let's not blame other people. Fourth deadly said continuing to blame others that also leads to another deadly which is trying to justify our behavior so we blame others unjustified ourselves and i'd say the justification is sort of like blames evil twin. They often go hand in hand. Ultimately blame is kind of a form of justification and justification leads to blame. It's something i said just a minute ago about saint. I yelled at you because you yielded me. I'm justifying the why i yelled blaming. You see how they go hand in hand so often is true that if you're blaming you're also justifying and if you're justifying you're probably blaming so trying to justify your behaviors rather than owning them. Sounds more like making an excuse even though what. We're trying to explain them. Honestly justifying your behavior by blaming someone else is a poor explanation. If i behave badly. I need to own and just move on. Doesn't matter what the person did or didn't do if i behave badly. It's my fault. I have control over my behaviors. So trying to justify. Our behaviors is the fifth that leeson

Molise Harris Ellen Leeson
"leeson" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Fully and i know there is a will be someone that leeson on this episode that understand so the next time you coming to the bed of your loved one that is between deaths in life that you'll tell them whisper in the ear is okay to go cut off the line for the So you have a little time left. I'd i look at the at the time. And i want to make it on their one hour but sometimes it isn't because spirits here in the in the room but It was more than when i was talking about the television program. So maybe maybe it's not coming through. So i need to to that spirit. That is here and it's a one it was one Move down to the the other apartment that was on the ground. And when i come look at at the apartment with a social service worker. And she's showing me up days apartment and we look in the refrigerator and it's was full of vodka at there was no food that was only a battles there and the in the living room. That was a very huge dragon on on the on the table. They have not move out yet. When i was looking in the apartment it was which it was almost to the ceiling from the table and the walls was black. They have painted. That living room will vote soon with black collar so it was very very dark and the then the in the bedroom it was dark red lack ballade blood collar on though whole walls nicely done so my landlord site that they they didn't want to to repair and Do the something new on the walls. So i have to live with that darkness and it was almost black floral also in in the kitchen and so it was very evil in that department. I move into so as they didn't want to make a change and it was too much for me to to cool the pain or the wolves the blackwoods so i did the graffiti painting. I'm good in painting. And so i did the picture that i have here. The on the cower my podcast that picture did on the wall.

leeson
"leeson" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Believe that that one day a those from the past our relatives are were family. Those that have been on this planet. Once they are coming back they return not all of them but many of them is returning. Yes now as you can here. In episodes the the wrist lack relatives to me coming back and talking. And the z are now the the space center they are they are looking leeson at the universe for to hear some some and there have been sounds that they can't explain what did this and and that is the start of coming it's The universe is not without limit. The recently met at own In the universe and those what have been in the past they gonna bouncing back and so they're coming and And that's what we need to be prepared for and the and do whatever we can to make us. Beer developed a be get more knowledge about what we can't see and most people don't tear this would have been because the worth had been in the past is going it's coming back to in the future is coming back everything. It's the the low of the industry that everything is going to going back to balance via balance and and i have talked about. The new water is not the new order is not vote people think and say this but is the balance and boats have been is coming back and meeting the future just now here and the is coming up. This man is coming now. And i think he wants to talk about what i was talking about.

leeson
"leeson" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

"A lot of services because we only get four percent government funding. So we have to fund raise the remainder. and. Why that's important to state is just to gain raise right hand credible the support here in camera is. What we can give back is apparant. So the lifeline brand is very well known well trusted rant, and if we can leverage affect brand for organizations and show them the benefit of engaging with charities because there is a very real return on an investment insofar as these large goodwill generated, we can create a lot of exposure. Will support organizations who are supporting Cam Cameron's people locked to see the money stay in camera and support day cameras. So there's so many reasons why charities and businesses should be working closely together. Absolutely and I think this. It's something. People are kind of shy about talking about. You know that there is a return on investment in supporting charity when the idea is don't you just do that of goodwill like, yeah you do it because you care and what's important actually is that there's it's a win win. Read. This fabulous book I've been talking about on the podcast a couple of times it's a by Adam grant it's called give and take. And have you read that one? It's really. he talks about people who give and people who take and he's he said there's three types of people. There's givers who give generally time advice money resources, etc. There's takers. Those are very happy to take it and are very self oriented, and then he said there's mattress people who give and take in return. So they have really strong fairness mindset and his research shows that the people who. Are Most successful. Are Givers. and. People were Lisa Sexual. Successful also givers. It's like how does that work out high where the most successful people givers and Lisa will also saint-ivan givers and he said there's there's a key difference between the ones who are successful once unsuccessful unsuccessful. Trouble of my words today. And he said the ones that the givers that are successful are. Have really strong compassionate giving ethos and that does not negate their own personal ambition. So there, personally very ambitious for themselves and they also are very ambitious where the people that contribute to. So it's not like you have to give and be self complete himself list the martyr's thing is not. In existence people give at that level. So when we come to talking about business being contributors, there's absolutely in my mind nothing wrong with a business being ambitious for the charity charities they support as well as ambitious themselves becomes because it becomes a virtuous cycle. Being able to be successful in business means a business can support. Of the community and so the community seeing that like to support that business. So because it, it's a synergistic can absolutely absolutely I highly agree with that nothing what's being born on that? It's the social impact will social investing Top themes that we're seeing. Organizations and justifiably we've been labeled. We are a not for profit and. I don't know how to run a for profit I. Don't know what that means because I don't think the just doesn't mean. that. Siebel have sustainability issues. I think you have to be for prophets you have to run like a business you have to generate a profit, but I think not for profit has has conditioned industry into that hand to mouth existence and I think some supporters justifiably are fatigued with pouring money into what seemingly a black hole into administration into backing services into. Tea and coffee or whatever. It might be for the organization they want to see that money that they're donating now produce more money. So teach a man to fish rather than give a man, a fish and. I think that's a very sensible way of approaching debris sustainable weights. It's going to be quite painful for organizations lock house to respond to that to become more sustainable but that allows us to plan ahead lie it allows us to to look ahead to structure our programs to ultra programs to suit the current need we can respond more readily. There's so many benefits to that. So I think we can learn a lot from business. We are. Charities. Absolutely. But there's no reason why we should be running like a business i. think that you point to really important trend or reality I guess for not for profits Charities Institution I worked for profits for thirty years so understand. That's like when he kind of got nothing in in the cupboard to to try and produce all these great programs and the reality is, is that charities business and they've got operate like one. They've got similar rules if not the same rules in terms of appealing to their stakeholders and providing a service and to make ends meet and to pay staff, etc.. I it was really amazing. Ted Talk I will send you. Lincoln also put it on the show notes page for folks. And the show notes page will be at Zoe routh dot com look under freebies for the podcast tab and then just. In the search bar look for lifeline and the interview will be there. So because we're shifting things around a little bit on the website I don't have the exact link but just search for lifeline, it'll come up. In any case, this Ted talk is by an American dude in marketer in the US, and he market specifically for charitable causes and he has his great tedtalk saying. The way that we thought about charities is actually hindering their ability to be successful. And he said. because when the Notion came out of the pill US came out of pilgrims going to America and they wanted to have a better life. For religious freedom and also to be financially. Successful. However, their religious belief was like woods bad to be. Prosperous, and so in order to be able to do good in the community set up this whole idea of charity and it's got a long history in England and so on that if you're going to do good in the community rely on donations. And kind of perpetuates this idea the money's bad and charities seen this throughout my entire career in those kinds of organizations are we had the strong poverty mindset? Hindering. So in the Ted talk that the guy talks about. He gives a big case study about how he worked. One charity had a massive marketing campaign because he say charities compete for attention. Saying, the compete against businesses for attention and that's need they need to broadcast what they do, share what they do. So they can invite contributors and sponsors etcetera and be successful through whether it's their. Commercial enterprises or whether it's through the nation's etc they need that attention. Therefore, they need a marketing budget. Yet there's this ethos saying if you look at a charity's accounts. Why do you spend so much a marketing that you've been gone going to services Weiss thanks so much on salaries and he said just backwards, you know the best charities need the best workers and if you deny them paying the staff properly, then they can't do their work properly and likewise if you don't give them A. Competitive on the world stage or their local stage. Anyway, like we need to change your mind about what is already It's differently here in Sydney and Canberra had journalist at the very disc loss week saying you've had to use a prophets up. Very interesting conversation. But it to at. A, very, very meaningful conversation against the ram what you've just defined. That's given me a lot more insight into why that's the case and it's definitely the mindset and something that needs to change and I think businesses want to see the change and that sharing information between charities and and business is is something that is all too often ignored when not facilitated. So again, looking forward to to come into your own conference because that's an opportunity again, ticket in front of some business into learn Absolutely. And you. To learn from each other and to learn how to do service better really.

Ted Talk Lisa Sexual Cam Cameron Siebel Adam Zoe routh Weiss US America Lincoln Canberra woods Sydney England
"leeson" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"leeson" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

"Carry lease in the CEO of lifeline today on the podcast, you're gonNA learn heaps from her about compassion and leadership and business. So let's get into it. Welcome to the Zely Ralph leadership podcast all sorts of strategies and insights to make you a better leader influence improve inspire. Hi this is a graph. Then I'm here today the amazing carry Leeson, who is the CEO of Lifeline camera and I've known Kerry. For last couple of years we met at a men's link breakfast of all things and hit it off and I've done some work with lifeline since and I'm extremely excited to have her as a table host at the upcoming on conference edgy leadership in March in camera, and because he has a lot to share about. Compassion, as well as business and the great function that lifeline provides in the community. So a little background about Kerry. Before seeing a sea of love. She was previously board member of the organization. So strong commitment to life on itself. She was executive director at happy, which is the health and Productivity Institute was the chair of the Advisory Council at. Workplace health. Association was on the Advisory Council for Aspen Medical. And she was a finalist for the Telstra one of the year in two, thousand and ten so. And you started off as a fitness instructor I thought that on your linked profile. Health is obviously been a huge part of your background. So tell us tell me first of all. Fitness instructing did you actually get up in front of classes and teach fitness clauses excited I did I'm not particularly coordinated, but it was something that I'd take my mind I think it was a new year's resolution to challenge myself and it was something I could fit in and around my degree in my studies at that time of my life because. I didn't really well obviously had a passion for health and that's reflected through a career with my business owned and sold and throughout the roles you just described I think a healthy body healthy mind I. Don't know which one comes first and I think if you focus on those look after yourself you're in good state Fort Lafayette throat us. I agree with that I think healthy which one comes for a healthy body healthy mind I think they're so interrelated and you need I think it helps if you get some exercise, it tends to generate some endorphins and then you can get your get yourself reset. I should also ask you what's your funny accent because they will be listening worry at. In Madiun this Jelly, I have my own funny accent. Accent I'm from South Africa. So I'm used to Australia fifteen years ago I am English speaking South Africans. I don't have strong Afrikaans Twang that makes it hard to decipher where I'm from. Yeah Yet I guess it is not quite a Twang. Yeah. So what how did you end up moving to Julia from South Africa? For Work on to your visa and moved straight to camera from a big city and in South Africa over four and a half million people. So I thought this country town won't be here, very long going to be a big city smoke I'll be hitting up there in in tears Thomasson as I can, of course, fifteen years later on one of the common stories you come to camera. You Fall in love with camera and you stay in camera and it's time for me. Now, I've gone from working in a business to to running the business to selling their business and then onto Laflin. So it's been a wonderful fifteen years. Australia has been amazing to me. I've been incredible people and absolutely love it Ya. Love going back to Africa to there a couple of times a year my family are still league. So, it's it's interesting. I'm very, very grateful for the technology we have. So I can keep in touch with the people that I'm close to. Do, the skype calls every day every day every day I talked to my mom every day. That's. How I don't talk to my mom every day though I did talk to her this morning I'm good. So. Tell me about lifeline so. You had a big journey for many your own this business. Did you was it? Health Futures Health Futures. That's right and after you sold that you. Or. During the same time, you're on the Aspen medical. Advisory Council. Use as medical purchased MMA business. Okay. We signed the contract on the day. I gave birth to my eldest son couldn't before so I didn't realize I wasn't labor. But I was it was right down the line I took a few months off with my little guy. Now winton to ask medical s manager to help grow that business and sit in when it was well entrenched. It was time for me to to look at doing something else and obviously being a volunteer on the phones at Laflin being on the board of directors being incredibly passionate anything distracting me from Laflin was my paid employment at that time. So in the role of CEO came up, I jumped at it and I've. been subleased land the role and be in the role of the last two years. What was it about lifeline that really drew you here? What I came to realize with health futures because we were a corporate health company, we're addressing physical health issues. Diabetes Prevention Heart Disease is coronary risk we were looking at live function flexibility. One thing we looked at and touched on in all of our health appraisals is forty thousand dollars a year across the globe. We. Look at streets we touched on it and what I realized having started in the business as a consultant was the fact that. Lists someone's stress levels are under control and at least someone actually feels. listerine on not stressed it's very hard to overcome physical barriers to change. So when you would approach someone to say, have you have you thought about including grandma's and you'll meals for example, if you thought about joining the gym, he's Rabat if the individual has a lot going on in the mind this very little charter to make structured ongoing sustainable changes to the routine. So I realized that the mind is something that you got the Mondro the body would follow. and. I studied psychology degree is in psychology. I never had the intention of practicing psychology. I've just loved the mind body connection how the Mont works off people off on the interesting intriguing. Curious. So coming to laugh line was a natural next step for me because I realized at the same time going through crises. Watching people I loved go through crises I, wondered what I could do to upskill myself to help and I started with his volunteer for that reason to try and learn the skills. The based organization to go to that is Laflin. saw started at the top. we to to Laflin training and lender on the fines, and that was such a privilege to be part of that prices to. But that's how I ended up where. I am now. That's an amazing journey I. I love how the of how do we actually get people to take action to fix their physical self and this idea that stress gets in the ways is actually really huge I've. Spent some time with a friend of mine in Calgary. And she was telling the she's a teacher and they had initiative her boss at an initiative. Oh let's have a wellness focus and she was kind of dissing it a little bit and what was behind that she goes well, he said of all these programs we'd have on Friday afternoon at four o'clock go and have a wellness Gathering with all the teachers and we'd do healthy recipes and she goes he just doesn't get four o'clock on a Friday after huge week you're absolutely mattress. You give us less work to do stop piling stuff on top of us..

Laflin CEO Advisory Council Aspen Medical Australia Kerry South Africa Lifeline health and Productivity Instit Zely Ralph Africa Telstra Fort Lafayette Leeson Calgary instructor
Tough Sales Month for Boeing

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

Tough Sales Month for Boeing

"Start first with Boeing and how many jets they've delivered. So in in July to those eighteen, and this is an article from barons, the liver thirty nine jets this past. July, they delivered four so. What do you think about these numbers? Obviously, this isn't surprising. Anyone given how insane this year's been again, my prediction still we still a four months to go to see if the crack in comes out of the deep sea. Just a cap off this crazy year but. What is your sentiment about four planes being delivered? Well, the the the issue really for Boeing seven, thirty-seven, Max and. Because of Kobe there's not a lot of international flights going on. So you're bigger triple seven's. Are. Just not going to be in a big production since an in terms of demand is just not going to be there. So the smaller seven three seventy are going to be a workhorse internally to the US also in Europe and Asia and all over the place, and since it can't deliver them, doesn't doesn't help their bottom line so they got to get the aircraft certified and. It looks like it's coming closer and closer Leeson the US but it says here that return outside the US has maybe been slowed. So what's that about? In in terms of just outside sales at the US. Well, it looks like the European Union Aviation Safety Agency is still waiting for more clarity going yeah. IGGY UPDATE I. Don't know if that's A. A policy position that they're having disputes about or an interpretation about. This particular rules that are maybe slightly different in the Ossa and and other parts of the world versus the United States. But it does seem like there's always a little bit of dragging When the Europeans Airbus certifies an airplane FA can drag its feet. It seems like it doesn't seem like either is trying to help the other country or region So I, don't know if it's politics or real engineering concern when you get to these levels of international disputes and the seven thirty seven is reached clearly international dispute territory sometimes, the engineers don't get to play so much as much as the politicians get to step into it. Could be both yeah. Well, that was yeah. Well, that was a good point by you that you're right like domestic air travel is going to be the first thing to come back and it's going to be really busy at some point. And you're right. Boeing has the plane. They have the perfect plane for that they they discontinued to have problems like they've gotten man solution, but it's just not there. So hopefully, right the the seven thirty, seven, Max gets. Gets into the hands of these companies that want to fly it in a radio put. It's a good work and get people back around the country and I thought the Airbus A to twenty was gonNA pick up on some sales and delivery just because they are not necessarily a one to one compared to the seven, three seven but they are sort of that regional jet new modern. Out Cockpit, design cabin efficiency has all the checks all the boxes they to twenty does and it. It has seen some improve sales is no doubt about that but they're not gonNA rival the seven thirty seven anytime soon. So people are still waiting for the seven thirty seven or they're not taking airplanes one of the

Boeing United States MAX Airbus European Union Aviation Safety Ossa Leeson Iggy Europeans Europe Asia
Tourner Sparkling Brut

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Tourner Sparkling Brut

"A cheap sparkley line cheap bubbles. She fumbles made in the traditional meth. Shop Watt style of Champagne. And from all the cost six hundred nine. which under a few years ago I would not have. I wouldn't hesitate anyway to bought it. But Not Anymore healers two major ways to make sparkling wines right the process go Cycle style, which is the from at the wine launch and they put into huge. Pressurized tanks and then they had Houston sugar and went out. One again. Here comes. Okay and then they add. Measured! Amount of sugar and yeast. and. As the carbon dioxide gets released from From the fermentation, the pressure is put back into the tank. Into the wind. and that's the nineteenth century technology to get bubbles into wine. and. It works for Seco-. They sell like crazy I like. I like winds. It's pretty damn, cool? Traditional method. Which is Sixteenth Century is where they fermented wine port in the battle. Every bottle gets a little bit of A. Little bit of sugar. And the cap it off and then for the next. On champagne a year and a half. The turn the bottle every two days a quarter turn so the dead use of the stick to the wine. And then neo this you know. One more. Yeah I think they're saying no way. And You, know they still like care. It's probably nine months, and no one says was making this. How how it's made, but that's how the traditional nothing words. And you turn it per. Quarter turn every couple days for months. And then when you have done, you've gotta breeze. The topic is All that uses now basically. And you gotta freeze that you can pull that out, and then you had to add. Some does size which is. Pre made. Pretty much the same. The same bubbly premade bubble you add to fill up and you can change the sweetness. Screener bubbly or he'll dryer just to just to. Go One more time. Yeah Way and Then you have to after you do that, you start. You gotTA. PALEA back backup you. Put the cap back on that and then you. And then you go another few months, maybe even longer just to aged agenda. Get everything. If everything to settle down. It's a huge commitment. To make traditional method sparkling wine. And when you see it for six ninety nine. Like wow, because no one really cares if they're six. Ninety nine sparkling wine is made in the process. Or Champagne Metro other than me. Because you know when on seven bucks got bubbles in it, it tastes nasty. It doesn't matter if it's sixteenth century, technology or Nineteenth Century Technology. It's all good. And this one is surprisingly. I, don't know. Are. But it's got nice flavor. The the acidity is on the. One year ago. Late and On the. On the cantaloupe, the edge of being a latched, but still faust, but not three we noticed. That has any right to complain because it's a six ninety ninety bubbly. What kind of crazy person complains about that so? I just took a SIP. It tastes great. It's six ninety nine traditional method. That all the all these blinds. Leeson all the neighborhood is just a mess. You can't tell what's what's. The. There's three of launders forty seven of another. You you might be sick, chardonnays and nothing else. But if you look and you try to find out what skin there. There's some pretty good stuff in there. I mean I'm shocked to their. Thousand, nine, hundred ninety nine champagne from last year was I. think my favorite wine of twenty nine thousand. It was excellent. Still talking about it, and it's July.

Nineteenth Century Technology Champagne Metro Houston Seco Leeson Faust TA
How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

Outcomes Rocket

05:50 min | 2 years ago

How Are we Going to Solve the Behavioral Health Crisis with Lisa Henderson

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw Marquez's here and that I had the privilege of hosting Lisa Henderson. She is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer at synchronous health. Her previous experience includes experience as an adjunct faculty at the Vanderbilt Cup. Periodic College chair the Southern Region at the American Counseling Association and also pass President Tennessee Counseling Association among other leadership roles. Her focus has always been on health and also mental health of communities and individuals, and with her work at synchronous health, the impact that they're making at a broader scale in. In Times of great need is just extraordinary, so I'm I'm excited to to dive into the conversation with Lisa and in the work that she and her team are are up to, but before that Lisa at one welcome you to the gas much for having me absolutely, it's a true pleasure, so you know before we dive into what you guys do. At synchronous health I want to understand better. What inspires your work in healthcare sir? So I started my career when I was planning my career and I was in Undergrad. In went straight into Grad school after that I actually got a masters in health education promotion, and so it was really focused on helping people live healthier lives and part of that research experience in that masters program was to be a health coach when police officers. It was really fine. had some great sessions where you know, I would have to kind of barter with them. So if I wanted the person who was leading the SWAT team, his stress levels were incredibly high humans and sleeping well and so I wanted him to do yoga in order for him to agree to do Yoga I had to meet him at the shooting range and. Learn how to shoot a pissed off, so you know being able to kind of meet people where they are and help them learn. New Skills was really fun, but the same time. It was so clear to me that. Those officers were living with so much more than just obesity and trouble sleeping. They were living with anxiety and depression and worry and guilt and. All the things that humans experience and it was just kind of sitting there and my training as a health coach really didn't give me the tools to address those things so I went back to school, and got a masters in counseling, so that I could get into those deeper sorts of issues with folks, and it's been just so rewarding percents to be able to kind of take both sides of health What are you doing on the behavioral side? In terms of lifestyle choices and out. Adherent to your treatment plans in taking your medication and things like that, but also why in what? What is the underlying factor of? Depression or anxiety or family conflict? Are you know other things going on that lead to the decisions that affect your health? Yeah so cool, so you got this this masters in public health education and you said this doesn't really do it i. want to dig deeper help. These people more their stressed. There's there's a lot here and you went to go. Get Your Masters and mental health, and it unlocked a lot of things and you know I. It looks and sounds like you did the right thing lease I mean now you're you're you're part of this this really unique company addressing a lot of these issues at scale. Tell me about how it happened and and folks Leeson. We're having some fun connecting before the podcast that I shared my story with their vow had a couple offers the people wanting to buy outcomes rocket before it was, it was it was a business profitable business and the pressures that I got at home, saying no to those offers. Lisa I. WanNa Hear Your Story. We were saving it here for for us to share it with the listeners to tell me how synchronous help happened and and what exactly you guys are doing. The add value to the healthcare ecosystem sure. So similar to your experience, so one of my co are three of us. Co Founders of synchronised Health Katie, Moore. Guy Barnard, Myself Katie and I are both mental health. Clinicians report together for about ten years and several years ago, we started a treatment center and the first sort of level of programming that we provided as. Intensive outpatient, so we had people with us in our services in our program for nine hours a week and we would have them for. One to four months, and even folks who had been with us for nine hours a week would still come in and say I forgot or I was too stressed or I was triggered to use the skills that we're learning while we're here and then have them show up when I meet them in real life, and so we were thinking okay. They don't need clinical criteria for a higher level of care. We're. We're not seeing the improvement that we WANNA see. We could keep doing more of the everything we were doing. Was Evidence based and supported by research? So it's not like you know what we were doing was in any way deficient. It just wasn't heading them at the right time and place when they really needed it,

Lisa Henderson Lisa Grad School Lisa I. Wan American Counseling Associatio Vanderbilt Cup Marquez President Tennessee Counseling Depression Chief Operating Officer Leeson Moore Guy Barnard Katie
The secrets we keep

Ladies, We Need To Talk

04:32 min | 2 years ago

The secrets we keep

"He's a bit of a list of the kinds of secrets. Jillian his the most a shame about some floor that the person imagines that they actually have because we keep secrets from ourselves. As well you me so infidelity is a common one feeling anim-. Pasta is often a secret that people have men and women like sort of stereotypes too much. But let's just indulge for the moment in the stereotype. I think men very often have the impostor syndrome that they performing as OPEC inside the field theory small or not competent and they have to keep that a secret from everybody in the workplace women. Mark of the NEF secrets about their anxieties about attractiveness or they might keep secrets about that. They're not quite tuned on the partners. The bottom I think they are also secrets about history that people not being sexually abused as children and it's interesting that the shame comes to rest with the victim often and not the perpetrator and they can be very anxious about that and the reasons because if they disclose it often they become defined by other people as the victim of sexual abuse and the complexity of you that are lost. Mental illness in the family is often hidden. So if these relative. That's Paolo who somebody has committed suicide. These often very very unfortunately and sadly and that's changing somewhat but the a lot of secrets around that as well Jill. I'm thinking about things I haven't disclosed to people like my partner and I don't know if it's fear of the consequences so much as just not wanting to talk about it. Can sometimes it just be private? I definitely believe that we need privacy. Because that's what we all made so that people can treat thoughts. We are definitely entitled to have our own inner subjectivity and earn in a lives. I would ask if you were in the rooms with me. Is the particular reason why you would prefer not to talk if you naturally introverted. That's fine but I think in the therapy space probes. Bit Foods are in circa. Was it important to you not to talk? What does it give you not talk? And it may indeed. You're not to talk that you don't have to feel everything has to be in the sheet space. And what would happen if you did talk because I think with social media we all having Leeson Leeson lease province face so DEB's opposite space from your partner fields to me a positive to what about the secrets that we keep from ourselves where we mytalk from ourselves for example that we angry people we might hard from ourselves that while we say that we are passionate about climate change we don't actually stopped going on Earth. Z's holiday in the plane that's putting a lot of emissions into the air we can't SOCI- eight from that bit in order to protect ourselves. Have you been looking at my passport? I know you be up in looking at my own. Always use the exhaust until said. I'm guilty so secrets aren't just about holding. In the fact that you know your best friend had an affair or that you have a Chinese character tattooed on your ass cheeks. Those are the things that you don't necessarily wanNA share with everyone but secrets ulcer. Include stuff that we're keeping from ourselves it's what therapists coal cognitive dissonance. Basically where you think one thing but do another like people who say. I'm really into healthy living while drinking two bottles of wine. It's not being honest with yourself but let's get back to secrets because they had tasty right and even sitting he now. I'm realizing that I have a few secrets of my own. That are buried so deep. It's actually like they've almost disappeared. Researches from Columbia University in the states have a website called keeping secrets dot org which has worked out the top. Thirty eight secrets people normally keep and they're not all negative. They include the secret people. Keep when they're planning to propose marriage and secret work envisions high up on the list. Is Secrecy about finances but predictably some of the most common secrets people keep About

Partner Jill Leeson Leeson Jillian Opec NEF Columbia University DEB Paolo
City of Houston Securing Bed Space, Waiting on Additional COVID-19 Tests

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

City of Houston Securing Bed Space, Waiting on Additional COVID-19 Tests

"The city of Houston is in the process of securing bed space with the expectation more residents will be testing positive for covert nineteen and need to be quarantined the vacancy rate ethics is very very high right now as a result of the buyers we are a negotiating and in conversations with several hotels in the city in terms of Leeson the necessary space for first responders city employees and other people in our city let's say like the homeless population who second as of quieting but there's a Mister Turner says that they're still waiting on another shipment of testing kits to monitor the outbreak the city county and local hospitals also are in need of more the N. ninety five masks for employees

Houston Leeson Mister Turner
Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

American Fashion Podcast

11:04 min | 2 years ago

Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

"The Workforce Development Institute is a nonprofit organization headquartered out of Albany and troy but we cover ten regions of New York. State So I I cover. The New York City region are broad mission is to help. New Yorkers obtaining keep good jobs So we do that in a number of ways. We're a convener for a great conversations that help of Industry Job Seekers We connect Entities to one another for sources of technical assistance and funding We're we provide grants in some cases to both manufacturers and Don Profit organizations that train job seekers As well as supporting unions so In my role as the New York City regional director in my in the piece of my work that focuses on supporting manufacturing I kind of naturally focused on the apparel manufacturing sector because there were many many needs Facing those companies but really we help Manufacturers across the board and get involved in lots of different workforce initiatives. Your question about what is Workforce Development For for the Fashion Business was workforce development. Sure will I think we're I think it applies to generally as well as for the fashion. Business really workforce development is looking at both the skill needs of employers to be able to remain competitive and You know produce. In the case of manufacturing produce their product sufficiently and it's also the need for skill development for job seekers and training programs that address those needs and allows people to earn a living wage and have a good quality job. So it's really both both those things in the apparel manufacturing sector there are lots of challenges around that A lot of that related to the store. Ecole offshoring of the industry And then some such subsequent growth in some reassuring but really different challenges and needs a major real estate crisis here in New York City and so I think a lot of apparel manufacturers are in what I would call survival mode They're not really able to focus much on training their incumbent workforce as they probably would like to. They're wearing so many hats they're juggling so many things they're dealing with a rising rents many of them have to move multiple times because they're Leeson's and they try to fund a new lease so they're just many many pain points for Apparel Manufacturers in particular and that's an area where I've tried to focus on providing some assistance to those companies. Now is it normal for a state to provide this? Is this something. That's in all fifty. It's actually really unusual and when I meet with people in other states there especially manufacturers. They're kind of jealous that. Wd exists in New York state. So the way our funding works is that we We're funded by the state Senate and so- senators Put Our budget request into the state budget every year and hopefully Nine Times edits ahead and we. We don't get cut at all and the GOVERNOR OKAYS OUR BUDGET. And so that's that's how that works but we are an independent nonprofit but we do rely on The state legislature who CNN. For the work that we do and so have continued to push for that support for us. We're grateful for that. So many of our listeners are from other states. Would it be possible for another state to also fund your organization and and get your resources into their? I mean we are very much near state. Focus but certainly We DO GET INVOLVED. Nationally in some initiatives so we we look at Look workforce strategies and we some of our staff do attend conferences and other states and kind of share our lessons learned here in New York. Stay so we're Very happy to share expertise and You Know Lease Organization of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Was at their conference in Pittsburgh a year and a half ago. And so I you know we. We do kind of collaborate with folks in other states that are doing related work and try and share best practice and this may be pretty obvious question but why does the fashion business need workforce development. What's why do people need to be trained for for new jobs in the fashion business? Well for anybody sure. Why don't someone else someone else can weigh in? And I can jump in after that. I think when we talk about made in. Us initiatives in this country You know trade union professionals manufacturers all talk about the bottleneck being just a labor shortage in general and I think very simply put. That's because a lot of people don't WANNA working garment factories. They they have the vision of that as like Norma. Rae Standing on top of the you know the the spinning machine. And it's not that anymore so I think that's one problem and I think the second problem is that there's new equipment coming into factories and that requires people to have different skill sets than they might have had being a traditional sewing machine operator or cutter on a factory floor. The other thing I would add is much of the sustained job losses that were faced by the manufacturing sector came from a parallel textile. And still there are families that over generations watch watched opportunities get washed out So that's I think fueling in part the perception gap that there aren't opportunities Associated with the sewn trades and then additionally when you have job losses of those Of that magnitude You have a workforce apparatus that gets dismantled and so we have a lot of rebuilding to do as a city And really this is true of cities. Nationally To reinvigorate Not only the hearts and minds of people thinking about opportunities in this own trades but also the underlying workforce infrastructure that supports those firms. And I think also we're seeing right. Now is a resurgence of small lot production which is really where. New York City thrives. We've ton of small factories can get quick production into the market. And what we're faced with right now is a generational gap. We have sores. Were aging out of the workforce. And nobody's coming up behind them so if we're going to continue to be able to keep up with the demand of small production we do need to be looking forward. The people who are going to be retiring and replacing them in the workforce. And if somebody goes into this as their job if they get the training is it going to be a good paying job for a long time? Because I think that would be a question most people would have. I won't I'm going to be trained to be a professional sewer that is is that a career absolutely. It's a great job and the sewers. I mean at me mill so me Mills. I work within the Millennium Mills Office in Sunset Park so we are kind of a for profit nonprofit partnership and our soldiers have been with us for fifteen years and they're amazing they get paid well and they get benefits and I think that's increasingly becoming the norm. I feel as if there needs to be new value or renewed value. Put on sewing pattern making and just the trade in general. So what made you was it? What made you identify this need and start to train. And how did you? How did you even start the training? Can I call it a school or kind of all came about when we moved out to sunset park and you know I had been working in a garment production factory before this bridal and then moved over to handling Molina's production and I really wanted to open my own factory and I I couldn't find people to so and I was trying to navigate this very complex way of word of mouth trying to find through our sewers and other sewer who might know someone who might know somebody else who needed a job for a week you know. It's this really really cumbersome process and what I realized was the people who were hiring were in their sixties and they WANNA and worked for two days a week and that's not really what we needed. We needed a full-time sour and we need multiple fulltime sewers. So I came up with this program I it's built in modules and it's in three languages currently so I can train in Spanish Mandarin and English in part. Because of the millennials team We Have Cantonese Mandarin and Spanish speakers on staff so they really helped me a ton and it's been incredibly gratifying to see how people take to selling and the confidence that comes with it and how factories where we play students are responding to it. I think people are really excited to get new people in and help them and foster their development and I just like to add that so. Wd I funded Course of trade. Because we saw that I mean I've been visiting garment factories for the last four years and I'm consistently hearing about a need for skilled sewers In my kind of investigations into this Really students aren't learning those industrial skills anymore. And even at the C. T. E. Highschool secured at technical education high schools. Students are learning some of those skills. But they're really really. They're all choosing to go into a career as a fashion designer for the most part so there hasn't been that emphasis on those industrial skills as much as there was in the past. So there's been a real lack of training programs. I spent a couple years trying to look into. What are the training programs How could we put something together? Is there a factory that would loan their space in the evening or could we do it at the high school? Fit's labs are so oversubscribed. It's very difficult to schedule. Training programs they are for adult learners. So got introduced to Libyan heard about the training that she had developed and we were really excited to put some funding toward that to be able so so that she could train more people and fill more of those open roles. Lisa helped us get sixteen new machines which is

New York City Workforce Development New York Workforce Development Institut Fashion Business Apparel Manufacturers Don Profit United States CNN Senate Albany Regional Director Troy Leeson Ecole Offshoring Nine Times Sunset Park Lease Organization Pittsburgh
Kent police search for shooter involved in road rage incident

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Kent police search for shooter involved in road rage incident

"Leeson Kantor's to looking for the person who shot a man after a road rage incident the injured man called nine one one around seven thirty Monday morning from an area near the arco gas station on eighty fourth Avenue postures phantom bleeding from a gunshot wound to his leg the shooter already left right now detectives will only say it was some kind of altercation which ended in several shots being fired the injured man is recovering at Harborview Medical

Leeson Kantor Harborview Medical
Presiding over Kiev's tourism boom

Correspondents Report

06:45 min | 3 years ago

Presiding over Kiev's tourism boom

"Tourism is booming in the Ukrainian capital Kiev. Thanks in large part to the renewed interest in visiting the site of the Noble Nuclear Power Plant all of that is happy news for Kiev's celebrity mayor the former world heavyweight boxing champion Vitali Klitschko the rising political star of this former Soviet state sit down with a Europe correspondent Linton Besser in one day some training come come to our school and ask boys who wants to be the champion in boxing yes of course everyone stand up and we starting to train gene from beginning the coach told. I was tall and skinny. He's not good for boxing you. Maybe for swimming. I was really upset. All my friends was boxing and I'm not the young Vitali Klitschko refused to to listen instead. He decided to prove the China wrong it by the way I lose my pillow fight in boxing but the you me so much motivation to show oh my skills and fight and fight and fight and better result than my friends and actually I have a dream to be one day. The heavyweight wait champion the world as you former world heavyweight champion. Vitali Klitschko is now the mayor of the Ukrainian capital Kiev and is one of the most popular politicians in eastern Europe. What's more violent boxing politics boxing my shoe much more easy. You have one opponent. We have clear rules politics you have. I love opponents no rules and in boxing input. Eh ex-professional is fighting just three or four times. A year in politics is fighting three hundred sixty five times everyday. He's five Kiev is now experiencing an unprecedented surge in foreign tourists the heading toward on Ukraine not to sample. It's famous amos cheese dumplings or it's Borscht soup but to visit the scene of the worst nuclear accident in history and the nearby ghost city city of Pripyat. Actually right now is journalists attraction for many people around the wall to everybody know about strategy and many of people want to see the gust CD. Nobody leave their own radio thirty years to listen to the story ball. Oh Disease Strategy and the numbers of visitors right now around hundred thousand breer. It's been thirty three years since Canabal reactor exploded and I went to the exclusions on to report on the boom in disaster tourists. It was a bizarre experience wandering wandering around the city of built to service the power plant and now long since abandoned children all special Chernobyl is it's difficult to explain with water. You have to feel that people leave the house and after that nobody wasn't his houses also if you go in in the loop with date ninety eighty six because in Boston they explained with people you leave just fo couple of days and you come back and after that nobody comes back tally. Klitschko has a special connection to the tragedy. I was fifteen. Eighteen Journal will explode and father told the beat Reggie lease staying home. Please don't go outside. It's was actually officially officially. Nothing happens small problem in the autumn station but nobody expected how Hugest Brooklyn how dangerous FAW AW everybody an Air Force officer Klitschko senior was directly involved in the cleanup operation at the plant farther spent whole all summer and after that years later all his friends died we say God or father stay healthy untouchable from radiation radiation but ten years ago Lake Oma we bring to our father to the best specialist if they Leeson they wasn't your noble. You get wants to love to novel attack. Klitschko is now pushing for the two thousand six hundred square kilometer to noble exclusion zone to be used to house new solar energy fields to help shift Ukraine from its ongoing dependence on nuclear energy the era of turnover have to use a oh for solar energy and actually we have a Lotta companies who ready to do that the infrastructure there already built many in years ago but for nickel as you right now we have to change the green energy and right now we have developed his own as green energies on even while Ukraine fought a war with Russia in its southeast it continues to depend on Russian nuclear fuel for its reactors. Klitschko says Ukrainians Liens don't want to leave and Moscow's Yolk. If you want to talk about the conflict between Russia new brain the conflict gail political question. Shen because Ukraine don't want to be part of Russia Empire. We see off you share part of European family and Ukrainians were that tally Klitschko. Oh has his eyes firmly sit on his future as a rising political star of this troubled former Soviet state but when I ask him about his favorite favorite fights this still glint in the I I fought against many boxers ten and breaks Lennox Lewis. I have a dream always as a WHO drink to fight Mike Tyson but the wheel rid decided about Mike Tyson lose the title and my dreams Brock and you wanted to keep both years is much shorter than me and do the bite my ears to break up. Oh let's consideration as a boxer has to make. How do you keep your ears safe. If you're going to fight Mike Tyson there that was the mayor of Kiev in the former world heavyweight boxing champions retallack Klitschko the speaking to our Europe correspondent Linton Besser.

Vitali Klitschko Kiev Ukraine Boxing Noble Nuclear Power Plant Linton Besser Mike Tyson Europe Russia Lennox Lewis China Eastern Europe Chernobyl Pripyat Eighteen Journal Russia Empire Officer
"leeson" Discussed on Latest In Tech News

Latest In Tech News

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on Latest In Tech News

"In looking for talented writers in your happened to be a magazine editor joining your staff considering out to them all seven deserve to continue doing what they did for game informer in yeah. That's it with that <hes> mm business. I mean if you're gonna try and trim some things up from game. Stop standpoint you. Gotta kind of do some not so nice things to be able to trim away and try and reorient yourself and try to become a more profitable company again before you kinda china do close in upon yourself and then implode and then nobody has a job so obviously that's always risk with business business but probably not as much interest to you as it is to me for me. It's always of interest in terms of how businesses and markets and everything along economics in entrepreneurship goals. That's one topic that i'm interested in but i wanted to bring it to the forefront at least to let you guys are aware yet <hes> <hes> this isn't just a fact a game development video game studios aaa rated studios or indie studios. It also affects the game game publications <unk> while at least news publications for gaming industries as well as a brick and mortar stores as has law so yeah interesting shakeup indeed as the market shifts <hes> businesses will have to change demand to while and <hes> the product service offerings to keep up with it and hopefully supply what the what the market wants <hes> what they might who knows they might just want cotton candy and a bunch amount. Do that's what i want. That's what i want. If you want that. Raise your hand as well all right with that that wraps up this episode of leeson in tech news. Thanks for tuning in new episodes every weekday lace intact news can be found on every major platform including apple spotify google youtube stitcher overcast and more now if you enjoyed this episode. I'll be sure to let us know by clicking that like button and by leaving a comment if you're watching youtube video if you're listening to a podcast hey could you go ahead and leave us. Review out on apple podcast or the app that you're currently listening.

youtube apple editor leeson
"leeson" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on The Filmcast

"But like not in a particularly satisfying way I thought this is pretty disappointing. I don't know why it's so hard to just do another taken the only one that's come close. In my opinion is like unknown kind of interesting. But like I've seen every single one of these Liam these next movies, and I find most of them to be pretty disappointing like I've seen, but this is not trying to be another taken, you know, like that's the thing I guess it depends on what you're going in looking for. Right. I mean it starts kind of as another taken. Yeah. Yes. And then then it sorts of. Becomes like a commentary on these Leeson prevents movies in a weird way. So it is darkly comedic, the sense of humor is so specific and weird very like is rector. I think he's. See swedish. He's a Norwegian director, and it feels like the very specific type of, like, you know, northern European humor, basically, I don't know what you'd call it L say it's worth a watch, because it reminds me of, like, the, the Martin mcdonagh's stuff like just a really sad. But darkly funny dramas a hate the villain, this movie who's the actor who plays the villain. He seems. Yeah. I'm not sure first of all, we should mention that the director is Hans Petter Moland. He also directed the original version of this film. Yes. That the coal pursued is based on everyone. I've tweeted about this with talked about this with says, like that movie is better than cold pursuit. And that movie is called in order of disappearance, which you can actually find on Netflix right now. I believe. So I was actually thinking maybe I should go back and check out in order of disappearance on Netflix, because it looks like it could be a better Stellan Skarsgard plays the main actor in that movie think, like compared to the rest of like the recent Niessen, you know, filmography like of everything trying to be taken again though. I think it does kind of rise above the crap. Like, it's, it's more interesting than some of those. Yeah graduates more interesting. The villain characters played by Tom Bateman, by the way, oka- Viking, who basically seems like. They're making fun of every like super evil. Bad guy who also is trying to be like a good dad or simply, like he has a family. Yes. Emotions. But oh man. That role could have been if it was a medical material in these kind of movies. I think if it was more explicitly that than I think I would have enjoyed it. I just the tone didn't work for me. I will many things that back. And I'll just say one of the thing, which is this movie has the worst CG. In a stabbing shots that I've one of the worst CG establishing shots ever seen, like we'll say, go ahead. We'll just like there's, there's several establishing shots of, like, here's like the city of Denver. Or here's like this mountain or whatever. And it looks like something that, like I could have made using like motion on my MAC at home. It looks awful. So it's almost like time that I'm like, is this supposed to be bad? You know, I, sometimes I didn't know I just found the tone of pursuit did not work for me. So we'll see. The setting is really interesting because Liam these plays. A guy he's just the guy who plows the snow. He's Mr. plow. Right. And this like shack on top of the mountain vengeance, that name again, is yester- plow is Mr.. He lives you know this shack with Laura Dern, and he clears the roads and that's his life. And I think the sense of place of this movie is really fascinating too. 'cause it's like first of all, who the hell wants to live there? This guy is basically superman for this community who goes on rampage. So I like those little elements because that's not something we've, we've never seen snow plow. Man go on a revenge spree. Yet, you know. So that was interesting. At least I, I mean, I wish I wish this was the movie you just described. I wish it was like oh, yeah. This guy who's like a hero of the city like becomes revenge murderous..

director Hans Petter Moland Netflix Liam Mr. plow Leeson Stellan Skarsgard Martin mcdonagh Laura Dern Denver Tom Bateman oka- Viking
"leeson" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"You so much, and Camille. You are so beautiful my favorite like thank you. Well, you're welcome. You are awesome. You're Auras beautiful and Tracey. My question is for you. My boyfriend Dirk looks chest like Michael J, FOX p loves a housewife. What if Michael favored housewife? To watch what happens when you're watching you leave the room as he watching hockey. I know he's a big Ocoee face watching hockey. Yes night he's watching hockey. He he respects my love of the house. Love it. Okay. Well, we respect. How's he doing by the way, he's doing well? I know he's I so Meyer his philanthropy, that he's done. I mean he's raised millions of dollars two billion almost dollars. Jackson say Erica, which question. Hi, Andy question for both of the ladies regarding see lie detector tests. Do you think that it's all fake, considering that Leeson you the questions beforehand, and that the blood pressure cuff placed around several layers of clothing? Oh, no, no, the blood pressure cough. Well, will John blizzard or Sesa whoever she was with wrote the questions cracked? So is that odd? That he wrote the question. Yeah. I mean I don't know about. Closing. But I mean, I think that it if you're lying, I think that it's very hard to fake. Okay, by the way. Britney L texted, Tracy, I love that. You cook with your family. What is.

hockey Michael J John blizzard Camille Meyer Tracey Leeson Dirk Andy Britney L Jackson Erica Tracy FOX p Michael
"leeson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Leeson, low performing the nineties live on q. Thanks, lisa. Thank you. That was the acoustic version. The album version is like very rock. What's your relationship with that with that area? These days, they nineties, you know, it's funny people are so nostalgic about the nineties and for me it was a time period that was right after college. It was, you know, they called generation x but for me it was more like everybody's just working so hard my friends, it was, it was such a great time period of friends, I had a lot of friends who are actors and musicians playwrights, and we all hung out in New York. And we were all trying so hard to do the next thing. And so many of those folks are so successful now doing what we were all trying to do back in those days. So it's, it's really fun and nest Audi to remember that because I play the song, stay and other songs from that era. And I do play a lot of concerts, and tour a lot, and I often meet the fans afterwards. I hear a lot about people's experiences in the nineties, right? And in some ways, like I said that it feels so far. Away in some ways, because it is twenty five years ago that that time period on the other hand, it feels pretty current I don't know. It's weird so reality bites celebrated its twenty fifth anniversary this year and you got to reunite with the cast with on a rider with Ethan Hawke with Ben Stiller all there. What was that like for you to be back with the old gang? You know what it in some ways? I mean the old gang for me was really thin. That was who I really hung out with I, I've only hung out with the other folks. A couple of times even though we look like we're all best friends, but it, it it's it's like being a snow globe. Again, I as a musician. I talk about the song almost on a daily basis, because people are interested in there playing my music all the time, the, the actors in the movie, they aren't living that over and over and over again, like I am with the song, because song to stick with you even more than movies. But it was fun to sort of all be there and sort of be able to see the think back to where we were and where we are now. So we're gonna play together. We are gonna play together. While while I walk over there. Can you tell me like how you when you sing the song over and over and over again? I mean, we sang it twice this morning. Ready practicing. Are you still able to put yourself in the place? You were when you wrote it or does it sort of exists outside of you right now? And I it I. Won't quest really long answer for me, a lot of Cedric. It's funny because when I approached the song stay, I definitely just like with all my songs it's kind of like acting. I, I was sort of an actor before I was musician. And so when I see, when I sing the same things over and over again, I, I don't know, for some reason able to tap into what's going on, now in my life, or I think about where I was then when I was writing the song. On the way you can bring yourself back there. Yeah. And also, I think the melody carries it along a lot. I don't know. The melody is something that's familiar and often right now. We don't have it. There are a few people in the room. But when I play live, especially there's so many faces singing back with me and at me. And with me that it makes me sort of empathize feel where they are because there's so many songs that for me that I connect with. I get it. I I'm often in the audience watching other people, you know, hoping they sing that song. That's my favorite not realizing it's from twenty years ago or fifty years ago, or whatever, shall we do this? Let's do it. Let me take one award tickets. This is me living out some kind of much music fantasy. Music fan, I like that much music banjo fantasy Muslim much music, which is the name of your new record. It is the next. Yeah, exactly what to call it thinking of calling it a simple trick to happiness. But music Banja fan better. Maybe that'll be the Canadian release. We're gonna play a k. I only Hugh, would I want to..

lisa Leeson Audi Ethan Hawke New York Ben Stiller Hugh twenty five years twenty fifth twenty years fifty years
New 'Men in Black: International' trailer is out

This Is Only A Test

01:12 min | 3 years ago

New 'Men in Black: International' trailer is out

"Men in black trailer is out men in black international Wilson's going to the song for this one. No, he's not even in it, though. It it does Tessa Thompson has two vendors Tessa Thompson, and Chris Hemsworth. Leeson is also in it as well as Emma Thompson and Rebecca Ferguson plays the villain. So this is second trailer. It's the it really shows off their chemistry, which we saw in Iraq. So I'm really looking forward to it very elegant or somebody else. It is not it is f f Gary gray who to wreck did the fast fear fest fears eight Phil bay the furious. Yeah, that's fine. I'm into that was that was opportunity for a segue that I did not make us a little dog going to be in it a little pug. They're not gonna have Will Smith you might as well have the little Dino. And sure worms was the little dog is the Wurmser in the trailer was was was the dog voiced by Joe Pesci or something. Or is that another dog by any of us at this table? Could could probably do the it was it was not. It was not a it was a character actor Tim Tim Blaney

Tessa Thompson Tim Tim Blaney Emma Thompson Wilson Joe Pesci Chris Hemsworth Will Smith Iraq Leeson Gary Gray Rebecca Ferguson Phil Bay
"leeson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"That would need to be shifted in order for Leeson Neubauer win. So why is she asking for financial support? Why is she asking for money for a recount that? In all likelihood isn't going to happen. I took a look back at the twenty eleven Wisconsin recount and found that the cost was in an election of about one point four one point five million votes. The cost was five hundred to six hundred thousand dollars now on my show yesterday. I had Brian Haggadah on and presumably he's been talking to his attorneys about how much recount would cost and just going through all the logistics of this because they've got to prepare for that possibility. He said it would cost somewhere in the neighborhood of two million dollars. I thought immediately after hearing that that sounded a little bit high. I would ballpark did just based on the twenty sixteen recount cost and the twenty eleven recount costs somewhere around a million dollars in any event. It is a massive amount of money. The total amount raised. Is by each of the candidates give or take one point five one point six million dollars. So it would take a massive effort and without any real evidence that you're going to be able to change the outcome. You're not going to be able to motivate a lot of people to be donating money. Heck, even Eric Holder has his limit for how much he's going to give Lisa Neubauer to try to steal Wisconsin supreme court away. It's unlikely that she's going to have the money. Now, she is independently wealthy is she really going to spend all of that money. She and her husband sold the business. Janitorial supply business in two thousand seventeen presumably for millions. I mean, it was doing a whole lot of as I reported exclusively. It had fifteen million dollars in state contracts with the state of Wisconsin alone. So it was doing a lot of business. It was very successful business. So theoretically, she's got the. The money where she might be able to sell fun to recount would that be smart? I mean, you can virtue signal all you want like Stacey Abrams about how an election was stolen from you. And you believe that you're the winner. And like Lisa Neubauer, go on Facebook live and say we wanna make sure every vote is counted. But she's also smart. She's not a stupid lady. She understands that. She's not going to say, we're we're looking into we're going to do a recount we're looking into taking those steps because she knows it's not likely it would be essentially a wasted effort. So why is she raising all this money for one? She loaned her campaign two hundred fifty thousand dollars. If the campaign doesn't have the money to pay it back. She's either got a forgive the loan or she's got a raise more money. It's entirely likely she's raising money to pay back that loan. The other possibility is what I think is equally likely a losing candidate or winning candidate for that matter. But in this case, it would be a losing candidate can keep their political apparatus open, and they can continue to raise money for their next election. For example, Lisa Neubauer loses for supreme court. She's got the political campaign. What you do is. You don't take donations individually you have to set up a campaign. So that the campaign is the entity that takes in this money. So what she does is she sets up. Lisa Neubauer for supreme court twenty nine the money that's leftover from that run could be transferred to Lisa Neubauer for supreme court twenty twenty. I don't believe you've seen the last of Leeson Neubauer given that. The only candidate who has already declared in the twenty twenty supreme court race to unseat conservative. Daniel Kelly is local crazy person f alone. She would immediately be a very very strong candidate the twenty twenty election. I have long said is going to be far easier for liberals to win than twenty nine thousand nine even though twenty nine thousand nine seemed like a slam dunk, even though Neubauer had every advantage going for her even though conservative money was scared away by Brian Hagedorn old blog posts and the Lisa Neubauer superpac known as the Milwaukee journal sentinel putting out story after story after story about what a crazy bigot..

Leeson Neubauer Lisa Neubauer Wisconsin Eric Holder Facebook Stacey Abrams Daniel Kelly Milwaukee journal Brian Hagedorn two hundred fifty thousand dol six hundred thousand dollars fifteen million dollars six million dollars two million dollars million dollars
"leeson" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Used to feel. New. Another day. It made me feel so. He day. Was so untimely. When my soul. Didn't just. No longer. Yeah. No. To. This to my father. Francis. It's a song girls in the band road. Leeson wendy. Never.

Leeson wendy Francis
Largest-ever U.S. border seizure of fentanyl made in Arizona: officials

KDWN Programming

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Largest-ever U.S. border seizure of fentanyl made in Arizona: officials

"The hour new this morning. The White House is pointing to a historic drug bust as a reason for tighter border security, US customs and border protection officials said this week that they made the biggest feno bust ever along the border, capturing more than two hundred pounds of the deadly synthetic opioid Arizona White House, counselor Kellyanne Conway reacting to the bus and people say there's no crisis at the border is manufactured. I point to what happened was released today and happened over last weekend two hundred and fifty pounds of sentinel. Shannon is enough to kill over fifty million Americans. It has a street value of about one hundred million dollars. So is lucrative, but it's also lethal and the CDC has reported centers for disease control reported. Sentinel is contributing the highest accelerate overdose deaths because. Milligrams tiny sentinel. Is enough to kill you is being wasted to St. Pels Leeson to marijuana heroin cocaine meth. And we know that it's being manufacturing predominantly in China. Many people. Call Chinese this point. He made a commitment to President Trump. In early December to schedule sentinel. And so that it would be controlled substance, meaning a crime punishable on really at the highest levels in China. We make good on that. Commitment because we know that this is killing millions of thousands of Americans, but these millions of doses I mean, people have to stop

Sentinel White House China Shannon St. Pels Leeson Kellyanne Conway CDC Arizona United States President Trump Marijuana Cocaine Heroin One Hundred Million Dollars Two Hundred Pounds Fifty Pounds
"leeson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:13 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The hormones get started, it's even better. Brisk radiation. We're just trying to the nipple of the breast reduce the it's called gonig. Amass Konica mass means abreast like a woman in a man and the hormones because the hormones takeaway testosterone allow allow the estrogens to go rampant in the body, and they caused the breast to grow. So you can reduce the chance of having kind of commands to your breast enlargement from seventy percent down to about twenty eight percent with just a few treatment. So we see many men in your predicament. Okay. So you can perform that you've got some we do every day. That's a whole team treat prostate cancer. What what's your prostate cancer situation? Now, I had radiation treatment about it in the past this and someone hormones are sorted at work. What was your PSA Leeson score? When you started the the PSA was ten and the Gleason schools, seven and like. Like eight or nine weeks of standard radiation collect? Yeah. And how long ago was that that was in twenty four team on may twenty four. Yeah. You might wanna take a look at our book that it's something that we talk about. And if you look at the data for your numbers for Gleason, seven PSA, ten prostate cancer nine weeks of radiation has about a sixty percent success rate. Our treatment has a ninety percent success rate in the half, the time and half the cost doc, I'm sorry. I didn't know. You did help. But you treated me for the went to the lymph nodes, and you help me with that. Okay. So at least we know each other, I guess some of the show is to help you. But some of the show is also helped listeners who may be in the same predicament. But yes, we do treat the breast. It's a few treatments. There's no side effects. And as soon as you do it the better. So you don't get big breasts and painful browser Larchmont by. Okay. Well, thank you, Dr shackling. I'll be on any time. God bless you. And thank you. Bye. Okay. I want to talk about a woman who is interesting woman. She has pancreas cancer spread to the media Steinem or spread to the lymph nodes. She was diagnosed last summer at that time shared a abdominal pain. She went to a local hospital. She I went there. She was told they couldn't help her. She came to us, and I saw her we offered radio surgery offered treatment to the pancreas and to the lymph nodes in the chest, those two areas retreated shed. Moment both areas were successful. And then about two weeks ago, she came in with her family. She said she was at a local hospital. They told her that the cancer traveled to the liver and that she should go on hospice. They couldn't do anything that cancer was incurable and she should go on hospice pretty much to wait to die. And the family was really confused because that last summer that treatment with me and everything was fine. So I called up the hospital we tried to get the records. And when we call to get the records. There wasn't any scan of the aftermath. There's only a of the neck and neck was fine. So we immediately offered to get a pet scan PET pet scan which is the most sensitive test. And it looks from the head all the way down to the legs. And we got the pet scan. We compared it actually I didn't have the radiologists to it. So it was done independently. And in fact, the cancer in the pancreas is in remission, the cancer and the media Steinem, the lymph node is in remission and deliver is perfectly fine. Fine. So, wow, what a difference. It makes it she came in had she listened to the advice at the other place. She would have been on hospice waiting to die. Instead, she came here for a checkup. We did a scan. It was all done in one day. I actually half of a day got approval. We did the scan. We got her the results who gave her copies of the images and reports and we're happy to tower that she's intermission. The cancer is in remission. There is no cancer. No lever. She's doing great. She's fully functional. And so sometimes a little bit dangerous to not know what to do. And that's why we urge people to get second. Opinions. It's really beneficial and many people derived on only benefit a joy in a second lease on life, and she has a second lease on life. Thanks to coming. Not only for the treatment for non invasive treatment for her pancreas noninvasive treatment for her lymph nodes, but also to comeback after she was told by others. There was no hope. And now she finds out not only was there. Hope she's in remission. So it's great news all around, and we sent her and her family our best wishes for continued good health and she'll be back. What's likely in about three months for another checkup? Our patients do like to come in for checkups they do like to get good news. And obviously the sweetest part of each day is to give our patients. Good news. Now, we're talking about a fifty two year old woman. Here's a woman who's whittled Chesnot children's has multiple medical problems. She has COPD Nympheas Eamon high blood pressure. She'd been up big smoker for many years, she's on, hey hours, shorter breath. Shed a chest x Ray for routine surgeon. She's found a nod your long shot a cat scan and the pet scan. And then she saw Palmer knowledge as she went to one of the big hospitals pulmonologist said she had to have radical surgery. She quit smoking magin. A fifty two year old woman was smoking forty years. She quit smoking. She has COPD her weight increased from one zero five to one forty five in the last couple of years. She saw the puck who told her shed Deb surge. Arteries. She saw the surgeons who told her she had to have surgery, and then she came in with her parents for valuation, and I heard I reviewed the records. And I said, well, you can have surgery, but the problem is you're already short of breath. As is if they cut out your lung or part of your long where you need your long to get oxygen. So they cut out your lung. You're gotta have more shortness of breath because they're cutting out your long along with this cancer. And who knows what happens if you have another cancer. And what are they gonna do? Then they're gonna cut out more, and you're going to have less long less ability to breathe and she is shorter breath on inhalers on oxygen. And I said if it were me I would avoid surgery because I wouldn't want part of my lung to be removed. I feel that way actually for most people. It doesn't have to be as severe COPD emphysema patient. But I think that if you keep your body intact for most instances, you'll be better off. And thank God, we have radio surgery pinpoint treatment trim that comes from thousands of angles to treat lung. And other cancers just like the woman, I told you a few minutes ago who had a pancreas cancer in lymph node in her chest filled with cancer both were treated both remission. This woman had the inspiration. She decided after thoughtful deliberation with her family and our loved ones not to have the certain members her that one of the biggest hospitals in the pulmonary doctors for pushing for surgery, the long doctors were pushing her for surgery surgeons are pushing for surgery and against all that she decided to come to radio to New York. She had treatment last year. She came for follow up and the cancer is gone. It's completely gone. She is happy. Her breathing is.

pancreas cancer COPD Steinem Gleason schools testosterone Leeson Gleason abdominal pain Dr shackling Larchmont New York Deb Palmer fifty two year nine weeks twenty eight percent seventy percent ninety percent
"leeson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"leeson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"It was Lisa Leeson cult jam and the jets, and like they were all out at the same time, the jets that was the other like chick can a man that came out along the same time of Lisa. Lisa Hemmer, a decade ago this day two thousand nine solely landed that jet in in the Hudson river ten years ago today. Everybody was fine. That's when I discovered Twitter, I never use Twitter before until that incident because somebody that was on that flight tweeted the photo of them in the water on Twitter. And that's how I discovered who. What's this Twitter thing? I've got to check this out the movie that Clint Eastwood made about his life, and what happened after the landing and how maybe. People were questioning whether or not he could have made it back to a runway because I'm Tom Hanks in some Hayes played. So I was really good. It's Clint Eastwood movie. And of course, it was the the plane was disabled by a giant bird strike over the birds swans or ducks or something that hit both the engines I actually have Kyle. I actually have the audio of this is silly sullen burger right after the plane was hit by the bird strikes. Talking back to the control. Wow. Thank you. Lyndon b. Okay. Yeah. You need to return. Going down into. What do you need to win? Thank you. Now. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Of course. Nobody died. Everybody was fine. Sully was the hero. I don't remember that in the movie. I don't remember that. The direct back and forth that sully had with air traffic control. Drew Brees is forty today could quite possibly be playing in the Super Bowl if he makes it past the NFC championship and the Los Angeles. Rams you drew in Super Bowl I want? I hate to say I don't want to root for the patriots the patriots and the saints or the most interesting match up to me..

Twitter Clint Eastwood Drew Brees Lisa Leeson Lisa Hemmer Sully Lisa patriots Super Bowl I Hudson river Tom Hanks Los Angeles NFC Lyndon b. Kyle Rams Hayes ten years
U.S. stops suspension of joint military exercises with South Korea

Tood Schnitt

00:35 sec | 4 years ago

U.S. stops suspension of joint military exercises with South Korea

"Heard these terms but what do they mean it's so confusing, well it was confusing not anymore I'm telling you about. True price from truecar it's a price that actually means something because it's the. Exact price you'll pay for the, car you want including fees accessories and best of all you'll, know if you're true prices competitive because truecar shows you what other people are paying for. The same car that you want so when. You're ready to buy a new or a used car visit truecar, to, enjoy a more confident car buying experience Just Senator John McCain from one of his closest allies in, the Senate South Carolina, Republican Senator Lindsey Graham. Was, John McCain's best friend in

Senator Lindsey Graham Senator John Mccain South Korea Senate Fox News Rachel Sutherland Fox Leeson Scranton World Trade Center Donald Trump Amata John Washington South Carolina Lisa Lacerra Mike Pompeo Truecar Stanford Peterle Pennsylvania
Mike Pilch, Travis Ryan King and Leeson Franklin discussed on Wisconsin Womens Sports Hour

Wisconsin Womens Sports Hour

00:50 sec | 4 years ago

Mike Pilch, Travis Ryan King and Leeson Franklin discussed on Wisconsin Womens Sports Hour

"W i s n and w w h two milwaukee an iheartradio station i'm mike pilch toronto police say nine people are dead after pedestrians were run over by van today on a busy city street officials say at least sixteen or hurt after the attack the driver the vanson custody nashville police say a citizens tip lead to the arrest of a suspect that a deadly waffle house shooting police say the citizen notified authorities said a man matching the description of twenty nine year old travis ryan king was seen walking through a construction area and into the woods ron king is suspected of killing four people the restaurant leeson franklin say thirtysevenyearold garrett clue has turned himself at a milwaukee police and charged with first degree sexual assault of a child under the age of twelve and former brewer coach and broadcaster davey nelson is passed away at the age of seventy three.

Mike Pilch Travis Ryan King Leeson Franklin Toronto Nashville Thirtysevenyearold Garrett Milwaukee Assault Davey Nelson Twenty Nine Year