18 Burst results for "Lee Savio Beers"

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of mayor might Eric Adam speed Jeffree Mays from The New York Times and WNYC's Elizabeth Kim look at the ways he'll apparently be different from mayor de Blasio in some ways in which we just don't know Also all the other local and national results plus the vocabulary of climate change What the words we use about the climate really mean from greenhouse to net zero The Brian lair show at ten a.m. on WNYC It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Noelle king And I'm Steven skip Many parents already know what they think of this news They've been poised hands on the doorknob ready to run out to get shots for their kids age 5 to 11 and they are now authorized to get those shots as soon as they can find a place that is ready to administer them The CDC gave final approval to COVID vaccines for 5 to 11 year olds last night NPR's Allison Aubrey is covering the story Allison good morning Good morning Steve Let's work through the evidence here What is the case for vaccination for 5 to 11 year olds You know the advisers who met yesterday to weigh in on this really brought to light that though many kids do get only mild symptoms from COVID There are lots of cases of serious illness more than 700 children have died from COVID among 5 to 11 year olds There have been a 172 deaths more than 8300 hospitalizations Here's one of the panel members doctor Oliver Brooks explaining his vote The bottom line is the data shown here today that the vaccine is safe and effective So children are dying and we can reduce hospitalization cases and deaths with the safe and effective vaccine that will benefit the community Now polls show that a lot of parents are on the fence about this but there are plenty of eager parents too We plan to get our ten year old daughter vaccinated at the first opportunity Something similar happening in our family We will talk about people who have skepticism in a moment but will shots be available for the parents who want them as soon as today Well shots can start now but it may be early next week before the campaign is fully operational thousands of pediatricians have signed up to administer the vaccine many pharmacies community health centers and in some areas schools will administer it too But remember it's a new product It's a lower dose vaccine packaged separately from the one given to adults and older adolescents So it's being shipped out and distributed Here's doctor Lee savio beers She's president of the American academy of pediatrics We know that states are making their deliveries of the vaccine now And so parents should reach out to their pediatrician or their local communities to find out where the vaccine will be available It may take a few days It may you know maybe go into next week but everyone's working as hard as they can Now each state is handling distribution a little bit differently Steve so best to check in with your pediatrician or local pharmacy and try to schedule an appointment Let's keep working through the evidence here You mentioned that the CDC advisers found that there is a degree of risk even for little kids not as big as for older people but there's a risk And that's why they recommend this vaccine But aren't there also some side effects Yeah lots of discussion of this yesterday the most common side effect is a sore arm not surprisingly but turns out fever and chills are pretty rare among 5 to 11 year olds That's what the clinical trial data showed regarding serious risks the chief concern has been myocarditis which is an inflammation of the heart muscle It's very rare in the range of about one case per 20,000 or so and mostly seen in adolescent boys and young men But there have been no deaths from myocarditis following COVID vaccination and most patients recover quickly Here's one of the members of the committee doctor Matthew Daly a pediatrician in Colorado who wants parents to hear this message To understandable that you have questions and concerns and this may be particularly true given what seems to be a deliberate campaign of disinformation out there And so I would just encourage you to talk to your child's pediatrician or family physician you know ask your questions Tell them what your concerns are The most recent data from the CDC shows that 38% of 5 to 11 year olds have antibodies to the virus indicating they've already had COVID but the recommendation that these children should still get the vaccine And that's because pediatricians say while there is some degree of protection following a COVID infection it won't last as long or be as strong as the immunity that comes from the vaccine Alison I want to ask about one more group of families some parents have kids under 5 And of course this is anxious for people they've been able to protect themselves can't protect their kids when can parents with kids under 5 expect news You know Pfizer and Moderna are both working on this but they would need to submit their data to the FDA This could be months away Alison thanks so much Thank you That's NPR's Allison Aubrey The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today in its first major gun case in more than ten years In 2008 the court ruled that the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms guarantees people the right to have a gun in their home for self defense Today the question is how far a state can go in regulating whether a person can carry a gun outside of their home Here's an emperor's legal affairs correspondent Nina totenberg At issue in today's case is New York's so called proper cause law It requires a license to carry a gun outside the home and it restricts those licenses to those going hunting or to target practice and those who can demonstrate a need for self protection like a bank messenger carrying cash or a store owner who wants to keep a gun in his store for self protection The state however does not allow people to get concealed carry permits because of a generalized fear or desire for self defense Instead applicants have to show a special or particular need to carry a gun a proper cause The law is being challenged by the New York rifle and pistol association an arm of the NRA and two men who live in upstate New York one got a permit to carry a gun to and from work and both got licenses to carry weapons for hunting or for shooting practice but they were denied the right to carry guns outside the home as a general matter of self defense as opposed to showing that they faced any unusual threat Former solicitor general Paul Clement who represents the challengers in the Supreme Court compares the right to carry guns outside the home to the right of free speech guaranteed by the constitution These are all rights that the founding generation thought were sufficiently important that we're going to enshrine them in the Bill of Rights And I think that judgment means that the states have to respect those rights I don't think we can forget We're talking about an instrument that is designed to kill people Richard deering is chief of appeals for the city of New York I think the problem the petitioners have is that the public safety considerations are so tremendous and varied on the side of gun regulation in a way that is not equally true of other rights Among the 87 friend of the court briefs in the case is one supporting New York filed by a group of top Justice Department officials from previous Republican administrations Among them is J Michael looty who served for 15 years as a federal appeal court judge earning a reputation as one of the country's most prominent and conservative judges He argues that a.

Allison Aubrey Eric Adam Jeffree Mays Elizabeth Kim mayor de Blasio NPR news Noelle king Steven skip Steve Let CDC COVID Oliver Brooks Lee savio beers myocarditis WNYC NPR Matthew Daly The New York Times
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And we can reduce hospitalizations cases and deaths with the safe and effective vaccine that will benefit the community Now polls show that many parents around the fence about this but there are plenty of eager parents too I plan to get my ten year old daughter vaccinated at the first opportunity Well we may be right behind you in line or right in front of you No But is it already possible like today to go out and get a shot if you are one of the parents who's eager Well shots can start now but it may be into early next week before the campaign is fully operational Thousands of pediatricians have signed up to administer the vaccine pharmacies will administer two But remember this is a new product It's a lower dose vaccine packaged separately from the one given to adults and older adolescents So it's being shipped out and distribute it Here's doctor Lee savio beers She's president of the American academy of pediatrics We know that states are making their deliveries of the vaccine now And so parents should reach out to their pediatrician or their local communities to find out where the vaccine will be available It may take a few days It may you know maybe go into next week but everyone's working as hard as they can Each state is handling distribution a little bit differently Steve so best to check in with your pediatrician or your local pharmacy and try to schedule an appointment Alison let's try to get some information on the table for parents who are still thinking this through You mentioned that some kids do get sick Some kids have died certainly not the numbers that you see with older people but there is a risk there so that's one factor and people have to weigh that against possible side effects Did the advisers discuss the risk of side effects for kids in their deliberations Yes absolutely I mean the most common side effect is a sore arm not surprisingly but turns out fever chills are pretty rare among 5 to 11 year olds That's what the clinical trial data showed Regarding serious risks the chief concern has been myocarditis which is an inflammation of the heart It's very rare in the range of about one case per 20,000 or so and seen mostly in adolescent boys and young men but there have been no deaths from myocarditis falling COVID vaccination and most patients recover quickly Here's one member of the committee doctor Matthew Daly at practicing pediatrician in Colorado He wanted parents to hear this message To understandable that you have questions and concerns and this may be particularly true given what seems to be a deliberate campaign of disinformation out there And so I would just encourage you to talk to your child's pediatrician or family physician you know ask your questions Tell them what you're concerns are He says pediatricians will be standing by to talk to families And piers Allison Aubrey thanks for standing by to talk to us Thank you Steve Okay the Supreme Court here's a case today that could decide whether people are allowed to carry concealed weapons into airports churches schools and shopping centers without a special license This case involves the New York State which is one of 8 states that outlaws carrying guns outside of the home And a decision on the scope of the Second Amendment which is what this would be may hinge on former president Donald Trump's three appointees And pierce Carrie Johnson is covering this case carrying a morning Good morning Steve So will you talk us through the legalities here on the Second Amendment Sure So remember in 2008 the Supreme Court declared that people have an individual right to bear arms for self defense in their homes and in 2010 the court applied that right to the states Today Steve the open question is does that Second Amendment right follow them outside their homes A gun rights group and two New Yorkers want the right to carry concealed weapons outside and not just for things like target practice or hunting The New York restrictions require them to demonstrate a special need for protection but they say they should have a mostly unfettered right So the New York State law is on the docket here And of course New York is a big state This would be a big case regardless but might this apply to all states in different ways Well many states already allow concealed carry but 8 states that includes New York California Massachusetts New Jersey and Maryland do not That's a small number of states but a big population something like 80 million people in those areas according to experts at duke university who follow gun rights issues Now depending on how the Supreme Court rules and how it decides to write the decision this case could have much wider impact What do you know about the current makeup of the justices and their views of gun rights Here's what we know The National Rifle Association supported all three of president Trump's former president Trump's Supreme Court nominees just as Neil Gorsuch is on record saying he would have taken up earlier gun rights challenges the court rejected And while they were appeals court judges both Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett said they would have struck down some gun restrictions Kavanaugh for instance has written about how the history matters to him that any gun bans or restrictions need to be rooted in text history and tradition And Barrett said one of her most important writings on the lower courts was a dissenting opinion where she traced the history to conclude in her view that fallons who aren't dangerous should be able to own guns that is not the case now That's very interesting So their presumption is that you do have a right to carry weapons anywhere Is what I hear from some of that except they want to find if there has been in text or tradition a specific prohibition that they can base current regulations on Does the news play into this at all The fact that we're in a time that where it seems to be increasing gun violence certainly increasing prominence of mass shootings Well the Justice Department and local police around the country are very concerned about gum gun homicides remember in the landmark Heller case back in 2008 the late justice Scalia left plenty of room to uphold some reasonable gun restrictions in places like schools and interestingly enough in this case in New York There's a divide among political conservatives and a little bit at issue we're going to have to hear in the argument today how the Supreme Court Justices show their hands if they do Carrie thanks for your insights Thank you That's NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Lee savio beers myocarditis Alison let fever chills Matthew Daly Supreme Court Allison Aubrey New York Steve Steve Okay president Trump pierce Carrie Johnson American academy of pediatrics Donald Trump Neil Gorsuch Brett Kavanaugh Amy Coney Barrett Colorado fallons National Rifle Association
"lee savio beers" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

04:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Many parents already know what they think of this news. They've been poised hands on the doorknob ready to run out to get shots for their kids age 5 to 11 and they are now authorized to get those shots as soon as they can find a place that is ready to administer them. The CDC gave final approval to COVID vaccines for 5 to 11 year olds last night. NPR's Allison Aubrey is covering this story. Allison, good morning. Good morning, Steve. Let's work through the evidence here. What is the case for vaccination for 5 to 11 year olds? You know, the advisers who met yesterday to weigh in on this really brought to light that though many kids do get only mild symptoms from COVID. There are lots of cases of serious illness more than 700 children have died from COVID among 5 to 11 year olds. There have been a 172 deaths, more than 8300 hospitalizations. Here's one of the panel members, doctor Oliver Brooks, explaining his vote. The bottom line is the data showed here today that the vaccine is safe and effective. So children are dying and we can reduce hospitalization cases and deaths with the safe and effective vaccine that will benefit the community. Now polls show that a lot of parents around the fence about this, but there are plenty of eager parents too. We plan to get our ten year old daughter vaccinated at the first opportunity. Something similar happening in our family. We will talk about people who have skepticism in a moment, but will shots be available for the parents who want them as soon as today. Well, shots can start now, but it may be early next week before the campaign is fully operational, thousands of pediatricians have signed up to administer the vaccine, many pharmacies, community health centers, and in some areas, schools will administer it too, but remember, it's a new product. It's a lower dose vaccine packaged separately from the one given to adults and older adolescents. So it's being shipped out and distributed. Here's doctor Lee savio beers. She's president of the American academy of pediatrics. We know that states are making their deliveries of the vaccine now. And so parents should reach out to their pediatrician or their local communities to find out where the vaccine will be available. It may take a few days. It may, you know, it may be go into next week, but everyone's working as hard as they can. Now each state is handling distribution a little bit differently, Steve, so best to check in with your pediatrician or local pharmacy and try to schedule an appointment. Let's keep working through the evidence here. You mentioned that the CDC advisers found that there is a degree of risk even for little kids, not as big as for older people, but there's a risk. And that's why they recommend this vaccine. But aren't there also some side effects? Yeah, lots of discussion of this yesterday, the most common side effect is a sore arm, not surprisingly, but turns out fever and chills are pretty rare among 5 to 11 year olds. That's what the clinical trial data showed, regarding serious risks, the chief concern has been myocarditis, which is an inflammation of the heart muscle. It's very rare in the range of about one case per 20,000 or so and mostly seen in adolescent boys and young men. But there have been no deaths from myocarditis following COVID vaccination and most patients recover quickly. Here's one of the members of the committee, doctor Matthew Daly, a pediatrician in Colorado, who wants parents to hear this message. To understand about that you have questions and concerns and this may be particularly true given what seems to be a deliberate campaign of disinformation out there. And so I would just encourage you to talk to your child's pediatrician or family physician, you know, ask your questions. Tell them what you're concerned are. The most recent data from the CDC shows that 38% of 5 to 11 year olds have antibodies to the virus indicating they've already had COVID, but the recommendation of these children should still get the vaccine. And that's because pediatricians say, while there is some degree of protection following a COVID infection, it won't last as long or be as strong as the immunity that comes from the vaccine. Alison, I want to ask about one more group of families, some parents have kids under 5. And of course, this is anxious for people they've been able to protect themselves can't protect their kids when can parents with kids under 5 expect news. You know, Pfizer and Moderna are both working on this, but they would need to submit their data to the FDA. This could be months away. Allison, thanks so much. Thank you. That's.

COVID Allison Aubrey Oliver Brooks CDC Lee savio Steve NPR Allison myocarditis American academy of pediatrics Matthew Daly chills fever Colorado Alison Moderna Pfizer FDA
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:44 min | Last month

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It done Not immediately A pharmacies won't just take the adult vaccine and give it to kids Pfizer has made a new product which is one third the dose enough to be effective but also chosen to minimize side effects The kids vaccine will come in different packaging and orange vials so as not to be confused with the adult version And these will need to be distributed out of pharmacies will offer it as will many pediatricians in their offices I spoke to pediatrician Lee savio beer She's president of the American academy of pediatrics She points out that the CDC will weigh in with recommendations too It does appear that there is plenty of vaccine supply available but I think also for parents to know that it won't be an instantaneous as soon as the vaccine is recommended by the CDC it may be a day or two or three before everything is really fully up and running The same goes for other locations that will offer vaccines to kids including pharmacies So if authorized early November is likely when 5 to 11 year olds can begin to be vaccinated Early November okay In the meantime millions of adults are eligible for booster shots and a lot of people are asking whether they need to get the same brand of booster shot as they got when they took the vaccine initially What's the decision there People do not need to be boost it with the same vaccine they receive for the first two doses It's possible for people who got the J&J vaccine to be boosted with one of the two mRNA vaccines There's some data to suggest to suggest that the mix and match approach with J&J can kind of boost antibodies to a greater extent But the message coming from lots of experts I talked to following this closely is that all of the vaccines are effective So mix and match could be more about convenience You know if you go to the pharmacy and they have only Pfizer or only Moderna you can get the one they have CDC director Rochelle Walensky said Friday that the agency will not weigh in with specific advice on which one to pick We will not articulate a preference My understanding is that most people will have done largely well with the initial vaccine that they got There may be some people who might prefer another vaccine over the one that they received and the current CDC recommendations now make that possible To the extent there are some differences of opinion among doctors It's because the science doesn't really clearly point to an optimal choice Doctor walensky stressed that all the vaccines are effective All of them are effective but if a person decides they want a particular brand will the pharmacy give them what they want You know it may vary a CVS spokesperson told me if you want to specify you should schedule in advance to assure it's available CVS says at this time participating pharmacies offer either Pfizer or Moderna depending on the location not both so best to inquire before if you have a preference You know this was one justification for the mix and match authorization not so much to suggest that one vaccine is better than the other but just to make it more convenient If you show up at the pharmacy for a booster you can receive whichever brand is available Okay so it makes the logistics a little bit easier Maybe even a lot easier Absolutely What about booster shots So older people and people with certain conditions are eligible at this point Is that going to expand to include more people anytime soon It is possible doctor walensky said they are actively looking at whether immunity is trailing off in other age groups It's been reported that the FDA is actively looking at whether people 40 in app should be eligible for a booster doctor walensky spoke at a White House briefing on Friday about this We are following the data in real time and we are looking at its ongoing efficacy as well as its potential for waning in our other age groups And we will update our recommendations as soon as we have more data It could be that after the agencies get through the process of determining authorization and recommendations for younger children they could look at boosters for these other age groups Okay so Sunday is Halloween and then after that we are pretty much headed full on into Thanksgiving Christmas new year's the holiday season right What's the saying about the holidays this year Well beginning with Halloween it is not lost on doctor walensky that kids absolutely love this holiday I would say put on those costumes stay outside and enjoy your trick or treating So good for kids to mask up if they're indoors with a crowd most kids are used to this by now As for Thanksgiving and beyond with so many people eager to celebrate with friends and family she says the more people who are vaccinated in your group the safer the gathering will be as of now about 78% of people 12 and up in the U.S. have had at least one shot And Pierre's Ellison Aubrey thanks Allison Thank.

CDC walensky Pfizer Lee savio Moderna Rochelle Walensky J American academy of pediatrics CVS FDA White House Ellison Aubrey U.S. Pierre Allison Thank
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:47 min | Last month

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"In on that drawing for that really cool electric bike From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Sarah mccammond and I'm Audi Cornish Vaccine maker Pfizer and its partner BioNTech say their COVID vaccine is more than 90% effective in children ages 5 through 11 and the company say their data supports authorization of the vaccine for this age group which could come as soon as next week NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us now with the latest welcome back Allison Hi there Audie What exactly does the clinical trial data from Pfizer particular show about vaccinations in children from this age group Sure a data from more than 2000 children shows the vaccine was about 91% effective against symptomatic infection There were no cases of serious illness No cases of multi system inflammatory syndrome children received one third of the dose of adults which was enough to be effective but also chosen to minimize side effects Now I spoke to pediatrician David kimberlin of the university of Alabama at Birmingham He is also a liaison representative to the CDC's vaccine advisory committee Having this vaccine available for 5 three 11 year olds is not only going to protect the child but also protect the child's loved ones You know we've already lost over 500 children to this to this virus Now with this likely authorization over the next week or two I really think we're going to have a tool to be able to prevent that He says while it's true that most children have only mild illness from the virus there have been more than 1.8 million cases among 5 to 11 year olds and thousands of hospitalizations among this age group Now the soonest in authorization would come Audi is next week Remember advisers to the CDC need to review all this data the agency needs to make a determination So if it's authorized in the coming days how will this work in terms of distribution Sure a pediatricians have been preparing for this for months and thousands are already offering the vaccine to older kids 12 and up in their offices In addition retail pharmacies are ready too A spokesperson for CVS tells me they are prepared to vaccinate 5 to 11 year olds Now remember it's a lower dose It's a different product Pfizer has designed orange packaging for the new vials I spoke to pediatrician Lee savio beer She's president of the American academy of pediatrics She tells me it's going to take a bit of time to get the new pediatric vaccines distributed It does appear that there is plenty of vaccine supply available but I think also for parents to know that it won't be an instantaneous as soon as the vaccine is recommended by the CDC it may be a day or two or three before everything is really fully up and running So bottom line Adi be patient But you're saying that there's a pent up demand I mean do pediatricians think most families will actually bring their 5 to 11 year olds in to get a COVID vaccine Well I'm about 44% of adolescents 12 to 17 years old I've been fully vaccinated So that's one data point And a recent poll from the COVID-19 vaccine education and equity project found about two thirds of parents of 5 to 11 year olds do plan to vaccinate their children Now this poll was done before there was data out to show the vaccine appears to be safe and effective Here's doctor kimberlin again I would expect we're still going to have kind of that initial rush of 20 or 30% of the population rushing out to get the vaccine Another pretty substantial chunk holding back for a while And hopefully a small percentage but it's a percentage We'll say no we're never going to get that for our child Now Kimberly says he hopes that this careful process of evaluation by the FDA and CDC will give parents confidence to opt for the vaccine So again what is expected next week is for the FDA to weigh in on authorization followed by CDC recommendations in early November That's NPR's Allison Aubrey thanks so much Thank you Ari Drivers are less likely to speed when they know there's a police officer around the corner with the radar gun Same goes for taxpayers They are less likely to cheat when they think they might get caught The Biden administration and congressional Democrats want to give the IRS a better financial radar gun Banking information to help spot tax cheats Republicans and the banking industry are fighting the idea as NPR's Scott horsley reports The American bankers association held its annual convention in Tampa this week and president rob nichol says there was a lot of nervous chatter about the Treasury Department's proposal to make banks share account information with the IRS As I was walking through the convention hall people were pulling me left and right to share stories of customers who had heard about it and were very very concerned about it Republican senator chuck grassley says he's hearing the same concerns I hear from iowans all the time that they don't want the peering eyes of the IRS snooping on them No one is suggesting that banks give the IRS detailed information about every transaction Just an annual total of deposits and withdrawals Still no one particularly likes the idea of having the government look over their shoulder and the complaints about this new proposal are as old as the income tax itself That's just a reminder that tax issues never die right They just keep coming around and around and around Tax notes historian Joseph thorndike says ever since Congress created the income tax early in the last century there have been fights over the information needed to collect it Over time though people get used to having that information shared workers have had their wages reported to the government for more than a hundred years and it's been almost 40 years since senator grassley co sponsored.

Allison Aubrey CDC Pfizer NPR news Sarah mccammond BioNTech Allison Hi symptomatic infection inflammatory syndrome David kimberlin vaccine advisory committee Audi NPR Lee savio COVID university of Alabama kimberlin
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:18 min | 2 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The Instagram research to The Wall Street Journal Senator Richard blumenthal is chair of the consumer protection subcommittee We now know that Facebook routinely puts profits ahead of kids online safety We know it chooses the growth of its products over the well-being of our children and we now know that it is indefensibly delinquent in acting to protect them Facebook has put on hold its work on a kids version of Instagram but the company has said it's just a temporary hold On Capitol Hill several women who now serve in Congress are serving are rather sharing emotional testimony about their personal experiences with abortion NPR's Barbara sprunt says today's oversight hearing was prompted by a Texas law that bans abortion after 6 weeks Missouri congresswoman Cori Bush testified that deciding to get an abortion as a teenager was the hardest decision she had ever made In the summer of 1994 I was raped I became pregnant and I chose to have an abortion Bush was joined by fellow Democrat Barbara Lee of California who testified she received a back alley abortion in Mexico as a teenager I was one of the lucky ones madam chair A lot of girls and women in my generation didn't make it They died from unsafe abortions The hearing also noted actions the federal government could take to protect the right to abortion including a bill that recently passed the house That measure does not however have a path forward in the Senate Barbara sprint and PR news This is NPR From W ABE news in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim beres It's four 32 More than half of all Georgia public school students are now required to wear masks in class This according to The Associated Press That compares to just a handful of districts that mandated masks before school began in August Martha Dalton has more Several metro Atlanta districts drop their mask mandates over the summer when it seemed the worst of COVID might be over Then came the delta variant districts like Atlanta gwinnett Clayton and de cab reinstated mask requirements Still some are holding out The data clearly indicates a mask mandate does not provide a significant change in the cases That's a Cobb county superintendent Chris ragsdale Cobb encourages mask wearing but doesn't require it At a recent school board meeting ragsdale said COVID cases in the district dropped 44% in a three week period Doctor Lee savio beers is the president of the American academy of pediatrics Despite Cobb's improvement she says research shows mass do help slow the spread of COVID in classrooms Our experts have actually reviewed hundreds of studies looking at how masks work And if they're effective and they are effective at decreasing the spread of COVID and other viruses within schools they work best if everybody's wearing them COVID cases are steadily declining across the state Veer says even though children are at a lower risk of contracting COVID schools need to be vigilant when it comes to mitigating the virus We still do have lots of children who are getting very very ill with COVID particularly with the.

Senator Richard blumenthal consumer protection subcommitt Barbara sprunt Cori Bush NPR Facebook Barbara sprint Jim beres Georgia public school Atlanta The Wall Street Journal Barbara Lee Instagram Martha Dalton Chris ragsdale Cobb Missouri Congress COVID Texas
"lee savio beers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:47 min | 2 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. You have heard a lot about booster shots lately. Are they needed when will they be approved and who will actually get them? But there are still tens of millions of people in this country who aren't even eligible for a first vaccine shot. We're talking about Children, 11 years old and younger. The vaccine still is not authorized for them, and Dr Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR last month. That he doesn't see a vaccine for kids coming before the end of this year. That timeline has prompted organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics to urge the Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its authorization process. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She joins us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me here. Okay. So before we get to this letter that you wrote, which urged the FDA to speed up approval of the vaccine for Children, can you just explain very briefly for us? Why is this taking so long in the first place? So I think one of the most important things to emphasize here is that the FDA authorization and approval process really is in place to make sure that when vaccines or any therapeutics actually are available that they're safe and effective And what we know in vaccine development for Children is that we are appropriately more cautious. Typically, vaccine development will start with adults and then we do what's called A gin does de escalation. Where will then work backwards to younger and younger Children? And make sure that the vaccine and the doses that were giving are also safe and effective for younger Children? Because Children are not just like little adults? They there are real issues to figuring out how to vaccinate Children specifically. Yes, absolutely. Children are smaller. They have different physiology there at a different stage of their development, and we want to make sure that anything that we approved for them that's authorized for them is safe and effective. Well, then let's turn to the letter that you wrote. To the FDA in this letter, you say that quote in our view, the rise of the delta variant changes the risk benefit analysis for authorizing vaccines in Children. Can you explain what is that risk benefit analysis in general? So one of the things that we think about every vaccine. Every medication has a potential side effect. And so does the risk outweigh the important benefit that this particular therapeutic can bring. So, for example, we know that covid 19 can be an incredibly serious illness, so it's important. To make sure that that we protect against that now we also know that for younger Children, the risk of severe covid infection is less. And so what we have to do is way is the risk of the vaccine, um less than or greater than the risk of Covid infection. Two Children, and I think it's very clear to us that the risk of covid in Children Far outweighs any potential risk of the vaccine. And just to be clear in this letter that you wrote, you argue that the FDA will have very soon the data it will need to authorize the vaccine for Children, right? Can you just explain what is that data that the FDA will have quite soon? Our understanding from what we're hearing from the clinical trial sites and from the manufacturers is that their trials are are fully enrolled in that At least one of the manufacturers expects to have data available to submit to the FDA, Hopefully, by the end of September, perhaps early in October, and so what That means is that once that data is submitted, the FDA will have a chance to look at it to determine, um the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine and consider the risk benefit for Children. Okay, but the FDA wants Six months of data. Why is that? Can you explain that discrepancy? And how important is that discrepancy? Yes, absolutely, You know, And this is actually something that we've seen with the emergency use authorization of the vaccine and adults. The emergency use authorization came after two months because the FDA really felt and believed that the benefit of approving the vaccine because of the public health emergency was great enough. That that they could rely on the very strong safety data at two months, and the final approval came at six months, which is which is an important landmark. But but a cautious one and we we really believe that the same situation applies for Children. So we absolutely believe that that we have Enough data to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for emergency use authorization in Children after two months. I'm curious because you're a pediatrician. Are you seeing parents coming into your office and asking you to go ahead and just vaccinate their Children? Regardless of what the FDA eventually decides. We are hearing from pediatricians across the country that parents are interested in receiving the FDA vaccine. What we can call off label for their younger Children. We don't recommend that at the AP, and nor does the FDA or the C D. C and the reason for that is that it is important to look at the data from the trials. It is important to make sure that we have approved and authorized The right safe and effective dose for Children. And what we know of the trials is that the dose for younger Children is likely to be less than that for of adults. Lee Sabio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Thank you very much for joining us today. Well, thank you so much for having me here to help grasp day to day life in Afghanistan and how it's changing. One of the people we've been checking in with is Felipe Ribeiro. He runs the Afghanistan office of Doctors without Borders. First spoke with him on August 6th nine days before Kabul fell to the Taliban. And then he was describing the situation in Lashkargah, one of the cities where his medical teams operate as horrific daily bombings burn and shrapnel wounds, stray bullets flying around the hospital compound. When we checked back August 19th. It was a different scene. Much calmer. The Lashkar Gah hospital was full, but not all war injuries. They were delivering healthy babies again. Well, we have asked fully pay Ribeiro back to hear how it's going. Now that the U. S military is gone, and the Taliban have announced an interim government Hi there Good to speak with you again. Hello. Good to speak. You too. Tell me about Lashkar Gar and how it's going now. This is southern Afghanistan. What does your team say? How are they describing the situation today? The situation is very common in the south. I mean, it's basically very calm all over the place in English car guard but also in the rest of the country..

Mary Louise Kelly American Academy of Pediatrics Lee Savio Beers Los Angeles Ailsa Chang Lee Sabio Beers Washington August 19th Food and Drug Administration Felipe Ribeiro Afghanistan 11 years NPR Francis Collins August 6th Lashkargah Six months six months FDA National Institutes of Health
"lee savio beers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:46 min | 2 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. You have heard a lot about booster shots lately. Are they needed when will they be approved and who will actually get them? But there are still tens of millions of people in this country who aren't even eligible for a first vaccine shot. We're talking about Children, 11 years old and younger. The vaccine still is not authorized for them, and Dr Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR last month. That he doesn't see a vaccine for kids coming before the end of this year. That timeline has prompted organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics to urge the Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its authorization process. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She joins us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me here. Okay. So before we get to this letter that you wrote, which urged the FDA to speed up approval of the vaccine for Children, can you just explain very briefly for us? Why is this taking so long in the first place? So I think one of the most important things to emphasize here is that the FDA authorization and approval process really is in place to make sure that when vaccines or any therapeutics actually are available that they're safe and effective And what we know in vaccine development for Children is that we are appropriately more cautious. Typically, vaccine development will start with adults and then we do what's called A gin does de escalation. Where will then work backwards to younger and younger Children? And make sure that the vaccine and the doses that were giving are also safe and effective for younger Children? Because Children are not just like little adults? They there are real issues to figuring out how to vaccinate Children specifically. Yes, absolutely that Children are smaller. They have different physiology there at a different stage of their development, and we want to make sure that anything that we approve for them that's authorized for them is safe and effective. Well, then let's turn to the letter that you wrote. To the FDA in this letter, you say that quote in our view, the rise of the delta variant changes the risk benefit analysis for authorizing vaccines in Children. Can you explain what is that risk benefit analysis in general? So one of the things that we think about every vaccine. Every medication has a potential side effect. And so does the risk outweigh the important benefit that this particular therapeutic can bring. So, for example, we know that covid 19 can be an incredibly serious illness, so it's important. To make sure that that we protect against that now we also know that for younger Children, the risk of severe covid infection is less. And so what we have to do is way is the risk of the vaccine, um less than or greater than the risk of Covid infection. Two Children, and I think it's very clear to us that the risk of covid in Children Far outweighs any potential risk of the vaccine. And just to be clear in this letter that you wrote, you argue that the FDA will have very soon the data it will need to authorize the vaccine for Children, right? Can you just explain what is that data that the FDA will have quite soon? Our understanding from what we're hearing from the clinical trial sites and from the manufacturers is that their trials are are fully enrolled, and that at least one of the manufacturers expects to have data available to submit to the FDA, Hopefully, by the end of September, perhaps early in October, and so what That means is that once that data is submitted, the FDA will have a chance to look at it to determine, um the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine and consider the risk benefit for Children. Okay, but the FDA wants Six months of data. Why is that? Can you explain that discrepancy? And how important is that discrepancy? Yes, absolutely, You know, And this is actually something that we've seen with the emergency use authorization of the vaccine and adults. The emergency use authorization came after two months because the FDA really felt and believed that the benefit of approving the vaccine because of the public health emergency was great enough. That that they could rely on the very strong safety data at two months, and the final approval came at six months, which is which is an important landmark. But but a cautious one and we we really believe that the same situation applies for Children. So we absolutely believe that that we have Enough data to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for emergency use authorization in Children after two months. I'm curious because you're a pediatrician. Are you seeing parents coming into your office and asking you to go ahead and just vaccinate Their Children, regardless of what the FDA eventually decides. We are hearing from pediatricians across the country that parents are interested in receiving the FDA vaccine. What we can call off label for their younger Children. We don't recommend that at the AP, and nor does the FDA or the CDC, and the reason for that is that it is important to look at the data from the trials. It is important to make sure that we have approved and authorized The right safe and effective dose for Children. And what we know of the trials is that the dose for younger Children is likely to be less than that for other adults. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Thank you very much for joining us today. Well, thank you so much for having me here to help grasp day to day life in Afghanistan and how it's changing. One of the people we've been checking in with is Felipe Ribeiro. He runs the Afghanistan office of Doctors without Borders. I first spoke with him on August 6th nine days before Kabul fell to the Taliban. And then he was describing the situation in Lashkargah, one of the cities where his medical teams operate as horrific daily bombings burn and shrapnel wounds, stray bullets flying around the hospital compound. When we checked back August 19th. It was a different scene. Much calmer. The Lashkar Gah hospital was full, but not all war injuries. They were delivering healthy babies again. Well, we have asked fully pay Ribeiro back to hear how it's going. Now that the U. S military is gone, and the Taliban have announced an interim government Hi there good to speak with you again and look good to speak you to to Tell me about Lashkar Gar and how it's going now. This is southern Afghanistan. What does your team say? How are they describing the situation today? The situation is very common in the south. I mean, it's basically very calm all over the place in English cargo, but also in the rest of the country..

Mary Louise Kelly American Academy of Pediatrics Lee Savio Beers Ailsa Chang Felipe Ribeiro Los Angeles Washington Food and Drug Administration Afghanistan August 19th 11 years August 6th Lashkargah Six months Francis Collins two months six months NPR FDA National Institutes of Health
"lee savio beers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:06 min | 2 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Dot org I'm Lisa Ledeen expect sunshine this afternoon with temperatures mainly in the seventies. And coming up. Some people who have lost loved ones to covid 19 have had their grief compounded by dismissive attitudes about the virus within their communities. That story ahead. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. You have heard a lot about booster shots lately. Are they needed when will they be approved and who will actually get them? But there are still tens of millions of people in this country who aren't even eligible for a first vaccine shot. We're talking about Children, 11 years old and younger. The vaccine still is not authorized for them, and Dr Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR last month. That he doesn't see a vaccine for kids coming before the end of this year. That timeline has prompted organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics to urge the Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its authorization process. Lee savvy. Oh beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me here. Okay. So before we get to this letter that you wrote, which urged the FDA to speed up approval of the vaccine for Children, can you just explain very briefly for us? Why is this taking so long in the first place? So I think one of the most important things to emphasize here is that the FDA authorization and approval process really is in place to make sure that when vaccines or any therapeutics actually are available that they're safe and effective And what we know in vaccine development for Children is that we are appropriately more cautious. Typically, vaccine development will start with adults and then we do what's called A gin does de escalation. Where will then work backwards to younger and younger Children? And make sure that the vaccine and the doses that were giving are also safe and effective for younger Children? Because Children are not just like little adults? They there are real issues to figuring out how to vaccinate Children specifically. Yes, absolutely. Children are smaller. They have different physiology there at a different stage of their development, and we want to make sure that anything that we approve for them that's authorized for them is safe and effective. Well, then let's turn to the letter that you wrote. To the FDA in this letter, you say that quote in our view, the rise of the delta variant changes the risk benefit analysis for authorizing vaccines in Children. Can you explain what is that risk benefit analysis in general? So one of the things that we think about every vaccine. Every medication has a potential side effect. And so does the risk outweigh the important benefit that this particular therapeutic can bring. So, for example, we know that covid 19 can be an incredibly serious illness, so it's important. To make sure that that we protect against that now we also know that for younger Children, the risk of severe covid infection is less. And so what we have to do is way is the risk of the vaccine less than or greater than the risk of Covid infection. Two Children, and I think it's very clear to us that the risk of covid in Children Far outweighs any potential risk of the vaccine. And just to be clear in this letter that you wrote, you argue that the FDA will have very soon the data it will need to authorize the vaccine for Children, right? Can you just explain what is that data that the FDA will have quite soon? Our understanding from what we're hearing from the clinical trial sites and from the manufacturers is that their trials are are fully enrolled in that At least one of the manufacturers expects to have data available to submit to the FDA, Hopefully, by the end of September, perhaps early in October, and so what That means is that once that data is submitted, the FDA will have a chance to look at it to determine, um the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine and consider the risk benefit for Children. Okay, but the FDA wants Six months of data. Why is that? Can you explain that discrepancy? And how important is that discrepancy? Yes, absolutely, You know, And this is actually something that we've seen with the emergency use authorization of the vaccine and adults. The emergency use authorization came after two months because the FDA really felt and believed that the benefit of approving the vaccine because of the public health emergency was great enough. That that they could rely on the very strong safety data at two months, and the final approval came at six months, which is which is an important landmark. But but a cautious one and we we really believe that the same situation applies for Children. So we absolutely believe that that we have Enough data to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for emergency use authorization in Children after two months. I'm curious because you're a pediatrician. Are you seeing parents coming into your office and asking you to go ahead and just vaccinate Their Children. Regardless of what the FDA eventually decides. We are hearing from pediatricians across the country that parents are interested in receiving the FDA vaccine. What we can call off label for their younger Children. We don't recommend that at the AP, and nor does the FDA or the C D. C and the reason for that is that it is important to look at the data from the trials. It is important to make sure that we have approved and authorized The right safe and effective dose for Children. And what we know of the trials is that the dose for younger Children is likely to be less than that for of adults. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Thank you very much for joining us today. Well, thank you so much for having me here to help grasp day to day life in Afghanistan and how it's changing. One of the people we've been checking in with is Felipe Ribeiro. He runs the Afghanistan office of Doctors without Borders. I first spoke with him on August 6th nine days before Kabul fell to the Taliban. And then he was describing the situation in Lashkargah, one of the cities where his medical teams operate as horrific daily bombings burn and shrapnel wounds, stray bullets flying around the hospital compound. When we checked back August 19th. It was a different scene. Much calmer. The Lashkar Gah hospital was full, but not all war injuries. They were delivering healthy babies again. Well, we have asked fully pay Ribeiro back to hear how it's going. Now that the U. S military is gone, and the Taliban have announced an interim government Hi there Good to speak with you again and good to speak. You too. Tell me about Lashkar Gar and how it's going now. This is southern Afghanistan. What does your team say? How are they describing the situation today? The situation is very common in the south. I mean, it's basically very calm all over the place in in Lashkar gar, but also in the rest of the country..

Mary Louise Kelly Lisa Ledeen Ailsa Chang American Academy of Pediatrics Lee Savio Beers Los Angeles August 19th Felipe Ribeiro Washington Afghanistan Food and Drug Administration August 6th Six months Ribeiro FDA National Institutes of Health today NPR Francis Collins Lashkar Gar
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:30 min | 2 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Power to more than half a million of its customers with the vast majority of New Orleans expected to have power back tomorrow. Stephen Bashar ha from member station WGBH M reports hundreds of thousands along the Gulf Coast, though good without power for much of the month. Most people in New Orleans have their lights back on, but some neighborhoods like Venetian Isles will have to wait longer because of how badly they were damaged. Crews are having to used cranes to lift down polls over homes along the Gulf Coast damages. And worse, Some people may have to wait until October to get power restored about 30,000 power poles have been knocked out across the state, more than the number damaged by hurricanes. Delta, Zeta and Katrina combined Energy says customers should not expect the price are paying for electricity to go up. But months from now, Louisiana residents could see steeper power bills when regulators factor in the cost of restoring the grid. For NPR News. I'm Stephen Bass. Aha. The Taliban have formed an interim government in Afghanistan, as NPR's Jackie Northam explains. Among the senior leaders are battle hardened fighters who are core members of the organization. Afghanistan's interim government is made up of the Taliban's old guard. The new leader is Mullah Mohammad Hassan Kunde. He's considered a hardliner from Kandahar and is headed the Taliban's leadership Council for 20 years. Deputy prime minister is Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, who heads up the Taliban's political office and was widely expected to become leader. There was no mention about the group's spiritual leader. Nor was there any indication that the new Afghan government would be inclusive involving other political parties and players as the Taliban had hinted. And there was no mention of a woman holding a ministerial role. Jackie Northam. NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD Though some technical glitches appear to be causing problems, El Salvador says it is the first country to formally adopt crypto currency. Bitcoin is legal tender in its first few hours of adoption, even the country's president admitted problems with the initial rollout. On Wall Street. The Dow was down 269 points. This is NPR. This is W m I C in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, Several residents in Woodside, Queens, whose homes flooded last week during storm Ida now say they've gone sick from exposure to raw sewage. Three residents on the scene, Woodside Block started vomiting and having diarrhea, one of them of it. Mail was hospitalized yesterday after being diagnosed with norovirus and E. Coli to highly contagious diseases that can be waterborne. Sunday night was just a disaster where I was getting up every 15 minutes and couldn't hold down any fluids. A spokesperson for the city's Health Department says they haven't seen a citywide uptick in hospitalization for gastrointestinal issues. He said. They're monitoring the situation. The State Health Department recommends wearing rubber boots and gloves and an n 95 mask when cleaning out of flood damaged home. Officials at Rikers Island confirmed that another inmate has died in custody, marking or making it the ninth death at the jail this year. Commissioner Vincent Scrawled E says conditions are worse because uniform staff are not showing up to their shifts. Staff don't show up to work. Every aspect of our operations suffer. So do the employees who pick up the slack and the people in custody safety suffers. Guaraldi says he believes it's possible the staff are fading illness to get out of work. Department of Correction Stats show about 1416 Uniform personnel were out sick every day in August. That's more than double the number who took sick days in August of 2020. Corrections officer union did not return a request for comment. The country's largest LGBT Q rights organization, has fired its president for helping former New York governor Andrew Cuomo craft his public response to allegations of sexual harassment. Alphonso David had served as Cuomo's chief counsel from 2015 to 2019 when he became the first black man to run the human rights campaign. But the New York attorney general's report on the former governor found that David was one of several close allies who advise Cuomo on discrediting his accusers. Nonprofits board says that violated the conflict of interest policy in a Twitter posts. David denied wrongdoing and threatened legal action. For the rest of tonight. We should see clear skies love about 68, but we'll probably see more rain returned tomorrow in the afternoon high near 83 that rain will really pick up tomorrow night with the love about 69. It's w m I. C at 606. Support for NPR comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are. W j f dot org This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. You have heard a lot about booster shots lately. Are they needed when will they be approved and who will actually get them? But there are still tens of millions of people in this country who aren't even eligible for a first vaccine shot. We're talking about Children, 11 years old and younger, The vaccine still is not authorized for them. And Dr Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR last month that he doesn't see a vaccine for kids coming before the end of this year. That timeline has prompted organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics to urge the Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its authorization process. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She joins us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me here. Okay. So before we get to this letter that you wrote, which urged the FDA to speed up approval of the vaccine for Children, can you just explain very briefly for us? Why is this taking so long in the first place? So I think one of the most important things to emphasize here is that the FDA authorization and approval process really is in place to make sure that when vaccines or any therapeutics actually are available that they're safe and effective And what we know in vaccine development for Children is that we are appropriately more cautious. Typically, vaccine development will start with adults and then we do what's called Agen Das de escalation. Where will then work backwards to younger and younger Children and make sure that the vaccine and the doses that were giving are also safe and effective for younger Children? Because Children are not just like little adults? They there are real issues to figuring out how to vaccinate Children specifically. Yes, absolutely. Children are smaller. They have different physiology there at a different stage of their development, and we want to make sure that anything that we approved for them that's authorized for them is safe and effective. Well, then let's turn to the letter that you wrote. To the FDA in this letter, you say that quote in our view, the rise of the delta variant changes the risk benefit analysis for authorizing vaccines in Children. Can you explain what is that risk benefit analysis in general? So one of the things that we think about every vaccine. Every medication has a potential side effect. And so does the risk outweigh the important benefit that this particular therapeutic can bring. So, for example, we know that covid 19 can be an incredibly serious illness, so it's important. To make sure that that we protect against that now we also know that for younger Children, the risk of severe covid infection is less. And so what we have to do is way is the risk of the vaccine, um less than or greater than the risk of Covid infection. Two Children, and I think it's very clear to us that the risk of covid in Children Far outweighs any potential risk of the vaccine. And just to be clear in this letter that you wrote, you argue that the FDA will have very soon the data it will need to authorize the vaccine for Children, right? Can you just explain what is that data that the FDA will have quite soon? Our understanding from what we're hearing from the clinical trial sites and from the manufacturers is that their trials are are fully enrolled in that At least one of the manufacturers expects to have data available to submit to the FDA, Hopefully, by the end of September, perhaps early in October, and so what That means is that once that data is submitted, the FDA will have a chance to look at it to determine, um the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine and consider the risk benefit for Children. Okay, but the FDA wants Six months of data. Why is that? Can you explain that discrepancy? And how important is that discrepancy?.

American Academy of Pediatrics Stephen Bass Mary Louise Kelly August of 2020 Ailsa Chang David Lee Savio Beers 2015 Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar Stephen Bashar Sean Carlson New Orleans Venetian Isles Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 11 years Alphonso David 269 points tomorrow night Washington Food and Drug Administration
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. You have heard a lot about booster shots lately. Are they needed when will they be approved and who will actually get them? But there are still tens of millions of people in this country who aren't even eligible for a first vaccine shot. We're talking about Children, 11 years old and younger, The vaccine still is not authorized for them. And Dr Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR last month that he doesn't see a vaccine for kids coming before the end of this year. That timeline has prompted organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics to urge the Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its authorization process. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She joins us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me here. Okay. So before we get to this letter that you wrote, which urged the FDA to speed up approval of the vaccine for Children, can you just explain very briefly for us? Why is this taking so long in the first place? So I think one of the most important things to emphasize here is that the FDA authorization and approval process really is in place to make sure that when vaccines or any therapeutics actually are available that they're safe and effective And what we know in vaccine development for Children is that we are appropriately more cautious. Typically, vaccine development will start with adults and then we do what's called A gin does de escalation. Where will then work backwards to younger and younger Children? And make sure that the vaccine and the doses that were giving are also safe and effective for younger Children? Because Children are not just like little adults? They there are real issues to figuring out how to vaccinate Children specifically. Yes, absolutely. Children are smaller. They have different physiology there at a different stage of their development, and we want to make sure that anything that we approved for them that's authorized for them is safe and effective. Well, then let's turn to the letter that you wrote. To the FDA in this letter, you say that quote in our view, the rise of the delta variant changes the risk benefit analysis for authorizing vaccines in Children. Can you explain what is that risk benefit analysis in general? So one of the things that we think about every vaccine. Every medication has a potential side effect. And so does the risk outweigh the important benefit that this particular therapeutic can bring. So, for example, we know that covid 19 can be an incredibly serious illness, so it's important. To make sure that that we protect against that now we also know that for younger Children, the risk of severe covid infection is less. And so what we have to do is way is the risk of the vaccine, um less than or greater than the risk of Covid infection. Two Children, and I think it's very clear to us that the risk of covid in Children Far outweighs any potential risk of the vaccine. And just to be clear in this letter that you wrote, you argue that the FDA will have very soon the data it will need to authorize the vaccine for Children, right? Can you just explain what is that data that the FDA will have quite soon? Our understanding from what we're hearing from the clinical trial sites and from the manufacturers is that their trials are are fully enrolled in that At least one of the manufacturers expects to have data available to submit to the FDA, Hopefully, by the end of September, perhaps early in October, and so what That means is that once that data is submitted, the FDA will have a chance to look at it to determine, um the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine and consider the risk benefit for Children. Okay, but the FDA wants Six months of data. Why is that? Can you explain that discrepancy? And how important is that discrepancy? Yes, absolutely, You know, And this is actually something that we've seen with the emergency use authorization of the vaccine and adults. The emergency use authorization came after two months because the FDA really felt and believed that the benefit of approving the vaccine because of the public health emergency was great enough that that they could rely on the very strong safety data at Few months, and the final approval came at six months, which is which is an important landmark, but a cautious one. Um and we really believe that the same situation applies for Children. So we absolutely believe that that we have enough data to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for emergency use authorization in Children After two months. I'm curious because you're a pediatrician. Are you seeing parents coming into your office and asking you to go ahead and just vaccinate their Children? Regardless of what the FDA eventually decides. We are hearing from pediatricians across the country that parents are interested in receiving the FDA vaccine. What we can call off label for their younger Children. We don't recommend that at the AP, and nor does the FDA or the CDC. And the reason for that is that it is important to look at the data from the trials that you Is important to make sure that we have approved and authorised the right safe and effective dose for Children. And what we know of the trials is that the dose for younger Children is likely to be less than that for of adults. Lee Savio Beers is a pediatrician and the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Thank you very much for joining us today. Well, thank you so much for having me here. To help grasp day to day life in Afghanistan and how it's changing. One of the people we've been checking in with is Felipe Ribeiro. He runs the Afghanistan office of Doctors without Borders. First spoke with him on August 6th nine days before Kabul fell to the Taliban. And then he was describing the situation in Lashkargah, one of the cities where his medical teams operate as horrific daily bombings burn and shrapnel wounds, stray bullets flying around the hospital compound. When we checked back August 19th. It was a different scene. Much calmer. The Lashkar Gah hospital was full, but not all war injuries. They were delivering healthy babies again. Well, we have asked fully pay Ribeiro back to hear how it's going. Now that the U. S military is gone, and the Taliban have announced an interim government Hi there Good to speak with you again and look good to speak. You too. Tell me about Lashkar Gar and how it's going now. This is southern Afghanistan. What does your team say? How are they describing the situation today? The situation is very common in the south. I mean, it's basically very calm all over the place. In English car guard but also in the rest of the country..

Mary Louise Kelly Lee Savio Beers American Academy of Pediatrics Ailsa Chang Los Angeles Washington Felipe Ribeiro Food and Drug Administration August 19th 11 years Afghanistan Francis Collins Six months August 6th six months NPR last month National Institutes of Health today FDA
"lee savio beers" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:19 min | 3 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Twenty years finally at an end it was time to end this war that might be over but the pandemic is not kids are heading back to school. Covert cases among them are taking up and vaccines are still not quite ready for them. President of the american academy of pediatrics. Dr lee savio beers number was just a disease for dos. But now we're seeing so many cases that that we really are seeing the impact on children. And i don't know about you but we're still working from home. Ceo's are pushing back the return to office but overall it's not all bad news in the c. suite share and ceo of kpmg. paul canal. There is a great degree of resilience. And i think we're feeling really good about how the vaccines are responding to the virus. Very optimistic about the future. It's wednesday september. First twenty twenty. One squawk thought begins right now. Becky by in three to one place. Good morning. welcome to squawk box here on cnbc. I'm becky quick. Along with joe kernan. Andrew is on vacation today. Let's september i. You know that what that means that we've just finished this month so we should take a look at how the markets actually performed for the month of august. If you were watching you saw that the dow gained one point two percent that would be at six positive month in the last seven. The snp was up by two point. Nine percent logging seven straight months of gains and then the nasdaq was up. Four percent for the month russell two thousand small cap index. It outperformed yesterday but for the month that was up by two point. One percent and despite a decline of one point one percent in yesterday session. The dow transports finished the month higher by one point. Four percent now. The transports are still more than nine percent from their all time high. But if you look at the financials they were the best performers. In august up by five percent energy stocks were the worst performers and the only sector declined for the month as well..

Dr lee savio paul canal joe kernan american academy of pediatrics kpmg cnbc Becky becky Andrew russell
"lee savio beers" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:57 min | 6 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Unruly passengers need to be reminded that they could face federal charges. It's a federal offense to interfere with the flight crew member Or attack of like, Remember, you've faced punishment in federal court and possibly imprisonment. This comes after a Southwest flight attendant was assaulted by a passenger on a flight to San Diego this past weekend that flight attendant lost two teeth, but it's said to be recovering. There've been more than 2500 reported cases of unruly airline passengers this year. Meanwhile, kids two years and older who have not been fully vaccinated, should they be still wearing masks. That's the updated covert guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics released on Wednesday. It explains masks should be worn at school camp, childcare programs and other events. The academy's president, argued vaccines are effective. But staying vigilant is also important. Dr Lee's Savio Beers added. It's smart to be cautious and careful since kids younger than 12 aren't eligible for the vaccine. I'm Brian Shook US consumer prices are surging, Susan Lee reports Washington Stimulus has been great for stock markets, but tough on consumers, touching budgets and wallets and consumer prices. We saw that last month where the fastest rate in 12 years the CEO of the world's biggest bank, Jamie Diamond, says that Americans should brace for even much higher prices. Thanks to D. C money printing as all that spending It takes place. But, yes, it will raise inflation. I think there's nothing wrong with 1.6%. You know, I would expect it to go because she'll be higher than that. You already see much more expensive prices used cars went by the most is 1953 Last month, bacon prices were up 16% and, yes, meat lovers are shelling out more money. Everything is as every Lego land was not awesome enough. The new expansion to the park definitely will be. Lego.

Susan Lee San Diego Jamie Diamond 1.6% 12 years American Academy of Pediatrics Wednesday two years Brian Shook Lego two teeth Lee more than 2500 reported cases 1953 this year Last month last month US Southwest 16%
Health Care Challenges for Transgender Youth

61 Minutes

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Health Care Challenges for Transgender Youth

"Doctors from treating transgender youth with puberty, blockers, testosterone arrest region and surgery to assist their transitions. As part of a new culture war. Similar bills have been introduced and at least 20 other states. In some cases, doctors could go to jail. Many physicians and therapists are appalled. Like Erica Anderson Ah, highly respected gender psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who's transgender herself. It's a very ominous development. It's a bad sign. Have you ever seen anything like that before in your lifetime? No. No. And it zero overreach on the part of such legislatures. Clearly, they are demonstrating their ignorance. And prejudice. At least six major medical associations have weighed in against these bills, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, of which Dr Lee Savio Beers is the president. I'm going to read you something that was said in support of this law in Arkansas, One of the Republican senators said gender affirming treatments are quote at best experimental and at worst, a serious threat to a child's welfare. These air, not experimental treatments there, really based in scientific literature. They're based in decades and decades of expert experience, and they're backed by a number of major medical organizations to let's say there was a young Person and they're on hormones under the lawn, Arkansas. A doctor has to take those hormones away. Yes, And if the doctor decides to move forward, they face significant penalty. Is there any medical rationale for this legislation in your opinions? No. There is not The field of transgender health care has

Erica Anderson Dr Lee Savio Beers University Of California American Academy Of Pediatrics San Francisco Arkansas
"lee savio beers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 10 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What they don't want is election integrity, he says they just want to drum up doubts about the election to provide cover to pass these kinds of bills. Anyone who doesn't look like them or think like them, they don't want them to vote. They don't care of its people of color of discipline, some with disability, someone retired and elderly vote. If they're not looking like them or thinking like them, they're going to continue to introduce bills to keep them from voting, making it more difficult. That's what this is about, and you'll hear that from legislative Democrats to as they Try in vain. TOC stop some of these bills from passing. Republicans control both chambers of the Legislature here and Mary Louise. I would add here in Georgia. At least it all goes back to 2018. When the then Secretary of state Brian Camp ran for governor against voting rights advocates Stacey Abrams, a rematch this likely expected in 2022. All right, talking there with Stephen Feller of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Abigail since key of WK are in Lansing, Michigan, and been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix, Arizona, getting a round up of steps underway and their states To change voting laws in the wake of the 2020 election. Thanks. All three of you. Thank you. Of course. Thank you. Vaccine makers, Visor and Madonna are testing how well they're coping. 19 vaccines work in kids, each 12 and up and as NPR's Allison Aubrey reports. If these trials show the vaccines are safe and effective, the shot could soon be authorized for use in this age group, perhaps by summer. Dr. Nicole Baldwin is a pediatrician practicing in Cincinnati, Ohio, and when her 16 year old daughter had the chance to be enrolled in a clinical trial of the Fizer vaccine, she did not hesitate. People keep discounting kids because they think, Oh, kids don't get that sick. They don't either vaccine. But she says Getting the under 18 population vaccinated could be beneficial, though most young people tend to have only mild infections. They do get it, You know, not only are teens getting infected and spreading it, but of the group of kids that get the sickest it tends to be. Our older kids are teenagers. Baldwin's daughter, Kendall says she was happy to roll a purse leave and be part of the vaccine trial. I feel like a lot of people my age, you're just kind of tired of everything going on missing out on so many activities, and the vaccine, she says, seems to be key to turning this around. So far, only the Fizer vaccine is authorized for teenagers. Her age 16 it up. This age group is much lower on the priority list, and supplies need to ramp up significantly, But ultimately, the goal is to be able to offer the vaccine to kids of all age groups. Dr Emily or building of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says the vaccine makers have plans to expand their trials further. So, starting with age 6 to 12, for example, testing the right dose testing safety. Honest things were good moving down into younger Children, perhaps aged 2 to 6. This will take some time. But since trials don't need to be is large is the initial clinical trials and adults, Dr Anthony Fauci says It could move fairly quickly so that hopefully By the time we get to the late spring and early summer, we will have Children being able to be vaccinated. According to the FDA is guidance. Scientists estimate about 70 to 85% of people need to be immune from the coronavirus to reach herd immunity. And given the kids make up about 20% of the population. Pediatrician Lee Savio Beers, who is president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, says kids play an important role immunizing Children against the cove in 19 absolutely will contribute to her community. And the American Academy of Pediatrics has spoken out strongly to really urge the vaccine manufacturers treat pediatric trials with the same urgency that they have with adults. 16 year old candle. Baldwin will find out soon whether You got the placebo or the real thing, and she's waiting for the day. It's safe to do things that she misses most hanging out my friends and going to restaurants or movies. But for now it's time to stay vigilant, especially is more contagious variants of the virus circulate. It will still be months before everyone who wants a vaccine can get one. Allison Aubrey NPR News,.

Dr. Nicole Baldwin Allison Aubrey American Academy of Pediatrics NPR National Institute of Allergy Dr Anthony Fauci Georgia Public Broadcasting Kendall Stephen Feller Georgia Legislature Madonna Dr Emily Lansing Mary Louise Stacey Abrams Phoenix
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:09 min | 10 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They don't care of its people of color of discipline, some with disability, someone retired and elderly folks. They're not looking like them or thinking like them. They're going to continue introduce bills to keep them from voting, making it more difficult. That's what this is about, and you'll hear that from legislative Democrats to as they try in vain. TOC stop some of these bills from passing. Republicans control both chambers of the Legislature here and Mary Louise. I would add here in Georgia, At least it all goes back to 2018. When the then Secretary of state Brian Camp ran for governor. Against voting rights advocates Stacey Abrams, a rematch this likely expected in 2022. All right, talking there with Stephen Feller of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail since key of W. K a. R in Lansing, Michigan and been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix, Arizona, getting a round up of steps underway and their states to change voting laws in the wake of the 2020 election. Thanks. All three of you Thank you. Of course. Thank you. Vaccine makers, Visor and Madonna are testing how well their covert 19 vaccines work in kids, each 12 and up and as NPR's Allison Aubrey reports. If these trials show the vaccines are safe and effective, the shot could soon be authorized for use in this age group, perhaps by summer. Dr. Nicole Baldwin is a pediatrician practicing in Cincinnati, Ohio, and when her 16 year old daughter had the chance to be enrolled in the clinical trial of the Fizer vaccine, she did not hesitate. People keep this counting kids because they think, Oh, kids don't get that sick. They don't need the vaccine. But she says getting the under 18 population vaccinated could be beneficial. Though most young people tend to have only mild infections. They do get it, you know, not only are our Keane's getting infected and spreading it, but of the group of kids that get the sickest it tends to be. Our older kids are teenagers. Baldwin's daughter, Kendall says she was happy to roll a purse leave and be part of the vaccine trial. I feel like a lot of people my age, you're just kind of tired of everything going on missing out on so many activities, and the vaccine, she says, seems to be Key to turning this around. So far, only the Fizer vaccine is authorized for teenagers. Her age 16 it up. This age group is much lower on the priority list and supplies need to ramp up significantly. But ultimately the goal is to be able to offer the vaccine to kids of all age groups. Dr Emily or building of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says the vaccine makers have plans to expand their trials further. Starting with age 6 to 12, for example, testing the right dose testing safety If things with good moving down into younger Children, perhaps aged 2 to 6. This will take some time. But since trials don't need to be is large is the initial clinical trials and adults. Dr. Anthony Fauci says It could move fairly quickly so that hopefully By the time we get to the late spring and early summer, we will have Children being able to be vaccinated, according to the FDA is guidance. Scientists estimate about 70 to 85% of people need to be immune from the coronavirus to reach herd immunity and given the kids make up about 20% of the population. Pediatrician Lee Savio beers, who is president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Says Kids play an important role immunizing Children against the cove in 19 absolutely will contribute to herd immunity. And the American Academy of Pediatrics has spoken out strongly to really urge the vaccine manufacturers treat pediatric trials with the same urgency that they have with adults. 16 year old candle. Baldwin will find out soon whether she got the placebo or the real thing, and she's waiting for the day. It's safe to do things that she misses most hanging out, my friend. And going to restaurants or movies. But for now it's time to stay vigilant, especially is more contagious variants of the virus circulate. It will still be months before everyone who wants a vaccine can get one. Allison Aubrey NPR.

Dr. Nicole Baldwin Dr Emily American Academy of Pediatrics Allison Aubrey NPR National Institute of Allergy Kendall NPR Allison Aubrey Georgia Public Broadcasting Lansing Stephen Feller Georgia Stacey Abrams Dr. Anthony Fauci Legislature Mary Louise Keane
"lee savio beers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:04 min | 10 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on KCRW

"If these trials show the vaccines are safe and effective, the shot could soon be authorized for use in this age group, perhaps by summer. Dr. Nicole Baldwin is a pediatrician practicing in Cincinnati, Ohio, and when her 16 year old daughter had the chance to be enrolled in a clinical trial of the Fizer vaccine, she did not hesitate. People keep discounting kids because they think, Oh, kids don't get that sick. They don't need the vaccine. But she says Getting the under 18 population vaccinated could be beneficial, though most young people tend to have only mild infections. They do get it, You know, not only are teens getting infected and spreading it, but of the group of kids that get the sickest it tends to be. Our older kids are teenagers. Baldwin's daughter, Kendall says she was happy to roll a purse leave and be part of the vaccine trial. I feel like a lot of people my age, you're just kind of tired of everything going on missing out on so many activities, and the vaccine, she says, seems to be key to turning this around. So far, only the Fizer vaccine is authorized for teenagers. Her age 16 it up. This age group is much lower on the priority list, and supplies need to ramp up significantly, But ultimately, the goal is to be able to offer the vaccine to kids of all age groups. Dr Emily or building of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says the vaccine makers have plans to expand their trials further. So, starting with age 6 to 12, for example, testing the right dose testing safety. All these things were good moving down into younger Children, perhaps aged 2 to 6. This will take some time. But since trials don't need to be as large as the initial clinical trials and adults, Dr Anthony Fauci ifs as it could move fairly quickly so that hopefully By the time we get to the late spring and early summer, we will have Children being able to be vaccinated. According to the FDA is guidance. Scientists estimate about 70 to 85% of people need to be immune from the coronavirus to reach herd immunity. And given the kids make up about 20% of the population. Pediatrician Lee Savio Beers, who is president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, says kids play an important role immunizing Children against the cove in 19 absolutely will contribute to herd immunity. And the American Academy of Pediatrics has spoken out strongly to really urge the vaccine manufacturers treat pediatric trials with the same urgency that they have with adults. 16 year old candle. Baldwin will find out soon whether Got the placebo or the real thing, and she's waiting for the day. It's safe to do things that she misses most hanging out my friends and going to restaurants or movies. But for now it's time to stay vigilant, especially is more contagious variants of the virus circulate. It will still be months before everyone who wants a vaccine can get one. Allison Aubrey NPR news Black.

Dr. Nicole Baldwin American Academy of Pediatrics Kendall National Institute of Allergy Dr Anthony Fauci Allison Aubrey NPR Dr Emily Cincinnati Ohio Lee Savio Beers FDA president
"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"lee savio beers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What they don't want is election integrity, he says they just want to drum up doubts about the election to provide cover to pass these kinds of bills. Anyone who doesn't look like them or think like them, they don't want them to vote. They don't care of its people of color of discipline, some with disability, someone retired and elderly folks. It is earned, not looking like them or thinking like them. They're going to continue introduce bills to keep them from voting, making it more difficult. That's what this is about, and you'll hear that from legislative Democrats to as they try in vain. TOC stop some of these bills from passing. Republicans control both chambers of the Legislature here and Mary Louise. I would add here in Georgia, at least it all goes back to 2018. When the then Secretary of state Brian Camp ran for governor against voting rights advocates, Stacy Abrams, a rematch. This likely expected in 2022 all right, talking there with Stephen Feller of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail since key of W. K a. R in Lansing, Michigan and been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix, Arizona, getting a round up of steps underway and their states To change voting laws in the wake of the 2020 election. Thanks. All three of you. Thank you. Of course. Thank you. Vaccine makers, Visor and Madonna are testing how well their covert 19 vaccines work in kids, each 12 and up and as NPR's Allison Aubrey reports. If these trials show the vaccines are safe and effective, that shot could soon be authorized for use in this age group. Perhaps by summer, Dr. Nicole Baldwin is a pediatrician practicing in Cincinnati, Ohio, and when her 16 year old daughter had the chance to be enrolled in the clinical trial of the Fizer vaccine. She did not hesitate. People keep discounting kids because they think, Oh, kids don't get that sick. They don't need the vaccine. But she says getting the under 18 population vaccinated could be beneficial. Though most young people tend to have only mild infections. They do get it, You know, not only are our teens getting infected and spreading it, but of the group of kids that get the sickest it tends to be. Our older kids are teenagers. Baldwin's daughter, Kendall says she was happy to roll it personally. Eve and be part of the vaccine trial. I feel like a lot of people my age, you're just kind of tired of everything going on missing out on so many activities, and the vaccine, she says, seems to be key to turning this around. So far, only the Fizer vaccine is authorized for teenagers. Her age 16 it up. This age group is much lower on the priority list and supplies need to ramp up significantly. But ultimately the goal is to be able to offer the vaccine to kids of all age groups. Dr Emily or building of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says the vaccine makers have plans to expand their trials further. Starting with age 6 to 12, for example, testing the right dose testing safety. If things with good moving down and two younger Children, perhaps aged 2 to 6. This will take some time. But since trials don't need to be Isla Rggi is the initial clinical trials and adults. Dr. Anthony Fauci says it could move fairly quickly so that hopefully By the time we get to the late spring and early summer, we will have Children being able to be vaccinated, according to the FDA is guidance. Scientists estimate about 70 to 85% of people need to be immune from the coronavirus to reach herd immunity and given the kids make up about 20% of the population. Pediatrician Lee Savio beers, who is president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Says Kids play an important role immunizing Children against the cove in 19 absolutely will contribute to herd immunity. And the American Academy of Pediatrics has spoken out strongly to really urge the vaccine manufacturers treat pediatric trials with the same urgency that they have with adults. 16 year old candle. Baldwin will find out soon whether she got the placebo or the real thing, and she's waiting for the day. It's safe to do things that she misses most hanging out, my friend. And going to restaurants or movies. But for now it's time to stay vigilant, especially is more contagious variants of the virus circulate. It will still be months before everyone who wants a vaccine can get one. Allison Aubrey NPR news Black and Latino people are nearly three times more likely than white people to die from covert 19. Yet in big cities across the south, vaccines are easier to find and white, more affluent neighborhoods. More on that NPR investigation tomorrow on morning edition. It's.

Isla Rggi Dr. Nicole Baldwin NPR Dr Emily Allison Aubrey NPR American Academy of Pediatrics National Institute of Allergy Allison Aubrey Georgia Public Broadcasting Kendall Lansing Georgia Stephen Feller Legislature Dr. Anthony Fauci Mary Louise Stacy Abrams