35 Burst results for "Lecturer"

Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

The Dan Bongino Show

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

"Well number one it's a relief to do a book like you and I have friends and you would have me on if I had something on the history of sewing We would have and that was really why I cared about it But that's to know And yet sad that the issues that I'm talking about in the 18 50s 1860s is still exist today Not to the degree it is but we're still talking about racial unrest We're talking about an equity We're talking about reparations We're talking about how to handle it how to equal the playing field without making it unlevel for either side and how much anger we should have And then we watch conduits to rise go to the view And at the same excuse me I keep in the segregated south I don't want to make white children feel bad or something they had nothing to do with I don't want black kids to feel like they're victims And please don't let you survive on segregation because you can go to a movie theater or sit in the front of a bus and she wants to play and be killed because they were black but she led this country as Secretary of State national security adviser sovietologist in this country in 8 to two presidents You can accomplish anything even if the playing field is an equal And even if there is something unjust and nobody personified that better than Frederick Douglass Dan whenever we're going through we weren't out going into savoring We did that We know our parents We know of birthday Even if our parents are bad what about having none What about not even knowing who your siblings were What about not having close into your 7 8 years old What about is it by the time you escape and find a way to get free and by hook and cook to learn to read and write within 7 years of getting your freedom right to your biography and becoming an international bestseller and soon a lecturer whose statue sit in Scotland Ireland Germany and England today So dude I'm not saying we can all be Frederick Douglas but please don't tell me your circumstances so bad Life isn't fair I will never achieve I will never offer also soft pedal We the original sin of America No one will And I don't want to I bring quotes not opinion

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Scotland Ireland Germany England America
Google Launches Anti-Racism Campaign, Says We're All "Raised to Be Raised"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 3 months ago

Google Launches Anti-Racism Campaign, Says We're All "Raised to Be Raised"

"Google the leviathan. The most powerful organization on the planet has now launched a new anti-racism initiative for all of their employees claiming that america is quote a system of white supremacy and that all americans are quote raised to be racist. They have a white supremacy pyramid. Christopher rufo rights. I've obtained a trove of whistle blower documents from the inside of google revealed a company's extensive racial reeducation program based on the core tenants of critical race theory including intersection algae white privilege and systemic racism in a module called ally ship in action. Google train their employees to deconstruct racial and sexual identities and then ranked themselves hierarchy of power and privilege and manner manager reactions through crying and assessing their happy place in a video guest lecturer henry rogers. Otherwise known as abram x. kennedy claimed that all americans including children as young as three months old are racist quote to be raised in the united states is to be raised to be racist and to be raised to rice. Racist is to be raised to be almost addicted to racist ideas. Denial of racism that a person is racist quote for me is the heartbeat of racism. Is denial and the sound of that. Denial is that. I'm not racist can told google employees. It's a critical critically important for americans to no longer being denial about their own racism and another lecture. Google paid nicole. Hannah jones claim that she created and she created the sixteen nineteen project to verify lifelong theory that everything in modern day united states can be traced back to slavery. If you name anything in america i can relate it back to slavery

Christopher Rufo Google Henry Rogers United States Abram Kennedy Hannah Jones Nicole
Last US Flight Departs Kabul, Leaving Afghanistan to Its Fate

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:25 min | 3 months ago

Last US Flight Departs Kabul, Leaving Afghanistan to Its Fate

"The united states has confirmed that all its forces arouse of afghanistan with the final evacuation flight leaving kabul around midnight. Local time on monday loud gunfire was heard at kabul airport as the taliban celebrated the withdrawal after twenty years. Well let's get the latest now with julie norman lecturer in politics and international relations that ucla. Who joins me down. The line julia. Good morning to you and thanks for joining us. Can you describe what happened overnight in afghanistan please. Well essentially what we saw. Georgina is what was known to be coming by the state the full withdrawal of the us military presence so actually prior to this morning the last us personnel on the last us aircraft departed from kabul and before leaving. The us also disabled the remaining military clinton in that was there the remaining helicopters etc. So that when the taliban did end up coming to their fuel come into the airport taking over They were pretty much left with just the run of what had been the us military presence prior and there were celebrations and some parts of afghantistan yesterday with this Seeming like a turning up the page so to speak with these taliban officially taking over obviously a lot of fear interpretation from others afghanistan at the same

Kabul Airport Julie Norman Kabul Afghanistan United States Taliban Ucla Georgina Julia Clinton
"lecturer" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"lecturer" Discussed on AP News

"Abdullah Saeed is a lecturer at Kabul Polytechnic University. Our people have very bad experience since 40 years. Now our people thinking if govern, our government cannot control the situation may be the civil war will be start U. S. Officials say the military has left Bagram airfield, the epicenter of the war to oust the Taliban. Elsa has strengthened into the first hurricane in the Atlantic season. It's battering the eastern Caribbean. It might reach Florida as a tropical storm by Tuesday. This is a P news Extreme drought is tearing apart communities in the massive river basin that spans the Oregon California border. The government stopped irrigation to hundreds of farmers for the first time in history. Everybody depends on the water, the climate, the river for their livelihood. That's that's the blood that ties us all together. Farmer Ben Duval worries about what will happen with no water coming in. Constant looming threat over me that in my going to be the generation that ends up losing the family farm because of Situation situation that's beyond my control. The climate tribes consider the fish species critical to their culture and heritage. To me. There's too many people after two little water, you know, we need to see a Right sizing of agriculture, irrigated agriculture, which is basically needs to be downsized. That's Chairman Don Gentry. There's also no extra water for down River salmon. A parasite is killing thousands of salmon. Ed Donahue. AP News I'm Rita Foley with an AP News Monette employers added 850,000 jobs in June, the latest sign the economy is rebounding powerfully from the pandemic recession. Triple A says This may be the second highest July 4th travel holiday on record about 48 million of us will be on the road or in the air. The triple A's Andrew Gross. The empty roads of the past year are kind of over there. If you choose to leave, like on a Thursday afternoon or Friday afternoon, which is the time we recommend you don't leave, but if you do, you will be facing traffic jams around major metropolitan areas. The U. S military left Bagram airbase in Afghanistan as the U. S winds down its war there. These are Charles de la Decima, A district administrator says the American departure was done overnight without any coordination with local officials. And as a result, dozens of local looters stormed through the unprotected gates before Afghan forces are again control. I'm.

Abdullah Saeed Rita Foley Florida Ed Donahue Ben Duval Taliban Tuesday 850,000 jobs June Friday afternoon Thursday afternoon July 4th Bagram Afghanistan Don Gentry eastern Caribbean Andrew Gross 40 years first hurricane Elsa
China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

BBC World Service

01:26 min | 6 months ago

China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

"Let's talk about big big news in China launched with great fanfare as well, and it's a Leading the news there, apparently lots of lots of happy cartoon images of Children on CCTV, the main broadcaster on the news agencies, and so on. This is because China has announced a major policy shift to the current limits on couples having Children. A member. A few years ago, the notorious one child policy became a two child policy. Well. Now families can have three. This is off the back of recent data showing an 18% decline in birth, which is the slowest population growth since the early 19 sixties. Which kind of suggests that the two child policy didn't really have any effect. So what effect is the three child policy? Gonna have someone who knows all about this has spent years researching The family policies of the Chinese government, is senior lecturer at King's College London doctor yet knew who joins us Now, first off what's the motivation for the government of doing this other worried about a demographic problem in the future? Absolutely the two child policy on announced really quickly as response to the seventh population. Sensor data just mentioned that China has the most dramatic drop in birth rate for 18%. Scenes 2019, So this is a really kind of desperate attempt to dress Demographic crisis in the years to come.

China Cctv Chinese Government King's College London
Christian College Offers Online Course on Global Warming

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 8 months ago

Christian College Offers Online Course on Global Warming

"Brian webb wants more conservative. Christians get involved in climate action to is really missing the ball on this. We are not actively engaging with what is one of the most complicated and important issues facing humanity. Today web is the sustainability director at houghton college a small christian college in new york state this spring. He's teaching an online class. Called god and climate change that helps. Christians engage with global warming to reach people who may be skeptical. the course starts with the common ground. Faith this idea of god made the world and called it. Good this idea. Jesus says that the two most important things you can do is love god and love your neighbors. Well how are we loving. God if we are intentionally disregarding and trashing the world that he has made and how are we love our neighbors if we're not proactively working to care for the ways that they're being impacted by the climate crisis. The course also includes climate science and features guest lecturers who are experts in their fields. Houghton college is made the class available to the public for free and web says when it ends. The class recordings will be available online. The topic is too important to not get it out there in front of people as widely as possible.

Brian Webb Houghton College A Small Chris New York Jesus Houghton College
The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

The 3:59

05:19 min | 9 months ago

The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

"Following. It's the second part of our four part interview with martin cooper inventor the phone. I'm roger chang and this is your daily charge or one of the issues. I've talked a lot about on this podcast and seen that in general the issue of the digital divide. I know you talked about that near the tail. Ender near the second part of your books. I'd love to get your perspective on really the deserve holistic impact of the cell phone and whether or not it's been a force for good in how it's been a force for good in closing that broadband gap that digital divide. We'll just think about this routers The whole educational system has been challenged today because the teacher gets up and gives a lecture and he's talking to a bunch of students if they're connected if they have smartphones they have access to all the knowledge the world the shakers not gonna give them information that they can find words so the whole nature of what a teacher is changes. The teacher now teaches people how to reach out for of religion. How to handle it. Taylor's educative process to individuals that having a lecturer to talk a people each different girl every other person. So we discover that what the result of this is that people's minds the challenge borden. They did before and the result of that. Is it their brains. Get bigger thinking smarter. Just think about that. Now that in this country one of the most advanced countries not in the world but in history forty percent of the students in this country do not have access to broadband wireless forty percent. Just imagine what that means over long term when the educational process chain that we end up with forty percent of the population with bigger brains. They're smarter or sixty percent and forty percent are dummies unacceptable with Broadband wireless now as essential to people as water food. So somehow that problems got to get fixed at the moment. The government is not digging right approaches. The only way to do that is through a first of all accept the fact this is essential and go to the carriers people have exclusive use of a spectrum and tell them either. You service all of the public or we're going to allow other people to do it. The technology exists to provide students with robin wireless whereas littlest cyber ten dollars a month. At that level everybody can have access to the but semi were we have to remove moves us exit seventy two big guys t verizon d mobile. They're doing a great job for the dense areas for the city's suburbs. They are not to have good job for the rural areas. They are after a good job for the people that can't afford a sixty dollars a month for a cellphone. The technology exists to do the both of those legs to handle people that can't afford into the rural areas and it's up to the government now to do figure out ways for business to provide those two kinds of services. We have to have one hundred percent accessibility for students and ultimately for everybody. Because i i'm so delighted you read the book because you know that it's not just education it's healthcare we're all going to be ultimately connected have have our bodily characteristics measured continually. There is the potential that we can anticipate diseases in people before they happen. Just because we're measuring things continually so healthcare is going to be a revolution. You can't provide after one segment of the public but public and keep it from other people so between those two issues education healthier and then you get the most important wall in. That's what your profession is is. Collaboration is getting people to talk to each other to generate ideas to people who are always more creative corporate than one person but of you got people talking to each other groups independent of time independent of where they are the potential for improving the productivity of people will be such that the idea of poverty will disappear. There's going to be enough for everybody. There is no reason why everybody can't be wealthy announced. Never worry about food or housing and everybody can't downs. The education served there.

Roger Chang Martin Cooper Ender Robin Wireless Borden Taylor Verizon
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | 9 months ago

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | 9 months ago

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 10 months ago

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

"Et. al say was up the fire nation. And what's something that you believe about becoming successful. Most people disagree with many believe nothing. In order to be successful. You need only passion for good idea but the reality is much more ashen is one. Listen gregan except enough in order to be a real success through. I really do need passion for the idea. That's obvious determination. Focus and patients most successful business. People who have been more abuses. I'd be there are many obstacles. one has to overcome great something new. You know especially if you are the first thing that feed over. The cost of my life is great. Tree comes owning the factory business which is a former finance. Each company was unique in the first of its kind in the seed amount of projection. One gets from new ideas. These enormous one doesn't believe in his or her idea. More than one hundred percent simply wants work in any new ideas. I you have to educate the market which is very hard are always suspicious affinity new then you have to persuade the investors. The people around view and the list goes on and on. You feel you're going up in most of the times you'll be a low and the loneliness is very hard to accept. Stein goes on in get more experienced. Then it becomes easier and you learn to build on and fix your mistakes from the negative remarks. Along the way you'll be enriched for capricorn's like me into his naturally because rare. Houston it's always about enforce. There's a lot that i want to focus on throughout this entire interview fire nation. But the one thing i wanna pull out about. What a alger said is patients. I mean all of them were brilliant but patients. It is such as something that today. I see more than ever people. Just don't have an seems like the younger generation. The less patience. I have so many people all the time coming up and saying. Hey john like. I've been doing this for two months and i'm not seeing any returns. Think any success and like it's been two months. Where's your patients. Where's your persistence. Wears your you gotta keep at that thing. Fire nation so in doing some research on ual. I saw that you were chosen to be a mentor at the harvard. Business school of. I mean this is top of the top. Why were you chosen. I was invited to comment there at harvard. Business school interpreters enterpreneurial program during two thousand thirteen. I spent on her the per person recognized and identified the Me after by lifestyle Lecture action lecturer. I approach the Was approaching the podium and the right the way after are presenting center students raise their hand. Us meet who is interpreting. Though i had my lecture plan i wanted to follow with students entering pro in prague improvise and said without hesitation that was born today or over the world is it potentially becoming in their furniture but the system. We live in prohibits most of them to become one why because of the barriers that society puts in front of us when the baby was born starts to crotone tone touching breaking things. The current say. Don't do that then. He's babies go through nursery and school and approach daily by new regulations of what they could or couldn't do then that news when they grow and enrolling through diversities and then it lasts. Even when they get married they fiend. The rules are filed on them. The handcuffs are placed on their hands and brains is additional rules imposed or their lives better directed in buxton through what they can't do this. Fact of life interferes in some Sometimes sabres independence and free thoughts of many of us. So my advice to you all. I said to be group is right. Now get hold of the keys. And i threw the keys to them. Release the handcuffs. Allow your brain to think without restrictions feel free to go with any idea thought you may have even if it seems ridiculous or unrealistic at the moment. Thank your dreams to the limit and interpret noor within. You will erupt like the genie out of the bottle. One hundred forty students stood up and they're up with laughter. I knew then but they got the message. I love that genie in a bottle analogy. I mean fire nation. Can't you just picture that. I mean it is such a great analogy. It's so true and it's something that you need to be striving towards and forward

Gregan Harvard Stein AL UAL Houston Prague John United States
Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:17 min | 10 months ago

Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

"Welcome to healthcare business. Secrets show where we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominated the markets you can live from the best and can w revenue w impact and w time off and this episode was speaking. Joel can joel. Otherwise known as america's healthy hot dog is a graduate of the university of michigan. School of medicine is a clinical professor of medicine at wayne state university school of medicine a frequent lecturer and author on topics of vegan nutrition health heart disease reversal and has written several books about alternative nutrition and hothouse. He's had been a guest and commentator amy. Tv shows podcasts. Magazines m practices at the concept of a cardiac longevity is very unpracticed in michigan. Welcome to the show joe. Thank you so much excited to share with the audience. Yeah so i wanted to kind of give out with some background on you. And and how you got into the space because you've kind of gone down a different role than maybe stanford medicine and things teaches. Unfortunately not because of any time in the in the slammer or any problems with my license in a somewhat thoughtful various er- pigeon Course but i grew up in detroit michigan Talking now from the suburb in detroit michigan attended university in ann arbor. Michigan graduated top of my class medical school. But i knew from about a swallow wanted to be a heart moved to dallas moved to kansas city out and training with the best skills and particularly treating heart attacks with angioplasty instead. You have some wonderfully people from australia. New zealand in the my mentor in kansas city was from all actually a dislike from new zealand allah but when visit i'll be of the difference between the do another very different entry but nineteen ninety way before you were born. I imagine or at least run it. I join back in detroit. Michigan big practice. And i was the guy running a night treating sick people coronary Cardiac cath lab artists. But i was even back then very interested in the other part the About our of health which is prevention nutrition. Lifestyles sleep stress. Nutraceutical supplements the whole thing. Much more light perhaps naturopathy and chiropractic. So i was always reading on my own incorporating little tidbits been using coenzyme q ten of people for thirty years my college or and then i'll percolating along as very happy guy got a chance to look down to. The university mentioned developed a preventive cardiology program. But i knew that there was something else that i really had an energy for something else. I mean that was doing wonderful. Things are day is the same thing every day. When wonderful big over i went back to university in two thousand twelve a whole year doing a university based courses integrative cardiology natural gas and pretty much nutrition thing adnan stunning that for decades. But i didn't know all the nutraceutical isn't about chemistry testing and the epa genetics and the protonix and we can use fancy words. I graduated and of course. I say in traditional practice but i ultimately with some thought took a big breath five years ago and says you know what i've done enough cath lab emergencies. That mouse running three hassles on the weekend alone. A great practice. I one focus on prevention and i looked around the country. I could barely find in the united states preventive cardiology practice. That was not attuned to only prescription. Drugs are printing preventive cardiology practices more precision more prescription. I wanted to about more health lifestyle disease reversal. I gleaned from various people what i could kinda created a model. I left the insurance system. You wanna have a sleepless night. As a physician who's always had a whole room full of baylor's and medicare and blue cross as we call in the united states and others and tell people in the city of detroit that is not beverly hills los angeles by a reasonably prosperous busy city with auto industry. But i don't take insurance. I can't even take your insurance them out of the system and launched in five years ago and yes. There's always challenges. My tears thought that maybe. I did. Have alcohol rounds. Drug problem slices. Is he doing all as they didn't understand. It has been the best decision. I don't think would have been as meaningful if i didn't pay the price. All those years of doing traditional medicine I'm respected because know what heart catheterization angioplasty bypass Medications use them when needed by I'm very much dedicate myself as upstream cardiologists. I'm the salmon trying to go upstream. Everybody else is going the other direction. But there's a lot of people out there and you know. I i'm sure for practice that are looking or a different path. They're just tired and they feel tired too many drugs too. Many ten minute appointments with dr the game now. It's a good nurse or a physician since i've provided alternative of time education a different approach. And it's so gratifying. Amin that i'm sixty one years old. I don't know what the word retires. Because i love what i do day after day today

Detroit Michigan Wayne State University School Kansas City New Zealand University Of Michigan United States School Of Medicine Joel Heart Disease Ann Arbor Heart Attacks AMY JOE Dallas Adnan Australia EPA
The Power of Humor

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:18 min | 10 months ago

The Power of Humor

"Jennifer occur a named by donuts or a professor and lecturer respectively at the stanford graduate school of business. They've just written a book called humor seriously so gentle. Why don't we start by well. Why don't you start by telling me the value of humor in the workplace. I in leadership when people use humor at work the are twenty three percent more respected and are seen as more competent and more confident. It doesn't even need to be good humor. Just not inappropriate humor. The bar is so low and for employee retention employees. Read their bosses. As having a sense of humor any sense of humor they were to be fifteen percent more satisfied and engaged in their jobs and even in sales studies show that people pay on average eighteen percent more if the seller includes a lighthearted line as part of their final offer like my final offer is x. And i'll throw in my pet frog again. The humor doesn't have to be good and just anything. So what do you think is the cost of not using humor. If you're recuperation well not only would it reduce creativity it also reduces engagement and retention so the koster significant All right so. I was thinking to myself as i read this book. If i was a corporation or a senior manager in a corporation and i was thinking i was wondering what the return on investment might be and i think touched on a couple of things. Creativity better relationships with clients productivity. Is there any other other any other things that you could think of. That would provide a decent return on investment for an investment in humor for companies. So just to be clear you want more than retention innovation leadership selling products. You want more from us. Pat coty. we'll give you another one. We'll give you a health that the cost of of health mental wellbeing physical wellbeing are enormous for companies and humor actually makes you not only healthier. It makes you live longer so one. Large-scale norwegian study conducted over the course of fifteen years. Found that people with a sense of humor. Happy thirty percent better chance of survival if severe disease strikes and they live eight years longer so laughter literally makes us more physically. Resilient has bottom line effects for companies. I know. I've met so many people in my career my careers in fact who are just not fans of humor that like look i just wanna do. My job paid and go home. But how do you deal. If you're a manager. How do you deal with someone. Who has that kind of vibe and feeling about them. Well you're hitting on one of costello's biggest pieces of advice the former. Ceo of twitter. Dick says if you wanna have more humor at work. Don't tell jokes. Don't try to be funny. Just look for more reasons to laugh. It's this idea of actually being human not about being humorous And this is the reality is right now that this is more important than ever because you know our work is much more technology mediated and therefore the harder it is to be to bring out our humanity and a sense of humor at work we subconsciously adopt to our medium and we're constantly communicating through technology. It's easy to sound like a robot so it's more really in a way it's more by sense of humor than being funny absolutely and it's also about being more generous with laughter so not trying to be funny just looking for moments to laugh generously and the entire texture of life changes when you're able to live this way And another thing that we try and tell people to do is to try and create small moments of joy for someone else and especially. If you're having trouble finding it in your own life right now just looked to create a little moment for someone and it can be a really small gesture not a joke by changing your virtual background to a picture from fun shared experience or You know leaving a nice posted on your fridge for the person that you cohabitate with But this focus on creating joy for someone else help. Take the pressure off. You know. I need to be funny. I need to look funny myself. And it's more about. How can i focus on someone else in. Elevate them

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Pat Coty Severe Disease Strikes Donuts Jennifer Costello Dick Twitter
How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

Short Wave

03:33 min | 11 months ago

How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

"Okay thomas we are talking about apple's today. Why don't you tell our listeners. Even got started down this weird little apple path so a few weeks ago i saw video of a dude eating apple from the bottom. And you know. I it up to the pitch me and at the time all i wanted to find out from the team was whom amongst us was with me in eating the entire. It was just way to start to get the conversation going. Yeah i remember. And i was horrified to find out so many members of our team eat the whole apple. We were pretty divided down the middle. Yeah that's right and the discussion led to the possible dangers of eating the apple seeds. Some of us had heard they might be toxic. Some of us hadn't so here we are chatting away about them apples and the science behind whether or not you can eat the core why we are here. Today is pretty cool. Yeah totally and i found a food. Scientists to help explain it all could also My name is islami outs. For last shoddy. I am senior lecturer in the department of food. Science outsider jackets ally investment technology. Islamia is a few scientists beast in nigeria and she told me on the one hand apples. Are these magical fruits. That are really nutritious. And good for you apple's Poplar fruits us are reaching nutrients such as anti oxidants minera house vitamese dietary fiber is an auditor nutrients but their seats are different than their flesh. Yeah exactly what i'd always heard. Is that apple. Seeds have like some amount of cyanide in them you know like generally not something that is good for humans i mean yes and no i asked islam yacht to explain it and it's a little more complicated seeds that is in the center of harpool copy above causing poisoning because the seed contains it compounds. That is called. I mean. I lean mick. Dolan is a compound that's found and lots of natural plants and things that humans eat such as apples but also peaches apricots and almonds. They're is a similar compound and cassava he staple in nigeria and on its own mattie in seeds a midland is usually harmless to people no concerns there but what is potentially concerning is when digestive enzymes in our bodies come in contact with the michelin and when they combine the enzyme breaks away the sugars in the dylan and leaves cyanide which could potentially lead to cyanide poisoning. What do you mean. Potentially thomas say more. Well the conditions have to be just right mattie for this to be more of a concern for starters the midland in apple seeds is encased by pretty tough outer layer in order to expose them make the land to our digestive enzymes have to chew those seeds really really. Well okay i get it and even whole eating monsters like you. Thomas are generally crushing those seeds down to a fine pace with your teeth right exactly. Mattie as much as i love that tidal more importantly though there's not enough apple seeds in one or two apples to really show in effect on our bodies the amount of cyanide that does get formed if at all our livers are pretty good at filtering out those hawks

Apple Department Of Food Islamia Minera House Nigeria Thomas Dolan Mick Mattie
New tensions emerge between Biden team and Trump administration

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:18 min | 1 year ago

New tensions emerge between Biden team and Trump administration

"Joe biden's incoming administration is taking shape. Former deputy secretary of state anthony blinken will be nominated for secretary of state x fed chair. Janet yellen is up to run treasury retired. General lloyd austin has been tapped to run the defense department. Some of these names have been more controversial than others. there've been some progressive objections to biden's likely pick a former iowa governor. Tom bill sack to reprise his role running. The agriculture department and a lot of republicans in the senate are cool to the choice of near attended a close hillary clinton confidante to run the office of management and budget. Some other choices like yellow. Have gotten pretty warm receptions across the political spectrum to talk about this administration that's what is likely to mean in terms of what a president joe biden might actually do. Let's bring in our left right and center panel on the right law. Chen is the david. Diane steffi fellow at the hoover institution and he's the director of domestic policy studies and lecturer in the public policy program at stanford lot. He has worked on several presidential campaigns for republicans including george w bush's reelection campaign marco. Rubio's two thousand sixteen run and he was the policy director for mitt romney in the two thousand twelve presidential campaign. Hello lonnie thanks for having me and on the left sabil. Rama joins us. Bill is president of demos a progressive organization that studies and advocates for voting rights economic and racial justice and equity sabil is also an associate professor at brooklyn law school. Bill so bill when you look at these names What does this tell you about. The sort of administration that joe biden is preparing to run. So i think the roster that's being built out is really interesting to me what it shows. Is there too big tensions that i think the new administration is trying to balance. A one is a balanced between old hands and some new faces and the other is a balanced between a pragmatic course and also progressive ones. So when you think about someone like janet yellen or cecilia rouse on the economic team These are folks who have deep experience in economic policy but also represent. I think a little bit more of a kind of a progressive wing of the larger policy debate. Not these are certainly not Bernie sanders elizabeth warren folks but they very much represent a part of the economic profession that is increasingly focused on issues of inequality Racial equity and issues of how we get around are sort of current problem of austerity politics. Lot he what do you make of this list of names. Well i think first of all there are a number of very highly qualified people on the list people who have great experience in government who i think even republicans who may have policy or ideological concerns would have to say are well qualified to play the roles. They've been a nominated by the president. Play and so. I think that that's a very hopeful. Sign on the other hand. You've got some real head. Scratchers here josh. There are people who the president is nominated for roles in various situations that i think people kinda wonder what was he. Thinking there Heavier sarah for example to be secretary of health and human services a man with no health policy no public health background who's really so claim to fame in healthcare is arguing to defend the affordable care act which by the way may have been enough for biden but it really seems to be one of those picks where he had put the sarah somewhere so he put him at. Hhs which under ordinary circumstances might be okay but in the middle of a pandemic hhs is going to play a critical role in disturbing the vaccine and hopefully overseeing and the the end of this covid nineteen pandemic here in the us. choice of. Sarah is puzzling one. The other one that i would point to which doesn't require senate confirmation and so Will be what it is. Is susan rice as director the domestic policy council which has traditionally been the policy making apparatus at the white house that coordinates the creation of domestic policy overseeing areas like education and health care immigration. Picking someone with with the deep foreign policy experience for that job seems to me to be a little bit odd. I think she was picked for that job. In part because it doesn't require senate confirmation and biden. His team knew there was no way republicans. Were going to confirm someone is controversial. Susan rice so for every sort of great. Pick for every janet. Yellen for every brian You know you have a few that sort of make you think. Gosh what is the biden team doing here. So it's a little bit of a mixed bag so far. Yeah bill when. I look at the list of names. I do sometimes see what he is describing their almost a sense that biden had list of people that he liked and wanted to give jobs to and a list of jobs he needed to fill and in some places. The matching of the to feels a little bit random. I'd also point to to marcia fudge who's an african american congresswoman from cleveland. She'd openly campaigned to be agriculture secretary. She's a senior member of the agriculture committee. There'd been a lot of progressive concerns about how the agriculture committee has dealt with black farmers and about beneficiaries of nutrition programs people primarily eat food rather than making it And biden has passed over. Her is expected to bill sack in that position and then fudge specifically said that she didn't want one of these traditionally black cabinet jobs like labor or housing and urban development. She's going to be put up to run housing and urban development. So some of these choices they do have that feeling to me of what we want this person job. Well here. this one's available. Let's give them out. One is that is that. Is that too harsh. Look looking at this selection process and saying that you know i. I do think there's a little bit of that. In terms of the example with congressman fudge gave. I think is a is a good one of your. She has deep expertise actually on areas connected to usda. I'm at the same time. I think she'll bring a novel. Interesting and important voice went on the issues of hud but there is a little bit of that. I think the thing i would offer is you know. There's so much going. On with this transition. Given the pandemic given the extraordinary delays that the trump administration put in place at one things that we're really looking at is what's what does that next layer down. Look like so when you think about the whole team Not just cabinet but cap a deputy secretaries and so on can does it look like a team that then has the balance of deep expertise and Mission alignment right at someone. Folks who are laser focused on the combined crises of of the economy and covid and climate and original justice moment. That's the next layer. That i would look at right. Are folks getting complimentary. Picks to offset some of where they might need additional insight or expertise

Janet Yellen Joe Biden Biden Anthony Blinken General Lloyd Austin Tom Bill Diane Steffi Hello Lonnie Cecilia Rouse Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warre Senate Hoover Institution Brooklyn Law School Office Of Management And Budge Defense Department Susan Rice HHS George W Bush Bill Domestic Policy Council
"lecturer" Discussed on Live and Learn

Live and Learn

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Live and Learn

"Value much more appreciation when I'm actually get in there and I'm enjoying this and I'm getting subsection from this learning or this participation off and then do you feel better about your fomo? That's a good question. And then I understand that I took all the opportunities I could have taken and then just up to me to decide either abandoned or not in the moment. So basically that helps me to live. In the moment when I need to make a decision. Imagine a normal day and 6:00 now and I have like six notification of water wait for me one is a jazz one is wine. Tasting one is the lecturer poetry one is the lecture and Psychotherapy to our the I didn't know coding event and they charged event and one is a somebody said that they're open for a online wine glass of wine. Well, I have no idea. How tired will I be by the end of the day? I have no idea either what I want to participate to choose one at this moment which calls for me or do I want just to put the music on and I didn't know dance with my husband. That's something that helps my fear of Miss analogies opportunity to make a decision in flow right now. What's better for me at this moment when I'm signing for the event because I understand this is in the field of my interests. This is something that I want to be notified about. This is something that I want to be able not to miss one making decision where to go. So I understand that the event makers will probably hate me. I guess that means that I'm not coming to six out of seven events because they need to choose but I think this is becoming a more and more FAQ normality issue and everybody who's creating the events understand that if it's three hundred people signed up that most probably will have 25 That's also a good point to to feel what your students feel in the lessons..

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm just struggling with the difference. Now I have one. OK, OK, great. And I'm going to start things off by introducing you to Yash Yes, among a lecturer on government at Harvard. So, Yeah, she was studying politics, but he's studying it in the past. So he was looking at, you know, going all the way back to the cradle of democracy in ancient Greece, and then how democracy came to thrive around the world. But as he was studying that he was noticing. You know, in the news he would see in certain countries like France or Austria. You know, there would be these parties. He's far right. Ultranationalist anti immigrant parties. That were starting to gain some traction jumped to 32,000 ten's thieves start winning for the first time Elena and will have a seat in Parliament, along with seven others from her far right party. These far right parties an Austrian, France, They start to gain power, and it's not just their that huge swathes of Europe. What's happening in Italy is also happening elsewhere in Europe. Similar right wing party start rising up in Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Poland, Hungary. Identity crisis for the entire European continent. And it's not just Europe. You have India, Turkey and what started off as of course, United States unlikely. Impossible is now reality. Basically, there's this wave of politicians whose message was people are really listening to your government has failed. You trust me. I really speak for the people. I'm going to fix everything. And two Yasha. This was you know, this was like a wake up call and not just because of immigration policy or right and left leanings of certain politicians. But even more deeply than that, I was quite worried about the way in which these political movements perhaps pretended to have some allegiance to democratic mechanisms, But actually, we were enemies off it. Like there's this one guy, the leader of the Austrian Freedom Party glorified the third right in various ways on really hardened back to the country's fascist past in a positive way. That wasn't a farfetched fear. I don't think I mean a huge number of worlds. Dictators have been elected democratically at some point, and then they move against democratic institutions in such a way that You can't space from democratically anymore. So for Yasha, who by this point was a lecturer at Harvard, he kept seeing this in country after country after country, he saw these citizens. Willingly elect these wannabe dictators into power. And so he started wondering what is making the citizens do this, do they? Do they feel like their current leaders? Don't get them Do they? Are they are they riled up about? You know some issue of the day like, like refugees or income inequality. Or is this a sign that they're upset about something even more foundational political system itself, like are they actually angry with democracy itself? And so I sat down with with a friend and colleague to figure it out? And his friend, it turns out, worked on something called the World Values Survey, which is a video ambitious attempt to try and get a public opinion around for world. It's basically just a bunch of social scientists who asks a whole bunch of very standard questions. To Ah, whole bunch of people all over the world, and they're like, Okay, let's let's actually like, scrutinize what what's being said in here about democracy? And when we actually look at the numbers We were, you know, honestly flabbergasted, Bella. We saw Okay, So there's actually three questions in particular that he got interested in. Okay here, So let's start with this one. How do you feel about a strong ruler who doesn't have to bother with Parliament? Elections? Who doesn't have to bother with Parliament Elections? Correct. Yeah, Okay. They also asked this of Americans just instead of doesn't have to bother with Parliament, it was doesn't have to bother with Congress. So in 1995 24% of all Americans endorsed that kind of strongman leader..

Parliament Europe Yasha lecturer France Greece Austrian Freedom Party Italy Harvard Elena India United States Austria Bella Turkey Congress Hungary The Netherlands Poland
Dr. Timothy Johnston On Taking Your Customer Service To The Next Level

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Timothy Johnston On Taking Your Customer Service To The Next Level

"A Nice Guy Community welcome back. Welcome back. It is strict on today and you are in for a treat today not just because I'm sitting in for Doug, it's also because I get to talk to Dr Timothy Johnston and award award-winning businessman lecturer published author in dental trade journals his business or dental center is the recipient of several prestigious awards is known for its excellent customer service Yod local community. He is a professional member of numerous Dental Association's personally received the Healthcare Heroes Award, and before you go running the other way because you know you hear dentist let me tell you. We're not talking just about Dennis today. Dr Johnson is also an international bestselling author of Ring Bell for service. He has some brilliant insights into succeeding in any business that depends on customer service. How are you doing today Dr Johnston I'm just fine. Thanks. Thanks for having me in absolutely absolutely, and you know we talk a lot about customer service on the Nice guys on business obviously as a dentist, it's Kinda critical isn't it? It really is and this is interview is not meant to really pertain so much the dental office because I've been doing that for years but one else I've learned from being. In terms of in terms of everything, but really what it means to be a dentist and take that experience. So to speak. I love that and again, your book. Ring Bell for service. It has some really really great insights and I'm sure lots of great ideas that you have realized over thirty years in business So the first one I wanted to touch on that you bring up in the book is, why is the customer not always right? It goes without saying that the customer is not always right. The thing that makes it stand out so much to me is when a customer client customer or anybody comes in and thinks he knows you, he thinks that his his take on the world is what's driving the whole thing. For example guy comes into my office. This is in a chapter in my book and before I can even. Kevin brought to the back. He stands up and he says I need to talk to the doctor right away. And I'm walking Brown and I hear this I step out and I'd say who I am Dr Johnston and I'll be seeing you come back this way we talk about if you like he has no, I need you to come out here. So I, walk out in the waiting room on it I stand there he goes I need to talk to you for minute about this TV. So I look in on TV is just a commercial again you the. Commercial. I don't understand it's commercial for something, and if you WANNA, come back, we could talk about not discuss it in front of these other patients here. He has not before this commercial. This was tuned to Fox News and I cannot believe you're playing Fox News. I said Ob size it today it's Fox. News. Tomorrow could be discovery channel the next day and might be you know who knows what? It's something different every day my receptionist controls it's not me. It's just whatever it is. I. Said if backup Santa Surprise that it's not the discovery channel because we we subscribe to that too and four days out of five of seems to be tuned into something dental. So but either as May. Come back. We'll talk about your needs and everything is going to go on and he says, no, you don't understand I could not possibly be a part of this in a dental office from someone who is preaching as politics out to everybody else. At this point I had to make a decision was this going to be a lifetime relationship with this guy or was it gonna be hi and bye because if I decided to keep them on to story for live longer and I was going to bend my ways to make him you know, yes, I could change the channel but if I was gonna bend over backwards to make this one person. Happy. was that going to be what my my position was going to be for the day? And you know flash of lightning ever only happens about once every five years I said well, you know what? If that's your position you can see the door right there. And he looked at me and he looked over behind him with the door said, wait a minute and might be the straight. You gotta let a perfectly good patient go because you won't change the TV station has no no, I'll just let you go but I won't let these perfectly good patients go. Ooh, good answer. I thought it was just a flash of lay. It just came to me and he turn on his heels and he huffed and puffed and slam the doors and Audi went, and there was two people sitting there in the waiting room. They were both patients of mine for years and they both looked at me at applauded me lately it likes to say good job Tim good job. So my point is you can't be everything to everybody the customer is not always right. We hear that time and time again, the customer's always right the customer's always right. But in reality I have to make my plans for ninety nine percent of the audience in for the one percent I've gotta them go and it was some of the best decisions I've ever made I've done it maybe five times in my life. I've been in practice for thirty thirty one years. It's a rare thing but we don't click with somebody really don't click and that's the times when I have to say you know what you're out of here and this is one of those times.

Dr Timothy Johnston Ring Bell Dental Association Dr Johnson Healthcare Heroes Award Dennis Fox News Lecturer Doug Audi Kevin TIM Brown Santa
Anger as Brazil revokes mangrove protection regulations

BBC Newshour

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Anger as Brazil revokes mangrove protection regulations

"Is ill and the environment. Now the government has revoked regulations that protect tropical mangroves and other fragile coastal ecosystems. Environmental groups say the removal of permanent protection zones will allow property developers to clear large areas of mangrove for tourism. To speak to Dr Raymond Ward, He's principal lecturers specializing in coastal environments at the university off Brighton. Here in England. He's worked in Brazil for 10 years studying ecosystems. Welcome to the program. First of all, what do you make of what the Brazilian government has decided to do? Well, it's not really a surprise the current federal environment minister, Hey, Carlos. Alice has been trying to do this for ever since the government came into power, but I completely agree with what you said the I mean, this is going to have a massive, substantial impact. On coastal systems, particularly on mangroves. But before before we talk about the the impact it's goingto make. Just tell us why mangroves are so important. Mangroves provide a wide range of ecosystem services. They provide protection against sea level rise. They store huge amounts of carbon much more than any other terrestrial. Ah, ecosystem. And they also provide protection from climate change related impact. Such a storm surges and they support a range of different Ah, jobs, for example, fisheries because they provide on excellent nursery habitat for commercially important fish species. So is it the case that all mangoes had been protected until now? Yeah, Mangroves have been protected in Brazil. They've been protected through the forest code, which is been a very well written Ah, legislation protecting mangroves. Another important ecosystems on that protection. Being taken away will mean what now what's going to be the direct impact and will it happen immediately? Yeah, I think immediately there will be in the near future. There will be a rapids degradation and losses of mangroves, particularly as a result, conversion tio agriculture and tourism related activities such as building hotels in the suchlike on DH That will have what kind of impact I mean, we're talking about. Structures that don't exist there at the moment, so it's just going to be a major intervention. Yes. Oh, I mean, the clearing of the mangroves means that you're no longer able to those those those mangroves will not look no longer be there to support those important fish species that will have a knock on effect on Local fisheries, particularly in the northeast of Brazil, where there's ah large man people engaged in subsistence fisheries as well as commercial fisheries. What argument do you have against those people who inside the government and others, too? Who would argue that relaxing these protection laws simply means that the coastline is being opened up for Economic activity and making that coastline viable in that way. I mean, ecosystem services means money, basically. So that's those parts of the system that offer some form of, for example, coastal protection. If you don't have the mangroves there, you have to pay for coastal protection. If you don't have the support for the fisheries, then you have to find some other economic engagement for those people that are in the coast life so obviously that there's a wide range of literature that saying that the bang grease off billion dollars Ah, ecosystem services every year If you convert those suddenly Tio two shrimp farms, for example, or hotels. You're not gonna have that same level. Of economic

Dr Raymond Ward Brazilian Government Brazil England Brighton Alice
Woman killed in Boston elevator accident identified as Carrie O’Connor

WBZ Midday News

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Woman killed in Boston elevator accident identified as Carrie O’Connor

"Of an an elevator elevator involved involved in in that that deadly deadly crash crash accident accident in in Allston Allston might might result result in in some some answers answers about about how how a a young young woman woman was was crushed crushed to to death death inside. inside. Carrie Carrie O'Connor O'Connor was was a a lecturer lecturer at at Boston Boston University and yesterday she was just moving into our new apartment when the accident happened. Neighbor Llegan scores, Oni says another resident had just helped O'Connor load a large box into the elevator, and they heard screams like he thinks happened was she either trying to put the box on Four went on with box and the box was calling up to hit something and that started moving and she either panicked and went to jump off or panicked and didn't stay on. O'Connor had a PhD in French studies. She was due to lecture at BU this semester. Medical examiner ruling her cause of death as traumatic asphyxiation. 1 36

Carrie Carrie O'connor O'conno Allston Allston Boston Boston University Lecturer
Boston University teacher killed in elevator accident

WBZ Morning News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Boston University teacher killed in elevator accident

"Police have now identified the victim in a deadly elevator accident in Allston apartment building. 38 year old Carrie O'Connor, a fulltime lecturer at Boston University, was killed. While trying to load a large package either onto or off the ancient elevator at her home on Commonwealth Avenue

Carrie O'connor Boston University Lecturer
Boston University professor crushed to death in elevator accident

Radio From Hell

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Boston University professor crushed to death in elevator accident

"Ah, Boston University professor was crushed to death by an elevator in her apartment building. When it suddenly dropped, trapping her between floors. What my wife saw was the lady's arms like hanging on to her package. Oh, said building resident Eric Carmichael. Hey, describing the evening of horror that killed French lecturer carry O'Connor, a man who witnessed the accident had to be rushed to the hospital for trauma. I I heard someone That was bringing in a package out in the hallway and then I heard ungodly Scream, said resident Lea Answer Cause scores Oni We ran into the hallway. We saw a gentleman who was obviously in distress. He was screaming and hyperventilating, saying she's dead. She's dead scores only told CBS that the man who witnessed the accident was helping O'Connor that the woman who was crushed With a box into the building, and he was going up the stairs and he had told her Hey, be careful because you have to pull the door across and then step in and then press the button of the of the elevator. If you have something in their it contributor a sensor, she said of the lift, which she described his old fashioned. The witness believes that whatever O'Connor was trying to get in there, hit the censor, and that started the elevator moving the elevators. Roof was visible from the lobby after the

O'connor Eric Carmichael Lea Answer Boston University Professor Lecturer CBS
"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a senior lecturer in the school of sports health and exercise science where she ran me through some breathing exercises that will quite grueling and also involved a fair amount of drooling this device can be used to train your inspiration muscles your breathing muscles I'm basically if I take this to Paul this is the valve and you can only breed if you are not files but the way you write to not valve is by putting in a certain amount of effort so it's a bit like blowing up a really hard to believe yes yeah I thought that is a form of breathing muscle training that's one of the original forms of freedom also trade at all schools yes I believe the size yeah yeah that will train your breathing muscles but what we could to try and get you today is thirty breaths what I'm usually gonna date is give you some to shape because so slippery yeah the K. right I think you'll pendants for they should be Kathy but you have to pop up I truly if it is not so easy yes we just got the code tied to simply the exercises I thought we were going to guys like nice relaxing yoga class actually he truly go does flux again key I'd love to see the level big depressing because you can hear the yeah going through the files to the remember just pools and then trying to get rid of me yeah we should bring about the aim of this warm up is to strengthen my breathing muscles the interesting thing is that the reason for doing it isn't just so that you can breathe in and out more powerfully or to make you better at throwing up billions for that matter it actually helps the other muscles in your body to do a better job this kind of a hierarchy in the body as to what areas get blood flow and hence oxygen in the nutrients that we made in the breathing muscles are really important enough so if you'll say you're running ready ready halt and your lexicon I want more oxygen if your breathing muscles Russo saying I want more oxygen your breathing muscles gonna have priority so what happens is they still got blood fly away from your working legs so one of the things that happens with breathing muscle training he's we were chiefs that conflict if you like so you can sort of train your breathing muscles to become more efficient yes and then that means that there's more oxygen available for the rest of your body it's not just about having strong last night and I just have a knock on effects on exercise performance excellent goods so that's the first to go so now I've done my woman time to retest my breathing prowess before the warm up my high school was one for seven that's a bit like the weight I can lift with my in spiritual muscles I thought I was actually pretty good but Mitch told me her high school is over two hundred pool con only get anywhere near that five one okay.

senior lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Serves as a lecturer to that city's counseling students at Concordia university as well Lainey welcome back how are you I'm good George how are you I'm looking forward to this there is no topic other than dreams that capture so many people's attention all the six how did you get into this I got into it it's kind of like the dreams came to me because I'm a person who has amazing dream recall and I've had that kind of recall my whole life so I think my father started it because when I was a little girl he was the one of the couple that would come into the bedroom and he never ever said to me it's just a dream go back to sleep he used to say oh good tell me and I would tell him this whole nightmare and then when it was time to go back to bed he would say to me Hey it's time to go back to bed and you gonna say I'm gonna have a nightmare I'm gonna have it I'm ready for it bring it on so there was all this that's very union and he didn't even realize he was doing that but he was welcoming the dream and teaching me to discuss them so it started young and very quickly when I was twenty I had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and not too long after obviously I became depressed and I ended up in psychoanalysis with a brilliant New York Freudian so much so he did probably eighty percent of my cycle analysis through dream interpretation so my introduction to Freud was that I experienced him long before I studied him and I went on to study these different fathers of psychology just because I'm not going to girl I'd like to I'm like you George when I get onto a subject I get all the way into it and that's kind of what happened on the collective in my approach and I mostly use for Lloyd young Adler and pearls why do we dream in the first place Laney well and it's it's interesting because I'm hoping to discuss this virus and how it's affecting all of our dreams and the best way to start is to say to you that we are problem solving in our dreams and we felt going deep because I am happy to go deep but at the first level the dream is the discussion you are having with yourself about a very specific current issue that you're trying to problem solve and that's what the dream is streaming it is only thinking on here to bust the mystery you're just talking to yourself and you're speaking in the language of metaphor and what all you do is teach the language of metaphor so that we can wipe away the mystery and I'm going to teach you how to uncover what the heck he was saying to yourself when you had what you think is a crazy dream why do some people remember dreams other people don't well there's a physiological reasons because there's a memory trace in your front your the frontal lobe that is not operating at the same capacity when you're asleep as when you're awake so it's more natural not to remember your dreams but some people do and and whether you remember them or you don't we are all dreaming and everybody is problem solving in their dreams and it's just so weird right now because I keep getting dreamer after dreamer after dreamer and when you we uncover the meaning of the dreams it's it's the virus it's everywhere it's including our dreams because he and the most wonderful news I have is the unconscious is not only so sophisticated but it's so positive it's your higher self that you're having a discussion with and the dreams and I'm gonna give you a bunch of examples you from any different scenery each of us or managing we are managing from the messages and encouragement that we are getting from our unconscious so you might think something starts off as a horrible dream lake I don't know if you're aware of Claudia asri she's known as girl with No job and I'm I like to be I'm involved with Instagram I love it there and so I followed her and she discussed with me how she keeps screaming about the Holocaust and thinking that she's dreaming about the Holocaust because she was watching a show on Netflix as she was falling asleep that has to do with the subject of the Holocaust and the N. I don't argue that point that the initial the way that some of the images are realizing your dream most definitely you get some of those images from what happened today well what you were seeing on TV the brain is like a tape recorder isn't exactly but I and it and this is a big batch we are so sophisticated that you will not choose an image unless it serves a certain something that you are trying to save yourself and that girl's dream is a beautiful example of what I call rehearsal it's a little rehearsal dreams because if you're practicing what it feels like not to have any control over what's around you same as the whole of the Holocaust you know it was like on life experience where people had absolutely no control over what was going on around them now if you rehearse what it feels like to have no control in your dreams and you rehearse it over and over and over again you know that expression been there done not that's what happens you exercise that muscle and then as you're going through this virus saying you were getting more and more used to not get you click that feeling of not having control and why do you get more comfortable with it because you've been doing it for the last whatever week or two or three in your dreams you've been choosing different situations and memories that have to do with having no control and you kind of get used to it and it it desensitizes you plenty let's talk when we come back about why people are under stress and what those dreams can do to help them we'll be back in a moment Lainey dolphin with us her website linked up it coast to coast AM dot com to find out where George Noory speaking go to the coast to coast AM dot com website scroll down to the bottom and click George's calendar we'll be right back don't go away this is five seventy K. L. on here is a real news and information update on five seven eight KLIA actual report corona virus update the U. S. Senate late Wednesday pastor that two point two trillion dollar economic.

lecturer Concordia university George
"lecturer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WTVN

"Serves as a lecturer to that city's counseling students at Concordia university as well Lainey welcome back how are you I'm good George how are you I'm looking forward to this there is no topic other than dreams that capture so many people's attention all the six how did you get into this I got into it it's kind of like the dreams came to me because I'm a person who has amazing dream recall and I've had that kind of recall my whole life so I think my father started it because when I was a little girl he was the one of the couple that would come into the bedroom and he never ever said to me it's just a dream go back to sleep he used to say good tell me and I would tell him this whole nightmare and then when it was time to go back to bed he would say to me Hey it's time to go back to bed and you gonna say I'm gonna have a nightmare I'm gonna have it I'm ready for it bring it on so there was all this that's very union and he didn't even realize he was doing that but he was welcoming the dream and teaching me to discuss them so it started young and very quickly when I was twenty I had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and not too long after obviously I became depressed and I ended up in psychoanalysis with a brilliant New York Freudian so much so he did probably eighty percent of my cycle analysis through dream interpretation so my introduction to Freud was that I experienced him long before I studied him and I went on to study these different fathers of psychology just because I'm not kind of girl I'd like to I'm like you George when I get onto a subject I get all the way into it and that's kind of what happened on the collective in my approach and I mostly use for Lloyd young Adler and pearls why do we dream in the first place Laney well and it's it's interesting because I'm hoping to discuss this virus and how it's affecting all of our dreams and the best way to start is to say to you that we are problem solving in our dreams and we felt going deep because I'm happy to go deep but at the first level the dream is the discussion you are having with yourself about a very specific current issue that you're trying to problem solve and that's what the dream is streaming it is only thinking I'm here to bust the mystery you're just talking to yourself and you're speaking in the language of metaphor and what I do is teach the language of metaphor so that we can wipe away the mystery and I'm going to teach you how to uncover what the heck you were saying to yourself when you had what you think is a crazy dream why do some people remember dreams other people don't well there's a physiological reason because there's a memory trace in your front your the frontal lobe that is not operating at the same capacity when you're asleep as when you're awake so it's more natural not to remember your dreams but some people do and and whether you remember them or you don't we are all dreaming and everybody is problem solving in their dreams and it's just so weird right now because I keep getting dreamer after dreamer after dreamer and when you we uncover the meaning of the dreams it's it's the virus it's everywhere it's including our dreams because he and the most wonderful news I have is the unconscious is not only so sophisticated but it's so positive it's your higher self that you're having a discussion with and the dreams and I'm gonna give you a bunch of examples you from any different scenery each of us are managing we are managing from the messages and encouragement that we are getting from our unconscious so you might think something starts off as a horrible dream lake I don't know if you're aware of Claudia asri she's known as girl with No job and I'm I like to be I'm involved with Instagram I love it there and so I followed her and she discussed with me how she keeps dreaming about the Holocaust and thinking that she's dreaming about the Holocaust because she was watching a show on Netflix as she was falling asleep that has to do with the subject of the Holocaust and the I know I don't argue that point that the initial way that some of the images are realizing your dream most definitely you get some of those images from what happened today what you're seeing on TV the brain is like a tape recorder isn't it exactly but I and it and this is a big but we are so sophisticated that you will not choose an image unless it serves a certain something that you are trying to say to yourself and that girl's dream it is a beautiful example of what I call rehearsal it's all a little rehearsal dreams because if you're practicing what it feels like not to have any control over what's around you same as the whole of the Holocaust you know it was like a life experience where people had absolutely no control over what was going on around them now if you rehearse what it feels like to have no control in your dreams and you rehearse it over and over and over again you know that expression been there done not that's what happens you exercise that muscle and then as you're going through this virus saying you are getting more and more used to not get you click that feeling of not having control and why do you get more comfortable with it because you've been doing it for the last whatever week or two or three in your dreams you've been choosing different situations and memories that have to do with having no control and you kind of get used to it and it it desensitizes you plenty let's talk when we come back about why people are under stress and what those dreams can do to help them we'll be back in a moment Lainey dolphin with us her website linked up it coast to coast AM dot com to find out where George Noory speaking go to the coast to coast AM dot com website scroll down to the bottom and click George's calendar right now there is a lot to consider when selling a home home equity is high housing inventory is down and interest rates are at an all time low but.

lecturer Concordia university George
"lecturer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Serves as a lecturer to that city's counseling students at Concordia university as well Lainey welcome back how are you I'm good George how are you I'm looking forward to this there is no topic other than dreams that capture so many people's attention all the six how did you get into this I got into it it's kind of like the dreams came to me because I'm a person who has amazing dream recall and I've had that kind of recall my whole life so I think my father started it because when I was a little girl he was the one of the couple that will come into the bedroom and he never ever said to me it's just a dream go back to sleep he used to say good tell me and I would tell him this whole nightmare and then when it was time to go back to bed he would say to me Hey it's time to go back to bed and you gonna say I'm gonna have a nightmare I'm gonna have it I'm ready for it bring it on so there was all this that's very union and he didn't even realize he was doing that but he was welcoming the dream and teaching me to discuss them so it started young and very quickly when I was twenty I had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and not too long after obviously I became depressed and I ended up in psychoanalysis with a brilliant New York Freudian so much so he did probably eighty percent of my cycle analysis through dream interpretation so my introduction to Freud was that I experienced him long before I studied him and I went on to study these different fathers of psychology just because I'm not kind of girl I like to like you George when I get onto a subject I get all the way into it and that's kind of what happened on the clock tick in my approach and I mostly use for Lloyd young Adler and pearls why do we dream in the first place Laney well and it's it's interesting because I'm hoping to discuss this virus and how it's affecting all of our dreams and the best way to start is to say to you that we are problem solving in our dreams and we felt going deep because I'm happy to go deep but at the first level the dream is the discussion you are having with yourself about a very specific current issue that you're trying to problem solve and that's what the dream is streaming it is only thinking I'm here to bust the mystery you're just talking to yourself and you're speaking in the language of metaphor and what I do is teach the language of metaphor so that we can wipe away the mystery and I'm going to teach you how to uncover what the heck he was saying to yourself when you had what you think is a crazy dream why do some people remember dreams other people don't well there's a physiological reason because there's a memory trace in your front your the frontal lobe that is not operating at the same capacity when you're asleep as when you're awake so it's more natural not to remember your dreams but some people do and and whether you remember them or you don't we are all dreaming and everybody is problem solving in their dreams and it's just so weird right now because I keep getting dreamer after dreamer after dreamer and when you we uncover the meaning of the dreams it's it's the virus it's everywhere it's including our dreams because he and the most wonderful news I have is the unconscious is not only so sophisticated but it's so positive it's your higher self that you're having a discussion with and the dreams and I'm gonna give you a bunch of examples you from any different scenery each of us are managing we are managing from the messages and encouragement that we are getting from our unconscious so you might think something starts off as a horrible dream lake I don't know if you're aware of Claudia asri she's known as girl with No job and I'm I like to be I'm involved with Instagram I love it there and so I followed her and she discussed with me how she keeps dreaming about the Holocaust and thinking that she's dreaming about the Holocaust because she was watching a show on Netflix as she was falling asleep that has to do with the subject of the Holocaust and the I know I don't argue that point that the initial way that some of the images are realizing your dream most definitely you get some of those images from what happened today what you're seeing on TV the brain is like a tape recorder isn't it exactly but I and it and this is a big batch we are so sophisticated that you will not choose an image unless it serves a certain something that you are trying to save yourself and that girl's dream is a beautiful example of what I call rehearsal it's a little rehearsal dream because if you're practicing what it feels like not to have any control over what's around you same as the whole of the Holocaust you know it was like a life experience where people had absolutely no control over what was going on around them now if you rehearse what it feels like to have no control in your dreams and you rehearse it over and over and over again you know that expression been there done not that's what happens you exercise that muscle and then as you're going through this virus saying you are getting more and more used to not get you click that feeling of not having control and why do you get more comfortable with it because you've been doing it for the last whatever week or two or three in your dreams you've been choosing different situations and memories that have to do with having no control and you kind of get used to it and it it desensitizes you plenty let's talk when we come back about why people are under stress and what those dreams can do to help them we'll be back in a moment Lainey dolphin with us her website linked up it coast to coast AM dot com to find out where George Noory speaking go to the coast to coast AM dot com website scroll down to the bottom and click George's calendar right now there is a lot to consider when selling a home home equity is high housing inventory is down and interest rates are at an all time low but.

lecturer Concordia university George
"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Serves as a lecturer to that city's counseling students at Concordia university as well Lainey welcome back how are you I'm good George how are you I'm looking forward to this there is no topic other than dreams that capture so many people's attention all the six how did you get into this I got into it it's kind of like the dreams came to me because I'm a person who has amazing dream recall and I've had that kind of recall my whole life so I think my father started it because when I was a little girl he was the one of the couple that would come into the bedroom and he never ever said to me it's just a dream go back to sleep he used to say good tell me and I would tell him this whole nightmare and then when it was time to go back to bed he would say to me Hey it's time to go back to bed and you gonna say I'm gonna have a nightmare I'm gonna have it I'm ready for it bring it on so there was all this that's very union and he didn't even realize he was doing that but he was welcoming the dream and teaching me to discuss them so it started young and very quickly when I was twenty I had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and not too long after obviously I became depressed and I ended up in psychoanalysis with a brilliant New York Freudian so much so he did probably eighty percent of my cycle analysis through dream interpretation so my introduction to Freud was that I experienced him long before I studied him and I went on to study these different fathers of psychology just because I'm not kind of girl I'd like to I'm like you George when I get onto a subject I get all the way into it and that's kind of what happened on the collective in my approach and I mostly use Freud jung Adler in pearls why do we dream in the first place Laney well and it's it's interesting because I'm hoping to discuss this virus and how it's affecting all of our dreams and the best way to start is to say to you that we are problem solving in our dreams and we felt going deep because I'm happy to go deep but at the first level the dream is the discussion you are having with yourself about a very specific current issue that you're trying to problem solve and that's what the dream is streaming it is only thinking I'm here to bust the mystery you're just talking to yourself and you're speaking in the language of metaphor and what I do is teach the language of metaphor so that we can wipe away the mystery and I'm going to teach you how to uncover what the heck you were saying to yourself when you had what you think is a crazy dream why do some people remember dreams other people don't well there's a physiological reasons because there's a memory trace in your front your the frontal lobe that is not operating at the same capacity when you're asleep as when you're awake so it's more natural not to remember your dreams but some people do and and whether you remember them or you don't we are all dreaming and everybody is problem solving in their dreams and it's just so weird right now because I keep getting dreamer after dreamer after dreamer and when you we uncover the meaning of the dreams it's it's the virus it's everywhere it's including our dreams because he and the most wonderful news I have is the unconscious is not only so sophisticated but it's so positive it's your higher self that you're having a discussion with and the dreams and I'm gonna give you a bunch of examples you from any different scenery each of us are managing we are managing from the messages and encouragement that we are getting from our unconscious so you might think something starts off as a horrible dream lake I don't know if you're aware of Claudia asri she's known as girl with No job and I'm I like to be I'm involved with Instagram I love it there and so I followed her and she discussed with me how she keeps screaming about the Holocaust and thinking that she's dreaming about the Holocaust because she was watching a show on Netflix as she was falling asleep that has to do with the subject of the Holocaust and the and all I don't argue that point that the initial the way that some of the images are realizing your dream most definitely you get some of those images from what happened today well what you were seeing on TV the brain is like a tape recorder is another exactly but I and it and this is a big batch we are so sophisticated that you will not choose an image unless it serves a certain something that you are trying to save yourself and that girl's dream is a beautiful example of what I call rehearsal it's a little rehearsal dreams because if you're practicing what it feels like not to have any control over what's around you same as the whole of the Holocaust you know it was like a life experience where people had absolutely no control over what was going on around them now if you rehearse what it feels like to have no control in your dreams and you rehearse it over and over and over again you know that expression been there done not that's what happens you exercise that muscle and then as you're going through this virus saying you are getting more and more used to not get you'd like that feeling of not having control and why do you get more comfortable with it because you've been doing it for the last whatever week or two or three in your dreams you've been choosing different situations and memories that have to do with having no control and you kind of get used to it and it it desensitizes you plenty let's talk when we come back about why people are under stress and what those dreams can do to help them we'll be back in a moment Lainey.

lecturer Concordia university George
"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Lecturer to that city's counseling students at concordia university as well laney welcome back thank you so much for having me george how was your first experience with us to have fun I did have fun. But I was so tired. so happy to say i had like what feels like a full night's sleep i'm wide awake excellent because you're you're up there on the east and cash it's free o'clock in the morning three going on four so you'll you'll you're going to have a fast day tomorrow when you go back to bed that's getting he how did you get involved in dreams that's so funny and synchronised your we're on we're on target today you and i because before we started i thought to myself maybe i should start with my own experience about what happened injury gms and give you the analysis of the dream so that you can understand where i wear doing i'm i'm i'm a sixty seven and when i was just turned twenty one i had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and so that was forty six years ago and forty six years ago most people didn't take their down's child home the people gave them up and so my doctor because my parents would not advise us one way or the other because they wanted to show that they were supportive in wanted to bring tina home and they will also support if we wanted to give her up with whatever you want to do and so a doctor of mine advice me to give her up and hurry up and go home and get pregnant again forget you ever had her he literally said jeez and not so long after i became depressed understandably and i ended up in the office of an unbelievable freudian analyst who was here in montreal and i wasn't willing able to articulate my feelings in my early twenties but i'm a dreamer and i've always had incredible dream recall and i used to go to the sessions with this rink always with the dream so my first experience with freud was that i experienced him long before i studied him and i started having after about two months there i started having a recurring dream about a freight elevator space without wobbly floor that we all also with and i consider except that i didn't feel like i had my ground literally kind of a a parent or a play on words which we do all the time in our dreams and so It was like a series I kept having this out my freight elevator dreams, and one of the ways that you can find, you know. join your goal is to attach the dream to very specific current issue that triggered that dream that's what i'm going to do with everybody tonight i'm gonna ask you questions to help people tell me what's the situation in your life this week that triggered the dream and for me the wobbly floor was i didn't feel like i had my ground i felt insecure and unhappy and it turned out to be that i didn't like that we gave up tina i didn't like it i had didn't know where she was what institution because somebody else placed her for us we gave we asked them a close family friend to find somewhere but i didn't know where and i knew this thing it wasn't fitting for me i had a baby where is she and maybe worked for somebody else to give the child up but it wasn't working for me and one of the ways that you find a solution is by taking the images of the dream outside into waking life as if it really happened and you decide what what what would you do like what the solution to the freight elevator dream and when i lecture at universities i asked that question and i'll get some people in the room say oh i'd stop the elevator and somebody else will say oh sit down so it stops wobbling gonna do what we're gonna do in the dream state laney is of course talk about all kinds of various dreams that people have lucid dreams pre cognitive dreams solution finding dreams which you're an expert in so one one of the questions laney than i want to ask you is when you get into the solution finding dreams do they come out of medically yeah that's why this is a great example because i took the dream out into waking life and ask myself what is it that i would do what's the solution to the freight elevator dream is to bring people into the dream because if you bring people into the elevator you put a lot of weight on the floor and it stops wobbling and the reason i use the freight elevator is because that in my memory bank which is your unconscious is very rich with material and when i was a little girl i used to go to work with my dad on the weekends and he had a big freight elevator in his office that used to make me a little nervous but i always felt better because my dad was there and i invited my parents to come with me to visit tina and then i brought her back into my life i mean she passed away a few years ago but she was a big part of my life sure and i realized that the solution was to bring tina back into my life and the way to get there was to invite my parents to come with me would make dreams laney so powerful i mean they are very very powerful that was a powerful dream because it changed my whole life with my daughter tina i mean she could have been in an institution forever court so that was one of the first dreams in in do in doing dreaming alice's that made me realize how powerful your dreams are and at the first level we are problem solving something that's bugging you vis week so that that's what triggers the dream is a current event that you are attempting to problem solve.

Lecturer concordia university george forty six years two months
"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"ISA on. And this is BBC wreath lecturer is Jonathan shin until recently, one of the UK's, top judges in this his fourth lecture recorded in the American capitol Washington, DC sumptious assesses, the constitutional models of the United States, and the United Kingdom. He argues that Britain should be wary about following the US example. That's the BBC wreath lectures, coming up after the news. BBC news with Stuart McIntosh. Britain's charity, regulator is to publish its long-awaited reporting walks fans handling of sexual misconduct by some stuff in Haiti after the earthquake there almost a decade ago, the scandal emerged last year. And since then, the charity has been banned from operating in Haiti. Torrential. Rainfall in southern China has left five people dead and destroyed thousands of hectares of crops state media said the downpours expected to continue for another four days, Gary in and South Korean crews have begun a salvage operation on the river Danube in Budapest to raise the sunken boat involved in a collision that claimed the lives of nineteen South Korean tourists and Hungarian, crewmen, eight people still missing the president of Mali has cut short a visit to Switzerland following the massacre of about one hundred villages in the region of Muphti president Ibrahim Boubacar cater said, Mali's affairs could not be driven by cycle of revenge. A human rights group report based on testimonies from more than six hundred North Korean defectors says the state continues to carry out public executions to intimidate citizens. The assessment documents hundreds of public executions over several decades, Syrian activists say, twenty five civilians in it live, province have been killed by air strikes by Russian-backed definite full sees thirteen people died in the southern village of Jabballah. Mexico has said there may need to be a regional response to the large numbers of migrants, heading to the United States. Mexico's foreign minister said, talks would begin with a transit country, including Brazil Kenema and tomorrow. And a new study suggests that data from mobile phones can help to predict where diseases, such as malaria alike, spread research, track, the movements of people carrying malaria in the Chittagong Hill, Tracts region of Bangladesh BBC news. Welcome back to the BBC wreath lectures. I'm Anita on. And then we're in Washington DC with Jonathan sumptious until recently, one of the UK's top judges Jonathan back to you. Abortion was once highly controversial in Britain to. After extensive parliamentary debate, it was introduced by ordinary legislation in nineteen sixty seven within carefully defined limits and subject to a framework of clinical regulation. The same pattern has been followed in Europe where all, but one state and Northern Ireland have now that just wanted for a regulated rights of abortion. As a result abortion, is much less controversial in Europe. Than it is in the United States. I suspect, although I kind of prove it, but one reason why abortion remains so controversial in the United States. Is that it was introduced judiciously? E by a method which relegated the wider political debate among Americans to irrelevance instead, the debate is concentrated on candidacies for the supreme court with results that were apparent in the undignified and partisan procedures in the most recent concentration hearings in his first inaugural address in eighteen sixty one ABRAHAM LINCOLN drew attention to the implications of filling gaps in the constitution by judicial decision. His words very well known the candidate citizen. He said must confess that, if the policy of the government on vital questions affecting the whole people is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the supreme court. The people will have ceased to be there and rulers having to that extent, practically resigns government into the hands of that eminent. Tribunal. Lincoln had in mind, the notorious supreme court's decision in dread, Scott. Which had held that African Americans were not to be treated as citizens, but he was also making a broader point, which was about active citizenship. The nation cannot hope to accommodate divisions among its people, and this, it citizens, actively participate in the process of finding political solutions to common problems law has its own competing claim to legitimate, but it is really no substitute for politics. Now, I'm certainly not saying that there are no rights, which should be constitutionally protected in a democracy. But I think that one listen, which Brisson can learn from US experience is that one must be very careful about, which rights when regards as so fundamental as to be the democratic choice. I suggested in a previous lecture in this series that in a democracy. There are only two kinds of right? That are truly fundamental in that sense. There are rights to a basic measure of security for life, liberty and property without, which life is reduced to a crude contest and the exercise of force and the rights such as freedom of expression, assembly and association without which community cannot function as a democracy at all. These rights will not be enough to prevent majoritarian tourney. But no code of rights will do that. The law simply has no solution to the problem of majoritarian tourney, even in a system of perfectly entrenched, constitutional rights like that of the United States law can insist that public authorities have a proper legal basis for everything that they do. Nor can supply the basic level of security on which civilized existence. Depends law can protect by not identified by some personal characteristics, such as gender race or sexual orientation from discrimination. But the courts cannot Perry, the broader threat that legislative majorities act oppressively unless they assume legislative powers for themselves. The only effective constraints on the abuse of democratic par political. They depend on active citizenship. On a culture of political sensitivity, and on the capacity of Representative institutions to perform the traditional row of accommodating division and mediating descent. If that no longer happens in the United States or on some issues in Britain. It is because our political culture has lost the capacity to identify common premises common bonds and common priorities, which stand above our differences. This is a serious problem in any democracy. But there is nothing that the law can do about it. In an essay written gnashing for Xi to the great American judge learned hand. Confessed the could not predict whether the spirit of equity and fannous, which animated, the constitution would survive without judges to enforce them. But he added these words this much he said, I think I do know that a society so riven that the spirit of moderation is gone. No court can save a society where that spirit flourishes. No court needs save the society, which evades its responsibilities by thrusting upon the courts, the nurture of that spirit that spirit will in the end perish. The ultimate expression of claims of law to set limits on political action is a written constitution in the next and final lecture in this series. I shall look at calls to introduce one in the United Kingdom. And at what such a constitution might say, thank you..

United States Britain supreme court United Kingdom BBC Europe Washington Haiti ABRAHAM LINCOLN Stuart McIntosh malaria Mexico Mali Jonathan shin UK Bangladesh BBC
"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of those black matters other ways to do it. We're it's much more attractive, and there's better ways to do it. We're. It doesn't affect the time us and with these new pool heaters. Sometimes you can heat the pool at three AM. Exactly. Right. That's the systems we like to put in that. We're actually doing this at night when powers much much. That's that's a big takeaway really is basically it's just we're using the same technology that we're using to heat water in people's homes. The technology were used to heat people's homes with and these heat pump technologies grounds. You know, we hear this ground source. He pump. It's all that same technology that we have incorporated into the pools where we're able to take that take that solar lecturer. And now use it to heat our pools very very efficiently. So we're able to take that energy off that solar system and take it at three o'clock at night. Just like you said and now heater pools at night where we can actually get the benefit of that low cost power to do that job. And it's a whole lot less expensive than most most people even. Think about isn't it. It depends on the situation. But yes. Especially when you consider heating between five pm and eight pm a lot cheaper than that. Boy that stuff is gone. Chris getting crazy expensive. Exact that's what we want to show you and just make you aware of that. You know, things could be changing if do we don't want that to be negatively impact junior. When the pools warm, the kids are happy when the adults come over with them. The adults are happy everybody being happy. And if you can do that save some money, I think it's pretty good deal. I think it's a pretty darn good deal. You know, we've gone over a lot of topics today. And.

lecturer Chris
"lecturer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"God. It's Friday now. Stick secular. Truck on the plane. Stains comply just. With pick. Will click. Fluck apply. That keeps the hoes. Become. Of. Lecturer. For business. Fritz chicken their kicking. Cats experts. Play..

Lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"You know that. Our former president lecturer and chief Barack Obama did did a wonderful job telling us that elections have consequences. I get that. We are just beginning in Colorado to understand how big the consequences are of electing. Progressives to every statewide position. And to control our state house and our state's Senate. So we're seeing it from from the red flag Bill that doesn't have any due process. Can't even face your chooser to a sex. Ed Bill that has nothing to do with the biology of how babies are made. But instead teaches you how to have a healthy trend sexual relationship to a governor who has put us on. Under the control of California's governor when it comes to what cars we buy those are low admission and zero emission vehicles. So we won't be able to buy the cars we want. The national popular vote. Without even going to a popular vote here in Colorado to give us a sense into that. So we're we're living with all of that. But what what's really Is the remarkable arrogance? Presumption lack of process and lack of transparency that our new progressive overlords won't even fake for us. And I don't quite get it because they control everything. I mean, everything. So why do they need to rush things and do things in secret? Let me dive down into an issue that you're going to be hearing a lot about in the coming weeks. It's Senate Bill one eight one Senate Bill one eighty one is a devastating Bill for the oil and gas industry and all those of us who depend on energy. Furthermore, if you're connected to the industry, it could be a job killer for you. It's odd that such an anti oil and gas Bill is flying through the legislature after the people of Colorado destroyed proposition one twelve the fracking.

Senate Ed Bill Colorado Barack Obama president lecturer California
"lecturer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Tucker Carlson is just so much parking and noise and yelling our role is to take three steps back and discern what really matters, Sean Hannity. The most important thing that we do. We are looking out for the forgotten men and women in this country. Laura Ingram, they're going to get a straight shooter no-holds-barred, I'm not gonna cut people slack. Fox's the one place for dissent is allowed. We have voices. We won't be signing who controls my voice. Nobody wants news. Real news. Real honest opinion. WABC mobile news all the level month ago. Now some lemons, and here's what's trending this hour. A man is in the hospital after being beaten on the city's northeast side this morning. I was called to Essex court after was spotted laying down on a sidewalk police found the man had been beaten and suffered multiple injuries. He was taken to the hospital in critical condition. Officials are investigating one Indiana lawmaker wants to give students the option of putting down scalpels animals virtually instead Madison Miguel reports state Representative Reagan Hatcher of Gary has filed her alternatives to animal dissection Bill to help students. Go digital UP y biology lecturer, Robert y'all says virtual dissections work, but as actually dissecting an animal, it really gives them an opportunity to be able to see what the true inside working really look like and how they're related Patras Bill also suggests using films pictures models or live observations.

Sean Hannity Tucker Carlson Laura Ingram Representative Reagan Hatcher WABC lecturer Madison Miguel Indiana Fox Essex Robert Gary
"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Forty nine was picking a special Oscar that magnificent Italian. This was before there was even a category for foreign film after that the now celebrated sight and sound magazine ho on the world's greatest films had bicycle thieves in the number one spot. In other words, the greatest film ever made. Of course, the impact of new release films like that of most revolutions dependent at least somewhat on what had come before. In this case. The Hollywood influenced lighter fare known as Telefoni Bianchi white telephone films made in the Mussalini run studios. Trinity talk a whole genre of movies about people who could afford such frivolous luxuries as telephones in a color other than black. It was a term used for Commodores, usually set in upper class or upper class settings author and lecturer David forego usually involving magic intrigues love stories that ended well usually happily with a wedding. But they were not about anything. And eventually has the world darkened something happened to filmmakers like to seek and his frequent collaborator of a teeny. They had a kind of moral conversion with the fall of fascism in the war. Several teeny was Neo realism's leading theorists and spokesperson, teeny very moving letters about having seen the decapitated body in the street from a bomb, and he said, you know, we can't go on writing comedies anymore, the world's become agreements areas place. We have to talk about suffering. Hence, a film, Rome. Open city. Roberto Rossellini nineteen Forty-five neorealist drama based on the tragic events over five days in Rome during the Nazi occupation.

Rome Roberto Rossellini Oscar Telefoni Bianchi lecturer Hollywood Mussalini David five days
"lecturer" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Movie Crush

"All right. So here's we're going to do with our little Oscar warm up talk there. It's gonna lead right into a very short explainer bit about how Oscar nominations are decided 'cause I don't think a lot of people know this stuff and people go this Peterson this this. Here's how it works. It's proportional voting. So few listen to stuff, she's no podcast on ranked choice. Voting and politics is sorta like that there are about fifty five hundred voting members of the academy of motion pictures, it's gonna lecturer college situations, you're saying, okay, go on brand choice voting. Okay. Now the same about the same same boy cheese. In fact, so different than we would have a different president. If if rank choice voting had gone into effect here more about this sounds like a good idea. Yeah. All the members. So if you're a member of the academy one fifty five hundred you can vote on best picture. But you can only vote on the other categories if you are appear so actors can vote for actors, although what did not see surely actors can vote for actress an actor in supporting actress and actor I need to look that up, but they say peer votes. I'm gonna check that. I can't imagine. They would just have guys voting for guys that would be stupid. That would be. Yeah. That would seem inherently wrong back. You know, what I'm gonna leave this in there. Even though look dumb. I was going to say cut it all out. Okay. Let's leave it in there. I applaud Chuck transparency. All right. So then what happens is that you can like I said, you can nominate your peer category everyone votes on desperate jer. And then the proportional representation comes in. Why they did this was they wanted diversity. They want a diverse slate of nominees because there's a lot of different kinds of people voting for the Oscars. And they have a lot of different kinds of creative taste, and so they wanna represent that as best they can. And this seems like decent way. So what you do on the ballot as five numbered slots for every category. If you're eligible to vote in that category. And you only get one vote, but you can choose five nominees, and you rank them in order, and that's like the ranked choice voting in politics. You. Them in order of your preference. So once your favorite nominee is eliminated by not getting enough oats it bumps up your second vote here, I choice. So I hope that makes sense. It's it sounds complicated. But it's really pretty easy. So basically in the end, if you know, a movie doesn't get support it falls away. Then it goes to the next most popular and so on into get down to the five or guess in the case of best picture, what is it eight to ten? In the category. Yeah. I don't think they have to have ten though interesting that never occurred to me because I think they don't this year. Yeah. It did seem like a like a smaller smaller field. Well, used to just be five, and they changed that uplift years ago to just so you've you've you voted you've ranked your things your your movies aren't as popular falling away, and basically any nominee that gets about twenty percent of the votes is going to get one of the nominations. And if you have more than five thousand people voting that's about a thousand votes that you need to get to make that nominee list thousand people. And that is how it works. No, thanks for that. Chuck sure thing I'm a I'm a little confused still. But you know, I'm not the muck it draw it out on paper. Yeah. It would make sense. Yeah. Is it like brackets? So. I have two three four five. Look, I'm running it Desi. I see you have first reform. You have BUSTER Scruggs of Roma. And then you have another movie in another movie. So I voted for first reform. I yeah, nobody else does. Okay. So it gets eliminated. Then my first vote is for BUSTER Scruggs got it. And if not enough people vote for that it goes by and then my top vote is Roma. So that's that's interesting. I get object. Thanks for the diagram. All right. Hope you played along at home everybody..

Peterson Oscar BUSTER Scruggs Chuck lecturer president twenty percent
"lecturer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Ads just before the national anthem as Americans come together in their living rooms and remind everyone that together is beautiful. Oh shut up. You make you make a nasty soft drink low. It's see I was Bill. They say nasty. I'm all I'm all for beating them up over this little boots. You love it. Don't bad mouth a coke zero. Thank you. All these companies are having delusions of grant. Sure, are they sure are. You sell a soft drink, right? Shut up. Don't be lecturer come on. Now. So they're just they're just trying to save a couple of bucks and still get their message out right instead of being in the Super Bowl and bending, you know, five million they do it just before the kick-off. It's been three million or whatever it is. And then they get their messages. I wonder if it has something to do also with the fact that Pepsi is fficials saw the NFL but they've advertise during the Super Bowl before this. I like this story said it was the first time in eleven years that they haven't actually advertised during the Super Bowl, but they've take breaks, you know, before before the eleven year run the taking breaks a few years not advertising during the actual Super Bowl. So you know, it's possible that the Pepsi has something to do with it. It's also possible that they're just, you know, we found a way to save a couple of bucks and still get our message close enough to the game that you know, it'll it'll help I don't know that the Super Bowl ads are as big a deal now because they don't do anything special any. No, They they should. seem like they're not very good. Those are not exposed much. It's tough to be good doing that kind of stuff now. Right. Because you can't might offend somebody. Yeah. Can't have that. You can't wear a hat. You can't wear to shirt. Can't have a funny look on your face. And you can't make a joke about anything. He's laugh about anyone's anything or the world comes to an end. I mean, really they should just put a can of coke real sugar on the screen and go drink it. That offense me though, too because I don't drink. If you're welcome coke for the idea, by the way. Nice triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three it's a new year and a bunch of new resolutions probably to try to adhere to a lot of those include eating healthier..

Pepsi lecturer NFL eleven years eleven year