35 Burst results for "Lecturer"

"lecturer" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"lecturer" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"On housing. We have a situation at the moment in Australia that people generally refer to as a housing crisis. But that simple phrase signifies a very complex set of causes and effects and circumstances. One of which has to do with rent and that's what we're talking about this week. The national rental vacancy rate is currently at its lowest level on record, which means demand for rental properties is surging, which means that rents are going up while wages are stagnating and people who might want to buy a place to live have been logged way out on the property market. Rent is one of those simple market economy mechanisms that seem very natural like it's just an organic outgrowth of human society. But in fact, rent has a philosophical history, and it's a history that's been traced in a new book written by today's guest. His name is Joe Collins. He's a lecturer in the faculty of arts and social sciences at the university of Sydney and his book is titled rent. And joy Collins is speaking

Australia Joe Collins university of Sydney joy Collins
Why 'Supreme Disorder' Author Ilya Shapiro Resigned From Georgetown

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:26 min | 7 months ago

Why 'Supreme Disorder' Author Ilya Shapiro Resigned From Georgetown

"Guys, I'm really happy to welcome to the podcast Ilya Shapiro. He's senior fellow director of constitutional studies at the Manhattan institute, but previously he was the executive director and senior lecturer at Georgetown university, the center for the constitution. He's the author of supreme disorder and other works. I want to talk about his experience at Georgetown and related to some of the larger issues we're dealing with in academia. Ilya, welcome to the podcast, great to have you, it seems like you've gone through a kind of a traumatic experience that Georgetown. But I think you're not alone in facing this kind of an issue. So maybe I'll begin by just asking you to describe what happened at Georgetown. It all started, I believe, with a tweet. Yeah. Yeah, good to be with you, dinesh. I had been at the Cato institute for nearly 15 years doing constitutional law. And thought it might be a good time in my career to switch to try to have a different kind of impact, got a wonderful offer from Georgetown to head up the center with alongside professor Randy Barnett, a giant of constitutional law. A few days before I was due to assume my new duties, so this is at the end of January, when news of justice Breyer's retirement leaked, I was doing media that day, I was on the road. I was in Austin, Texas, and used what's not a best practice in doom scrolling my Twitter feed late at night in my hotel room, and was unhappy with President Biden's having declared that he would be limiting his candidate pool by race and sex. He said that he'd pick a black woman. And I said, well, look, and to my mind, if I were a democratic president, I would pick Sri srinavasan. He would be the first Indian American justice as well, very well reputed on the D.C. circuit. But of course, he's disqualified because it doesn't have the right intersectional characteristics. And that tweet set off a firestorm. I was even before joining Georgetown, I was suspended, and there was a four month long investigation into whether my commentary violated the university's harassment and anti discrimination policies. At the end of which they discovered, oh, one of their lawyers looked at the calendar and realized I had not been an employee when I tweeted. And so those policies didn't even apply

Georgetown Ilya Shapiro Manhattan Institute Randy Barnett Georgetown University Justice Breyer Ilya Dinesh Academia Cato Institute President Biden Austin Texas Twitter SRI D.C.
"lecturer" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

06:03 min | 7 months ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WBUR

"From the BBC office is a hub of all sorts of creatives. Photographers, musicians, sculptors and painters, and leading me down a corridor past the music practice rooms is a scientist who studies them. I am rectangular and I'm a lecturer in the psychology department at goldsmiths University of London. And I know goldsmiths as an arts college, what's a psychologist doing that? Yeah, that's correct. We managed to sort of infiltrate the rules of the design school. A lot of us are involved in research on the arts. So if we're talking about artists and non artists, maybe we should define some terms. How do you define who's an artist and who isn't one for your studies? So often we go on sort of self identification and usually that means that someone's been practicing as a professional artist, the majority of my work is really focused on representational drawing ability and that is the ability to draw things out there in the real world. And so I will basically have some kind of threshold of engagement with that activity. So they need to be drawing several times a week and they need to have done that over a period of years. So that I can sort of guarantee some level of expertise in that domain. Now, can you tell me about the eye tracking studies you carried out? Yeah, absolutely. So it's essentially either a pair of glasses that someone can wear or a camera that's set on the desk and it finds out where your pupil is and it uses that to predict where you're looking. So Rebecca asked the group of artists and a bunch of non artists to do some tasks while wearing these glasses, getting them to draw an image on the screen and measuring where they were looking on that image while they were drawing. So we had them drawing the images, but we also just had them free viewing the images. So just have a look at this photograph for 30 seconds. And in eye movement terms, you've got two features of eye movements that are interesting. One is the fixation, which is where your eye is statically fixed on one point of the image that you're looking at. And then these things called the cards, which are essentially eye movements. So you'll make a fixation, you'll fixate on a particular part of the image, and then your eye will move to another part of the image. And in this way, you'll kind of be sampling from the image. So it's funny when you look at a recording of someone's eye movements, they move around so much, much more than we subjectively experience. And what's also interesting about those cigars is eye movements is that we don't see anything in that period of the eye moving. So we have these big black spots in our visual experience that we're not consciously aware of, but actually no information is being received when those eye movements are happening. And what became clear quite quickly from that research was that artists seem to be processing the visual world in a different way to non artists, particularly when they're drawing. The artist actually take a more global approach to looking so they make bigger saccades, bigger eye movements, and shorter fixations on the image. So it's almost like they're getting much more of a kind of just level view of the thing that they're looking at, almost probably to get a sense of, how does this all work together? And then they have these periods of long fixations and little eye movements within a particular region of the image. Is that the bit that they're trying to draw? We don't actually know because it's difficult to capture at the same time what they're drawing and what they're looking at. But yeah, it's reasonable to assume that they might be sampling from the whole image and then yet focusing on particular details. But the non artists weren't making these global eye movements as much. So they were becoming much more fixated on individual parts of the image, artists seem to be better. Essentially it's sort of allocating their visual attention to things that they needed to attend to. And one more interesting thing about this study was that we didn't see any differences between the artists and the artists when they're just viewing an image. As opposed to viewing an image to draw it. Yeah, exactly. So I think what artists are doing are they're switching on a way of seeing the world that's very specific for drawing. And that makes a lot of sense because the way that we look at things when we're drawing is very different to the way that we would look at things when we're just navigating around meeting Friends for coffee in this kind of thing. Our visual system is very much built for survival, which means being able to identify objects in our environment, potentially threats, moving things, fast taxis, going across the road. And often that's governed by a lot of sort of expectations about the way that the visual world works. We don't really stop and think we often just react to things. And I think what's happening when we're in this kind of creative space is that we often sort of override or we stop and take a bit of time to really think about what we're seeing. In a way that's probably not very good for survival, but leads to really interesting ways of representing the world. So artists, brains are different when they're in professional drawing mode. A disclaimer at this point that Rebecca's experiment used artists who are trying to draw the world. This is a small fraction of what art can be. And I think defining what is or is not art is probably beyond the remit of crowd science. Some art has a large element of craft to it. If say you're a sculptor or a musician and you're trying to master different instruments or techniques in stone, and some art tries to draw the world, some is abstract, some is all about ideas. There's no definition of art that includes all forms of artistic expression which doesn't also include football. So we are sticking with listener Mike's realm, visual art in our quest to understand how artists might be seeing the world, but will broaden that out to search for differences in the brains of creative people. Talking of Mike, back in Malawi, it

goldsmiths University of Londo BBC Rebecca football Mike Malawi
Eric Chats With 'Mystical Perelandra' Author James Como

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Eric Chats With 'Mystical Perelandra' Author James Como

"To James como, CO, MO. You can find him at James como dot com. He's a lecturer writer, teacher written many books, the new book is mystical para landra, about C. S. Lewis's book, peril andra. And we were just talking about the basic plot, James como. Let's pick up where we left off. The prohibition. So this is an unfallen planet. Weston, who is the. Villain, the villain. He's not there yet. Ransom, the good guy who's named ransom for some big reasons here, right? He arrives on the planet, and he is, in a sense, charged with helping prevent the fall on this planet. It didn't happen here. Here, the fall happened. So it was not prevented. But Louis, I mean, even for C. S. Lewis to have this idea, it doesn't get much bigger than this. It's like, you want something tough to pull off. How does that? It doesn't. The thing is, when ransom first gets there, he has no idea what he's doing there. And then when he realizes what's expected of him, he can't believe it because he's ill suited to this. You know, he's a middle aged philologist. And now he has to prevent this cosmic catastrophe. And there's no one to help him. He needs a miracle, and then he hears the voice, you know? You have a miracle. You're here to do this. And my view of this, and I really do think this is one of the great modern epics in English. We will rival anything from Greek and Roman literature. Look, look, I've said the same thing, it's not you think it is. Okay. And that makes ransom one of the great unacknowledged heroic figures in western literature. Yeah, you

James Como C. S. Lewis Weston Louis
Former UCLA lecturer threatened to 'hunt' female professor

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Former UCLA lecturer threatened to 'hunt' female professor

"A a a a former former former former UCLA UCLA UCLA UCLA lecturer lecturer lecturer lecturer is is is is in in in in custody custody custody custody after after after after allegedly allegedly allegedly allegedly threatening threatening threatening threatening a a a a mass mass mass mass attack attack attack attack on on on on the the the the university university university university campus campus campus campus police police police police say say say say Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthew Harris Harris Harris Harris emails emails emails emails to to to to his his his his former former former former UCLA UCLA UCLA UCLA students students students students early early early early Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday morning morning morning morning contain contain contain contain links links links links to to to to both both both both an an an an eight eight eight eight hundred hundred hundred hundred page page page page manifesto manifesto manifesto manifesto and and and and videos videos videos videos he he he he made made made made depicting depicting depicting depicting and and and and threatening threatening threatening threatening violence violence violence violence the the the the campus campus campus campus police police police police track track track track terrorist terrorist terrorist terrorist to to to to boulder boulder boulder boulder Colorado Colorado Colorado Colorado boulder boulder boulder boulder police police police police chief chief chief chief Maris Maris Maris Maris Herold Herold Herold Herold on on on on Denver Denver Denver Denver seven seven seven seven upon upon upon upon reviewing reviewing reviewing reviewing parts parts parts parts of of of of the the the the manifesto manifesto manifesto manifesto we we we we identified identified identified identified thousands thousands thousands thousands of of of of references references references references to to to to violence violence violence violence stating stating stating stating things things things things such such such such as as as as killing killing killing killing death death death death murder murder murder murder shootings shootings shootings shootings bombs bombs bombs bombs a a a a year year year year ago ago ago ago Harris Harris Harris Harris emailed emailed emailed emailed his his his his mother mother mother mother and and and and threatened threatened threatened threatened to to to to hunt hunt hunt hunt and and and and shoot shoot shoot shoot a a a a university university university university of of of of California California California California Irvine Irvine Irvine Irvine philosophy philosophy philosophy philosophy professor professor professor professor she she she she notified notified notified notified the the the the woman woman woman woman who who who who took took took took out out out out a a a a restraining restraining restraining restraining order order order order against against against against him him him him police police police police say say say say it it it it was was was was likely likely likely likely that that that that order order order order that that that that prevented prevented prevented prevented terrorists terrorists terrorists terrorists from from from from buying buying buying buying a a a a handgun handgun handgun handgun last last last last November November November November he he he he was was was was arrested arrested arrested arrested Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday morning morning morning morning following following following following a a a a standoff standoff standoff standoff at at at at this this this this apartment apartment apartment apartment complex complex complex complex I'm I'm I'm I'm Jim Jim Jim Jim acquire acquire acquire acquire

Ucla Boulder Mass Attack Attack Attack Atta University University Universi Colorado Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthe Denver Boulder Boulder Boulder Police Police Police P Maris Maris Maris Maris Herold Harris Harris Harris Harris University University Universi Irvine Irvine Irvine Irvine Ph California Jim Jim Jim Jim
"lecturer" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"A TV show. Now let's talk about professor Ilya Shapiro. Great Khan lost scholar Cato institute libertarian. He has an unfortunate tweet that very and artful very in alligator. He's not a racist, but it sounds like he's a racist. He's apologized, but George sounds suspended him. So why does Elia get suspended and Whoopi gets back with an apology? And by the way, alien apologized as well. Look, I mean, I think it's, it would be two different standards. I saw what he said and how he said it. Again, I don't think he should be fired or suspended. He apologized. I think that as a society over the past several years, we've become far too sensitive and unforgiving when people say things in public that are in artful or just wrong or stupid, especially if they immediately apologize. I think though this is a reminder of the danger in particular, a social media where you have 280 characters in a tweet, you can mess things up. I think some of the totality of someone's life and behavior is how these things should be judged. If it's an example of how you've been living your life and this just sheds a light on it, that's one thing. When it's the opposite, I think people should show more grace. I also think Joe Rogan should not be canceled because he's asked some in artful questions of doctors, Malone and McCulloch. Then others tell me he's made racist jokes. I've never listened to Joe Rogan. He's back since 2009. He's got a 190 million downloads a month. But he should be left alone. I mean, Spotify is not going to cancel him, David, your thought. Well, look, he's a money maker. So they probably won't. I mean, look, I think by the same token, I think people should be responsible for what they say, and they should think about what they say. They should apologize when necessary. And if the marketplace and a company and a platform that hosts them is going to take actions because of the marketplace, that's what happens in business in the United States. I got to get a quick free to do it. A quick pluck in for in Trump shadow. You're at the Nixon library. You sold a bunch of books. How did Jim Byron do as an interviewer? He was great, you. I mean, he wasn't you, but Jim was that's the important thing to say. People in person. He was very good, but he wasn't you, you. Actually, I love Jim Byron. He's the new director of the Nixon library. He is now doing an interview there and he had David drucker talking about in Trump's shadow last week. Sell out crowd as always at the Nixon library. The Nixon seminar and tonight don't miss it. Watch it. Beginning at 5 p.m. on the West Coast. I'm guilty of it. I believe we'll start to see much more being open about indoor situations, be they theaters, be they restaurants, be they schools, be they workplaces. That doesn't mean that it's going to be exactly the way it was three or four years ago. But I think when it comes to travel, school, workplace entertainment will start to see a gradual return to normal, even though normal will not be exactly the way it was before all of this. Saying nothing at great.

Ilya Shapiro George sounds Nixon library Joe Rogan Jim Byron Cato institute Elia Whoopi Khan McCulloch Malone Spotify David drucker David United States Jim Trump Nixon West Coast
Georgetown Lecturer Suspended After Tweets About Biden Court Nominee

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Georgetown Lecturer Suspended After Tweets About Biden Court Nominee

"Now let's talk about professor Ilya Shapiro. Great Khan lost scholar Cato institute libertarian. He has an unfortunate tweet that very and artful very in alligator. He's not a racist, but it sounds like he's a racist. He's apologized, but George sounds suspended him. So why does Elia get suspended and Whoopi gets back with an apology? And by the way, alien apologized as well. Look, I mean, I think it's, it would be two different standards. I saw what he said and how he said it. Again, I don't think he should be fired or suspended. He apologized. I think that as a society over the past several years, we've become far too sensitive and unforgiving when people say things in public that are in artful or just wrong or stupid, especially if they immediately apologize. I think though this is a reminder of the danger in particular, a social media where you have 280 characters in a tweet, you can mess things up. I think some of the totality of someone's life and behavior is how these things should be judged. If it's an example of how you've been living your life and this just sheds a light on it, that's one thing. When it's the opposite, I think people should show more

Ilya Shapiro George Sounds Cato Institute Elia Whoopi Khan
Joe Biden Does Not Get to Define Who Republicans Are

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden Does Not Get to Define Who Republicans Are

"Benny lecturers ask about what the Republican Party is or is not Cut 16 go Well some courageous men and women in the Republican Party are standing against it Trying to really courageous With the media at their back with the Democrat party at their back go ahead Well that party Too many others are transforming that party into something else They see how completely politicized this is Completely Now I had want to be the party The party of Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan the bushes All right let's stop The Democrats hated Lincoln Fact they assassinated him The Democrats hated Reagan Hated his guts They wanted to impeach him over Iran if they could have The bushes they blew off the old man as a joke and his son they said he was an illegitimate president So Biden throws out these Republican names Biden doesn't get to decide what the Republican Party will be and he doesn't get to decide who the Republican nominee will be As a matter of common sense and I'll say it whether people like it or not with arm under attack or not Everybody scratches their head frankly even in the media even in the Democrat party how the hell did this guy get 80 million votes From his basement

Republican Party Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan Democrat Party Benny Biden Reagan Lincoln Iran
"lecturer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Why Pelosi didn't bring in the National Guard Not one Ask what Pelosi did on January 4th January 5th or even on January 6th for that matter They don't want to know how to fix this quote unquote That's not what any of this is about Go ahead Off the Oval Office in The White House Shut up you idiot You damn fool Whether it's Afghanistan or Iran or China or Russia whether it's our border whether it's our economy whether it's the virus you clown listening to you get emotional get passionate with a speech that's been written by somebody else And you lie You lie all the time And you always have How many career she tried to destroy from bob bork to clarence Thomas and a thousand in between before and after Gotta listen to this schmuck Benny lecturers ask about what the Republican Party is or is not Cut 16 go Well some courageous men and women in the Republican Party are standing against it Trying to really courageous With the media at their back with the Democrat party at their back go ahead Well that party Too many others are transforming that party into something else They see how completely politicized this is Completely Now I had want to be the party The party of Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan the bushes All right let's stop The Democrats hated Lincoln Fact they assassinated him The Democrats hated Reagan.

Pelosi bob bork National Guard Oval Office Republican Party White House clarence Thomas Afghanistan Iran Russia China Democrat party Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan Lincoln Reagan
Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

The Dan Bongino Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

"Well number one it's a relief to do a book like you and I have friends and you would have me on if I had something on the history of sewing We would have and that was really why I cared about it But that's to know And yet sad that the issues that I'm talking about in the 18 50s 1860s is still exist today Not to the degree it is but we're still talking about racial unrest We're talking about an equity We're talking about reparations We're talking about how to handle it how to equal the playing field without making it unlevel for either side and how much anger we should have And then we watch conduits to rise go to the view And at the same excuse me I keep in the segregated south I don't want to make white children feel bad or something they had nothing to do with I don't want black kids to feel like they're victims And please don't let you survive on segregation because you can go to a movie theater or sit in the front of a bus and she wants to play and be killed because they were black but she led this country as Secretary of State national security adviser sovietologist in this country in 8 to two presidents You can accomplish anything even if the playing field is an equal And even if there is something unjust and nobody personified that better than Frederick Douglass Dan whenever we're going through we weren't out going into savoring We did that We know our parents We know of birthday Even if our parents are bad what about having none What about not even knowing who your siblings were What about not having close into your 7 8 years old What about is it by the time you escape and find a way to get free and by hook and cook to learn to read and write within 7 years of getting your freedom right to your biography and becoming an international bestseller and soon a lecturer whose statue sit in Scotland Ireland Germany and England today So dude I'm not saying we can all be Frederick Douglas but please don't tell me your circumstances so bad Life isn't fair I will never achieve I will never offer also soft pedal We the original sin of America No one will And I don't want to I bring quotes not opinion

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Scotland Ireland Germany England America
"lecturer" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an abc podcast. This is science fiction on the tesha mitchell with the taliban seizing power in afghanistan the country's university scholars and educators. Face an immediate urgent crisis. A few have escaped the country. It cannot go back of as currently stranded overseas as students. Sure that are less and many more Now in hiding inside afghanistan and they fear for their lives are not accepting the woman as human today. The stories of young afghan scientists and scholars who don't know what will happen to their families. What will happen to their jobs or to their hopes and aspirations because this is the generation who have thrived in education after the taliban was lost toppled in two thousand and one we had independence on these two in tears and free and we and the woman to work and continue your education. Now they feed. The clock is being wound back two decades to a dark time when girls were completely banned from classrooms and women hidden from view. I don't know how we can work. This is h to protect her. I can't tell you her name where she's from or where she currently is i. I am sure that we cannot grow side there lot alot to the as lecturer at inure scare son and it's like very strange for us. The situation afghanistan is obviously dire. And it's really on a scale that i don't think has been seen in the higher education community really since world war two in the last few weeks. We scholars a risk alone have received over nine hundred requests for assistance. We of course are getting a large number of requests from female scholars women who work in civil society really who have embraced the vision of a forward-looking afghanistan over the last twenty years in themselves took advantage of education return to their countries to try to give those opportunities to other women and others queenie's founding executive director of scullers at resq in new york city. It's an international network connecting higher education institutions and individuals in over forty countries to assist persecuted scholars and promote academic freedom. We're seeing people who are literally going house to house in hiding because persons allegedly connected to the taliban are also going house to house looking for the more visiting their families homes looking for them and so they're trying to stay ahead of that threat and they're also trying to put distance between themselves and their families so as not to bring that risk on the people that they care about really so few have got out you know there was a very busy period of for in roughly three to four weeks which you know we call it the sprint where we and many many many other organizations and individuals inside of government outside of government in higher education and civil society we really scrambling to try to get as many people out as we could before the the transition but effort hasn't stopped is just move now into what i call the marathon face which is something we're very familiar within our work and we will continue to try to do what we can for as many as we can prolong as we can. It is difficult to live a home-country to leave our family to live over things to leave book of your but we have to do it because we have to save our lives. This is aim again. I can't use his name or location because he says he's in danger. He's a young computer science lecturer ahead of a university department whose fled his home in recent weeks along with twelve of his close colleagues at a university in the province of afghanistan. The now in hiding desperately trying to get out of the country people lost their hopes. People don't have access right now to basic services. The tame mostly science and technology scholars also organized human rights and gender equity initiatives at the university. M says that regularly put them in the crosshairs of extremists and because of the threats they've received they've had to leave otherwise we would be really hard. Why the taliban near-shore that we will be harmed because several times they treat on the us directly or indirectly through phone calls through messages. It was really dangerous. They zara ethnicity a minority long targeted by the taliban threatened beaten tortured murdered including in recent weeks. And i feel like. I'm not safe anymore here. Because of targeted killing by the taliban militias ataka the in the past few days and this week a report by amnesty international the international federation for human rights and the world organisation against torture painted a very grim picture of human rights violations across afghanistan since the taliban takeover especially towards minorities and women. I is biology lecturer at the same university as a young man. You've just heard from when the taliban seized afghanistan in august. She was overseas completing her master's of science degree in biotechnology and biomolecular science. She has been dreams trying to finish. And in i will continue my phd as will is. I have chance in the future. It's my ambition. My back home. She was the only woman lecturer at who university in a province where extremists made life very difficult for women who stood at or who fought for the rights of other women to be educated as hd. Did they don't want to the woman outside and be as civilised sake activities their minds limited and are trying to limit a woman as real as the only woman lecturer at your university in a province in afghanistan teaching male and female students. You and your female. Students have been threatened directly by the taliban and other extremists. Yes unfortunately because usually were occurring by By one bus in me and my three million students they familiar with that birth and they try to many times to attack the on that bus. I'm the female and me and also the all the stuff altruistic. What compelled you to keep being a lecturer at the university in those conditions. When it was clear that your life was under threat for who you are a woman. A lecturer a young scientist by myself. Because i want the younger generation to be educated not like taliban the just i forced myself to continue on through video. Be stronger than these strange Change the environment was supporting them to continue You were determined. Yes when she started there. Were only a few female students. Women were too scared to enroll in a university full of maine. So i was encouraged encouraging. Female that you should come nudity and you should continue our study. I n v q. I will support you over tot presence inspired more and she caught the busing with her female students each day to give them courage after it was for me here really good since and feeling you were inspiring each other. Yes but every morning when she said goodbye to her parents and her family and got on that bus with her students. She says she wondered if that day. That bus journey might be her last and one day. It neely watts. They killed the gar. Our newest city a.

taliban afghanistan tesha mitchell resq queenie abc international federation for h new york city zara us maine neely watts
"lecturer" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"I'm excited about the guest of today's episode senior lecturer at central queensland university. Australia and director of the motivation of health behavior slapped. She completed her. Phd in kinesiology at pennsylvania state university research focuses on the psychology of health behavior change and the impact of physical activity a mental health and wellbeing..

central queensland university pennsylvania state university Australia
Google Launches Anti-Racism Campaign, Says We're All "Raised to Be Raised"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Google Launches Anti-Racism Campaign, Says We're All "Raised to Be Raised"

"Google the leviathan. The most powerful organization on the planet has now launched a new anti-racism initiative for all of their employees claiming that america is quote a system of white supremacy and that all americans are quote raised to be racist. They have a white supremacy pyramid. Christopher rufo rights. I've obtained a trove of whistle blower documents from the inside of google revealed a company's extensive racial reeducation program based on the core tenants of critical race theory including intersection algae white privilege and systemic racism in a module called ally ship in action. Google train their employees to deconstruct racial and sexual identities and then ranked themselves hierarchy of power and privilege and manner manager reactions through crying and assessing their happy place in a video guest lecturer henry rogers. Otherwise known as abram x. kennedy claimed that all americans including children as young as three months old are racist quote to be raised in the united states is to be raised to be racist and to be raised to rice. Racist is to be raised to be almost addicted to racist ideas. Denial of racism that a person is racist quote for me is the heartbeat of racism. Is denial and the sound of that. Denial is that. I'm not racist can told google employees. It's a critical critically important for americans to no longer being denial about their own racism and another lecture. Google paid nicole. Hannah jones claim that she created and she created the sixteen nineteen project to verify lifelong theory that everything in modern day united states can be traced back to slavery. If you name anything in america i can relate it back to slavery

Christopher Rufo Google Henry Rogers United States Abram Kennedy Hannah Jones Nicole
Last US Flight Departs Kabul, Leaving Afghanistan to Its Fate

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Last US Flight Departs Kabul, Leaving Afghanistan to Its Fate

"The united states has confirmed that all its forces arouse of afghanistan with the final evacuation flight leaving kabul around midnight. Local time on monday loud gunfire was heard at kabul airport as the taliban celebrated the withdrawal after twenty years. Well let's get the latest now with julie norman lecturer in politics and international relations that ucla. Who joins me down. The line julia. Good morning to you and thanks for joining us. Can you describe what happened overnight in afghanistan please. Well essentially what we saw. Georgina is what was known to be coming by the state the full withdrawal of the us military presence so actually prior to this morning the last us personnel on the last us aircraft departed from kabul and before leaving. The us also disabled the remaining military clinton in that was there the remaining helicopters etc. So that when the taliban did end up coming to their fuel come into the airport taking over They were pretty much left with just the run of what had been the us military presence prior and there were celebrations and some parts of afghantistan yesterday with this Seeming like a turning up the page so to speak with these taliban officially taking over obviously a lot of fear interpretation from others afghanistan at the same

Kabul Airport Julie Norman Kabul Afghanistan United States Taliban Ucla Georgina Julia Clinton
AJ on How He Crafts His Podcasts

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:29 min | 1 year ago

AJ on How He Crafts His Podcasts

"But I used to hate absolutely hate leaving my house for any job I had when I was married. And I'm more like that now than I ever was. I'm very lucky that I can stay home and do this or do this anywhere anywhere I go because it feels like I'm just, I don't know, I don't know, maybe with a comic feels like or a lecturer, I don't really know what lifestyle this is. I wouldn't prescribe it to just anybody, but it certainly works for me. I think this would make a lot of people crazy. Because there's a lot of talking to yourself over and over all day shaping the story. I'm just come here and just go, I'm going to just spit some stuff out. Sometimes that happens, but most of the time I know I'm going to start with this, this is the middle, and that's the third act. I'm going to close with that. I basically know what I'm going to do. And it takes, it takes a good part of the day to figure out the really good shows. I can't shut off my brain and just think about the show for a half hour and sit down and do it. I can't do that. And a lot of podcasts are like that. And I lose interest in them. I like something crafted. I like something built. I like when someone sits at home and makes a chair at a wood and a lathe and files and rasps. I like craftsmanship. It's leaving us. And this is craftsmanship, not to be a big fucking braggart, but it is to a degree. It really is. It's a

"lecturer" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

"Coming to you. Live from our houses in los angeles california. It's nobody listens to paula. Poundstone your company field guide to life tonight feeling lonely. Why would that be something happen on a global scale or something weird anyway if you are lonely. You're in good company and that company. Tonight is lecturer at harvard medical school and founder of the only project. Dr jeremy nobel you ask for you. Got a lot of listener feedback without a theme. Why do you hate themes okay. Well this the theme as we bring you a variety pack the input from our nobody's on mailbag.

paula Dr jeremy nobel los angeles california harvard medical school
"lecturer" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on AP News

"Abdullah Saeed is a lecturer at Kabul Polytechnic University. Our people have very bad experience since 40 years. Now our people thinking if govern, our government cannot control the situation may be the civil war will be start U. S. Officials say the military has left Bagram airfield, the epicenter of the war to oust the Taliban. Elsa has strengthened into the first hurricane in the Atlantic season. It's battering the eastern Caribbean. It might reach Florida as a tropical storm by Tuesday. This is a P news Extreme drought is tearing apart communities in the massive river basin that spans the Oregon California border. The government stopped irrigation to hundreds of farmers for the first time in history. Everybody depends on the water, the climate, the river for their livelihood. That's that's the blood that ties us all together. Farmer Ben Duval worries about what will happen with no water coming in. Constant looming threat over me that in my going to be the generation that ends up losing the family farm because of Situation situation that's beyond my control. The climate tribes consider the fish species critical to their culture and heritage. To me. There's too many people after two little water, you know, we need to see a Right sizing of agriculture, irrigated agriculture, which is basically needs to be downsized. That's Chairman Don Gentry. There's also no extra water for down River salmon. A parasite is killing thousands of salmon. Ed Donahue. AP News I'm Rita Foley with an AP News Monette employers added 850,000 jobs in June, the latest sign the economy is rebounding powerfully from the pandemic recession. Triple A says This may be the second highest July 4th travel holiday on record about 48 million of us will be on the road or in the air. The triple A's Andrew Gross. The empty roads of the past year are kind of over there. If you choose to leave, like on a Thursday afternoon or Friday afternoon, which is the time we recommend you don't leave, but if you do, you will be facing traffic jams around major metropolitan areas. The U. S military left Bagram airbase in Afghanistan as the U. S winds down its war there. These are Charles de la Decima, A district administrator says the American departure was done overnight without any coordination with local officials. And as a result, dozens of local looters stormed through the unprotected gates before Afghan forces are again control. I'm.

Abdullah Saeed Rita Foley Florida Ed Donahue Ben Duval Taliban Tuesday 850,000 jobs June Friday afternoon Thursday afternoon July 4th Bagram Afghanistan Don Gentry eastern Caribbean Andrew Gross 40 years first hurricane Elsa
China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

BBC World Service

01:26 min | 1 year ago

China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

"Let's talk about big big news in China launched with great fanfare as well, and it's a Leading the news there, apparently lots of lots of happy cartoon images of Children on CCTV, the main broadcaster on the news agencies, and so on. This is because China has announced a major policy shift to the current limits on couples having Children. A member. A few years ago, the notorious one child policy became a two child policy. Well. Now families can have three. This is off the back of recent data showing an 18% decline in birth, which is the slowest population growth since the early 19 sixties. Which kind of suggests that the two child policy didn't really have any effect. So what effect is the three child policy? Gonna have someone who knows all about this has spent years researching The family policies of the Chinese government, is senior lecturer at King's College London doctor yet knew who joins us Now, first off what's the motivation for the government of doing this other worried about a demographic problem in the future? Absolutely the two child policy on announced really quickly as response to the seventh population. Sensor data just mentioned that China has the most dramatic drop in birth rate for 18%. Scenes 2019, So this is a really kind of desperate attempt to dress Demographic crisis in the years to come.

China Cctv Chinese Government King's College London
Christian College Offers Online Course on Global Warming

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Christian College Offers Online Course on Global Warming

"Brian webb wants more conservative. Christians get involved in climate action to is really missing the ball on this. We are not actively engaging with what is one of the most complicated and important issues facing humanity. Today web is the sustainability director at houghton college a small christian college in new york state this spring. He's teaching an online class. Called god and climate change that helps. Christians engage with global warming to reach people who may be skeptical. the course starts with the common ground. Faith this idea of god made the world and called it. Good this idea. Jesus says that the two most important things you can do is love god and love your neighbors. Well how are we loving. God if we are intentionally disregarding and trashing the world that he has made and how are we love our neighbors if we're not proactively working to care for the ways that they're being impacted by the climate crisis. The course also includes climate science and features guest lecturers who are experts in their fields. Houghton college is made the class available to the public for free and web says when it ends. The class recordings will be available online. The topic is too important to not get it out there in front of people as widely as possible.

Brian Webb Houghton College A Small Chris New York Jesus Houghton College
The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

The 3:59

05:19 min | 2 years ago

The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

"Following. It's the second part of our four part interview with martin cooper inventor the phone. I'm roger chang and this is your daily charge or one of the issues. I've talked a lot about on this podcast and seen that in general the issue of the digital divide. I know you talked about that near the tail. Ender near the second part of your books. I'd love to get your perspective on really the deserve holistic impact of the cell phone and whether or not it's been a force for good in how it's been a force for good in closing that broadband gap that digital divide. We'll just think about this routers The whole educational system has been challenged today because the teacher gets up and gives a lecture and he's talking to a bunch of students if they're connected if they have smartphones they have access to all the knowledge the world the shakers not gonna give them information that they can find words so the whole nature of what a teacher is changes. The teacher now teaches people how to reach out for of religion. How to handle it. Taylor's educative process to individuals that having a lecturer to talk a people each different girl every other person. So we discover that what the result of this is that people's minds the challenge borden. They did before and the result of that. Is it their brains. Get bigger thinking smarter. Just think about that. Now that in this country one of the most advanced countries not in the world but in history forty percent of the students in this country do not have access to broadband wireless forty percent. Just imagine what that means over long term when the educational process chain that we end up with forty percent of the population with bigger brains. They're smarter or sixty percent and forty percent are dummies unacceptable with Broadband wireless now as essential to people as water food. So somehow that problems got to get fixed at the moment. The government is not digging right approaches. The only way to do that is through a first of all accept the fact this is essential and go to the carriers people have exclusive use of a spectrum and tell them either. You service all of the public or we're going to allow other people to do it. The technology exists to provide students with robin wireless whereas littlest cyber ten dollars a month. At that level everybody can have access to the but semi were we have to remove moves us exit seventy two big guys t verizon d mobile. They're doing a great job for the dense areas for the city's suburbs. They are not to have good job for the rural areas. They are after a good job for the people that can't afford a sixty dollars a month for a cellphone. The technology exists to do the both of those legs to handle people that can't afford into the rural areas and it's up to the government now to do figure out ways for business to provide those two kinds of services. We have to have one hundred percent accessibility for students and ultimately for everybody. Because i i'm so delighted you read the book because you know that it's not just education it's healthcare we're all going to be ultimately connected have have our bodily characteristics measured continually. There is the potential that we can anticipate diseases in people before they happen. Just because we're measuring things continually so healthcare is going to be a revolution. You can't provide after one segment of the public but public and keep it from other people so between those two issues education healthier and then you get the most important wall in. That's what your profession is is. Collaboration is getting people to talk to each other to generate ideas to people who are always more creative corporate than one person but of you got people talking to each other groups independent of time independent of where they are the potential for improving the productivity of people will be such that the idea of poverty will disappear. There's going to be enough for everybody. There is no reason why everybody can't be wealthy announced. Never worry about food or housing and everybody can't downs. The education served there.

Roger Chang Martin Cooper Ender Robin Wireless Borden Taylor Verizon
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | 2 years ago

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | 2 years ago

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
"lecturer" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

The Social Work Routes Podcast

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

"All right welcome to social work routes on your host. Chris clark from the university of helsinki. And i'm really pleased to welcome. Dr cassandra little today. She's a lecturer at fresno state university in california as well as fresno pacific university. So welcome cassandra thank you. Could you tell us a little bit about your your background your identity.

cassandra Chris clark california fresno pacific university today fresno state university of helsinki
Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 2 years ago

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

"Et. al say was up the fire nation. And what's something that you believe about becoming successful. Most people disagree with many believe nothing. In order to be successful. You need only passion for good idea but the reality is much more ashen is one. Listen gregan except enough in order to be a real success through. I really do need passion for the idea. That's obvious determination. Focus and patients most successful business. People who have been more abuses. I'd be there are many obstacles. one has to overcome great something new. You know especially if you are the first thing that feed over. The cost of my life is great. Tree comes owning the factory business which is a former finance. Each company was unique in the first of its kind in the seed amount of projection. One gets from new ideas. These enormous one doesn't believe in his or her idea. More than one hundred percent simply wants work in any new ideas. I you have to educate the market which is very hard are always suspicious affinity new then you have to persuade the investors. The people around view and the list goes on and on. You feel you're going up in most of the times you'll be a low and the loneliness is very hard to accept. Stein goes on in get more experienced. Then it becomes easier and you learn to build on and fix your mistakes from the negative remarks. Along the way you'll be enriched for capricorn's like me into his naturally because rare. Houston it's always about enforce. There's a lot that i want to focus on throughout this entire interview fire nation. But the one thing i wanna pull out about. What a alger said is patients. I mean all of them were brilliant but patients. It is such as something that today. I see more than ever people. Just don't have an seems like the younger generation. The less patience. I have so many people all the time coming up and saying. Hey john like. I've been doing this for two months and i'm not seeing any returns. Think any success and like it's been two months. Where's your patients. Where's your persistence. Wears your you gotta keep at that thing. Fire nation so in doing some research on ual. I saw that you were chosen to be a mentor at the harvard. Business school of. I mean this is top of the top. Why were you chosen. I was invited to comment there at harvard. Business school interpreters enterpreneurial program during two thousand thirteen. I spent on her the per person recognized and identified the Me after by lifestyle Lecture action lecturer. I approach the Was approaching the podium and the right the way after are presenting center students raise their hand. Us meet who is interpreting. Though i had my lecture plan i wanted to follow with students entering pro in prague improvise and said without hesitation that was born today or over the world is it potentially becoming in their furniture but the system. We live in prohibits most of them to become one why because of the barriers that society puts in front of us when the baby was born starts to crotone tone touching breaking things. The current say. Don't do that then. He's babies go through nursery and school and approach daily by new regulations of what they could or couldn't do then that news when they grow and enrolling through diversities and then it lasts. Even when they get married they fiend. The rules are filed on them. The handcuffs are placed on their hands and brains is additional rules imposed or their lives better directed in buxton through what they can't do this. Fact of life interferes in some Sometimes sabres independence and free thoughts of many of us. So my advice to you all. I said to be group is right. Now get hold of the keys. And i threw the keys to them. Release the handcuffs. Allow your brain to think without restrictions feel free to go with any idea thought you may have even if it seems ridiculous or unrealistic at the moment. Thank your dreams to the limit and interpret noor within. You will erupt like the genie out of the bottle. One hundred forty students stood up and they're up with laughter. I knew then but they got the message. I love that genie in a bottle analogy. I mean fire nation. Can't you just picture that. I mean it is such a great analogy. It's so true and it's something that you need to be striving towards and forward

Gregan Harvard Stein AL UAL Houston Prague John United States
Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:17 min | 2 years ago

Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

"Welcome to healthcare business. Secrets show where we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominated the markets you can live from the best and can w revenue w impact and w time off and this episode was speaking. Joel can joel. Otherwise known as america's healthy hot dog is a graduate of the university of michigan. School of medicine is a clinical professor of medicine at wayne state university school of medicine a frequent lecturer and author on topics of vegan nutrition health heart disease reversal and has written several books about alternative nutrition and hothouse. He's had been a guest and commentator amy. Tv shows podcasts. Magazines m practices at the concept of a cardiac longevity is very unpracticed in michigan. Welcome to the show joe. Thank you so much excited to share with the audience. Yeah so i wanted to kind of give out with some background on you. And and how you got into the space because you've kind of gone down a different role than maybe stanford medicine and things teaches. Unfortunately not because of any time in the in the slammer or any problems with my license in a somewhat thoughtful various er- pigeon Course but i grew up in detroit michigan Talking now from the suburb in detroit michigan attended university in ann arbor. Michigan graduated top of my class medical school. But i knew from about a swallow wanted to be a heart moved to dallas moved to kansas city out and training with the best skills and particularly treating heart attacks with angioplasty instead. You have some wonderfully people from australia. New zealand in the my mentor in kansas city was from all actually a dislike from new zealand allah but when visit i'll be of the difference between the do another very different entry but nineteen ninety way before you were born. I imagine or at least run it. I join back in detroit. Michigan big practice. And i was the guy running a night treating sick people coronary Cardiac cath lab artists. But i was even back then very interested in the other part the About our of health which is prevention nutrition. Lifestyles sleep stress. Nutraceutical supplements the whole thing. Much more light perhaps naturopathy and chiropractic. So i was always reading on my own incorporating little tidbits been using coenzyme q ten of people for thirty years my college or and then i'll percolating along as very happy guy got a chance to look down to. The university mentioned developed a preventive cardiology program. But i knew that there was something else that i really had an energy for something else. I mean that was doing wonderful. Things are day is the same thing every day. When wonderful big over i went back to university in two thousand twelve a whole year doing a university based courses integrative cardiology natural gas and pretty much nutrition thing adnan stunning that for decades. But i didn't know all the nutraceutical isn't about chemistry testing and the epa genetics and the protonix and we can use fancy words. I graduated and of course. I say in traditional practice but i ultimately with some thought took a big breath five years ago and says you know what i've done enough cath lab emergencies. That mouse running three hassles on the weekend alone. A great practice. I one focus on prevention and i looked around the country. I could barely find in the united states preventive cardiology practice. That was not attuned to only prescription. Drugs are printing preventive cardiology practices more precision more prescription. I wanted to about more health lifestyle disease reversal. I gleaned from various people what i could kinda created a model. I left the insurance system. You wanna have a sleepless night. As a physician who's always had a whole room full of baylor's and medicare and blue cross as we call in the united states and others and tell people in the city of detroit that is not beverly hills los angeles by a reasonably prosperous busy city with auto industry. But i don't take insurance. I can't even take your insurance them out of the system and launched in five years ago and yes. There's always challenges. My tears thought that maybe. I did. Have alcohol rounds. Drug problem slices. Is he doing all as they didn't understand. It has been the best decision. I don't think would have been as meaningful if i didn't pay the price. All those years of doing traditional medicine I'm respected because know what heart catheterization angioplasty bypass Medications use them when needed by I'm very much dedicate myself as upstream cardiologists. I'm the salmon trying to go upstream. Everybody else is going the other direction. But there's a lot of people out there and you know. I i'm sure for practice that are looking or a different path. They're just tired and they feel tired too many drugs too. Many ten minute appointments with dr the game now. It's a good nurse or a physician since i've provided alternative of time education a different approach. And it's so gratifying. Amin that i'm sixty one years old. I don't know what the word retires. Because i love what i do day after day today

Detroit Michigan Wayne State University School Kansas City New Zealand University Of Michigan United States School Of Medicine Joel Heart Disease Ann Arbor Heart Attacks AMY JOE Dallas Adnan Australia EPA
The Power of Humor

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:18 min | 2 years ago

The Power of Humor

"Jennifer occur a named by donuts or a professor and lecturer respectively at the stanford graduate school of business. They've just written a book called humor seriously so gentle. Why don't we start by well. Why don't you start by telling me the value of humor in the workplace. I in leadership when people use humor at work the are twenty three percent more respected and are seen as more competent and more confident. It doesn't even need to be good humor. Just not inappropriate humor. The bar is so low and for employee retention employees. Read their bosses. As having a sense of humor any sense of humor they were to be fifteen percent more satisfied and engaged in their jobs and even in sales studies show that people pay on average eighteen percent more if the seller includes a lighthearted line as part of their final offer like my final offer is x. And i'll throw in my pet frog again. The humor doesn't have to be good and just anything. So what do you think is the cost of not using humor. If you're recuperation well not only would it reduce creativity it also reduces engagement and retention so the koster significant All right so. I was thinking to myself as i read this book. If i was a corporation or a senior manager in a corporation and i was thinking i was wondering what the return on investment might be and i think touched on a couple of things. Creativity better relationships with clients productivity. Is there any other other any other things that you could think of. That would provide a decent return on investment for an investment in humor for companies. So just to be clear you want more than retention innovation leadership selling products. You want more from us. Pat coty. we'll give you another one. We'll give you a health that the cost of of health mental wellbeing physical wellbeing are enormous for companies and humor actually makes you not only healthier. It makes you live longer so one. Large-scale norwegian study conducted over the course of fifteen years. Found that people with a sense of humor. Happy thirty percent better chance of survival if severe disease strikes and they live eight years longer so laughter literally makes us more physically. Resilient has bottom line effects for companies. I know. I've met so many people in my career my careers in fact who are just not fans of humor that like look i just wanna do. My job paid and go home. But how do you deal. If you're a manager. How do you deal with someone. Who has that kind of vibe and feeling about them. Well you're hitting on one of costello's biggest pieces of advice the former. Ceo of twitter. Dick says if you wanna have more humor at work. Don't tell jokes. Don't try to be funny. Just look for more reasons to laugh. It's this idea of actually being human not about being humorous And this is the reality is right now that this is more important than ever because you know our work is much more technology mediated and therefore the harder it is to be to bring out our humanity and a sense of humor at work we subconsciously adopt to our medium and we're constantly communicating through technology. It's easy to sound like a robot so it's more really in a way it's more by sense of humor than being funny absolutely and it's also about being more generous with laughter so not trying to be funny just looking for moments to laugh generously and the entire texture of life changes when you're able to live this way And another thing that we try and tell people to do is to try and create small moments of joy for someone else and especially. If you're having trouble finding it in your own life right now just looked to create a little moment for someone and it can be a really small gesture not a joke by changing your virtual background to a picture from fun shared experience or You know leaving a nice posted on your fridge for the person that you cohabitate with But this focus on creating joy for someone else help. Take the pressure off. You know. I need to be funny. I need to look funny myself. And it's more about. How can i focus on someone else in. Elevate them

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Pat Coty Severe Disease Strikes Donuts Jennifer Costello Dick Twitter
"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I want to add to that right after he met US Baltimore Paul came down with very serious life threatening illnesses and it really threatened his life. Our dream. What it solidified our friendship. We really sort of rallied around Paul because he had this dream, And yet he was really hitting a big bump in the road and he came through it and we were just very elated that it was going to be on again. And the pandemic kit. Right Cove. It And yet we had already sort of been through tested by the fire, whether we were going to be a band or not. And we soldier through and what Baltimore Paul's goal was his toe end 2020. You know, everybody was saying, Oh, I can't wait to get over 2020. Our view was We were gonna end 2020 on a high note, not a low note. Baltimore. Paul O'Sullivan, Um, you're feeling better. Your music instructor Yes and Pennsylvania Paul I mostly retired, I guess or unemployed. I'm not sure which is which and I'm told Manchester Paul's a former college lecturer who now works in public health and follow Sullivan in Rotterdam. God blesses a grief counselor. Yeah, they're really dear dear people. Absolutely. We hit the name twin lottery with these guys. Hello Sullivan In Baltimore, Paul O'Sullivan of Pennsylvania, both members of the four member Paul O'Sullivan band. Gentlemen. Thanks So.

Manchester Paul Paul O'Sullivan Baltimore Sullivan Right Cove Pennsylvania Rotterdam instructor lecturer Um
"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Right after he met US Baltimore Paul came down with very serious life threatening illnesses and it really threatened his life. Our dream. What it solidified our friendship. We really sort of rallied around Paul because he had this dream, and yet he was really hitting a big bump in the road. And he came through it and we were just very elated that it was going to be on again and the pandemic kit Right Cove. It And yet we had already sort of been through tested by the fire, whether we were going to be a band or not, and we soldier through and what Baltimore Paul's goal was his toe end 2020 You know, everybody was saying, Oh, I can't wait to get over 2020. Our view was We were gonna end 2020 on a high note, Not a low note. Baltimore Paul O'Sullivan. Um you're feeling better. Your music instructor? Yes. And Pennsylvania, Paul I mostly retired, I guess or unemployed. I'm not sure which is which and I'm told Manchester Paul's, a former college lecturer who now works in public Health and Paul O'Sullivan in Rotterdam. God blesses a grief counselor. Yeah, they're really dear dear people. Absolutely. We hit the name twin lottery with these guys. Hello Sullivan In Baltimore, Paul O'Sullivan of Pennsylvania, both members of the four member Paul O'Sullivan band. Gentlemen. Thanks so much for speaking with us,.

Manchester Paul Paul O'Sullivan Baltimore Pennsylvania Rotterdam Sullivan instructor lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Professor Epstein thruster of lot and why you Lost School Senior Lecturer University of Chicago right after the Loves Listen to podcasts on this show at Dan puff show dot com. Lifeboats. Com You can instantly compare the rates of 30 leading life insurance companies and have the freedom to buy from the company of your choice. Life insurance rates are now at all time lows. So this is a great time to shop for life insurance. For example, a healthy male age 40 can now apply for $500,000 of term life insurance for $17 per month. Females pay even less. Are you carrying enough life insurance for your loved one's life quotes recommends at least 10 times your annual earnings as a minimum or $300,000. If you're a stay at home caregiver. Getting life insurance quotes that life quotes dot com takes only seconds It's online, private and convenient visit life quotes dot com today to see how much you could save or call 806 40 life. That's 806 40. L I f E 806 40 l i f e or go to life coach dot com. For more information that's life quotes dot com today to see how much you could save 806 40 life. Everybody. We want to invite you to join Dennis Prager and Mike Gallagher for a travel opportunity. That may be the highlight of your year. We're headed back to Israel in October. 2021 for a 10 day stand with Israel. Tour of the key sites and best place is meant to give you an unprecedented view of the world You've likely only read or heard about. If you've ever dreamed of seeing is real. This is your opportunity Registered today worry free with no cancelation fees until May 8th call 855565 55 19 or book online that stand with Israel tour dot com. Okay. First time we read this commercial. He got one. So I had to get one. And we're both in love with this product. The glass chair Matt by the Trotta. They're unbelievable. Know that junkie plastic chairman under your office chair or at home piece of garbage? It's the ugliest thing in your office that draws a glass chair mats are beautiful, durable. Each one will support over £1000. So they'll even hold me They've got a lifetime warranty and the way you feel rolling over smooth glass instead of cheap, crackling plastic. It's like working in a million dollar office..

"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Tisch professor of law and why you Lost Cool. Senior lecturer at University of Chicago as well. We're discussing his sort of common carrier concept for regulating Thebes dominant tech companies. I don't want to call them big tax wanna demagoguery, But But, you know, I take the point that we left off last hour. What about the idea of treating the big tech companies? There I go. Thies marketplaces as a lunch counter rather than as a common carrier, so you don't have to get into the question of whether or not their monopolies you just say these are public places of accommodation, and those they need to abide anti discrimination laws, just like the lunch counter does. Well, it turns out I'm not a fan of the anti discrimination laws applied for lunch counters or anything else. Indeed, one of the great difficulties with respect to the civil rights laws is that the anti discrimination norm that they start to develop was originally done in response to common carriers. And then what it does is it gets extended to a competitive industries. And the real danger of doing this is that these kinds of activities of regulating companies or presumptively a bad and you have to have some good reason to do it. If their many, many places that you can go to hear I'm not in favor of the regulations, so that give you an illustration. You take a guy like Josh Holy, who gets into trouble on the Senate floor, and Simon is just decides to pull his book that may be a breach of contract action. But I think it would be dangerous beyond below belief to say that every publishing company in the United States has to publish the title they don't want and what happens is regularly comes along with his will publish that book, and then they write over a piece of the Wall Street Journal. And Holy gets more publicity. So when you've got lots of alternatives, you don't want to do that. And going back to the race question. I've never been in favor of the Civil Rights Act. And so far as they applied competitive employment market. One of the things that happens when you try to do that is you kill off all sorts of affirmative action programs with your Columbine principal, and you also create this huge government bureaucracy, which is going to tell everybody what kind of things you have to provide us to see whether or not you're hiring the right people in the right kind of way, So I'm going to bite this particular bullet. And to say, I'm not going to flinch when you throw the race card to the sex card in my direction, I think, in effect that these industries weren't quite well by themselves. And indeed, if there's any problem that one has within industry today, eyes that if anything, they bend over in the other direction, and they're so as it were woken the way in which they feel things that they're overt discrimination is against the very groups who was thought to be in some sense, Dominant, but really or not, So I think the lunch counter example goes exactly the opposite way. So then you go to the Southern case, and I think it's him. Point to do that. Why is that different from a lunch counter today? Because if somebody sat down on the lunch content, try to integrate it. They'd be shocked by the KKK or the local police..

Josh Holy Senior lecturer professor of law University of Chicago Wall Street Journal United States Senate principal Simon
"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Welcome back to the dam prop show in the question as to what to do with Big Tech. Is there a regulatory framework that is consistent with conservative free market oriented principles but addresses some of the excesses, particularly the area of viewpoint discrimination? Of the big tech companies in the wake of the purging we've seen going on over the last several weeks. Well much longer than that, or perhaps most pronounced in the last couple of weeks after what occurred at the Capitol, the riding that occurred at the Capitol on January 6th very good interview over the weekend in the Wall Street Journal getting input from famed law professor Richard Epstein. You talked a little bit about it with the Mercatus Center's Adam Thierer. And now we're pleased to be able to talk to the man himself about his thoughts on it. Richard Epstein, the he is the Peter and Kirsten better for senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He's the Laurence A. Tisch, professor of law at N. Y. U Law School and a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago. Professor Epstein. Thanks so much for joining us again Appreciate it. It's always my pleasure. So the idea of treating big tech companies like common carriers like railroads or public utilities explain Why you think that is a path forward? First of all, one has to understand the old scheme of regulation in order to understand the new one, And the basic point is a common carrier in the pure case is somebody for whom there is no alternative service. This system of rate regulation started in very simple context on Ben. The question is doing the race when you get to big tech. Makes is somewhat different problem. You're not worried about rates because most of them offer their services for free. It's clear that none of these particular companies have a monopoly. The sense that the only one who supply information but if you kind of look at the distribution, what you see is there maybe three or four of these common carrier type operations that transfer the bulk of the information and the word non discriminatory, which started with respect to rates. You can't play thing, which seems to apply to this particular point. And so this is not necessarily that their government actors, although some people claim that what it is, is that, given their power than on discrimination view He's affect the appropriate one. It wouldn't they are you though, that prepare your comparison? The common carriers, All we're doing is eliminating the scoundrels were not the people that are right. Yes, well, the answer is that's the question all the people who being thrown off the networks like the drugs to try to get on the airplane is the simplest way to put it. And the answer is no. They're doing much more than that. Because what has happened is they've taken the notion of Information off Ford and the notion of coercion and extended them to simply unacceptable level. So if you hear somebody like a Twitter saying well or Facebook, saying, we're not going to give anybody the right to express something on health care policy covert policy unless it's consistent with what the WHL is, what you're doing is you're completely upending the system the whole point of a free system. Did you have people in authority and learning people allowed to disagree with them? And what you do is you silence their voices. You're giving exactly the life you should be able to ban. Somebody was going to say that Snake oil would called kill cancer. But I think on areas which have contested and subject the serious discussion, it's utterly improper to ban these people. And then you get to somebody like Donald Trump. The man was, you know a person unto himself, And he said many things that are not only regrettable but indefensible. But he it is a question of proportionality, and my sense is that they wanted to shut down that tweet. They wanted to remove that tweet. They probably be within their rights. But if they want to say you can't say anything about anything for the rest of your life, then it seems to me that they're denying him access. Well, the argument goes well, They're conservative network that you could put up this gap. This part the one of the things that we discovered is that the people who control the dominant networks Also control the APP stores on the applications and all the various linkages so that these guys have a very, very hard time getting started. So if you're talking about an industry with three or four dominant players, which is the kind of operative definition of what counts is a monopoly today, and you've got gap with 1% Impala with 2% and so forth. Those are not effective alternatives unless they can grow themselves. Hopefully, they will be allowed to grow themselves. But ironically there stop by the very companies whose dominant positions and operations and so what you need to do is essentially say they could on Lee kick people off the cause, and course has to be narrowly defined. It has to be overtly defamatory of somebody, or it has to be probably coercive and then the remedy has to be narrowed. So that you can't ban somebody for life or for very long time because of one indiscretion. I mean, I'm not a fan of Donald Trump, although I voted for him in this last time, But 80 million people want to listen to him and the idea that you can shut him off. While Joe Biden gets a free audience is exactly what we don't want in this world and given their dominant position, we should do it. When you call somebody big tech, which is the word that you were using big oil and so forth. There's always a little bit of demagoguery and that we don't like these people, so we're just blast him. But there's also an implicit public regulation that the industry concentrations are high enough that the quote competitive processes may not work as well as they do. In the other circumstances, especially perfectly clear the one thing Okay, go ahead. The first best solution is to encourage new entry so you could avoid some of these difficulties. But that doesn't seem likely. Today s so when we come back, I want to explore whether or not we can get around the predicate question of whether or not their monopolies More with Professor Richard Epstein, who is Hoover Institution professor of law and why you lost school Senior Lecturer University of Chicago will be right back getting good grades. I wish she was more you listen more, you'll know this is this is the dance profit.

Professor Richard Epstein Big Tech Donald Trump Hoover Institution professor of law Wall Street Journal Mercatus Center professor Adam Thierer Senior Lecturer University of University of Chicago senior lecturer Joe Biden Twitter senior fellow Laurence A. Tisch Ford
"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Unless it's rob lecturer who's in there? It's Friday Could be Sean Gallagher Haven't seen anybody else because I haven't left the room Protocols Mask and Martin izing and sanitizing and everything else. Nine First 20 FORECAST 17 tonight Sunshine 33 for Your Saturday 37 Sunday rain and snow, maybe new accumulations of less than maybe a half inch, So it's It's nothing. It's enough snow to complain, whine and cry about it not enough to do anything with And I feel bad. I have a buddy of mine in a cousin actually is in the business, too. They do like landscaping stuff. And then in the winter time they push no and drop ice melt down. And, uh, these little things they make a little bit of money, but they need to push some snow and get paid. So not only what I like to be able to dick around and play with my snow blower. I want them to be able to go out. Make some money. I mean, just on principle. It's But for everybody, I guess you know, virtual school anymore. It's not like anybody can do this. No dance and think they're gonna get to stay home with no school. Those kids If you diss crude when I was a kid that you actually had snow days now they're like no. You've been doing it at home for the pandemic. So enjoy the snow. Now get your work done. It's misery. Sean Gallagher's got your 10 30 port will come back. We'll talk on mega millions and what you do with it. Would you buy into the Reds? Would you say like Jeff has who is producing the show? Jakarta's I would say Here's some money. Let's sign Trevor Bauer. What would you do with the mega millions, It is to jump to a billion dollars. I am not in it. I cannot win it. I'm sure I did not have the numbers in my head. Anyhow, I would've hit auto pick and then and you're just like you. Did I win. That's another game. I don't understand. People do. It's like, you know, and hey, here's the numbers. Did you win? No. On my brain. I can't handle it. Let's make sense of some other stuff. News time. Come back. What would you do with the billion dollars? If you one mega millions, We'll talk on the insurrection and boy, I've got some good email on that and lots more to do Glad you're along. On a Friday night Sterling 700 wlw. News, traffic and Weather news radio 700 WLW Cincinnati Push for more covert relief with the 10 30 report.

Sean Gallagher wlw lecturer Trevor Bauer Martin izing Reds Jakarta Jeff
"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To meet. That was Virginia of idea. Nothin talking from the Indian capital, New Delhi. The time is coming up to 11 minutes past seven GMT we have with us as I mentioned throughout the program. Two guests. Remmy Adekoya, Polish Nigerian writer and politics lecturer and Kristina O'Donoghue, as well as a writer novelist, is head of the family policy unit at the Center for Social Justice based here in London. I've bean looking at your new book, Remmy called Bi Racial Britain and you talked earlier about the importance of not being embittered by experience of racism, but Goodness. Some of the people whose stories you tell in that book have reason to be bitter, Haven't they? Off course that's true on. Unfortunately, this applies to many people. Too many people in in Britain if we're talking about Britain right now on in the Western world, I wanted to write a book, which explored how mixed race Britain's navigate race and identity into 21st century baby, though I also spoke to people who grew up essentially mostly in the 20th century, So the oldest person I interviewed for the book was 73. The youngest person will. Six. What was very important to me was to show this story from various perspectives. So to talkto festival mixed race people of different racial configurations because when we talk about mixed race people, we often think about people like me. So people who had one black parent on one white parent, but there's a whole variety off configurations out there. There's people who are mixed Indian English. There's people who are Jamaican Pakistani. There's all sorts of mix is out there and I wanted to talk about this. I wanted to show this story also, how peop Will experience race in Britain in very different parts of the country on do as I expected, the stories were varied. The stories were buried. There was racism that definitely but there's also people who have more positive stories on it's really It's really It's really a mixed picture. What was really important to me was not to sort of come out with this, you know, top down grand narrative. About. You know how I think Race works in this country, but toe like I say, speak to regular people on see exactly what they say. So I'm hoping if I if I can pick out sorry. Yeah, sure. If I could pick out one thing from your personal experience that that you highlight yourself, it's How early you were aware of the pressure to identify as black rather than white in your youth, A Ziff, you know if you if you said, if you thought of yourself as a as a white person, you you were somehow denying your heritage. Yes, definitely sort of psychology of the black white relationship is extremely complicated on volatile on it's been shaped essentially by the history of slavery, colonialism, Andres ism on so there's very sort off a sensitive feelings among black people. For how, for instance, mixed race people who are mixed black white identify, so historically, there were instances and given many instances in history off Mixed black white people, especially those light skin, trying to distance themselves from blackness. Okay in various in various parts of the world that used to happen on so today if the mixed race person who is my mixed mixed block wide, you know, talk emphasizes. They're mixed Race nest, for instance. Then there will be black people who see this at all. What you're trying to do is dissention. So from blackness. You think you're better than us? Perhaps because you are like the skin or you're even supporting colorism. You are de facto actually sanctioning white supremacy on so you know, mixed black on People have to navigate these sort of very volatile terrain on try to, you know, at the one time acknowledge the fact that look I may have actually a white mom while we have the white father, But, you know, I identify also with black so that there's all those kinds of pressures there on that kind of pressure to, you know, see who you are. So to speak. It comes from that tribal mindset which essentially human beings have human beings like to know where you belong. Okay where you belong. Which camp? Are you in? Which tribe by you in so I can identify you and sort of put you in a box on when you're mixed race. We muddy the waters. Okay on people. I'm not sure. So you know, where does this guy's loyalty actually lie? You know, she with them, or he stay with us. And just briefly confused by the mixed race by racial is the future in a country like Britain. Where I think the reckoning is that the current of the current rate of mixed marriage ng and having mixed race Children 75% of the population by 21 50 is going to be bi racial. Exactly. And I mentioned this in various orbiting so by the end of this century, at least a third of the population is expected to be mixed race because of the rates of interracial marriage on because of the simple fact that technically wants a mixed race person gets married to any sort of person. The offspring is mixed. Race s So in my case, my wife is Nigerian 100% Nigerian, but our child is going to be mixed race. I'm so does there's there's millions of us already in here in Britain and in the Western world, and this has, I think allowed us and this has emboldened the people I spoke to in the book to actually try and talk about the experience is simply how they wear and talk about race as it is one of the things which were which I often hear said about ratio in Britain is that we don't discuss race enough. I disagree. I think the problem is that we don't discuss race honestly enough. Kristina or Jonas. Sorry I want to bring in Kristina. Here, Talk, read play. That's your latest audio book. It sounds like the sermon to home schooling parents. Um, it's not for homeschooling parents only, but but sure they can..

Britain Kristina O'Donoghue Remmy Adekoya Virginia New Delhi Center for Social Justice writer London Andres ism colorism lecturer Jonas
How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

Short Wave

03:33 min | 2 years ago

How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

"Okay thomas we are talking about apple's today. Why don't you tell our listeners. Even got started down this weird little apple path so a few weeks ago i saw video of a dude eating apple from the bottom. And you know. I it up to the pitch me and at the time all i wanted to find out from the team was whom amongst us was with me in eating the entire. It was just way to start to get the conversation going. Yeah i remember. And i was horrified to find out so many members of our team eat the whole apple. We were pretty divided down the middle. Yeah that's right and the discussion led to the possible dangers of eating the apple seeds. Some of us had heard they might be toxic. Some of us hadn't so here we are chatting away about them apples and the science behind whether or not you can eat the core why we are here. Today is pretty cool. Yeah totally and i found a food. Scientists to help explain it all could also My name is islami outs. For last shoddy. I am senior lecturer in the department of food. Science outsider jackets ally investment technology. Islamia is a few scientists beast in nigeria and she told me on the one hand apples. Are these magical fruits. That are really nutritious. And good for you apple's Poplar fruits us are reaching nutrients such as anti oxidants minera house vitamese dietary fiber is an auditor nutrients but their seats are different than their flesh. Yeah exactly what i'd always heard. Is that apple. Seeds have like some amount of cyanide in them you know like generally not something that is good for humans i mean yes and no i asked islam yacht to explain it and it's a little more complicated seeds that is in the center of harpool copy above causing poisoning because the seed contains it compounds. That is called. I mean. I lean mick. Dolan is a compound that's found and lots of natural plants and things that humans eat such as apples but also peaches apricots and almonds. They're is a similar compound and cassava he staple in nigeria and on its own mattie in seeds a midland is usually harmless to people no concerns there but what is potentially concerning is when digestive enzymes in our bodies come in contact with the michelin and when they combine the enzyme breaks away the sugars in the dylan and leaves cyanide which could potentially lead to cyanide poisoning. What do you mean. Potentially thomas say more. Well the conditions have to be just right mattie for this to be more of a concern for starters the midland in apple seeds is encased by pretty tough outer layer in order to expose them make the land to our digestive enzymes have to chew those seeds really really. Well okay i get it and even whole eating monsters like you. Thomas are generally crushing those seeds down to a fine pace with your teeth right exactly. Mattie as much as i love that tidal more importantly though there's not enough apple seeds in one or two apples to really show in effect on our bodies the amount of cyanide that does get formed if at all our livers are pretty good at filtering out those hawks

Apple Department Of Food Islamia Minera House Nigeria Thomas Dolan Mick Mattie
"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Want to move to America? Despite his fears it Reese Mukhtar Ibrahim has decided Yes, he does. There's something about what Berkeley in particular represents. That's pulling him. Blankly of all is rated The liberal Invest is a center of like, you know, democracy or like protest, So I want to see this for myself. He just found out. He'll be flying out next week in time for the start of the spring semester for the California reports. I'm Chloe Veltman. You know, we wish to keep Sharma Way way That's a gap really no tongue by prayer from the original people of Los Angeles and the Southern Channel Islands. One of the singers you're hearing. It's Cindy Alfie Tray. She's a mama Grandma A Weaver, a writer, a storyteller and a traditional singer. She is a tongue, the descendant of the Salt Water clan and a lecturer at Cal State Long Beach. I talked with her about her new Children's book. It's called What aka the Bird who fell in love with the sun, and it's got a lot of timely message is about community connection and how ego can be dangerous. Sure way. So I noticed that you dedicated the book to your father. Tell us a little bit about him. And was he a storyteller? Oh, jeez. Yeah, he was filled with stories. My father was an abalone diver. And so everything that lived amongst us had a story. The sea week, the Siegels, the water, the sam the sand dollars. Everything had a history and a story and he cherished that That was his way of teaching us. Tongue of a culture and Native American culture in general in California, is erased from the narrative in so many ways, I.

Reese Mukhtar Ibrahim Cindy Alfie Tray California Chloe Veltman Cal State Long Beach America Berkeley Southern Channel Islands Los Angeles Sharma lecturer writer