35 Burst results for "Led Zeppelin"

"led zeppelin" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

02:16 min | 11 months ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

"led zeppelin" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

08:10 min | 11 months ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

"Thirty two while yeah i love that and i love that i was able to share that with you because you know i didn't research that myself i found that somewhere you know and it stuck with me because unlike wow yeah there is something different about this music and bob marley as well. You know. that's another favorite of mine. But you know either way. I think they're pushing us into this technocratic paradigm you know and and things like the through rhythm that you're describing. I think is really yeah part and parcel to this whole plan. Another thing. that really scares me. As those virtual reality i mean the whole idea of our solar system is a form of virtual reality. The way they tell us you know so we can get into maybe your worldview and how you see the world. because they're they're really trying to create this virtual reality. And i hear people more and more calling our reality assimilation. You know but i feel like it's you know you can call it a simulation but it's really more like a holographic universe you know it's it's organic first before simulation yeah exactly a hit is organic but as assimilation in that it is mathematical with mental symmetric projection and so the cody's old mathematical universities made out knuckles and the simulation is that its temporal. It's lady It's not it's transient. It's it's not stable. Anything that is stable is considered to be rear so something that is unstable changing all the elements of the a- changing. They're all unstable. Gold is pre steidl. Stuck like right on. And that really and sue tanya uranium. They're older very unstable so as makes them so toxic insolvable truck magnetic so folk why the white heaps the generate everything material and physical that. You say it's it's a projection the gods by and very credible because we're participating Thinking that wearing ritual where we are individuals to think that we are separate the body might be separate but not the sole at a high level level all of their souls connected and our wan but a. g. button which comes from parma is an individual soul which comes from the ugly soul the padova and so we Jesus lou jd's juliette nuts and atma is an an and grand for a tomb and always atone so and atoms tombs. Not sign adam as well. So we're all adamat's where oh atom is we all have anatomies and said the undestand that's caught the university's just an electric magneti phenomena produced by waves to conduct wife's standing radiation wives and transverse vibration wide. It's one is magnetic magnetism one is electricity and two different things that two different things. Electricity cannot exist without nine magnetism. He always exists electrician. He's a hybrid. Pizza by brazen radiation at magnetism is a rightish. Magnetism is a pulse. Electricity is awadhi. It's a pulse. Why be in a ghost sought apoteker y. Abuna booths their narcotics. So once you understand in that. And how old that. Extrapolates into theology. Philosophy mahlougi's mythologies and all about sciences including alchemy industry. Then you'll understand the true nature of the universe. It's an astrological slash electromagnetic eunice while bravo. Santos let people know where they can follow up with the academy so they can learn more directly from your exactly some before. I go on swamped to promote the virtual academy. We had made this. We have night history full days ago. Ugly the first g century stationary earth. Halos platonic syncretic virtual academy and soon. We'll have a brecon voter enemy that's coming. We'd never ran roundabout to twenty instructors at the monument Sharing in the the that this yoga this out to cook vegan meddlesome nutritional nails. Learn as out. Meekly editing you want that strategy about the sand bist method. Which is that teaching. That i had than at big using for many years. Anything we're gonna have the best Flutter this like the thoughts and daniel open they got paid to structures the flood. I'll be doing. Everything is wo-. I'm going to be releasing twenty-two brian. You help a prison thais. So what are we gonna be. Getty is information that is exclusively lucy in this and we so that's syncretism society dot com. Please bikes joining the academy and help us for the expansion. Aw syncretism all saturday will bait. I some of the heat remote galas teaches that we had that are trying to get at system and water. Why start model to able to have the best school in the world and you're actually supported us teaches by finding the it's why why. Listen if you do begin at harvard or yale yeah right on and support these people. You get some karmic benefit in return. This is the type of model. Were moving into value for volume but santos is has been so much fun. I gotta ask you one more question. This is the my family thinks. Some crazy podcasts. As your family. Think you're crazy. After having this awakening entailed ominous journey number. Eight there with ya. I might sure that monmouth behind with terry. I couldn't get out the to before he died my show. The my father understood secret season. I'm sure all my brothers and sisters and distorted and got the all out of the jugs treatments overnights asia and got then while they out all white. They're all in australia in melbourne under the city about downs. My son never been back tonight'd since he was born. Twenty eight years ago. Very happy very healthy and they are all on board with may ensue. Critism and everything. I say that is the truth. 'cause i know a true and i do not think i'm crazy. Sometimes at the beginning. I did but then i realized that i was rasonable and not had full. The angst so had richardson's. I had all the fruit. See when you when you do come a truth you donate had research and you need to be up for it. That onless ought at times to be. I would sue convinced someday. You've got to be credible. You've gotta be twas -able yeah hose it officials say. Thank you santos. This wisdom is is rare impactful and and needed in this new age. So again they can. My friend have a great day. Thank you bella. Saket.

sue tanya lou jd juliette nuts Abuna bob marley eunice Santos bravo adam galas Getty daniel santos brian harvard monmouth terry melbourne asia australia
"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:55 min | 11 months ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Podcast you've got the latest jam. Queued up the sound system cranks. But you're missing that extra element take it all the way to eleven listening to music is only half the journey our senses mingled to create unforgettable moments on the magazine podcast tunes and tumblers. We dive headfirst into that concept by pairing new and classic albums with original craft cocktail recipes. We invite listeners. to bring out their inter mixologist. as we explore the music we love from a unique immersive and thoroughly delicious perspective. My name is anthony. And i host tunes in tumblers alongside my invaluable crew pager your mixologist and ryan your music sewer over the past three years. We've spoken to artists across the spectrum. Toasted their music with cocktails. You won't find any bar menu. Rappers open mike eagle and how the nomad indie pop superstars the aces and tessa violet. Talented multi instrumentalists known bay and tau win of town. The get down stay down. Have all taken the hot seat. I roster gets bigger and better with each episode and like every good conversation it gets deeper with every round. Join us on this intoxicating journey through the records. We love raising a glass to each wherever you get your podcasts. And don't forget to drink. Responsibly cheers cheers..

mike eagle tessa violet anthony ryan
"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:35 min | 11 months ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"A cover two meanings would be different right exactly exactly thompsons rock-n-roll who of time since screw it back. Get back back from time. Loan long.

"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:34 min | 11 months ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"So i really dig this albums. I started as in a led zeppelin fan as a kid so naturally i was attracted to this. But i i liked. You've had several other acoustic projects against some solo albums years when he was partnered with eric. Woan But i do have project we've done. I did the audio stones with john batchelor from veteran rodney. And as a matter of fact i as i recall goldman View but it was like two thousand four every couple of years. I do just for the phone of it. I did the door with cliff eberhardt. But i did that because john. I launch jaylen dinsmore. Jesus i i love the doors to it. First time i heard the doors elsom san jose state with them radio driving in the so microbus and light. My fire comes on tom. Donohue was the dj at that station. That great fm stations san francisco and and we heard light my fire and we literally over listen to it. We couldn't drive and listen to no. I don't think he meant anything to do with it. Man we were. I was so so i just love my friends going to watch. Most john dance more and you take my book. Just ask them to sign the writers and accepted this. Call him and i said okay and i lunch. Lonzo my hand go. Hi james lee stanley. Really james lee stanley stones and it was like score. I was so true. It's a sit down. Chris relaxing type thing. He says you know what if you do. The doors like he did the stones. I'll play him. I said you know. And so i called john john. I just had lunch with john denver. The doors and johnson happened like the doors man. Okay so i called up everhart. Who approached me about the album. And i said what do this short ran. They resulted other. anything We went over the catalog thick the levin and then he left and came out of the woodwork for that album or not was tour. Foam it a record but Immigration from the eagles from little chad watts from jan van and bonnie scott rendered from lindsey liking hand. Oh and john has more in the robby. Krieger from the doors played on. That launched our plato person. Nine famous on record was well. He have a lot of. We have a lot of famous collaborators. I mean let's go to the beginning. Nineteen sixty four Maybe you could explain a little bit about how your career began. You've read you were all. I really was even this in virginia beach. But but because of dc hyphen of music. Not a lot of great clubs let agrees issues and the ice to go up and play the cellar door open mic on sundays news. The biggest. leon stages blink kid play and it was the beginning of that problem as i say just because i i about the suffering assholes you know what i mean i. I used to actually feel compelled to make sure they knew they were assholes. I've gotten over that because it's it's not helpful. Hope that's how i got through high school. And then i went back in the fall to school and then i wanted to own. These guys weren't famous yet. So i went back to high school as i saved sixty five and graduated and then i wanted to go to college. Career was really poor. So i joined the air force aid breath into the infantry and children hitting so i joined the air force which had a pretty high rate of survival and and also because it was four years they would pay for four years of college while it was in college a they came back to la and l. acc then slowly began reconnecting with i think I ended up. Cast whose break connector of all kinds. you know i. I admit that i wasn't i was twenty one but when see twenty one was playing yogurt. You know when. I was twenty one. I couldn't figure only we could play like that. They just the guys the guys that the that coalesce her and end so i met them and it wasn't like they said james. Come on over jam. You know they were. They were moving Highly and i was in school studying. I was gonna be no graduate from college. I got a record record in the club in my friends. In the working everybody played them at records. Doug dillard late banjo. Learn carlton played with russ will russ was leading husband so of course he was my first couple records and a gym. Ford just ended up getting everybody in living in la. And i think. I might have done better but i thought love with this girl from lyndale and she to santa cruz college so went up there to be with her up periods and i think it might have been more involved because like bishop and i were were friends from what he was. Nineteen honesty other tour together. Law living in santa cruz playing rockstar. Piney pollen. I stephen was very famous. Big no much happened to all my friends but amazingly we stayed friends. I'm friends with everybody. Still and they and they play my records. Although you know all this record of all the lead. Because i up to this mountain. I used to call a rare literally. I blocks away. At saint paul come some slide timothy speech come on. He was on all his records to from the eagles. I timothy a high part. As a matter of fact. I stones record i. It was gonna be after me and again lead. George merrill.

james lee stanley Woan john batchelor cliff eberhardt jaylen dinsmore Lonzo chad watts jan van bonnie scott john Donohue john john everhart john denver rodney goldman san jose eric Krieger robby
"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"They just keep building it up. Let's listen to his slide guitar here. Multiple parts playing off oven intertwining with each other l. Notice how roberts vocals move back and forth across the sound field. Listen to robert's vocal here and so the song ends as it began a slow fade on jimmy page's guitar achilles. Last stand led zeppelin after all the blood sweat and tears literally that went into making the album presence would be led zeppelin's least commercially successful record. Although it's often ranked towards the bottom of their catalog. I think this album is a triumph both musically and under the conditions that it was made. And you don't have to look any further than achilles last. Stand to hear the genius of this band with each member playing to perfection. Thanks again for joining us here on the. I'm in love with that song. Podcast if you enjoyed this episode let us know what you think on our facebook page. Just look for the. I'm in love with that song. Podcast page and you'll find us there and you can catch up on our previous episodes on our website. Love that song. Podcast dot com. There's a ton of episodes. They're just waiting for you to discover them. We are part of the pantheon. Podcast network where you'll find even more music related podcast. Checkout will return in two weeks with a new episode. thanks for joining us. This time for our exploration of achilles last stand by led zeppelin to listen to the song again in its entirety stream it download it or buy it from wherever find music is sold.

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"On top of that section. Robert sings of very haunting vocal. Refrain thick with reverb after a couple of times through. He layers another vocal part over that. Let's hear that altogether in here. Jimmy page combines two different sections into one beneath that section jimmy page's now playing slide guitars in harmony. Let's go back and listen to that drum. Fill their and let's bring up jimmy page's guitar part. It's a great one. They just

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"Unique guitarists. I mean come on that has to be one of the greatest guitar solos ever spa away. This time the sleet in zoos calms sleeping more doubled and harmonized guitars. And i love this layered guitar part here all right. Let's break this section down. The base in the drums are totally in sync here. Each part reinforcing the other while jimmy page weaves one of his mysterious guitar parts around the others. The unique sound of the eight string bass is particularly noticeable. Here

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"And notice how the re verb swells up when roberts sings about the devil in his whole seem now. Here's a new riff introduced into the saw. It's a pretty classic. Jimmy page ref. Let's listen to that guitar. Part and that riff is immediately followed by an ascending guitar. Part to guitar tracks playing in harmony one has some heavy effects on it. Sounds like some modulation effect and maybe some phasing too. Let's hear all those parts together another great bottom drum fill. Here's another great little drum bit. Here's another doubled and harmonized guitar part. This is another point where they crank up the river on the focal in. Here's a classic robert plant mon saturated in reverse next up is jimmy page's guitar solo and it's great one. He rated himself as one of his best right up there with a stairway to heaven solo. And i agree. It's one of his greatest. It's full his unique bends and phrasing that make him one of the most identifiable and unique guitarists.

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"Left and right. A lmost imperceptibly in the background there, you can hear John Bonham hit a few notes on a cymbal. And with one hit of a snare drum, we're into the song. Essential to the driving force of this track. Is john Paul Jones' bass part, played on an eight string bass. He's using a beck var series to triple omega base. This is the first time on any led zeppelin track that an eight string bass is used. He's playing with a pick to which gives it an extra attack and a little bite to the high end. Listen to how. John Bonham uses his snare drum to reinforce jimmy page's guitar riff. Here comes the first verse notice. How Robert plant doubles his vocal. Only on the second half of each line their dreams to sing last. Let's listen to that drum. Fell and notice how the

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"So in September of 1975, Robert Plant-- still in a wheelchair-- joined Jimmy Page in southern California to write some new songs. Bass player John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham would join them not long after. Once they finished rehearsing most of the material in California, t he band then relocated to Musicland Studios in Munich Germany to record the album in November. The challenge was that the Rolling S tones had already booked the same studio for December. Which left Led Zeppelin with about two weeks to record the whole album. Jimmy Page, who not only played all of the guitar parts but also wrote virtually all of the music and produced t he album, was working eighteen to twenty hours a day on it. In the end, they ran out of time a nd Jimmy had to ask Mick Jagger for two more days in the studio to finish up. Jagger gave him the two days, and Jimmy Page, almost by himself, recorded all of the overdubs-- seven songs worth in one single night. And then Jimmy and engineer Keith Harwood mixed the whole album the next day. the album would be named "Presence", and it was released in march of 1976. Robert Plant described the struggle to make the presence album "as our stand against everything, our stand against the elements against chance. We were literally fighting against existence itself." Unlike every other Led Zeppelin album, there are almost no acoustic instruments on "Presence" at all. No keyboards, no mandolins or recorders, no acoustic ballads. This is an album dominated by Jimmy Page's electric guitar wizardry, and " Achilles last stand" may be the pinnacle of his guitar playing and arranging genius. "Achilles Last stand" is the first track on the album, opening the record with a slow fade in on Jimmy Page's guitar, played on his legendary Gibson Les Paul nicknamed " number one". The part is doubled and then panned left and right. A lmost imperceptibly in the background there, you can hear John Bonham hit a few notes on a cymbal. And with one hit of a snare drum, we're into the song.

jimmy page robert plant Peter grant zeppelin robert maureen John bonham greece Paul jones roberts england jimmy Robert southern california munich mick jagger jagger germany Harwood california
Podcast Excerpt from Led Zeppelin - "Achilles Last Stand"

I'm In Love With That Song

02:59 min | 1 year ago

Podcast Excerpt from Led Zeppelin - "Achilles Last Stand"

"So in september of nineteen seventy five robert plant still in a wheelchair joined jimmy page in southern california to write some new songs bass player john. Paul jones and drummer. John bonham would join them not long after once. They finished rehearsing most of the material in california. The band then relocated to music land studios in munich germany to record the album in november. The challenge was that the rolling stones had already booked the same studio for december. Which left led zeppelin with about two weeks to record the whole album. Jimmy page who not only played all of the guitar parts but also wrote virtually all of the music and produced. The album was working eighteen to twenty hours a day on it in the end they ran out of time. And jimmy had to ask mick jagger for two more days. In the studio to finish up jagger gave him the two days and jimmy page almost by himself recorded all of the overdubbed seven songs worth in one single night. And then jimmy. An engineer keith. Harwood mixed the whole album. The next day the album would be named presence and it was released in march of nineteen. Seventy six robert plant described this struggle to make the presence album as our stand against everything our stand against the elements against chance. We were literally fighting against existence itself. Unlike every other led zeppelin album. There are almost no acoustic instruments on presence at all. No keyboards no mandolins or recorders. No acoustic ballads. This is an album dominated by jimmy page's electric guitar wizardry and achilles last stand may be the pinnacle of his guitar playing and arranging genius achilles. Last stand is the first track on the album opening the record with a slow fade in on jimmy. Page's guitar played on his legendary gibson. Les paul nicknamed number one. The part is doubled and then panned left and right almost imperceptibly in the background there. You can hear john. Bonham hit a few notes on a symbol and with one hit of a snare drum into the song.

Jimmy Page Robert Plant John Bonham Paul Jones Jimmy Southern California Munich Mick Jagger Jagger Germany Harwood John California Keith Les Paul Gibson Page Bonham
"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"So in September of 1975, Robert Plant-- still in a wheelchair-- joined Jimmy Page in southern California to write some new songs. Bass player John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham would join them not long after. Once they finished rehearsing most of the material in California, t he band then relocated to Musicland Studios in Munich Germany to record the album in November. The challenge was that the Rolling S tones had already booked the same studio for December. Which left Led Zeppelin with about two weeks to record the whole album. Jimmy Page, who not only played all of the guitar parts but also wrote virtually all of the music and produced t he album, was working eighteen to twenty hours a day on it. In the end, they ran out of time a nd Jimmy had to ask Mick Jagger for two more days in the studio to finish up. Jagger gave him the two days, and Jimmy Page, almost by himself, recorded all of the overdubs-- seven songs worth in one single night. And then Jimmy and engineer Keith Harwood mixed the whole album the next day. the album would be named "Presence", and it was released in march of 1976. Robert Plant described the struggle to make the presence album "as our stand against everything, our stand against the elements against chance. We were literally fighting against existence itself." Unlike every other Led Zeppelin album, there are almost no acoustic instruments on "Presence" at all. No keyboards, no mandolins or recorders, no acoustic ballads. This is an album dominated by Jimmy Page's electric guitar wizardry, and " Achilles last stand" may be the pinnacle of his guitar playing and arranging genius. "Achilles Last stand" is the first track on the album, opening the record with a slow fade in on Jimmy Page's guitar, played on his legendary Gibson Les Paul nicknamed " number one". The part is doubled and then panned left and right. A lmost imperceptibly in the background there, you can hear John Bonham hit a few notes on a cymbal. And with one hit of a snare drum, we're into the song.

jimmy page robert plant Peter grant zeppelin robert maureen John bonham greece Paul jones roberts england jimmy Robert southern california munich mick jagger jagger germany Harwood california
"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

I'm In Love With That Song

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on I'm In Love With That Song

"After Led Zeppelin wrapped up their 1975 tour, the four members of the band, along with their manager, Peter Grant, were planning to leave England to avoid the high taxes. There they were doing what other rockstars had done before them including the rolling stones. They would be tax exiles. Vocalist Robert Plant was on vacation in Greece with his wife and two children, when on August 4, they had a terrible car accident. The kids were ok, thankfully, but Robert's wife Maureen, who was behind the wheel, was knocked unconscious and suffered a fractured skull and broken pelvis. Robert had multiple fractures in his right leg and elbow. The doctors said he wouldn't walk again for six months-- maybe more. A n American tour had been planned for that summer, but after Robert's accident, that was never going to happen... which meant that all that money t hey were counting on from that tour wasn't going to happen either. The only way to make up for that loss of income was to make another album. Luckily, guitarist Jimmy Page had a bunch of ideas for new material and Robert wanted to get back to work to do something-- anything was better than sitting around feeling miserable. So in September of 1975, Robert Plant-- still in a wheelchair-- joined Jimmy Page in southern California to write some new songs. Bass player John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham would join them not long after. Once they finished rehearsing most of the material in California, t he band then relocated to Musicland Studios in Munich Germany to record the album in November. The challenge was that the Rolling S tones had already booked the same studio for December. Which left Led Zeppelin with about two weeks to record the whole album. Jimmy Page, who not only played all of the guitar parts but also wrote virtually all of the music and produced t he album, was working eighteen to twenty hours a day on it. In the end, they ran out of time a nd Jimmy had to ask Mick Jagger for two more days in the studio to finish up. Jagger gave him the two days, and Jimmy Page, almost by himself, recorded all of the overdubs-- seven songs worth in one single night. And then Jimmy and engineer Keith Harwood mixed the whole album the next day. the album would be named "Presence", and it was released in march of 1976. Robert Plant described the struggle to make the presence album "as our stand against everything, our stand against the elements against chance. We were literally fighting against existence itself." Unlike every other Led Zeppelin album, there are almost no acoustic instruments on "Presence" at all. No keyboards, no mandolins or recorders, no acoustic ballads. This is an album dominated by Jimmy Page's electric guitar wizardry, and " Achilles last stand" may be the pinnacle of his guitar playing and arranging genius. "Achilles Last stand" is the first track on the album, opening the record with a slow fade in on Jimmy Page's guitar, played on his legendary Gibson Les Paul nicknamed " number one". The part is doubled and then panned

jimmy page robert plant Peter grant zeppelin robert maureen John bonham greece Paul jones roberts england jimmy Robert southern california munich mick jagger jagger germany Harwood california
"led zeppelin" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"An awesome singer. Yeah, she had a great voice, doesn't she? But I mean, he could just see here. We're going to play the dance before you hit the button. I knew it. You knew it was going to be that. Yeah, well, if guards going to get emotional that have to be the day that have to be that, you know, you know, the other emotional event that I remember. From and you guys may Some was when The girls from heart Honored Led Zeppelin. Did they play something? Uh, heart. Did heart did Stairway to heaven? Oh, I saw them play Battle of evermore by Led Zeppelin 10 15 years ago. Yeah. Dang. They were They did that good. Oh, they I mean, they killed it and to see and Robert plant and all those guys who are still with us from Led Zeppelin. We're just or just booing. I mean, boo hooing. I should say booing. They were just crying. Yeah. They were just crying in their suite sitting there watching this because it was It was just amazing to hear heart do this. I mean, you know, I might have some of this audio song Bergersen, sometimes on my thoughts. On this scares me. Oh, makes me want But these guys are I mean, they're locked in on it Intense, you know, And she goes after that just crushes its do and listeners. Yes, yes. Yeah, She's awesome. Yeah, both of those at the Kennedy Center. Not last night with the heart and led Zeppelin. But 7 41 w b a p coming up next Shannon Brown is going to join us. She was.

Shannon Brown Bergersen Led Zeppelin Kennedy Center 15 years ago both Battle of evermore last night Zeppelin 10 Robert plant w 41
"led zeppelin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Um uh, Led Zeppelin. Nice. Thank you. Very nice. Britney who you're doing good. They put out songs with that title right within the wolves. That the new Yardbird Yeah, yeah. Right. We're switching. Yeah, don't know to pop questions. It's still spans the decades, but I love Pop. I love pop. Okay, What's not like all 20 tens, okay? Some 20 twenties. Got it cued the music cue it, which 80 star is recognized by Guinness World Records is the best selling female recording artists of all time. Um, girls. Just wanna have fun. Cindy Lauper Incorrect. The best selling in 19 eighties and best selling female recording artists of all time largely known as an 80 star still around, but the eighties were her time. It was her jam. She's pop. Give me a song Just sing it will feel really good. Just sing it. Leave her better help man knew her girls just wanna have fun on my crazy. Oh, sorry, I said the road saw girl that's like you could never shave me on the show again. Number showed me another Britney. That is my phone. What a beggar! That was, though, by the old Lop adopted Ding Dong Cyndi Lauper. I was like my my really asleep Divide. Is he doing this.

Cindy Lauper Britney Led Zeppelin 80 star eighties Cyndi Lauper 20 twenties 19 eighties 20 tens Ding Dong Guinness World Records decades
Damon Johnson misses live concerts

Pantheon

07:43 min | 1 year ago

Damon Johnson misses live concerts

"Nothing better to do during a pandemic than listened to some new tunes. Some stuff you've been wanting to listen to and haven't had the chance to. I know things are starting opened up across the country but it's nevertheless music can always be escape. It can always be a form of healing and rock and roll is always there for you. It's it's loyalty you so please be loyal to rock and roll like to welcome in our next guest. Some really excited about this. I've had the pleasure of seen him live over the last few years with his old band. Black star riders and also solo. I had a pleasure of seeing him up for the winery dogs here in saint charles just outside of chicago couple years ago. Like to welcome in mr damon johnson. What's going on man. How are you good buddy. Thank you for having me on Sure i miss getting to play live shows at all but i definitely miss coming to the greater chicago. Area man there some of the best rock and roll fans in the country right there. Yeah it's always a great seen a great show whenever whenever. There's a live concert here in chicago whether it's a small club theater or arena it it just has an atmosphere that is like no other. It's really cool. I agree man I've been coming to chicago since the early days of brother cane We could have first. Album outweigh back in ninety three and straightaway man chicago and northern illinois radio in general. They really embrace this. And i feel like it's a relationship that i've been really fortunate to have for gosh man crazy number thirty years ago long time and you have some connection here too in chicago. I know steph from f three design. I think he does your local man. Stephon stephan does everything. He's yeah steffen. I think the first thing he did for me was help me. Get my website design in early two thousands and then Bizmart work for me. On my i guess my second solo album which was in a stick record and then when he has started warns. The arm in You know i've been a proud supporter of their clothing company and i love awareness stuff and they're just they're to of my favorite people on the planet. They're like family to us. Yeah i've known stephan for gosh. It's gotta be two decades three decades almost and i used to live with this rock band in chicago and he used to do. They're designed to as well in all their kind of marketing in and You know other kind kinda website and designing stuff. And i've known him so i run into him at shows like him and i always like bump into each other like. Hey man what's going on so it's always good to see him. That's amazing you've known him longer than i have. So that's That's really cool. And i'm i'm so proud of the growth. They've had their company and They're both incredibly talented. And it's inspiring you know for them to start their own kind of mom and pop business as they as they have and they grown it to the level that they have. I'm really proud to be a part of their circle. Well we got lots to get into but we always begin the episode. Every time we have a first time guest the same way and that's the essence of the show. The the question. We always ask just like every rock song has a hook. That sucks you in rock fan has a moment whether it's a band performance a song or album that hook them on rock and roll. What was it for you. Wow that's a big question The thing that hooked me on rock and roll was. I saw kiss on the midnight special on my television. When i was in the seventh grade and i it was the equivalent. I'm sure jay of our older friends. When they saw the beatles on ed sullivan that was the equivalent of that moment for me. No one's ever asked me that question to tell you the truth You know. I grew up my my folks to this day man. Both my parents love music and so it was a very musical household. The radio was always playing in. Dad would buy vinyl records of perjury artists pop artists and but yeah that was when i felt like it was something that was specifically mind. You know my parents not care for kids. They played black diamond complete with this. You know the rising drum riser in the pyro and everything manages your that. Messed me up preordained. I think it put me on the path for sure. Your kiss was an inspiration for a lot of musicians. And i think it was just the the imagery you know the the faces and the explosions and all the stuff. That kind of just pulled you in you know. The music was great too. But it just had like this power over young kids. I mean i got exposed to kiss back in like the early eighties. And i always remember knowing of them in knowing what they look like before i heard their music and then i heard their music and then i was just hooked. Yeah you know. I you know. I'm i'm probably a little older than you. So you know that midnight. Special show man that would have been nineteen seventy seven grow. This was this was early. This was. I believe this was between kiss alive. One destroyer and You know it was cool. Because i had a group of friends at school that you know we were all kind of discovering rock and roll at the same time and i remember that year in school that no kid and leonard skinner. I'm from the south. And so you know sweet home. Alabama was already the national anthem for us. And so you know the musicality of a ban like skinner We love led zeppelin and You know not long after that. We really got into bands like rush pink. Floyd bad company was big call. Rogers greatest singer of all time. You know things like that. So that set the table for me. I guess jay and then the two big bands not long after that you know when i finally started going to concerts where we saw thin lizzy. Ironically i saw them in seventy nine and that was a game changer for me and The the next summer. I saw van halen for the first time and i was cooked like that's it. I'm i gonna play guitar. You know. I have friends who go to college and get a degree and and and pursued that actually and it wasn't until i had already graduated junior college that i really ever thought of even considering it to be possible to play music as living especially for women coming from such rural backgrounds. There was nobody from where i came from. That was a professional musician. You know so. It just didn't seem possible.

Chicago Mr Damon Johnson Stephon Stephan Saint Charles Northern Illinois Steffen Steph Stephan Ed Sullivan JAY Beatles Leonard Skinner Skinner Alabama Floyd Rogers Van Halen
Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

Bobbycast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

"Joining me now is Steve. Gorman who was the drummer in the Black Crowes who now plays with trigger hippy and before we talk about some of the Black Crowes stuff in your book I. I saw tweets even it was talking about Eddie Van Halen, which is Kinda. Why you here you say there will be many many words written and spoken about Eddie. Van. Halen, over the next few days, weeks, months and years those millions of words will never come close to expressing what he meant a rock music what he meant to guitarist and what he meant to the guitar itself that's pretty powerful statement Mr Gorman what did Eddie and remind me to rock music I. Think it's it's pretty simple. You can say that he and Jimi Hendrix of the two guys. That truly, and and only the two guys that moved the needle for the guitar itself I mean Hendrix. came out of a blue based. seem. And took the playing and the tone he could get to a new place but even hail and. Really almost came in from another country. Another planet I should say another he's like an alien life form I mean, he was a virtuosic player obviously but he He reinvented what what you could do is to guitar and the fact of the matter is this. Like Hendrix. But even to a greater degree, anybody tries to play like Eddie. Van Halen. Just sounds like a mind a mimic they. It's like rich little doing Johnny Carson okay. Yeah. That kind of sounds like him but. There's nothing nobody's ever been able to do any van. Halen. Did it make it feel a certain way? That each just the and he was that way at twenty two I mean, this is this is not a guy like it's not like David Blaine magic tricks where he gets bigger and better every year he started with card tricks that other people did I even Halen hit the ground running with Van Halen one playing an instrument that have been around for centuries unlike anybody else had ever done I mean he was on the Mount. Rushmore. Of Great Depar- players. At twenty two years old and then, and then he stuck around for another forty years still playing unlike anybody before sin. So I just think that in terms of. You know. Sheer unique. Mindset ambition combined with just. Great talent obviously. But but also phenomenal work ethic I mean he's just a complete unicorn in every sense of the word. How would you describe his guitar sound and I say that I know what I think of it but I wasn't I just messed van Halen like I came around right as you guys were blowing up honestly so that for me the van Halen was slightly classic rock slightly old rock to me as A. Kid. So as someone 'cause, you're just years older than I am but how would you describe his guitar sound someone who was in in it and living it in love and Van Halen? Well I can tell you that that was thirteen years old the first time I heard Van Halen and I remember it. I remember where I was I remember who I was with. It was going home from school in Hopkinsville Kentucky. You really got me there kinks the you know the their cover, the kinks song came on the radio. And and it was playing already and I said, Hey, mom turn that up. It was me and my mom and my friend Brooke. Lofton. The three of us in a car and she turned it up and I my first thought was. That must be like a live version of the king song and I was thinking like we don't they don't rock or do they. But when it hit that Solo and then by the time, the song ended I realized well, that does that's not ray Davey seeing this is clearly a cover version but what on earth is this and it was like making my? Hair on the back of my neck stand up. This is a time when I thought punk rock was the coolest thing in the world. and. The truth is Van Halen was more punk than the punks because they were truly breaking down a bunch of barriers if you will or they were going in their own. You know there hasn't been a band like Van Halen since led Zeppelin in terms of. Rock band hits the ground running at full steam and it obliterates everything in their path in a certain sense and. Jimmy van Halen sound it sounded like California was in my head. You know soon as I realized soon as I heard about them, they're from La, and as soon as I saw David Lee Roth and then as soon as I heard more than you know the next thing I heard was eruption Guitar Solo and you know hearing just two pieces of their first album and seeing what they look like it just. It felt brand new and it already felt like they're going to be around forever. You just knew from the jump and this is me as a thirteen year old kid who is obsessed with music. This band is one of the Alzheimer's like there's nothing like this and they all have the chops and the other thing too as long as I'm just rambling incessantly any van Halen was a great rhythm player. It wasn't just about the Solos he led the band rhythmically and he's also it needs to be noted not that it's not obvious. He's a hell of a songwriter I mean he really was. As I said before he's a true Unicorn I mean, just just nothing like it. What does this sound like do you? It sounds frequent and right in right in the zone near your your key. That's one thing because listen I played a little bit I don't play even as good as my friends who are real life musicians, but it's perfect frequency and frequency is in the tone or the, but as because it's a lot. I mean Brad Paisley plays unnoticed Brad. Paisley. Because I hear the chicken Pickin I hear a very distinct sound and again I didn't catch van Halen as it was happening in my childhood. But when I hear Van Halen Song even if I, it's I, don't know who it is. Just hear the guitar part I hear the Eddie van Halen because I how fast he shreds but the pattern that he does it, you can just tell. By By his fingers and it just kind of again it's hard to explain when you ask about music but that's what I think about and I try to. Always try to. Prepare analogies and most of the people who listen to this podcast here between twenty to forty, and if you were to make an analogy to another band, it's GonNa be tough because Van Halen was massive. But who later on had the kind of? Impact or. Reflected the mass listening that Van Halen had well. What band what yeah. What band can we look at now or in the last ten years and see? Okay. Well, that's how big Van Halen was to the people that were the kids in the eighties.

Van Halen Eddie Van Halen Jimmy Van Halen Halen Jimi Hendrix Black Crowes Mr Gorman Johnny Carson Steve Hendrix. David Blaine Brad Paisley Kentucky Alzheimer David Lee Roth LA Lofton Ray Davey Brooke
Legendary Seattle disc jockey Pat O'Day dies at 85

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Legendary Seattle disc jockey Pat O'Day dies at 85

"Remembering the life and legacy of Pat O Day. The truly legendary Seattle deejay and concert promoter who became an icon to a generation of northwest music and sports fans. Pat has passed away the age of 85. And Cuomo's Corwin Headache has this remembrance Today programme is 27 minutes late 65 with a hammer green in Seattle. He reeled off that classic top 40 deejay pattern to perfection. Wasn't it a good day today that I was around 51? It was as natural as breathing. Currently it's 49 in the sky. There's Pat was a pitch perfect pitchman. Did you ever get on a plane enough to walk through the first class? Section? Your seat in the back? Don't you feel You know, why can't I sit here? Right? Go to the back of the point. Well, you'll never see the day on a West Coast jet. But you could say I had it down. Pat taught many other rock jocks how to do the same. During a radio career that helped raise the first Northwest rock scene to national prominence. He promoted bands like the Kinsman and the Wailers at the Siri's of Northwest team dancers. His concert promotion company brought the Beatles, the Beach Boys and Led Zeppelin to Seattle and friendly Young and upcoming guitars. Jimmy Hendrix. As Pat told another iconic local deejay Bob Rivers. I was on an airplane with Jimi Hendrix and and on the road with Led Zeppelin and we're handling Elvis. And and now I look back and go. Oh, my God, that happened to me. But for all that Pat might be best remembered as the voice of the Hydro's. Calling the Seafarer races for 40 years old coming out of the north. Turn. Here they come. What a beautiful side, six screaming, unlimited hydroplane streak and passed along boom and into the Mures around a bridge turn. He re created those calls for Co. Moh in 2013. Have mentors, many a broadcast professional. He wrote several books and he enrich the lives of radio listeners around the Northwest. As Pat himself once said, I've had a great run. Corwin hate Homo news. Pat Love to tell the story about taking Jimi Hendrix back to his all mater at Garfield High School when Jimmy was 25 years old and how painfully shy Jimi Hendrix wass But the two of them have quite a history paddle day in the sixties operated Ah place called the Spanish Castle between Seattle and Tacoma and Jimi Hendrix opened there for another band. In the early sixties. He was 17 years old and was playing a $50 Sears, Roebuck guitar.

PAT Jimmy Hendrix Seattle Pat O Pat Love Corwin Headache Led Zeppelin Northwest Cuomo Wailers West Coast Bob Rivers Garfield High School Beatles Siri Tacoma CO
New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

Roe Conn

06:19 min | 2 years ago

New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

"If you have Amazon prime video there's a movie called mice bite which was just hitting theaters when covert nineteen hit this is an action comedy Dave Batista who's you know guardians of the galaxy you know that big giant former wrestler guy he's a CIA agent row he finds himself teamed up with the precocious nine year old so in other words should be making kindergarten cop now I have to tell you about this to think that this is actually this is a rite of passage for action star Jackie Chan had a movie like this the rock had a movie like this John Cena is had a movie like this at some point you gotta so you're lovable side and be charged with guarding little kids and then you learn about the soft side yourself this one is particularly horrible and one of the things we hate about this movie Rakan my spot is set primarily in Chicago they shot it in Toronto eight that and the worst moments in this movie is there's a chase that begins in wicker park okay the bad guy gets behind the wheel of a car with her party he's trying to get away from Dave Batista CIA agent now the C. I. A. tech person is in David she says here telling them where you know traveling this guy and the agents as one minute after this car leaves wicker park the agent says looks like he's heading to the Naperville area because Naperville has a giant airfield so wrong later five minutes later we're in phony Naperville where I kid you not there's a big you know action sequence where the plane on the runway is now dangling over what appears to be the Grand Canyon who knew that in Naperville there was an airport overlooking a giant canyon clearly green screen so I mean it's just been really poorly done it's too violent for the little kids and it's too stupid for the adults and a lot of parents thing all this might be fun have a fun action movie stay away from my spy that's too bad you're you're totally right about that right of passage because Arnold Schwarzenegger had to do that too right I mean it was like a garden shop yeah I mean everybody has to make sure that the kids have something to go watch in that in those movies were actually pretty good for kids you're saying this one's not this was terrible okay now I've got I've got the funniest movie of the summer Fauria probably so far it has the worst title of all time it's called Eurovision Song Contest the story of fire saga well the Eurovision Song Contest is an actual deal in Europe and has been since the rent if these in fact Salim young was discovered on that aba was first on the Eurovision Song Contest this is a parity with will Ferrell the king of the parity right and Rachel McAdams they play a couple of Icelandic singer songwriters he's Lars Eriksen she's cigarette original daughter and their Icelandic and they're dreaming of representing their home whether they do kind of like Viking game of thrones stamp rock songs so this is filled with all these big production numbers because then we meet the contestants from Greece and the grand the Russian the Russian contest is actually played by our friend Dan Stevens was Matthew Crawley on Downton abbey he plays a Russian oligarch who's also a ballad singer it's really really stupid and it's really really funny it's mostly excuse these big giant set pieces where they do these huge production numbers remember will Ferrell did a movie called blades of glory your hair well he does for you know that did for ice dancing with the stars for song competition so even though we don't know the Eurovision Song Contest here in the states we know about all the competition shows that this is basically get one singer from each country you know what it's all European countries they have a couple of other than the states they're not we're not eligible for the Eurovision Song Contest was there an SNL bit with will Ferrell that was similarly themed I I just don't know that there could have been it's it's clearly the kind of stuff that he just excels at when you see him in the big Viking outfit and looks like the blue eye shadow it's singing about Viking you know might biking protector this is the song from this will enrich McAdams by the was wonderful as well she can also be very funny the video and the song they do is so terrible that it's great because it looks just like when you see those kind of you know that's a big deal that kind of like that Viking will rock nonsense yeah there's my aunts were everybody everybody pretends like the rolling the slave ship which is really just unfortunate or the big Viking ship as it will be we kind of you know horrible music but really right prepared well it there's that old joke about Led Zeppelin thank you know I have the have the crap was about Vikings right and if the agency had no idea what they were saying about this the music was so great musicianship as of right but if you look back you're like what the hell of the talk was only in the middle of the song yeah they had they did they had references to the lord of the rings when it was just a yeah they were so ready this is really true okay and anything else this weekend it's yeah I want to tell people is a completely does shift in tone row but the there's a best selling book a called I'll be gone in the dark written by the late Michelle McNamara who was UP board result park went to California become a true crime writer Mary Patton Oswalt the famous comedian and actor and she wrote about one of the best true crime book sense in cold blood called I'll be gone in the dark about the search for the Golden State killer probably the least known to most prolific serial killer rapist of the last fifty years this is not a six part series about Michelle's book and also about the Golden State killer it starts on HBO on Sunday night if people if you're into that true crime genre you know talk about making a murderer people aren't so many of these other ones this is the podcast to get started this is brilliantly done and it's really a profile of Michelle McNamara and her marriage to Pat now as well because it's young obviously she had a lot of recording should podcasters video for a lot and she died while writing the book she died in her sleep partially because the stress of the book and and prescription drugs and under heart condition and they continued patent and some researchers continued and finished the book without her and then we get to know the story of this incredible monster who I will let people know was just arrested a couple of years ago and charged with all these crimes because guess what they got his DNA matched about fourteen of the crime scenes that that kept the updates from I'll be gone in the

Dave Batista Amazon CIA
History in Five Songs 47: Bands of Individuals

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:38 min | 2 years ago

History in Five Songs 47: Bands of Individuals

"So this is episode forty seven. We are going to be calling this bands of individuals. I couldn't think of a snappier title. But this basically explains this concept and it's actually a pretty elevated concept If you don't mind me saying this is something I've always felt and it's an episode. I've been burning to do So let's just get to it. I mean essentially One funny thing about this episode is it's not very heavy metal or hard rock. Although I am going to be mentioning a lot of bands that are hard. Rock and heavy metal but my examples per se are not particularly in that field. But I am going to end with a with a classic heavy metal band so So all shall be forgiven. I hope by the end of this. I might mention a few Honorable Mentions Myself All right so we're GONNA do this one a little bit differently. I hope it doesn't go on too long. I probably will shorten up when it comes to the actual entries but I have a little bit of a along intro here so I went to you the fine listeners. And and said hey give me some examples of this and it's kind of funny The example started flowing in and I'm going to read some of those in in a second But what I realized when I was reading these examples is I'm not too clear on what my concept is for this. I hope by the end of this episode and when you hear examples you're GonNa understand what has always been stuck in my brain for decades essentially about bands. That are like this why I think there are certain bands truly truly truly like this. So let's just get on with that so I sent. I sent off a facebook cry for help here So what did I say here so So here's a really cool concept that I'm at four at need one. More as I said bands of individuals and ecosystem is created with a clear north South East and West. It's an ecosystem that has not one world but four five teams that comprise a complex world. I've thought this for years about these four bands. But do you get my drift strode. A few band names and if one of them just hits me like a lightning bolt. I'll know it but I don't want to explain further or debated. Let's save that for the episode. Only one of my choices is remotely a metal band. So that's what I wrote And yet just to explain a little more before. I read some of these Entries the idea here is that these bands create almost like You know you think of a little Snow Globe that you shakeup and there. There's the snowflakes in there. There's this enclosed world that is a weird world but very importantly this world is not one that ends up being kind of a unified sounding thing that a lot of other band's sound like it is a world unto itself that's number one but number two it does have an east west North and south. I mean it. Basically sounds like a world of individual players or Feifdoms that is making this up so doesn't sound like particularly like a unified whole. It sounds like a band or a record or song that you listened to where you can't get the members themselves out of your head when you're listening to it. You don't think the band name you think all of these original members jumbled up together at once. I think that explains it probably pretty well but let me tell you quickly and what I'm going to do here is I'm going to leave out. The bans That were suggested that are actually my choices anyways. And I'm just going to go through some of these very quickly dispelled the notion of why didn't include the more. How they they? Almost clay came close. Oh so we've got vanya Derek. I mentioned led Zeppelin Queen Cream and Russia. Okay all of those are pretty close but no cigar. They had certain things about them. That were almost two unified Long Story But those ones are are all pretty close but let's see Jacob Tannahill said sons of Apollo Mister Big Asia. Any one of them fit the bill and I actually almost thought Asia that I would include But Yeah I think he's getting the point here Sons of Apollo definitely. You know the big the big You know important band members. Asia supergroup The police New York Doll says Thomas Hackney also the pretenders I would say no on the pretenders I would. That wouldn't have come to mind. I wouldn't New York dolls that come to mind. Police is one of my honorable mention so with that band. You know you are thinking This this chicken scratch sort of textured a guitar playing from Andy. You know base. I don't think you think of sting so much base but you think of that vocalist and then also I with Stewart Copeland. You definitely get a unique drummer. That is a distraction. I mean you're thinking of him when you're hearing these police songs so yes that's a good example of what we're getting at here. Augusta Garcia parade. As mentioned the clash. I would say no I don't. It doesn't really fit the bill here. Thomas Hackney comes up with AKS little bit. That's kind of cool. One Eagles Blazed Barshop. Says no I wouldn't say so Going to leave Well no I'm not going to leave this one because I kick them out. Pat conners has fleetwood Mac. I actually was include fleetwood Mac but I couldn't see myself playing a fleetwood Mac song as one of our five choices here but definitely you get the yet. This is a perfect example. And like I say I was one of mine that was on the at the top of my head. You get. Basically these. Three distinct vocalists are all with their personalities and their baggage in their own solo albums. The whole bit Stevie Nicks Christie. Make Christine mcvie his Christine. Yeah and Lindsey Buckingham All very distinct vocalists. And you also get You Know Mick. Fleetwood is the is kind of the the patriarch of the ban. But you had get this very stripped down drumming John mcvie Idaho. Don't really think of him too much in this but Lindsay as well you think of a very distinct Sort of I said chicken. Scratch already with Andy Summers. Chicken scratch makes a lot more sense with Lindsay So again you're listening to fleetwood Mac song or a few in a row and you're thinking oh when's this focus gonNA sing or that one or oh. They're they're doing this together And then and then. Lindsey gives you this very stark guitar Solo And and you get this very sort of straight line B line kind of Feel to a of their songs so that is a ban when you're listening to them. I can't get the members individually out of their heads hence bands of individuals. Okay

Thomas Hackney Andy Summers Lindsey Buckingham Asia Lindsay Fleetwood Christine Mcvie Facebook Idaho Stewart Copeland New York Augusta Garcia Parade Vanya Derek Jacob Tannahill Russia Mick Stevie Nicks
The Low Down with Derek Frank

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:37 min | 2 years ago

The Low Down with Derek Frank

"What do Gwen Stefani and Shania Twain have in Common? Well for one they both have vegas residencies but more importantly on the bottom and they have Derek Frank Holden down the base. That's right Derek. Frank is on tour with both gwen engine in addition to doing their vegas residencies. Also if you live in the Los Angeles area you can check out Derek. Frank at soundcheck live. And he's in the resident band there. At lucky strike in Hollywood additionally Derek has played with Shakira. Paulina Rubio Daniel Powder. Air Supply Mindy a bear in the bone-shakers and you guessed it the list goes on checkout Derek Frank. Bass player extraordinaire right here on the career musician. Podcast Derek Frank. Welcome to nomads place. Hey man good to be here. Thank you so much for coming to my pleasure. Right down the street. Yes yeah we were just talking about how we never were neighbors. Yeah Yeah Burbank. Yep GotTa Love Burbank. Indeed man now Your House. You have a studio as well right Yup Yup got a garage we That was kind of the main selling point of the houses that we'd a three car garage that we could build a studio in awesome. Yeah I mean I wonder how many people in Burbank actually musicians right probably half composed. Who's play yeah? It seems like every you know every couple of months I get invited to some session and it's like down the street somewhere in someone's garage. I'm like Oh my God. I didn't even know there was a studio here. That's all it seems. Like half half the houses in Burbank. Have some SORTA studio you know right right. But he's in the industry exactly and then not to mention writers and actors and producers directors. Sure we're definitely in the entertainment district. Here hub yeah cool all right so bro. The career musician it is what it is right. A lot of people say. What does that mean? Well we've made a living out of playing music so I kinda dub does as career music. Yes somehow we've made it work exactly. Yeah against all odds so look I. I WanNa talk about a brief history. Okay I think you went to the University of Miami is I did. What got into music? What was the impetus that said you know what? I'm going to be a musician but I'm going to be a bass player as well. Well that was early on I mean just as a Kid. I think a lot of us that end up doing this. You know we discover music when we're really young and we just like it. We don't know anything about it. We don't play an instrument yet but we're just into it and that was me. I I listen to a lot of stuff. I was really into it when MTV came out. I just could not stop watching it. I just saw people playing on. Mtv knows like man. I want to do that so then when the time came I I gotta get started taking lessons for just a few months and then I was in a music store once waiting for my lesson in there was based on the wall and I was like. What's that and the guys who get the Bass Guitar and I? I had no idea what that was. It was like I wanNA check that out so as I'm waiting for my guitar lesson I start playing this basin it immediately just like wow like this instrument. This is what I WANNA play. Wow that's who's who's kind of like that. Yeah what what was it? Because there was only four strings would they because they were thicker the vibrations the lower frequency? I can't explain it. It's just like I started playing it and just really dug it. I was like wow. This thing's really cool like and then I kind of learned what it is and what its function isn't a band and Yeah just started taking lessons on one of those i. I was a caddy at the time. Saved up some money caddying at the golf course and bought a Kramer Bass Kramer Duke Bass Guitar. Oh Yeah that was in Norwalk Connecticut. You probably know where that is your from. Long Island right absolutely now not too far away. Yeah all right. So then what brought you down to Miami and eventually over here. Well I've you know pretty soon got pretty serious about it like I had my high school garage band jam on. Know Van. Halen led Zeppelin stuff like that. Then my family moved to Cleveland. Ohio and I was kind of thrust into all the all the groups in the school. Like in the music program like the Renault Bass players so I got thrust into jazz band concert band marching band. Because they didn't have Tubas so I played in marching band with a wireless and then look would do play in the pit orchestra for the musicals. They'd have it high school so I was just kind of thrust into all these situations that that made me a better musician you know I had to. I had to learn to read ahead to to play jazz. I had to learn. You know all all that kind of stuff you know. Kinda made me get serious about music and then started auditioning for other stuff around Cleveland. I played in this like all state jazz band called Ohio Jazz Orchestra for Youth and got my ass kicked in that really like you know. Made Me Kinda step up and shed a lot and that's a trip. How about half of the right? Yeah Yeah so. How did you learn how to read and and play changes and whatnot and jazz because you're going from rock and Roll Jazz? That's a transition. Oh yeah totally. I was a metal head before I did that. Likud I moved to Cleveland. I was like into thrash metal and stuff like that and like you know I started taking theory in the in the high school band director was was like. Oh you know we need to play jazz. Been and all this stuff and I'd never played any of that stuff before I had never read anything so I was just thrust into it and I had to learn and I got Got A teacher in Cleveland and helped me start reading and I got some reading books and practised reading. You know it was just like trial by fire. Sink or swim. You know if there's something that I couldn't figure out how to like take it home and figure it out you know and this is the days before the Internet Youtube to just look it up. Oh no I just had to kind of learn from books and learn from a teacher and just learn about putting the hours in just by you know Kinda practicing reading rhythms and reading notes and the more I did that in the more reading situations I got put into Just kind of the better I got at it and it was a very valuable skill that I was fortunate enough to learn on right. Incredible did you ever use the clap out? The rhythms before is doesn't that table. I remember I would just sit in bed with my book and like a flashlight and a pencil and I would just kind of like nod my head to the quarter note just tap out. The rhythms can only do that for a half hour before bed. You know things like that or if I if I had time where I didn't have my base with me and I couldn't like actually practice do that. Yeah just tap out the rhythms just to Kinda learn how to read rhythms. I talk about that all the time to this day. I'll be sitting on the airplane writing a chart totally an IPAD and you can just tap it out and you can count through it and slow it down right. Yeah I do that all the time just like on planes. Because that's like you know downtime. You have a lot of times in between gigs or whatever and you're like okay. We'll I can use. I can use this three hour flight to chart out tunes for the next GIG. That's right and that's all the time. Yeah Yeah we're GONNA come back to that actually so then you go to. Um so which is kind of good because you start in Jazz Ban. You get your feet wet. Yeah I got more serious a- more serious with jazz as time went on like I said I I was in that Ohio Jazz Orchestra for youth with a lot of real great players from local high schools. I did that and then I went to a interlocken center for the arts for two summer programs and then ended up staying for my senior year of High School Eight of Boarding School. It's just an arts boarding school where everybody's there to get just better at their craft. That's along we. There was there for years senior year so I did two summers and then stayed around for my senior year of high school. Then I went to University of Miami. That's immersive though that. That's Oh man. It was great idea. Yeah it really was because I was with a lot of like minded people all the time you know aside from our on. Sambas that we were in our classes. We jam constantly. You know late at night early in the morning like you're with a bunch of people that just want to play and that just really head start you know just putting in that many hours playing those very fortunate to have been able to do that okay. So that got you prepped for. Yeah then I went to Miami. Miami was the only school I auditioned for. I You know I was. I was an electric bass player. Never really got into the upright thing. A lot of other schools that have jazz programs. Were a little bit more traditional big bandy. You know to where like I couldn't really just be an electric bass player and you go there. Really my options were Miami Berkeley or am I and Miami just seemed to be the right program at the time but you didn't even apply to the others. I didn't I just. I applied auditioned addition to Miami. Got Accepted and that was it. Bam So my choice easy. That's awesome just went yet just went for one school. Yeah what was that like? It's great you've completed your yeah. I did for years. I did take a year off after freshman year. I just kind of wanted like takes time off and process everything because I I've been going pretty intensely for a while with with You know the the the summer jazz program I was in and then interlocken for a year and then after that I did a cruise ship for for the summer. Then I went to Miami for freshman year and It was just a ton of intense shedding for years. And I really just kinda needed to take time away from that just process it so I took a year off after Freshman Year. I did a cruise ship Gig for six on states. Saved up some money practice my ass off but also you know partied quite a bit simple. Do on. Cruise ships brilliant. Yeah just kind of wanted just. I just needed a year to Kinda like SORTA CATCH UP PROCESS. Right relaxed a little bit as well. I feel just like a lot of information intel. It was really practicing a lot back then. To right Yeah so took that year off and then went back and finished and it was great. It was a great program a lot of great players. I played in a lot of bands and just took in a lot of information and it was. It was

Miami Derek Frank Cleveland Ohio Jazz Orchestra University Of Miami Derek Frank Holden Derek Burbank Gwen Stefani Paulina Rubio Los Angeles High School Eight Of Boarding MTV Hollywood Long Island Shania Twain Golf Daniel Powder Intel
Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

BrainStuff

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

"I think we can all admit that we've pulled a Paris bueller once or twice while lathered up in the shower. Everyone sometimes grabs a handy bottle of shampoo was an Improv. Microphone and busts out a tune or two. There's just something completely satisfying about singing in the shower even celebrities do it. According to People magazine after Jack Black likes to belt out led Zeppelin and Wycliffe. Sean digs a little bruce springsteen everyone's a rockstar in the bathroom whether you have a voice like aretha Franklin or couldn't carry a melody if it had a handle but have you ever wondered about this phenomenon. Some of US wouldn't see in public if someone paid us. We'll sing in the shower without embarrassment. Believe it or not there is a scientific explanation behind our soapy. Musical stylings first. Let's look at why we're relaxed enough in the shower to bust into song. I think about it. You don't sing when you're sad unless you're singing the blues. Maybe for many people shower times the only time they're alone all day. You're in a warm small safe environment. You're comfortable enough to be in the buff stress literally washes off of you when you relax your brain releases dopamine which can give your creative juices a jump start. Warm waters rushing over you and now you're relaxed and feeling good. It turns out that singing makes you feel even better singing because of the breathing that you put into. It gets more oxygen to the blood. This gives you better circulation. Which in turn improves your body and mood. And because you have to breathe a little deeper to belt out a song you get some of the same relaxation and mind clearing benefits as meditation. Another neat thing. Is that when you're singing? You can't really think about your problems. More stress relief. But the best thing about sending in the shower the acoustics. You couldn't ask for a better sound system than a bathroom because bathroom tiles. Don't absorb sound. Your Voice bounces back and forth around the room before fading away and because the shower is a small space it boosts your voice and even adds a little base making your singing sound more powerful sound bouncing also gives your vocal styling a reverse effect which makes voice hang in the air longer and evens out variations in your singing. I think of it as a primitive auto tune. It makes you sound better than you normally would. Which is a confidence boost? We don't sing in the shower simply because we have that song stuck in our heads. You know the one it turns out. We do it for many reasons. Stress Relief happiness great acoustics or maybe just because we like to hear our own voices no matter what the reason keep it up. It's good for you and if you've never tried it pick a song and put on your own private concert.

Aretha Franklin Paris People Magazine Dopamine Bruce Springsteen Jack Black Wycliffe Zeppelin Sean
Led Zeppelin wins 'Stairway to Heaven' copyright case

Z Morning Zoo

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Led Zeppelin wins 'Stairway to Heaven' copyright case

"So in case you don't know led Zeppelin prevailed yesterday in the long standing copyright battle with another British rock group called spirit they were suing led Zeppelin claiming that stairway to heaven infringed upon their song called Taurus you're gone stairway to heaven classic everyone knows it's hard to steal kill nineteen seventy one it makes it almost fifty years old this lawsuit and by the way they had sued before if you wouldn't mind seeing now they stood before and led Zeppelin one in that trial by the U. S. appeals court ruled that the judge gave misleading instructions to jurors he was probably is up one fan and that's really what it was anyways even after reading all this okay in my head I'm going who cares these songs are so old nobody listens you know I mean you still is not on the radio today but nobody cares about this lawsuit that is almost fifty years old now and it's probably not even close not even yeah right then I listen to the songs holy crap these guys got ripped off really here is the classic opening led Zeppelin's stairway to heaven listen carefully all right now here is the opening to this other band splits us spirit and their song Taurus yeah I know I heard it I was like how did you lose this food chain so you can tell me ask you this is it just the beginning of the whole songs are getting just so here's always look at music lawsuits is if you play for me and didn't tell me anything yeah what I say all that stats so whatever when you play that out of the like well so we did an acoustic version of stairway to heaven that's my initial yeah and I'll always say this because he said it was a good girl that's right yeah I know I agreed and this lawsuit now is almost fifty

Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin wins major copyright battle for 'Stairway to Heaven'

Steve Cochran

01:43 min | 2 years ago

Led Zeppelin wins major copyright battle for 'Stairway to Heaven'

"A federal appeals court has restored a jury verdict that found Led Zeppelin did not steal stairway to heaven the state claimed that the nineteen seventy one Maggie had violated the copyright of the nineteen sixty eight song by spirit called Taurus do you want to hear a little bit of this let's hear a little bit of stairway to heaven first and then we'll compare that to Taurus C. which you think that's a major win for Jimmy Page and Robert plans and here's the song by spirit called Taurus it is it is similar the jury an eleven judge panel overturned a previous ruling at the jury in the year two thousand sixteen trial should have heard the recording of Taurus and was given poor instructions before jurors found in favor of pasion plant the jurors never heard the recording but a federal appeals court yesterday did restore the jury verdict that found Led Zeppelin did not

Maggie Jimmy Page Robert
Led Zeppelin wins 'Stairway to Heaven' copyright case

Austin's Morning News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Led Zeppelin wins 'Stairway to Heaven' copyright case

"Three Led Zeppelin wins a court battle over its stairway to heaven led Zeppelin has won a major court battle over whether the band stole their iconic stairway to heaven from the band spirits nineteen sixty eight song Tom ninth circuit court of appeals upheld a jury's previous decision which overturned the inverse ratio broke precedent which is largely controlled copyright cases in the ninth circuit for the past forty three years the role seven more evidence there is to show the defendant had access to the plaintiff's work before producing the material in question the

Zeppelin
Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart has died of brain cancer

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart has died of brain cancer

"Burl music legend Neil Peart drummer for the Canadian rock trio rush has passed away according to a statement peered died January seventh from brain cancer more now from ABC entertainment contributor Matt wolf is an equally powerful presence for rush transfixed in audiences for years Neil Peart was considered one of the greatest drummers in rock joining the band along with getting Lee and Alex Lifeson in nineteen seventy four style and precision was often compared to the likes of led Zeppelin's John Bonham he was also the band's lyricist bringing character as in songs like Tom Sawyer to life sixty seven ABC news

Brain Cancer Matt Wolf Neil Peart LEE Zeppelin John Bonham Tom Sawyer Abc Entertainment Alex Lifeson ABC
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 3 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Lake Roop, Skeleton Skeleton Lake And Roop Kanwar Lake discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

01:21 min | 3 years ago

Lake Roop, Skeleton Skeleton Lake And Roop Kanwar Lake discussed on This Week in Science

"High in the himalayan mountains. There's a lake roop. Oop condoms lake also known as mystery lake. It's a lovely lake. Actually it's a frozen lake all year long covered in ice and snow surrounded by frozen rocky each rain in a very uninhabitable area is this we start singing that led zeppelin song almost and just as the ice and and the snow melter way in the summer sun it gets a new name and instead of mystery laker go start referring it to refer to it as skeleton skeleton lake because the lake bottom is covered in thousands and thousands of bones and they happened happen to be human bones large scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons relatives of roop kanwar lake belong to a wildly genetically distinct group of people that died at very different times so there's a lot of stories about who these people were it was the king and queen and their entourage it was this <hes> this army that was passing this gap in and they got stuck in all of these stories. He's about this being one group that that had an ill-fated end what it turns out.

Lake Roop Skeleton Skeleton Lake Roop Kanwar Lake Lake Bottom OOP Zeppelin
Sony's 230-Walkman exhibit celebrates 40 years of a music icon - Engadget

Orlando's Evening News

00:44 sec | 3 years ago

Sony's 230-Walkman exhibit celebrates 40 years of a music icon - Engadget

"Antonio is forty years ago today that for the first time we can take our music with us as we go out and about the walls from Sony the one and only back in nineteen seventy nine the Sony Walkman Dave you would end up selling over four hundred million units over the years however sales began to plummet once apple released the iPod back in two thousand one Tony what was on your Walkman eros bath night I'm sure maybe some Led Zeppelin can only hold one album I mean this is way before my time it what you you put a CD there so yeah one CD at a time our ways that way before your time yeah and it did it did plummeted it became almost nonexistent once the iPad came out

Antonio Sony Apple Tony Forty Years
Zeppelin, California And Lake Qatar discussed on Mike McConnell

Mike McConnell

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Zeppelin, California And Lake Qatar discussed on Mike McConnell

"Now back to court goes Led Zeppelin, and the stairway claim this, this has been going on it seems forever. All right. Led Zeppelin has won its bid for a full eleven judge federal appeals court to review a decision to revive a lawsuit that accused the band of stealing the opening courts to stairway to heaven. A three judge penguins timber sided with the trust of Randy, California. The trust claimed Led Zeppelin ripped off the lake Qatar riff and his band's nineteen sixty eight song Taurus. So this is going to reignite, the fight over whether an earlier, judge should have allowed a jury to hear the song by California's band spirit. That judge had excluded the recording because at the time it was written copyright protection only applied to sheet music, not sound recordings. So he said, that's weird. Yeah, we have the original from spirit at that, they're my brother. Apparently spirit opened

Zeppelin California Lake Qatar Randy
Spotify's Long, Winding Road To India

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:31 min | 3 years ago

Spotify's Long, Winding Road To India

"Do. Are made medicine. Good zoo. Bob love and a beautiful so beautiful. This is the lovely voice of Indian singer RG sing. And Spotify said he was their most requested artists in the first week that they launched in India last month, this is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith, and I'm Pamela Boyko this expansion into India. It's key for Spotify. Right. It's this alluring big market one point three billion people, and they're spending more and more time on their smartphones. So many tech companies Stacey they wanna get in there. Well, yeah. Because the Swedish company Spotify, it's become the world's most popular music streaming service. I mean, I have it. I think you haven't. I haven't wants to keep growing it needs to expand to new places at their first investor day a year ago, the CEO Daniel Eck made this big announcement. We're working launching in some of the biggest markets in the world places like India, Russia and most of Africa the trouble Stacy is that launching an. Ndia? It's not that easy. The market is really complicated to enter from the outside. Spotify had a long hard fight ahead on today's indicator Spotify in India, we take the experience of this one company and use it as a way to figure out why it's so difficult to break into India. This message comes from NPR sponsor gained bridge. Gained bridge offers a new Witty's designed for the digital age simplify products with guaranteed returns that you can buy direct. Learn more at gain bridge dot life slash NPR. Game bridge is not available in all states. Support also comes from Hello Monday. A new podcast from Lincoln's aditorial team about the changing nature of work and how to get the most from Monday and your career find Hello Monday on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Stacey I wanted to learn more about why? Spotify would be so interested in launching in India, and why it was such a struggle. I called up this man nickel power. He's an Indian digital rights activist and the founder of a tech website called media NAMA. He said the amount of data used on India's largest cell phone provider is eight to ten times what it was just a year ago. They does really really cheap in speeds of a bitter and improving. Vittal nicely forty market now. But there has been this problem just like everywhere else. Indians do not wanna pay for online content a bunch of music download sites failed in the past. And there is still just a huge amount of piracy in the last. Couple of years subscription streaming services are starting to grow enough to catch the attention of a big company like Spotify, but not just Spotify. Lots of companies wanna make money off India's growing population of internet users. That's a big challenge. Competition is intense local music streaming apps are leading the market like Ghana GO Saban. And then they're also these familiar international names in their Google play, apple music, and Amazon we counted and before Spotify there were already at least ten music streaming services in India, plus Powell says of to deal with another competitor. When you might not always think of of goes, the largest music service in India is actually you to most people prefer to stream videos and listen to the music. In India because it's completely free. And you know, what it turns out? That's not just India ah music industry. Reporting twenty seventeen estimated one point three billion people around the world are using YouTube to listen to music, but I'm getting off topic here in an interesting way, though. But yes back to India so Spotify entered the market on the later side and in order to try to go up against this pretty heavy competition. They needed to come in prepared Indian customers were expecting this big international famous app with this great reputation to really deliver to the best selections of songs and the best playlists in India. That means both big Bollywood hits and western pop music. The industry is pretty fragmented. I you've got these big international labels like Sony and Warner Music group, then they're all these Indian labels Uduas that specialize in Bollywood and lots of little ones that specialize in a specific region or language. This is a country with twenty two official languages that is a lot of official languages so many. Spotify needed to make new deals with indie. Labels and expand their deals with international wants to include India. That's where the real trouble started, the company spent months and months negotiating with all of these different labels. Meanwhile, the CEO kept getting asked winter you launching an India on his earnings calls and then finally boom big progress. Spotify announces that it has made a deal with this huge local label called t series to stream its music and just to give you an idea of the size of t-series. It's YouTube channel has the most subscribers of any YouTube channel in the world. Now reports start coming out that Spotify in India's gonna launch this teaser is deal on January thirty first, but that day comes and goes and music fans in India, or like what gives turns out Spotify and Warner Music group. Just can't agree on a deal. The two sides end up in this messy court battle that in fact is still going on when Spotify finally launches at the end of February. It does. So without songs from artists that belong to Warner Music publishing division Indian customers on Twitter start complaining their favourite songs by Shirin Cardi B Led Zeppelin. They aren't available. So you can see how difficult it was to launch in this market customers that are hesitant to pay stiff competition and legal problems. Plus Spotify has to adapt its product to suit India. They Beasley have to go local. So Spotify makes a bunch of substantial changes to try to make the Indian market work for them stuff. They aren't doing anywhere else. They changed price payment methods and languages. India is the only place where the free ad-supported version of the smartphone app. Lets you play every song on demand in other countries that something you have to pay for like this country like this country, slightly cheated. Also to get Indian users. Spotify set a price for its premium service that is really cheap under two dollars a month type cheap that is less than it costs in Peru or Vietnam and a lot less than it costs here where it's

India Spotify Warner Music Group Youtube Stacey Vanik Smith Bob Love CEO Apple Game Bridge Pamela Boyko Stacey I Ghana Africa NPR Beasley Daniel Eck Founder Lincoln Sony
Need A Can't-Miss Wheel Of Cheese? Try Playing It Some Hip-Hop

BMAN

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Need A Can't-Miss Wheel Of Cheese? Try Playing It Some Hip-Hop

"We finally have a follow up that Swiss study on which music improves the flavor of cheese because you're holding your breath. I've been it's rap and that your answer is hip hop. Right. Hip hop. Researchers exposed nine wheels of a mental cheese. Menthol. Mansard, light smoking good. All of course, it's how do you spell? It. A mental M M E N T A L idea expose the cheese to Mozart Led Zeppelin and a tribe called quest. Among other artists in the bindings burn university of arts. Researchers said they. By the way. Right. Ben, Byron Switzerland. No idea. I'm just hop. The list of all the cheese exposed to music in terms of freeness. The strongest of those in terms of taste and smell

Byron Switzerland University Of Arts BEN M M E N T
"led zeppelin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Sing like that. But you got to think that's got to be his singing voice rate putting on some kind of ethics station because that would get old and hard to do. This is this is what we're hearing your talent. You don't you know, there's no MAC book. They're like plans some redubbed beat. There's no auto tune flash. There's no pomp and circumstance. It's just a couple of boys who want to do some good music, which you don't see anymore. So I love them for that. And as far as the Led Zeppelin stuff goes and people saying that there a rip off of Led Zeppelin. Here's the thing. If someone's a rip off that generally means that they would not be good, for instance. You would hear it and be like, oh, this is painful because they're trying to be. But if you if you were I'm sure they were inspired obviously by Led Zeppelin, and if you can make it sound that good cool levies. Does their ballad? You're the one. by the singer. The hair cannot be overlooked. There's his brothers..

Led Zeppelin
"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"led zeppelin" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"I mean that was the eighties in the in the hair metal scene. Have literally you had to have the blonde singer and the black haired guitar player can't get some. If you did you go. But I just such a powerful is a powerful music know for young generation. This is something that came across. It says the book it was kids. The seventies wasn't necessarily for their older brothers live for Woodstock in that sixties in that period. This was for the net is vitamins, they famously did not play Woodstock hill now grown while on the Bela would stop, but yeah, this should be the sentences in. I think it is not they just show up a little bit ahead of time. You know, then in Kazan show up sixty nine you know, you could probably put black Sabbath in there as well. Because they show up in sixty nine although I think their first opened doesn't launch till seventy. But yeah, this is this is the music of the future. Definitely. That's I think that's why it were to on irradicial question. It was something new. It was visually exciting powerful evidence or around. It was enema scarce. It was managed scarcity guess, very very clever might into viable, you might them on a vital to. They didn't do interviews is a big deal. And so while they know Sullivan for of Led Zeppelin while that unavailable. The the mistake just builds the stories bailed him build them build around. Yeah. And of course, they they internalized that and and lyrically musically. They get more mysterious in and throw that back to the audience, which is obvious in in on Led Zeppelin four, you know, no name taking a page out of the Beatles Abbey Road. You know, you don't you don't need anything. You don't even need a picture of them. Eat a picture that anything to do with rock music. It doesn't matter. Ill sell a million copies. And that's that's happened. He delayed the the arguments the coveted light the Alba's about three months. Yeah. Grumbling botched abandoned budge. And it goes, you know, the the full symbols and game at that to the mystique. Right. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. All the way and then houses at the holy again, all those help or just your there's no miss on him. It's it's really it's really incredible. Okay. So in the book, and I think we both agree appears nineteen seventy five win the cracks really start to become gaping holes. So let's let's talk about the decline. You know, obviously, we need to start with the drugs in the insane expectations of successful rock act in those days. You know, is is that is that like, you know. Delay that as the foundation, I think the drugs play the Paul, especially when you had caught a hog drugs. When harrowing time into the band, oversee note with everybody, you know monthly page. I believe the page a little bit jumbled. I think jump John's rope applaud that they moments for they can't the heads of a goal. I mean, obviously. Once you bring once I mean, anyone spoke to it cites wants heroin crept into the pants things. Started giant plaza this point she's the point where things become problematic for bronze. He developed a huge cane habit and the Peruvian marching powder. Lou, the Amal Shing how and econ underestimate impulses had any suddenly in terms of paces on story, as you know, as he's children were telling as the people telling me the time. That's when he takes his football into of his how life he's not neglect. He's alive and he's wife time grower. And that's when the crack stop to pay plus had a band of been working non-stop four five six years them. You know, you've got a little bit of a power struggle now, which we wrote applauding Jimmy page robot is younger than Jimmy. He was hard by Jimmy to me the singer in Jimmy's band and the Coles he's rubble clout. Now, he's the Viking gold. He's writing the songs. He singing them. You know, so e com expected to be safe as junior calmer anymore thing that was very important of the problems in the, you know, then totally understandable as well. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. So they went and formed swansong as a label. They not realize that they're falling into the same trap that Beatles. Did I bake their egos were signing flat? I feel I feel like anything, you know, when we go to that stake. They they're indestructible Graham. Yes, they load. So on some records. We're going to sell fiber acts, you're Wegener actors an element. It..

Graham Jimmy Coles Sullivan Lou Woodstock Led Zeppelin Kazan heroin Paul Alba football Wegener John Amal Shing four five six years three months