35 Burst results for "Lecturer"

Texas early voting totals for next week’s election exceed total number of ballots cast during 2016 election

KCBS Radio Midday News

04:46 min | Last month

Texas early voting totals for next week’s election exceed total number of ballots cast during 2016 election

"The early voting numbers continue to be staggering. Texas this morning is reporting early voting totals for next week's election. I've already exceeded the total number of ballots cast during the 2016 presidential election. All those votes have many wondering if the Lone Star state is in play for Joe Biden. To discuss the smart returned to the KCBS bring Central News like to talk with Dr James Hansen, lecturer in the government department at the University of Texas, Austin. Thanks very much for talking to us this morning, so This is assuming that the early voters are leaning left. Well, you know, I think there's an assumption out there that's showing up a little bit in the numbers based on what we're seeing. In the early in the in the voter file on how we mapped out onto this certainly voting. Ah, it looks like right now among voters would primary records Republican Primary voters have shown up about 1% less And they did in 2016 for early voting among Democratic primary voters. Ah, turnout is about a point and a half. So we're seeing a slight democratic advantage. I mean, I think the A realist. You here is that we've got about almost 45% of the vote. Or people that either have no primary election voting history or no voting history in Texas at all, and that's a big chunk of voters about whom it's hard to make predictions. The fewer Republicans mailing in their vote right now is that because you think they believe what the president has been saying about the dangers of mail in voting Well, what I should say, You know, this is all in person. Early voting mail in voting in Texas. Is highly restricted its other piece with fairly tight voting laws in Texas, So I think if you want if you wantto vote by mail in Texas, you have to be over 65 or have some kind of a qualifying disability. So these are all voters. They're they're turning out in person. I think with the big part of the drop and Republican voting is that Republicans tend in Texas as elsewhere to wait until election Day to vote. We know from pulling we've done for the University of Texas Texas tradition Pole That the level of concern about the threat posed by the pandemic despite the current rise in infections here, um You are not very high among Republicans. They're considerably lower than among Democrats. And so I think you know what it looks like. A this point is that Republicans are not consuming if you will, the safety offered by an extended early voting period in Texas. And we're going to see a pretty big Republican turnout on election day. So let's say Texas is leaning toward the left. I mean, we won't know more until next week, but Why is that happening? I mean, what has pushed Texas that direction is a California is moving there is that anti trump feeling what's happening? Well, I think it's no one thing. I think that Democrats are highly mobilized, um, in opposition to President Trump here, and there's there's just no doubt about that. There. Good job. His negative ratings among Democrats among Democrats in our polling is consistently in the nineties. It suddenly high. It's very intense. We're also seeing a period in which the Democratic Party here is coming out of the wilderness. Democrats haven't won a statewide election here since 19. Our since 1990 they have been, you know, ah, permanent, seemingly permanent majority or minority across the board since 2002 when the Republicans took over the state legislature. And we've seen a lot of a lot of organizing going on here in a lot of effort that is fueled by both opposition to President Trump and two demographic changes here. That have that have moved a lot more Democrats into into areas previously occupied primarily by Republicans in the suburbs. That's fueling both competitive races of the congressional state legislative races level. And you know that's adding to the bike to the mobile on providing here fascinating story in Texas right now, thanks for talking to us. Appreciate it that is Dr James Hansen. He's a lecture in the government Department of the University of Texas

Texas University Of Texas Texas University Of Texas Dr James Hansen President Trump Government Department Joe Biden Austin Democratic Party Lecturer California
Dr. Timothy Johnston On Taking Your Customer Service To The Next Level

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

05:26 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Timothy Johnston On Taking Your Customer Service To The Next Level

"A Nice Guy Community welcome back. Welcome back. It is strict on today and you are in for a treat today not just because I'm sitting in for Doug, it's also because I get to talk to Dr Timothy Johnston and award award-winning businessman lecturer published author in dental trade journals his business or dental center is the recipient of several prestigious awards is known for its excellent customer service Yod local community. He is a professional member of numerous Dental Association's personally received the Healthcare Heroes Award, and before you go running the other way because you know you hear dentist let me tell you. We're not talking just about Dennis today. Dr Johnson is also an international bestselling author of Ring Bell for service. He has some brilliant insights into succeeding in any business that depends on customer service. How are you doing today Dr Johnston I'm just fine. Thanks. Thanks for having me in absolutely absolutely, and you know we talk a lot about customer service on the Nice guys on business obviously as a dentist, it's Kinda critical isn't it? It really is and this is interview is not meant to really pertain so much the dental office because I've been doing that for years but one else I've learned from being. In terms of in terms of everything, but really what it means to be a dentist and take that experience. So to speak. I love that and again, your book. Ring Bell for service. It has some really really great insights and I'm sure lots of great ideas that you have realized over thirty years in business So the first one I wanted to touch on that you bring up in the book is, why is the customer not always right? It goes without saying that the customer is not always right. The thing that makes it stand out so much to me is when a customer client customer or anybody comes in and thinks he knows you, he thinks that his his take on the world is what's driving the whole thing. For example guy comes into my office. This is in a chapter in my book and before I can even. Kevin brought to the back. He stands up and he says I need to talk to the doctor right away. And I'm walking Brown and I hear this I step out and I'd say who I am Dr Johnston and I'll be seeing you come back this way we talk about if you like he has no, I need you to come out here. So I, walk out in the waiting room on it I stand there he goes I need to talk to you for minute about this TV. So I look in on TV is just a commercial again you the. Commercial. I don't understand it's commercial for something, and if you WANNA, come back, we could talk about not discuss it in front of these other patients here. He has not before this commercial. This was tuned to Fox News and I cannot believe you're playing Fox News. I said Ob size it today it's Fox. News. Tomorrow could be discovery channel the next day and might be you know who knows what? It's something different every day my receptionist controls it's not me. It's just whatever it is. I. Said if backup Santa Surprise that it's not the discovery channel because we we subscribe to that too and four days out of five of seems to be tuned into something dental. So but either as May. Come back. We'll talk about your needs and everything is going to go on and he says, no, you don't understand I could not possibly be a part of this in a dental office from someone who is preaching as politics out to everybody else. At this point I had to make a decision was this going to be a lifetime relationship with this guy or was it gonna be hi and bye because if I decided to keep them on to story for live longer and I was going to bend my ways to make him you know, yes, I could change the channel but if I was gonna bend over backwards to make this one person. Happy. was that going to be what my my position was going to be for the day? And you know flash of lightning ever only happens about once every five years I said well, you know what? If that's your position you can see the door right there. And he looked at me and he looked over behind him with the door said, wait a minute and might be the straight. You gotta let a perfectly good patient go because you won't change the TV station has no no, I'll just let you go but I won't let these perfectly good patients go. Ooh, good answer. I thought it was just a flash of lay. It just came to me and he turn on his heels and he huffed and puffed and slam the doors and Audi went, and there was two people sitting there in the waiting room. They were both patients of mine for years and they both looked at me at applauded me lately it likes to say good job Tim good job. So my point is you can't be everything to everybody the customer is not always right. We hear that time and time again, the customer's always right the customer's always right. But in reality I have to make my plans for ninety nine percent of the audience in for the one percent I've gotta them go and it was some of the best decisions I've ever made I've done it maybe five times in my life. I've been in practice for thirty thirty one years. It's a rare thing but we don't click with somebody really don't click and that's the times when I have to say you know what you're out of here and this is one of those times.

Dr Timothy Johnston Ring Bell Dental Association Dr Johnson Healthcare Heroes Award Dennis Fox News Lecturer Doug Audi Kevin TIM Brown Santa
Anger as Brazil revokes mangrove protection regulations

BBC Newshour

04:05 min | 2 months ago

Anger as Brazil revokes mangrove protection regulations

"Is ill and the environment. Now the government has revoked regulations that protect tropical mangroves and other fragile coastal ecosystems. Environmental groups say the removal of permanent protection zones will allow property developers to clear large areas of mangrove for tourism. To speak to Dr Raymond Ward, He's principal lecturers specializing in coastal environments at the university off Brighton. Here in England. He's worked in Brazil for 10 years studying ecosystems. Welcome to the program. First of all, what do you make of what the Brazilian government has decided to do? Well, it's not really a surprise the current federal environment minister, Hey, Carlos. Alice has been trying to do this for ever since the government came into power, but I completely agree with what you said the I mean, this is going to have a massive, substantial impact. On coastal systems, particularly on mangroves. But before before we talk about the the impact it's goingto make. Just tell us why mangroves are so important. Mangroves provide a wide range of ecosystem services. They provide protection against sea level rise. They store huge amounts of carbon much more than any other terrestrial. Ah, ecosystem. And they also provide protection from climate change related impact. Such a storm surges and they support a range of different Ah, jobs, for example, fisheries because they provide on excellent nursery habitat for commercially important fish species. So is it the case that all mangoes had been protected until now? Yeah, Mangroves have been protected in Brazil. They've been protected through the forest code, which is been a very well written Ah, legislation protecting mangroves. Another important ecosystems on that protection. Being taken away will mean what now what's going to be the direct impact and will it happen immediately? Yeah, I think immediately there will be in the near future. There will be a rapids degradation and losses of mangroves, particularly as a result, conversion tio agriculture and tourism related activities such as building hotels in the suchlike on DH That will have what kind of impact I mean, we're talking about. Structures that don't exist there at the moment, so it's just going to be a major intervention. Yes. Oh, I mean, the clearing of the mangroves means that you're no longer able to those those those mangroves will not look no longer be there to support those important fish species that will have a knock on effect on Local fisheries, particularly in the northeast of Brazil, where there's ah large man people engaged in subsistence fisheries as well as commercial fisheries. What argument do you have against those people who inside the government and others, too? Who would argue that relaxing these protection laws simply means that the coastline is being opened up for Economic activity and making that coastline viable in that way. I mean, ecosystem services means money, basically. So that's those parts of the system that offer some form of, for example, coastal protection. If you don't have the mangroves there, you have to pay for coastal protection. If you don't have the support for the fisheries, then you have to find some other economic engagement for those people that are in the coast life so obviously that there's a wide range of literature that saying that the bang grease off billion dollars Ah, ecosystem services every year If you convert those suddenly Tio two shrimp farms, for example, or hotels. You're not gonna have that same level. Of economic

Dr Raymond Ward Brazilian Government Brazil England Brighton Alice
Woman killed in Boston elevator accident identified as Carrie O’Connor

WBZ Midday News

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Woman killed in Boston elevator accident identified as Carrie O’Connor

"Of an an elevator elevator involved involved in in that that deadly deadly crash crash accident accident in in Allston Allston might might result result in in some some answers answers about about how how a a young young woman woman was was crushed crushed to to death death inside. inside. Carrie Carrie O'Connor O'Connor was was a a lecturer lecturer at at Boston Boston University and yesterday she was just moving into our new apartment when the accident happened. Neighbor Llegan scores, Oni says another resident had just helped O'Connor load a large box into the elevator, and they heard screams like he thinks happened was she either trying to put the box on Four went on with box and the box was calling up to hit something and that started moving and she either panicked and went to jump off or panicked and didn't stay on. O'Connor had a PhD in French studies. She was due to lecture at BU this semester. Medical examiner ruling her cause of death as traumatic asphyxiation. 1 36

Carrie Carrie O'connor O'conno Allston Allston Boston Boston University Lecturer
Boston University teacher killed in elevator accident

WBZ Morning News

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Boston University teacher killed in elevator accident

"Police have now identified the victim in a deadly elevator accident in Allston apartment building. 38 year old Carrie O'Connor, a fulltime lecturer at Boston University, was killed. While trying to load a large package either onto or off the ancient elevator at her home on Commonwealth Avenue

Carrie O'connor Boston University Lecturer
Boston University professor crushed to death in elevator accident

Radio From Hell

01:28 min | 2 months ago

Boston University professor crushed to death in elevator accident

"Ah, Boston University professor was crushed to death by an elevator in her apartment building. When it suddenly dropped, trapping her between floors. What my wife saw was the lady's arms like hanging on to her package. Oh, said building resident Eric Carmichael. Hey, describing the evening of horror that killed French lecturer carry O'Connor, a man who witnessed the accident had to be rushed to the hospital for trauma. I I heard someone That was bringing in a package out in the hallway and then I heard ungodly Scream, said resident Lea Answer Cause scores Oni We ran into the hallway. We saw a gentleman who was obviously in distress. He was screaming and hyperventilating, saying she's dead. She's dead scores only told CBS that the man who witnessed the accident was helping O'Connor that the woman who was crushed With a box into the building, and he was going up the stairs and he had told her Hey, be careful because you have to pull the door across and then step in and then press the button of the of the elevator. If you have something in their it contributor a sensor, she said of the lift, which she described his old fashioned. The witness believes that whatever O'Connor was trying to get in there, hit the censor, and that started the elevator moving the elevators. Roof was visible from the lobby after the

O'connor Eric Carmichael Lea Answer Boston University Professor Lecturer CBS
Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | 2 months ago

Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

"Today we're talking about a trail-blazing political activist and educator. She was the first black woman to be a member of a oral cabinet in New York City and the only woman on the administrative committee for the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. Let's talk about Anna. Arnold. Henchmen. Anna was born in eighteen ninety nine in Marshall Town. Iowa. Her family later moved to a NOCA- where they were the only black family in the community. In Nineteen Eighteen Anna graduated from high school and enrolled in Hamline University. It was there that she heard a lecture by w e boys and was inspired to pursue a career in education. In nineteen twenty two Anna was the first African American to graduate from HER UNIVERSITY After graduation unable to find a teaching job in Saint Paul Public schools because she was black and found a teaching job but historically, black school in Mississippi called Rust College. On her train ride down south to her new job in Mississippi Anna, had her first experience with Jim. Crow segregation laws a train conductor told her that when the train reached Illinois had to sit in the overcrowded colored section and not in the dining car white people sat. Anna spent two years at rust college before turning to Minnesota. Unable to find a teaching job after once again, facing racial discrimination, she switched careers. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and became an executive director of the black. Branch of the Young Women's Christian, association or the YWCA. She continued her executive role for twelve years helping to develop various international programs and education. In nineteen thirty, three Anna married folk musician merit a henchman. In nineteen forty, four Anna was appointed executive director at the F. E. P. C.. The national. Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee. She spearheaded the fight against employment discrimination. From nineteen, fifty, four to nineteen fifty eat anna served in the cabinet of Robert F Wagner Junior then New York mayor. She was the first african-american and first female member of a mayoral cabinet. For the next few years she worked in a variety of roles including as a columnist as well as as a public relations consultant. In one thousand, nine, fifty, three Anna spent three months in India as next leader for the State Department. She also unsuccessfully ran for Congress in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty and for New York City Council president in Nineteen. Sixty five. One of Anna's most famous feats was her role in the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington. We hold these choose to be self-evident. That, all men are created. Was the only woman on the administrative committee working with civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, junior, Bayard Reston. And Eighth Phillip Randolph. Mobilize people to attend to arrange transportation logistics and to organize food and water for attendees fell on Anna's pleat because King Randolph and the other men she wrote for carrying on all of their regular responsibilities and it was difficult to get them to the meetings. Shortly before the march. Anna was angry when she saw that no women were included as speakers instead randolph was planning to briefly mention some black women activists in his speech although Anna strongly urged for women to be included a speakers on the program her calls were largely dismissed. In the end as a compromise, daisy beats was allowed to speak at the end of the march but her allotted speech time was significantly shorter than all the other male speakers. Anna later captured in her autobiography a moment during the March as she sat in front of the steps of the Lincoln. Memorial. I thought of the one, hundred, eighty, thousand Negro soldiers and the twenty nine thousand black seamen who had moved in at the crucial moment to win the war and save the fragile union she wrote. Most of the two hundred and fifty thousand people present could not know of these men for the history books available to Americans have failed to record their story. In the Nineteen Seventies Anna continued her work as an author and lecturer in the US and abroad. She wrote two books about her life's work. The trumpet of sounds in Nineteen, sixty four and the gift of chaos in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven. Anna was honored for her working race relations by various organizations throughout her life and was awarded honorary doctorate degrees from both Howard and Hamline University's. She also received the Pioneer Woman Award in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three from the New York State Conference on Midlife and older women. Anna died in nineteen ninety she was ninety years old.

Anna New York City Hamline University Rust College Executive Director Washington Permanent Fair Employment Prac Arnold New York City Council Mississippi Phillip Randolph Robert F Wagner Junior Iowa Congress New York State Minnesota Marshall Town Illinois Executive United States
Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

Secular Buddhism

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances.

Buddhist Meditation Dr Sarah Shah Dr. Sarah University Of Oxford Manchester University KIM Faculty Member Nicola Cindy Lecturer
The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:02 min | 3 months ago

The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

"Now. What is it like? Every year you have a new batch of of students coming on board and they all want to connect to your network I mean what's the? What's the reality of that situation from a security point of view It is a lot of prep-work over the summertime, a lot of you know repair and refine and and. You know replace things that aren't doing well, and then when you know we get about two weeks out from classes starting. which this year is September second. So we're kind of in that zone right now. That's where we're making sure that everything is working. In it in. Its, optimum. Capacity and capability. Following that it's you know let's continue planning for whatever is going to happen next you know we the spring term winter spring term in in January this past year and nobody anticipated. Kobe I I'm not. You know I'm sure that there was an -ticipant because the the fun part of that is we actually did a pandemic tabletop exercise in the division of Information Technology, which is the central a unit on campus. We do that path the fall of twenty and eighteen. So we hit already kind of work through some of the. You know the communications challenges and the organizational challenges so when it came time to do. The transition from online or from in person courses to online courses, we were able to do that in very short time and that included transitioning thirty seven hundred core courses. From in person delivery to online delivery so that really served you well, I and it was the preparation time and it was the understanding. Of what we would need to do and it was also, you know checking those channels you know. I've done some business continuity work in my in my pass and a business continuity plan to just never exercise it's not a plan. It's a bunch of on paper so So we were able to walk through and validate that and that's the kind of work we do during the school year. And we take our you know kind of slowdown period so. Beginning summer you know everybody takes a deep breath and then we exhaling get back to work you know Sometime during the summer I like to encourage my my team to have a little bit of time off. But when September goes in and the students arrive we, we try to work really hard to get him through and then we take it the winter holidays. What what kinds of things are you and your team defending against who? Who's WHO's coming at your network? You know it's the usual array of Fred actors You know think about the things that research is doing. You know we're we're doing. A lot of research in the area of Koga right now, and it's just. Be We have the capability. We have the expertise we have the researchers at want to do that. But we also have school medicine in public health. We also have a school of Nursing School of Pharmacy. So healthcare education is important in that has just a treasure trove highly valuable. Information in it. But we do engineering work, and some of that work is is patentable work. So that's probably attractive We do a lot of business influenced work. we have data science institute which is trying to figure out the the better ways to understand. You know the the magic acronyms of a I in L.. Artificial intelligence. Machine. Learning. And and that's that's attractive information not only that forty four, thousand students twenty three, thousand staff that's a treasure trove of marketable information. You know I always wonder you know someone in a situation like yours where certainly you're going to have some students and I'm thinking of Oh I don't know folks in computer science and other sorts of places who were going to look at you know the the campus system or the university system as you know their own personal playground there that. you know they're gonNA WANNA, test their own skills against yours. I mean I is that an annual thing and and how do you? How do you? How do you not be adversarial? How do you support You know the educational aspects of of those students while still keeping things up and running what's your approach to those sorts of things? Well. So I we we are establishing some really good partnerships with with the Academy with the the the professors and researchers that are interested in studying the cybersecurity arts and sciences. we've had a relationship with the information school. is They're they're part of the College of letters and Sciences and now they're part of what's been amalgam is as the the School of Computing. Data. And Information Studies so CDs. In in in doing that, I, mean, the partnership is if it's data and if it's doing things if it's you know working or arresting or or if it's needing to be analyzed, we have people that are very much interested and so I've had my my department be intentional about establishing those greater relationships we have you know researchers doing anything from identity access. Management Research to data analytics to cybersecurity metrics and then we have others on campus that are doing great work in high throughput. Computing Great Work in in you know engineering the the next greatest you know computer technologies. In other side trips we had We have a researcher that is working on, Thomas Vehicle. Research you know and there's an awful lot of cyber in there too so. Having those kind of relationships is the the real multiplier here, and this is not unusual by the way for university. This is nothing super special. We're doing it's just that You know there's a, there's a lot of cybersecurity programs out there where there you know NSA certified Center for Academic Excellence. Certified and we're GONNA. Get there eventually. I believe But right now we're just supporting the researchers in the courses are being taught. Sue I myself have been a guest lecturer in a one of the business school courses. It has an information security course as part of its core. That's been fun. I enjoy doing. I did a little bit of that as an adjunct University part of my coming here.

Researcher Nursing School Of Pharmacy College Of Letters And Science School Of Computing Koga Kobe Guest Lecturer Fred NSA Thomas Vehicle Center For Academic Excellence
Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

Papa Phd Podcast

05:11 min | 3 months ago

Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

"I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network.

Moon Israel Australia Danny National Organization For Migr Supervisor Pakistan Corona Beastie Germany Philippines UN Europe Cairo South Korea Brazil. Rio.
The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:50 min | 3 months ago

The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

"Self proclaimed alcohol self esteem anxiety reduction expert, and a clinical hypnotherapist, and today we are to no one's surprise talking about alcohol. Specifically, we are getting into the emotional issues that can come up when alcohol is used as a coping mechanism. Hello Twenty twenty, the different personality traits that come with drinking including the perfectionist, the people pleaser and the inner critic. Finally, we're discussing why the all or nothing. Mentality that comes with dieting also applies to both food and alcohol why it's so detrimental, and then why cutting out alcohol completely will not really solve all of the issues of the casual drinker and then Georgia is giving us some practical tips on what you can do to both get out of the all or nothing mentality when it comes to drinking, and then what you can also say to people if you're more of the people pleaser mentality. I WanNa know more about how you became a self-proclaimed like alcohol self esteem and anxiety reduction expert and a clinical hypnotherapist. show. Well I I'm fifty four now. But. Many years ago when my late twenties I had. One could set with breakdown. Berlow. self-esteem. Overweight. Pretty miserable attracting the wrong guy and I was very aware that I didn't like myself so. I, Ran, away. To a health bomb went to the travel agent and I said the travel agent I want to go on holiday on my online. I WanNa, know who I am. She can look to a bit of a widows and I said. I need to go somewhere where there's no cocktails with is no crazy kind of food that will make me feel more crazy. So the worst place, one place in Australia. In Queensland and I flew on a plane up there and I lived in this in the middle of a rainforest a two weeks where we went into. Therapy basically and I've never done anything like this before. So but what was really interesting about being in this environment? was there people who really beautiful enslaved some rich had beautiful families and I could walk out why they were there because. Everything. That got you know slim bodies money. And it turned out that we all have. Different lives but the same thing was that we over crap about ourselves bicycling. So I left that not knowing the answers but understanding that I wanted to find them. And I came across a book. Add Up to share this particular. I'm theory with with with you at this book. Really literally an Cliche. But it changed my life. My mother is a therapist and I open this book and wanted to know malls. So I went to California and I studied this incredible psychology theory. And then my grandmother's British. So our went on to London and I trained to be clinical hypnotherapist and that kind of. happened organically because I met a friend I was in those days you call that a secretary working. In. An office and I met this woman hugh had been hypnotized to help her give birth. The pain control, but that's interesting. and. So I just. Something about it kind really productive. My my is so I applied for college in in Europe One of the biggest college. And I trained to make the Clinton therapist. And so I decided that was going to. It was like falling in love. It's a really weird description but. I realized that it was something had to do just. But along the way when I was training I was working with friends on wasn't charging anybody and were getting really good results but I was combining it waived my psychology training. And then the college in Botany back to become a lecturer for them. So used to teach in the universities hypnosis for many years and. I. Just as I soul. Students blow some I was hypnotized myself and getting some great results and unrealized one of my problems was. Because, I didn't like myself. I thought was because it was a bad person of considerable people thought. It was. A permanent stress in my life

Twenty Twenty Georgia Australia Europe Hugh Queensland Botany Secretary California London Lecturer
Leaf botany: Silicon

On The Ledge

06:53 min | 3 months ago

Leaf botany: Silicon

"Me ask you a question what is in the night off. Probably, most of us would say, when asked this question? Might be we'd say Kaban maybe we'd say water. Nutrients. Silos. But I think very few of, US would mention silicon and yet silicon can make up. To, ten percent over leafs dry mass. The what exactly is silicon on? What role does it play in the life of leaves? In this third part of my occasional leaf botany series, I'm joined by applauds ecologists that spent a lot of her career finding out what silicon is all about my name's Julia Cook. Planned to colleges of myself as a plant functional color just because I'm interested in the role that different spacey's play in Ecosystems I work at the university as a lecturer. So my next year of teaching and research and public outreach. The really super obvious question to stop war exactly is. Silicon is, is sort of coming into its moment beat in terms of plants. So I'm not surprised that you haven't had too much about it, but I hope I hope you willing feature even more. So silicon is one of the elements sits on the periodic table below carbon and it doesn't easily exist just as plain silicon on earth. It's often silica glasses is silica or insulation. So it's as sadistic acid in in water. So it's it's often associated with oxygen, and then when it dissolves, it's it's sort of as component of water, but it's very, very abundant on earth in the in the cross it's the second most abundant element of oxygen silicon oxygen together a silica. Everywhere really do plants contains the uneasy something that's concentrated in particular plant tissues or residual spread around the hope loan. Yes. It is in old plants, but the mountain plants varies enormously. So some plants have have just miniscule amounts whereas others can have. Up Ten percent or even more in their in their plot tissue. So ten percent of their dry mass is a lot this. This is enormous amounts. If you think about how much not uniform Susana plant, the amount of silicon also can really exceed that some of the plants at a really big accumulators things like horse tails you can always feel how grain Ian they are when you run your hands up some some of the and some people actually use them as Sandpiper because they've got so much silica in them. Another family that has leads of silicon as the the grasses, some more than others but most crosses have quite a bit of silicon and sometimes you run your finger class blade and you get a little paper cut. and. That is because the edge of the Cross has a whole lot of little silica deposits on there, and that's designed to as a head of defense to damage the mouth parts of animals and stop animals eating it. But we see that as a paper cut on fingertips. That is amazing. Ten percent that's quite as you say, that's. A lot silicon. So what what, what's the role? Obviously, as you say, some more than others, what was the purpose of the silicon that's in our plants? That's great question because we're still learning about that I guess the simplest way to describe it seems to help plants manage a whole range of stresses. of its its main role seems to be stress alleviation so they is stresses can. Biotic or caused by things that are alive or can the Arctic so coast by by sort of environmental factors. So looking at the the biotech stresses so plants get eaten a lot by animals. And look for ways to or revolved a number of ways to defend themselves in silicon can be very important they for some animals so. Things, like stinging nettles when you get stung busting initial, the sting is essentially a little silica needle that that injects toxin into your skin. So without the Seneca, you probably wouldn't get stung busting missile they can be very abrasive. Surfaces can can be very bryce than damage the mouth parts of insects and possibly mammals. It can be layers of silicon within Leith that prevent animals from cheering all eating them as much as they might if they was nice elegant. So plants he silicon quite a lot as a head of defense and and Somerset is found that once the plant is attacked by Voles, some plants were able to then take up more silicon to protect themselves when they're under attack so it can be judged any juiced defense. On the other side looking at the environmental factors silicon has is shined to help a lot of different stresses I want to stress stress. It can help manage nutrient imbalances. help manage wind stress. Also two things if a plant stressed adding silicon generally helps some is a house plant grow this obviously immediately makes me think of my own selfish world. A think about. Whether I need to worry about the silicon in my plants. In the amount I have seen some fertilize houseplants recently advertising include silicon, making this making big play of this, but he's not something that's worth considering I how plows usually get this in the first place. So that's really interesting that you've change and I don't know if that because people making the fertilizers have appreciated the importance of silicon now owned adding more silicon over there reporting silicon that was always there I'm not sure. Suddenly silicon is applied losses of fertilizer in agricultural systems, particularly in Ross sugarcane where as as crops, harvested and things people removing silicon from the system in deflatingly available silicon. So it's it's becoming increasingly popular as infantilized in terms of. Indoor, plants. There's been a lot of work looking at indoor plant. Specifically I know there's a lot of work looking hydroponics and and sort of indoor plants way. Is Routinely added and very important as I. Think he will also ask how plants a obtained silicon. Plants take up silicon through the roots as dissolved in in the sole solution of the water solutions obviously gathered. And then that goes through the transpiration stream in than is deposited. Ole Throughout the plant often there's more in leaves. Oh, the sheets lays the plants, but they can be high silicon deposits in route sandbar can and woods end all sorts of places in Pont. One

Susana Plant Leafs United States Julia Cook Spacey Lecturer Arctic Pont Somerset IAN
Out of Chicago  IN-DEPTH!

This Week in Photo

05:46 min | 3 months ago

Out of Chicago IN-DEPTH!

"Able to the back to another episode of this week in photo. I. Am your host Frederik van Johnson today. I'm sitting down with my friend and fellow Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Chris and I. Talk about the latest out of Chicago Conference and how that win is pivot virtual all that stuff, and then how how he's planning to move forward in the future amidst this whole sort of sea change in the conference space. Chris. Math. Welcome to the show man how you doing. I'm great. Thank you Frederick great to be here. Thank you very much. Is Good to have you on man I'm excited to chat with you for a lot of reasons, some of which will become clear during this conversation but Yeah, that's a cliffhanger. So. Say to chat with you so. For the folks that may not have heard of out of Chicago the conference, what is out of Chicago give us the quick. Elevator Pitch Origin Story of that conference. Sure. So out of Chicago originally was my blog like I think has been like eleven or twelve years now but eventually, we started doing conferences in Chicago. This would have been the seventh annual get together conference downtown Chicago where was this eighth year I don't know but but that was what we did for a long time and then. You know we've. Seen over the years that coming in person all the way to Chicago because people would come from around the country around the world to it that we found that it's better to go. To the destinations where people want to shoot. So we've started now our conferences are around the country we're going to MOAB and Acadia National Park this year and Death Valley next year. So all sorts of different places and really have gotten a little bit away from doing the downtown out of Chicago Conference. But this year we did it online instead and it was fabulous and basically the response we got from everybody was don't go back to how you did it before this is awesome that we can do it. In our pajamas from home, and then you know just just get to see all the general things because because originally the conference was kind of all different. Genres I mean you've been an instructor in the past and we would have portrait people Lindsay Adler, we would have people you know doing landscape we had kind of everything lots of street photography, and now instead it's like, okay, we're GonNa go to the botanic. Garden. And we're just GONNA do flower and garden photography or we're going to like I said, Acadia National Park and when we're doing. Landscapes in creative nature photography. So so that's kind of how we've changed. But yeah, everything's totally different for everyone now right. So yeah. So everything's really changed the last couple of months. Yeah, and it's sort of it's a I. think that change was coming anyway you and I've had offline conversations sort about the state of the of the photo conference in Education Online Education Industry and how that's converging and The old school conferences are the attendance was going to getting lower and lower, and now after this latest adventure with co vid Can't conferences are getting getting canceled and moving online much like yours did yours was able to pivot a lot easier than some of those bigger conferences in my from my external opinion. And you correct me if I'm wrong largely because you'd already built sort of this next generation conference that wasn't, Hey, come check out these massive array of boats that that people spend gazillions of dollars on. Downstairs go to the education. You're kind of flip that on its head. Can you talk about that a little bit sure. So I mean when we decided to run our first photography conference, we were running it and I had never been to a photography conference before I'm like, I don't know what would you do it a photography conference well, you'd go out and shoot. You'd get to hang out. With the you know all these people that you follow online, it's like a really great networking opportunity and yeah, we'll teach them classes too but it was really different especially like a set like eight years ago most places like you come you watch one lecture then stay in watch another lecturer then watch more and go home or whatever, and then go to the trade show or whatever. So What we built was really based around shooting, and so we did a lot of the street photography and the downtown architecture photography in Chicago but. But by switching it that way, it made it a whole lot easier to go virtual. Well, that's kind of ironic because we're doing the shooting but it we didn't have this huge big infrastructure behind. We're just a very small company. I have a few people to help me run it and they're awesome by the way and. Is. A great team that I have and and we were able to it was unbelievable when this all hit and we didn't cancel another conference. We weren't planning on doing this normal out of Chicago conference. We were going to do something that was just architecture. which we weren't able to do of course but. But instead. We said. We've got all these instructors. We had seventy instructors at the thing I said I've got a list of. All these people we could email them immediately, we can ask, Hey, do you WanNa do this while in the best part of it was that they were all stuck at home and so they're like, yeah, I got nothing better to do. So all these years. Yeah. All were like excited about it and I mean it was really it was really meant as something that we wanted to do. But it was also a benefit foot benefit for our instructors who had to cancel all of their workshops I mean, that's I mean that's their livelihood is going around the world teaching, and so we did this instead to help you know cover some of those costs for them that they that they're

Chicago Acadia National Park Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Frederik Van Johnson Instructor Education Online Education Ind Lindsay Adler Frederick Death Valley Lecturer
How To Grow From An Accidental To Intentional Business Nomad

Accelerate Your Business Growth

07:09 min | 3 months ago

How To Grow From An Accidental To Intentional Business Nomad

"My guest today is Kyle Hegarty. Kyle is the managing director of Leadership Nomad, a division of tesl marketing where he focuses on helping companies such as IBM Lufthansa. Jess. An Oracle expand globally. Kyle looks at how companies connect with their customers while focusing on communication sales marketing and management leadership. He has trained thousands of executives is a faculty lecturer for Singapore Management. University. Is a frequent speaker business management conferences around the world. Kyle is the author of of the accidental business. No Matt thanks so much for joining me today. Kyle, thank you so much. You put a lot of pressure now on all of the great guests that you've had in the past so. It is pretty high bar to live up to, but I don't think you'd be here if I didn't think you are going to be able to so. It's all good. Thank you for inviting me absolute. so This whole concept of of being business nomad is interesting for me and. And how you help companies expand globally and one of my questions is really around. A cultural differences. And how a business owner or business person who's starting to to sort of go out there how do they navigate? What seems to be like an invisible language of cultural misunderstandings. Well. That's the big question that I that I try and address in this book and. By the way I'm here in Singapore. So I don't know how many time zones away from from you I am but about fifteen years ago I moved from the United States over to Singapore to help Western companies figure out how they're going to expand cross Southeast Asia and over and over again what I kept seeing was regardless of company size, it could be startup it could be a small business all the way up to the very large companies but all of them seemed to wrestle with some of these invisible cultural differences that you mentioned and I myself did as well APP. In fact, I'm I'm exhibit A.. In terms of making all of these mistakes and I'll give you just one example great showed up hired somebody locally. And was thought we were all on the same page. She spoke English I was speaking English. We signed a contract. and. Then on day one, she just didn't show up. And on to she didn't show up and then day three she dead and this was not an entry level role. This was like a pretty you know I mean, it wasn't a super senior but still you'd think that on day you'd think you shopped the job. And again, it's not the same that people in certain parts the world down do that but it was crystal clear right from the get go. That things were different in different parts of the world expectations were different. What I thought was crystal clear was not crystal clear to other people and that was something that just kept happening on repeat I could I could that this book at Twenty Times the size it is I simply chose a couple of of handful stories here and there, but these obstacles continued to pop up. Even. Companies that are doing the travel most are are a bit stuck these days. We can't get on airplanes as much. We're still facing this stuff because we are on the zoom calls on skype calls we are trying to do these partnership deals. We are expanding potentially into new markets and what I think is absolutely clear communication what the way I approach of business relationship. To me makes perfect sense and what I find over and over again is that that's not the case in other parts of the world. So I wrote this book to tell those stories and to start going down that path to get hopefully to help people avoid these mistakes that just keep happening over and over again. Okay so You gotTa tell me why didn't she shut up what? What was that? What ended up being the story? In this case, she had a sick relative in another in Malaysia. This is in Singapore and Malaysia. You can get over a bridge to cross over to Malaysia. And I love I'm not going to put words into your mouth but. She. Essentially, her excuse was that this obviously, you know family takes precedence which shaw absolutely fine with that. But to me, you would have communicated that and she she showed up and three thinking everything was fine like. This you're not you're fired. And she shot absolutely shocked. Absolutely. Shocked. Another another fascinating example, which is actually really sad We had a whole team in Philippines and this woman would be hired I. Think she was we hired her at a entry level and just when somebody has it and you you just know it I mean this this person was just she was on the ball she just got everything done clients loved her every I mean she was just in a small company she stood out and she got Promoted, and she moved up the food chain very quickly we had plans to actually get her ownership status in and to kind of put her into a managing director track we're invest. We're ready to invest in all this stuff. Storm came through Philippines and knocked the roof off of her family house where she and her mother lived. These monsoons are unfortunately coming in greater frequency. There and the mother decided that this was an almond and forced the entire family to move into the country province where she came from. And without. Second. Thought our point of just up and quit she. I think she gave us a day notice of because. At the age of thirty two, you do what your mother tells you to do, and that was the end of it. And I would bet you today that she is living in a you know in A. I needed third world is is kind of a past term but I mean, you know that she she went in a very different direction because of that and you know where where does that come up in the in the business school lessons?

Kyle Hegarty Singapore Managing Director Malaysia Singapore Management Oracle Business Owner Lecturer IBM Lufthansa Southeast Asia Philippines Twenty Times Matt United States Skype Shaw
Unifying your will with the will of Allah

TMV Podcast

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Unifying your will with the will of Allah

"Blessed to be joined by a very good friend of mine said Sane Machi-. He's an Islamic lecturer he's been studying in. Beirut for some years now. Just an all-round quite and. Inspiring and Kind of God centric Guy I think. So. We've been wanting to do content together and we wanted him through some something with the Muslim viable years now but he's always out studying, and then when he comes, he's kind of like lecturing for a few days and then he's back out. But we were able to find some time. and. We. So. Obviously, you hear the conversation that we have but why I really wanted to get him on is that I think there's like a very unique way in which he talks about God and religion. And it's quite an empowering thing. So like even I remember when we were having the conversation I was thinking back to some lecture gave last year I think when he was in London and I had the same kind of thing where it's also simple and it's all just anchored around God I'm so I so I called them up and I said you know, let's let's your podcast and I want you to kind of talk about some of these things and some things you mentioned your lecture series and whatever else and we had like twenty minutes half we mapped out what we're going to discuss. Item we go into go into record. A couple of days AIDS like over a week weeknights and then he's like I was like, oh, she would just recap what we discussed. It acknowledged freestyler. So he kind of just thought at the conversation and and just saw when I loved it to be honest I'm. Always enjoy his company and conversations with him. And that's that's it really If you did actually, if you do enjoy this podcast there is potential opportunity for us to. Record more with a sane so Why as in like message email will ever ask postal social media tiger us. Last No, and let me know and I will be sure to me because in London for a while very short time I'm going to try and. Getting back in if there is a a decent response from people, so please do. Everything without further ado. Here's my conversation with Hossein. Monkey. Saddam Hussein. Thank you very much for for coming on the podcast I I. Think It's worth people nine the background that you me. Quite a few favours now because a few few years ago I was out in in. Lebanon. Yes, and we would you to meet. It's about three years ago and but three to two or three three years ago and you you flopped I mean I had a car accident. This is the second. Comes on an important. Was that and then you've come to London Tovia from London reason you've come to the under every an we've had like brief moments of being able to meet up and chat and whatever but we haven't sat down like this. longtime common. Yeah. It's quite exciting to be honest So. What, begin wherever you want my i. I think social talk about is in the we've allowed to catch up. But let's specify those part that to one side right. So I think for me when when you said Yes to podcast I thought it'd be interesting to talk about quite a few things. So recent you've been talking about you did an election series into what the Prophets yes and stories from the Koran what was was really interesting and and the stuff that she would we wanna do, oh, we're going to be doing more of, but the year before that you were in London and you delivered ten lectures and it was all kind of shaped around the love of God. Yes. And what was quite striking for me personally was that there was something in because I know you personally as well and I I've known you for for a long time before you were studying and everything else, and maybe we'll do another a whole podcast on on the whole journey has been about nine years almost nine ten years. It's been a long time but but there's there's there was something there is something in the way that you when you talk about God and when you're talking about all of these notions of loving God and really embracing. The spirit of Islam and everything else that this is a a really deeper kind of passion. And belief and almost serenity as well in the way that you kind of talks I wanted to I think if we start with that like. What Okay we approach allies a concept and a as a as a topic as you know our. Creator Moss and everything else What is allow mean to you? That's a big I'm sorry for. Jumping from the great question. So I think. Yes. I do use love as the launchpad to talk about a loss upon down and talk to a law SUPERNOVA. But I think that when a human beings especially in young is. When they think of God or the concept of God even in when it comes to parents for example, because when we're young, we don't fully understand the concept of God, but we see in

London Sane Machi Saddam Hussein London Tovia Beirut Lebanon Hossein
Exapndddd - burst 5

Ubuntu Podcast

01:32 min | 4 months ago

Exapndddd - burst 5

"Stuff. The Toshiba. Lebron Toe was pretty revolutionary at the time. It was a tiny little almost pocket size computer but a proper P. C.. That had a a wacky little mouse on the screen that you could like use your thumb on. Yeah. The touch point was on the side. So I still have my she bretault ct one hundred nice which I bought in nine t nine, hundred, seven on I. Think I got the I got the good one in quite switch had a get brace yourself sixty four megabytes of Ram. And a one hundred and sixty six megahertz Amex processor because the AMEX. Then that was that was what you want Amex stick. With an XTRAC -nology? Yes. Our first family PC after the apple mentioned Amiga was one six, six. AMEX, machines. Yeah. Yeah. The first time I ever saw one of those Toshiba Libretto is doing some work at Sheffield. University and one of the lecturers they had one and I was swooning over this computer. It was so gorgeous. It was like amazing. So yes, phrase sad having a laptop the size of a VHS Cassatt was behind it was it was a good form factor those those are happy days the Proto. Net Book I would. Absolutely r.i.p in piece Toshiba. Next up. Mock. Well in further sight news, Mozilla as announcers axing two hundred, fifty

Toshiba Amex Lebron Toe Mozilla Apple Sheffield
Solving the mental load  update

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:41 min | 4 months ago

Solving the mental load update

"When we first spoke about the mental load on this podcast, there was a fringe cartoon cold. You should've asked that was going viral. It explained the mental load with such clarity that when I first saw it, my reaction was fury. I wanted to. Shift to the ground. It showed a woman with a baby and a hapless male partner who was kind, but needed to be told how to help and it so familiar. So common. So exasperating and so profoundly unfair. Journalist, Tracey spicer new. What I was talking about. It was an absolute lightbulb moment for me, I sir, Clementine, Ford's facebook page. I share with everyone and I knew that went viral swear words and it happened in the time when I realized that my life with my wonderful husband who's fifty fifty with the housework fifty, fifty with the childcare, but it was just the little things. I'm always the one who organizes school holiday care or who takes the time to look after the kids or rangers everyone's Christmas presents or birthday present in his extended family and my extended family. So after reading that I, decided to go on strike in the household so he had to do it drove him Berserk. He said this is crazy. Such little school holiday cared Australia. I said now you know my pain. Jenny talk about the mental load in your life. I think when I saw the catching was like, oh, no added that to my mental learn. About. How often I think about the mental load? That's Jenny Leong amp in New South Wales Parliament I was very lucky and I consider it to be like that. My partner was able to access paid parental leave. So he was the primary care for a significant amount of time and in that case he did take the mental Lloyd and a lot of that was then there that the what's interesting is once we're both Both. Back at work where the default position falls back and the expectation of WHO's supposed to know those things to me. Then you feel like part of it is also all of my being bad feminist because of that because I think then adds another level to it to how much you should make a deal of this or not I noticed the gender dynamic with my. Friends that are in. Relationships, they're both men they quite comfortably into stereotypes, gender roles that old without all of the challenges and the. Doctor Leah. Repent on a lecturer in sociology at the University of, Melbourne. She racist as domestic labor, and this idea of the mental load is her field of expertise. I'm going to start and say a little bit controversial. Say That everyone actually carries the mental load. So some portion of your mental load may go to thinking about your career. Some portion of it may go to thinking about your family and some portion of it may be going to thinking about your personal life and the differences, the balance across men and women. So you could imagine men are spending a lot more of their mental load thinking about how do I advance my career thinking about the day to day challenges of work. That is a very different mental load than who is going to pick up the child from daycare. or WHO's GonNa Organize School holidays or who's doing the housework wise. House a mass. And one leads to economic outcome, career mobility and one is just unpaid sometimes recognized sometimes not recognized labor. And I think that's really the difference. How do we shift the ratio? Definitely does seat more with women the. Yeah, I, K-. So we're all in agreement about that. Absolutely. Absolutely, the balance in terms of unpaid in terms of thinking about the experience is disproportionately shouldered by women. Yes. Absolutely. Once, you get your head around the idea of the mental load. You start seeing it everywhere in the lives of your friends, colleagues, your mother, your self. It. Happens to women in all walks of life and age and six urology, but it seems to hit hardest when there's a baby. So. Now, we have a name for the mental load. But. The problem is naming, it doesn't make it go away. As I was sobbing thinking. I used to be able to manage employees teams. And now I'm too overwhelmed to even manage a grocery list. And more importantly. How did I become the default for every single child care and household tasks for my family? It wasn't supposed to happen to me. This is a road ski shades La, and she's written a book called Fairplay, which is all about fairly distributing the mental load aves marriage nearly ended when her husband center, it takes saying. I'm surprised you didn't get blueberries. She was furious at the assumption that she had gone from high powered lawyer to full-time Default Blueberry shepper. Eight. Knew she had to do something about it? She says, there are a few ways to look the mental load. My favorite was a term from nineteen eighty-seven and American sociologist named Arlene Kaplan. Daniels. coined a term called invisible work. In why like that term so much is because that's the only one that had a modicum of a solution in it. Because I kept thinking to myself. Maybe. Maybe if I can make. Visible all the invisible things I was doing from my home and family for my husband, Seth? Maybe then he would value what I did.

Jenny Leong Partner Tracey Spicer Australia Arlene Kaplan Ford Lloyd Facebook Seth Lecturer New South Wales Daniels. Melbourne LA
Interview With Stephen Lamonby

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

05:11 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Stephen Lamonby

"As an engineer Steven Lamb designed navy torpedoes satellite carrying Rookus oil rigs special effects for Hollywood blockbusters films like saving. Private Ryan. Ryan's just to name. Finding him. So even though homes that earns me the right to get back to my wife and. That's my mission. To. Remove your helmet and tell me Your name. Name is gladiator. I will have my venues. Generous with his time he proved that so many times when he was working at solar giving up his time for free. After the lectures were over. With students who needed that extra tuition, he joined university as a part time lecturer in special effects and mechanical engineering. And he really does turn dry boring lectures because I've definitely sat through some lectures which are quite boring into exciting practical demonstrations. And is it true that you constructed a fake Russian tank and it was used on the streets of Saint Petersburg James Bond movie. Goldeneye? Yes, we did. Yeah. We did that. How did that come about? Because the Russians didn't WanNA. Wheel tank driving over the cobblestones. Smashing cobblestones up around the Mojica Palace. So we built a tank like a kid's toy which rubber tracks and underneath had wheels. So we'll take but not break anything and how did you get into the James Bond movie. To supply. Thanks. Okay, the power of tanks they you got the PUTT supplied. All, the military vehicles for Saving Private Ryan. Was Elvis choice for the James Bond Films. Thank you a sexist misogynist dinosaur relative to. James. WAISTBAND. Like boys with toys. I wouldn't single. Chatting, sophisticated secret agent shaken but not to stir, we're actually by the river. In Winchester as the people won't buy on a sunny August stay. And a lot of people didn't about you. Thank you very much for joining us software pleasure because of that private lunch last year. So perhaps you could set the record straight firstly in what context did you say the words Jewish people are among? The cleverest in the world. It came up in conversation. About Physics I've always an interest since I was a boy in astrophysics. because. I couldn't believe that one hundred years ago almost. Albert Einstein we're talking about such abstract subjects as light being affected by gravity. And he works out the speed of light, which was a phenomenal thing to do in the nineteen twenties. How did this man come to realizations about what actually control the will then what does control the world? And the whole universe that we live in? So. My interest was based on this philosophy. On physics. And when the lady Mico sleater told me that she was a qualified physicist and she was American. It was almost involuntary question for me to Oscar. She was Jewish and again, this was a private lunch at a private lynch over Cup of coffee. Now, it was also reported to say that you said that black men on the privileged needle help that they can get. Yes. I did say that. Because I've worked all over the world of work in Africa I worked in South Africa Mozambique worked in North Africa. And I realized that a lot of people in Africa are culturally disadvantaged. Cheaper to anybody else. But. The coach or they grow up in doesn't give them the advantages that we have in the West. And therefore, I was always prepared to give them extra help. In addition to this, it was reported in the Times by Phillips that you told Dr Burner. Most Nigerians did not have it in their DNA to be engineers. Is this true? Absolutely not true. This was one of the spiteful comments made by my course. Lita. In a fifth of of temper to get me set knowing. It would certainly get me ten. She also alleged other city things. Like that I was a totalitarian. Does, one become a totalitarian over coffee break. Did you say anything about DNA and African students I said nothing about ten not not an area of expertise of mine. I know nothing about it I only know that gets us by the police. In various reports, you read in the papers on I know nothing about DNA.

Africa Ryan Physicist James Bond Times James Bond Films Albert Einstein Dr Burner Winchester Engineer Steven Lamb Mojica Palace James Rookus Lecturer Mico Sleater Saint Petersburg Lita South Africa North Africa
"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 8 months ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a senior lecturer in the school of sports health and exercise science where she ran me through some breathing exercises that will quite grueling and also involved a fair amount of drooling this device can be used to train your inspiration muscles your breathing muscles I'm basically if I take this to Paul this is the valve and you can only breed if you are not files but the way you write to not valve is by putting in a certain amount of effort so it's a bit like blowing up a really hard to believe yes yeah I thought that is a form of breathing muscle training that's one of the original forms of freedom also trade at all schools yes I believe the size yeah yeah that will train your breathing muscles but what we could to try and get you today is thirty breaths what I'm usually gonna date is give you some to shape because so slippery yeah the K. right I think you'll pendants for they should be Kathy but you have to pop up I truly if it is not so easy yes we just got the code tied to simply the exercises I thought we were going to guys like nice relaxing yoga class actually he truly go does flux again key I'd love to see the level big depressing because you can hear the yeah going through the files to the remember just pools and then trying to get rid of me yeah we should bring about the aim of this warm up is to strengthen my breathing muscles the interesting thing is that the reason for doing it isn't just so that you can breathe in and out more powerfully or to make you better at throwing up billions for that matter it actually helps the other muscles in your body to do a better job this kind of a hierarchy in the body as to what areas get blood flow and hence oxygen in the nutrients that we made in the breathing muscles are really important enough so if you'll say you're running ready ready halt and your lexicon I want more oxygen if your breathing muscles Russo saying I want more oxygen your breathing muscles gonna have priority so what happens is they still got blood fly away from your working legs so one of the things that happens with breathing muscle training he's we were chiefs that conflict if you like so you can sort of train your breathing muscles to become more efficient yes and then that means that there's more oxygen available for the rest of your body it's not just about having strong last night and I just have a knock on effects on exercise performance excellent goods so that's the first to go so now I've done my woman time to retest my breathing prowess before the warm up my high school was one for seven that's a bit like the weight I can lift with my in spiritual muscles I thought I was actually pretty good but Mitch told me her high school is over two hundred pool con only get anywhere near that five one okay.

senior lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"lecturer" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Serves as a lecturer to that city's counseling students at Concordia university as well Lainey welcome back how are you I'm good George how are you I'm looking forward to this there is no topic other than dreams that capture so many people's attention all the six how did you get into this I got into it it's kind of like the dreams came to me because I'm a person who has amazing dream recall and I've had that kind of recall my whole life so I think my father started it because when I was a little girl he was the one of the couple that would come into the bedroom and he never ever said to me it's just a dream go back to sleep he used to say good tell me and I would tell him this whole nightmare and then when it was time to go back to bed he would say to me Hey it's time to go back to bed and you gonna say I'm gonna have a nightmare I'm gonna have it I'm ready for it bring it on so there was all this that's very union and he didn't even realize he was doing that but he was welcoming the dream and teaching me to discuss them so it started young and very quickly when I was twenty I had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and not too long after obviously I became depressed and I ended up in psychoanalysis with a brilliant New York Freudian so much so he did probably eighty percent of my cycle analysis through dream interpretation so my introduction to Freud was that I experienced him long before I studied him and I went on to study these different fathers of psychology just because I'm not kind of girl I'd like to I'm like you George when I get onto a subject I get all the way into it and that's kind of what happened on the collective in my approach and I mostly use Freud jung Adler in pearls why do we dream in the first place Laney well and it's it's interesting because I'm hoping to discuss this virus and how it's affecting all of our dreams and the best way to start is to say to you that we are problem solving in our dreams and we felt going deep because I'm happy to go deep but at the first level the dream is the discussion you are having with yourself about a very specific current issue that you're trying to problem solve and that's what the dream is streaming it is only thinking I'm here to bust the mystery you're just talking to yourself and you're speaking in the language of metaphor and what I do is teach the language of metaphor so that we can wipe away the mystery and I'm going to teach you how to uncover what the heck you were saying to yourself when you had what you think is a crazy dream why do some people remember dreams other people don't well there's a physiological reasons because there's a memory trace in your front your the frontal lobe that is not operating at the same capacity when you're asleep as when you're awake so it's more natural not to remember your dreams but some people do and and whether you remember them or you don't we are all dreaming and everybody is problem solving in their dreams and it's just so weird right now because I keep getting dreamer after dreamer after dreamer and when you we uncover the meaning of the dreams it's it's the virus it's everywhere it's including our dreams because he and the most wonderful news I have is the unconscious is not only so sophisticated but it's so positive it's your higher self that you're having a discussion with and the dreams and I'm gonna give you a bunch of examples you from any different scenery each of us are managing we are managing from the messages and encouragement that we are getting from our unconscious so you might think something starts off as a horrible dream lake I don't know if you're aware of Claudia asri she's known as girl with No job and I'm I like to be I'm involved with Instagram I love it there and so I followed her and she discussed with me how she keeps screaming about the Holocaust and thinking that she's dreaming about the Holocaust because she was watching a show on Netflix as she was falling asleep that has to do with the subject of the Holocaust and the and all I don't argue that point that the initial the way that some of the images are realizing your dream most definitely you get some of those images from what happened today well what you were seeing on TV the brain is like a tape recorder is another exactly but I and it and this is a big batch we are so sophisticated that you will not choose an image unless it serves a certain something that you are trying to save yourself and that girl's dream is a beautiful example of what I call rehearsal it's a little rehearsal dreams because if you're practicing what it feels like not to have any control over what's around you same as the whole of the Holocaust you know it was like a life experience where people had absolutely no control over what was going on around them now if you rehearse what it feels like to have no control in your dreams and you rehearse it over and over and over again you know that expression been there done not that's what happens you exercise that muscle and then as you're going through this virus saying you are getting more and more used to not get you'd like that feeling of not having control and why do you get more comfortable with it because you've been doing it for the last whatever week or two or three in your dreams you've been choosing different situations and memories that have to do with having no control and you kind of get used to it and it it desensitizes you plenty let's talk when we come back about why people are under stress and what those dreams can do to help them we'll be back in a moment Lainey.

lecturer Concordia university George
"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Lecturer to that city's counseling students at concordia university as well laney welcome back thank you so much for having me george how was your first experience with us to have fun I did have fun. But I was so tired. so happy to say i had like what feels like a full night's sleep i'm wide awake excellent because you're you're up there on the east and cash it's free o'clock in the morning three going on four so you'll you'll you're going to have a fast day tomorrow when you go back to bed that's getting he how did you get involved in dreams that's so funny and synchronised your we're on we're on target today you and i because before we started i thought to myself maybe i should start with my own experience about what happened injury gms and give you the analysis of the dream so that you can understand where i wear doing i'm i'm i'm a sixty seven and when i was just turned twenty one i had my first of four daughters who was born with down syndrome and so that was forty six years ago and forty six years ago most people didn't take their down's child home the people gave them up and so my doctor because my parents would not advise us one way or the other because they wanted to show that they were supportive in wanted to bring tina home and they will also support if we wanted to give her up with whatever you want to do and so a doctor of mine advice me to give her up and hurry up and go home and get pregnant again forget you ever had her he literally said jeez and not so long after i became depressed understandably and i ended up in the office of an unbelievable freudian analyst who was here in montreal and i wasn't willing able to articulate my feelings in my early twenties but i'm a dreamer and i've always had incredible dream recall and i used to go to the sessions with this rink always with the dream so my first experience with freud was that i experienced him long before i studied him and i started having after about two months there i started having a recurring dream about a freight elevator space without wobbly floor that we all also with and i consider except that i didn't feel like i had my ground literally kind of a a parent or a play on words which we do all the time in our dreams and so It was like a series I kept having this out my freight elevator dreams, and one of the ways that you can find, you know. join your goal is to attach the dream to very specific current issue that triggered that dream that's what i'm going to do with everybody tonight i'm gonna ask you questions to help people tell me what's the situation in your life this week that triggered the dream and for me the wobbly floor was i didn't feel like i had my ground i felt insecure and unhappy and it turned out to be that i didn't like that we gave up tina i didn't like it i had didn't know where she was what institution because somebody else placed her for us we gave we asked them a close family friend to find somewhere but i didn't know where and i knew this thing it wasn't fitting for me i had a baby where is she and maybe worked for somebody else to give the child up but it wasn't working for me and one of the ways that you find a solution is by taking the images of the dream outside into waking life as if it really happened and you decide what what what would you do like what the solution to the freight elevator dream and when i lecture at universities i asked that question and i'll get some people in the room say oh i'd stop the elevator and somebody else will say oh sit down so it stops wobbling gonna do what we're gonna do in the dream state laney is of course talk about all kinds of various dreams that people have lucid dreams pre cognitive dreams solution finding dreams which you're an expert in so one one of the questions laney than i want to ask you is when you get into the solution finding dreams do they come out of medically yeah that's why this is a great example because i took the dream out into waking life and ask myself what is it that i would do what's the solution to the freight elevator dream is to bring people into the dream because if you bring people into the elevator you put a lot of weight on the floor and it stops wobbling and the reason i use the freight elevator is because that in my memory bank which is your unconscious is very rich with material and when i was a little girl i used to go to work with my dad on the weekends and he had a big freight elevator in his office that used to make me a little nervous but i always felt better because my dad was there and i invited my parents to come with me to visit tina and then i brought her back into my life i mean she passed away a few years ago but she was a big part of my life sure and i realized that the solution was to bring tina back into my life and the way to get there was to invite my parents to come with me would make dreams laney so powerful i mean they are very very powerful that was a powerful dream because it changed my whole life with my daughter tina i mean she could have been in an institution forever court so that was one of the first dreams in in do in doing dreaming alice's that made me realize how powerful your dreams are and at the first level we are problem solving something that's bugging you vis week so that that's what triggers the dream is a current event that you are attempting to problem solve.

Lecturer concordia university george forty six years two months
"lecturer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"lecturer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"God. It's Friday now. Stick secular. Truck on the plane. Stains comply just. With pick. Will click. Fluck apply. That keeps the hoes. Become. Of. Lecturer. For business. Fritz chicken their kicking. Cats experts. Play..

Lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"What you do about everything did not being morning i'll recovered berea if i never come back this is where everything dan i'm actually holding the payroll that's what that's what relaxes me to know where everything's covered china well got high cholesterol now so thanks a lot guys for that you called and everything having some kind of brain meltdowns whatever because the you know the whole the whole big spiel i just went on about effective not being a word it's a word here giving you all a spelling lecturer smart in fact it to go and look it up i'm like oh i guess i'm just a big da live my life like that instead of thinking i'm smart hey you really talk down to go vein does that a lot okay okay back the way we speak okay bandaid notice adler is vocabulary has changed i never heard him use the term da either now he's getting manner i earlier in the hall bandaid he would never done that so sorry i'm a rude person now thanks to y'all and i've cholesterol it used to be pretty nicely caught y'all's cholesterol i caught the sugar dude you're pretty young and the attitude and the ad we locked to compete i think we all should bring in our lab reports and see who wins each guy i will say this adler is a head on cholesterol for the total but i'm second i had a bad one the other day.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KCBS All News

"On the traffic leader case all right franken let's check that weather forecast which is not too bad we had a beautiful easter sunday didn't we sunshine blue skies temperatures in the seventies many areas and you can expect pretty much more of the same for tomorrow albeit they're putting partly cloudy skies into the forecast but the daytime highs will be in the sixties and the low seventies once again it'll stay that way till mid week on thursday we start to see some more clouds move in and a slight chance of rain the temperatures however will still be in the sixties and the mid seventies so the start out the work week we're going to be pretty darn nice we may get a few sprinkles as we head toward the end of the week traffic and weather together on the and all news one zero six nine am seven forty kcbs kcbs news time five twenty one pope francis is widely regarded as a religious leader who is not afraid to wade into hot button issues politically nobody he has a noble notably he has called for action on climate change and has struck a softer tone on divorce and homosexuality but university of essex lecturer fredrika genoveva took the time to study the post public statements and she says what she found was part of that there's no more political than his predecessors kcbs john bristow spoke with her research really focused on some bits of the book frances communications and i focused on some of this letters as well as as tweets and you certainly is a very liberal pope and he takes critically important positions on socially contentious issues but he's not more often political than other popes before him certainly not since the nineteen fifties and he sort of follows to some patterns of political communication that popes before him have taken as well so yeah his ideological positions maybe a bit different but pattern ended a timing of is more political messages is not quite so tell us a little more about your actual research into his public statements right so i have been interested in and language really and the words and patterns of words that pope francis it uses when you writes letters suggested a famous climate change in cyclical they came out in that doesn't fifteen or when he tweets a winning sensitive short messages on the.

franken wade university of essex lecturer fredrika genoveva john bristow
"lecturer" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Thirty fourteen that's eight hundred five six nine thirty fourteen again eight hundred five six nine thirty four fourteen reveillard the afforded lecturer newproduct deal couplers would be restricted your idea what a try get a patent the colored that helped thou revelled your confidential let explains every step of the adventure prosperous we create professional but cereals representing your idea submitted to companies were looking for new ideas we have more than nine thousand catholics who agreed to review ideas being confidence if accompanies you'll speakers did manufacturing you adventure we can negotiate on your behalf we have helped over ten thousand clients received patents we also offer services including 3d modeling and animation demonstrating your idea prototyping services and we new state of the art technology to show it vet helpline of ideas to a digital company's joy thousands of people just like you who chose invent help to pursue their idea we are experienced we are working for you we are vet hell colors for free information at one eight hundred six zero seven eighty nine forty five that's one eight hundred six zero seven 89 five again one eight hundred six zero seven eight nine four five dead you roll held him i'll start poses to brew oh my god fulgencio roma roasted coffee invade from mound road convenes richly roasted in filing ground for rate weaken up two two claims from were there too rural toxic world we will have to blast organiser as we believe organically when we walk through the whole thing we do.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"The time no to general is it a problem do you have a problem a rat with your dog's behavior around being on the couch for example when you go and try to sit down on the couch if your dog is already on the couch will they growl lecturer snap or if you try to move your dog off the couch will they growl at eu or snap it you right so in that situation then we may very well want to implement a no couch boundary because the dog is not being cooler on the couch but if there is no problem with it your dog's not doing anything bad around the couch and as long as you have control of the space then there's no reason to not let your dog on the couch it's up to you some people don't want their dog on couches some people like to have their dogs on couch is so that's just you get to say what feels good for you and your home with your dog but it's not this blanket like don't it's bad to let your dog on the couch shrank to general in our house it's cats that regulated whether the dog dramatic gouge and mesa now they keep the dog off the couch area typical that's their spot yeah but that doesn't stop them from taking the dog bed we soon as the dog goes of debris the other back yeah cats cats cats notice this is the dog show that's route i can't people work with 'capi everright different beast harder cast would be harder for a lot of reasons especially hurting them hurting as we all know hurting twer he red eye energia yeah hurting cats.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Also phrase to describe a still travel yet i would say attendances absolutely down like him out there saying ten thousand it even looks lunch the man no way i mean you put in prior years you couldn't even get down the whole way where i've been coming in and out of here no problem all day and it just takes attendance way down even last night at usually it we fill the space for seacock and it was which empty frankly is kind of noise because it's still you guys who are my favorite people coming to town they don't get to see you that often so that i don't have to get through the crowd to see you and i don't have to say hi to a million other people that i see from time to time that don't really like while it it's it's nice for everyone here that is here but not nice for the acu ticket sales these these conferences are expensive and that's definitely a challenge but i let let's move on from attendance to talk about what in a lot of people are talking about now uh since the park shooting is sod is national conversation that we're supposed to be having on god's which is really more a lecturer bob then a conversation but will vote will for this national conversation on guns now you are all ladies yes sir he saw this shooting the find my gender april euromonitor what are your feelings on guns in schools should should teachers or administrators be allowed to have a concealed carry permit and take their gun to school yeah i think the ones that are trains and already are carrying a licence carrying meant gun members earth i've talked to several teachers who said they do want to be able to have because they they care about our children they want to be able to protect our children and they in that's goes with shootings or however they when he could save and they're they're willing to do that and certainly there are some who are not willing to do that and they're terrified of guns but and and you wouldn't know which teachers had the guns in which what it is you know for safety reasons so it is not the point it's a deterrence thing right just.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WLAC

"Message because like why in the world would they have to derive it from lecturer on youtube and they're not being taught that they it's important to develop yourself visit does it bother you that your audience is predominantly male does that isn't is not a bit divisive no i mean stopped short of i just want to go over it was all go over what he just said well he just said that there are many men who are not growing up they are not taking responsibility for their life and that will give their life no meaning they will become bitter resentful vengeful deceitful and alone that's a ticking time bomb okay so what does he say don't shake your finger at them show them that they need to be responsible because they can make their own life worth living all positive there's an incentive there's an incentive he's not just doing it out of out of priority you're doing it because it actually is good for you as well we don't want you to be vengeful resentful deceitful and alone we want you to have meaning in your life and it's it's that you have value but nobody's ever said that to you as he says no would they're not encouraged nobody has and they're and they're coming to him in droves because there's starving four the message listen to the message i am starving for the message that i need to grow up that i need to be responsible that i need to take control of my own life that i can't be a kid for the rest of my life they're starving for that message and she says was nebot divisive aim of what part of that is.

lecturer youtube
"lecturer" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"And do this so it was a bit less abstract and more this is gonna be but in in a seat in front of a direct threat yes it was they've felt very direct and i definitely need its to let the other speaker no and they took it very seriously the they called in the police department in between the police department and the colleges security department day tried to find the source and i knew they wouldn't too because you you can't it's completely anonymous but they just increase the security detail and the police department was there that day and they were great and some people were a little bit on our arrived and i still don't think anything would happen and in the lecturer i call about i said if this if this person moved here you know let's talk because you know i i if sort of encouraged him to do some of the things that were suggested like make wale malaises then throw stuff fateh both slipped now let's give it your best shot and of course t either either he was not there or he thought better of it or was afraid because it was you know pretty sizeable audience stand the cops were there who hate so nothing happened that was that was one time when i felt compelled to follow through and do something about it but usually it's pretty easy for me to ignore i can't really symptom of any of these people who i find just fad wads of hates i can't think of anything they could do or say that that would upset me not that i wanted challenged them bookstores to be here.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"They are the lead they're the ones that lecturer us the you know for example on gun control they're the ones that that sit there in their elite castles when they're gated in with their gated homes and their gated communities with uh armed security and armed personal bodyguards and start telling us how to live our life now they're the same ones that sit there and tell us that the world is going to end and therefore we need to cut back on our lifestyles when they keep expanding their unbelievable rich lifestyles that use way more energy than any of us will ever use and they're lecturing us on how to live our lives we knew they were hypocrites it was obvious to begin with this is just another example of the hypocrisy yeah you know you and i've asked this question in many times of the left what are they truly believe do they truly have any core besides i am a victim now in urine of presser when it comes to a real core belief is at all show there is so much hypocrisy i mean you look at the big issues out there look at the big issues you look at racism that there are always accusing the other side of racism who plays the identity politics who judges everything by skin color they do on climate change that's their pu big issues racism and climate change yet on climate change they lecture us about how the world is going to be destroyed and how we need to change and they live these opulent lifestyle some.

climate change lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Early church and i think it's interesting because as i mentioned at the beginning so many people today are uncharged a religious and but they're still seeking and there's still looking for some kind of an sure as to the meaning of life and direction and why are we here you know the the big questions if you will and i i know in talking in some of the interviews i've done the the attitude tends to be well you know it's like religion as like a guy with a guy with a big book in each beat near the head with it with all these different rules and regulations but this is this might be a way for some people to approach it not from a doctrinal standpoint but more of a historical standpoint no that's exactly right that's i think the the the idea behind the lecturer series is to help people feed it many of our religious beliefs and the christian world or or connected to history and it can act to to what we would call historical fact and this lecture on giving is not going to be a sermon it's not going to be sort of theological or doctrinal in terms of its ross but electron going to be giving is just helping people understand how the new testament was put together in where came from in my mike spring through the air speaking to a lot of different groups both on the academic tied in on a on the church sod that people may have a lot of questions about where the bible came from they they read that they read the bible or parts of it they know about it they they realized that uh it it claimed claim to be god's word by christians but they may think what we're does think come from any way and and watch i think that the way was put together is a reliable way and that a trustworthy that there's the right books in it and so the perfect at his lectures at two on packed on let people know we're not at questions uh at all afraid that you what those issues that those issues have been looked at for many years of there well understood there's a lot of evidence that support for the origins and a has to receive new testament and we just invite people to come out and see what that is in i think from the standpoint.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on KELO

"A lecturer as i was his assistant and some of the uh you know board ended this center dimensional uh uh idea we did try to have uh different approaches to the ah the subject agip never really was it too much into the uh exit terrestrial theory uh he thought the or or was convinced for at least the brief period of time that somehow the the cia was involved in this sort of course they've claimed over the years you know that they they were responsible for a lot of ufo sightings had all but that the that that we can bridge it pretty much a you know a pretty quickly because what are these objects that their coffee about the talking about it'll plays the full the very high altitude and a lot of these reports there are a good percentage of whom are at least where he treetop level or or hovering hovering over a backyard landing in fields that leaving impressionism the ah the ground uh stalking people i i mean it it it got to the point that i was getting phone calls of late at night from people who claimed that these things where a heraf it nam these things i whoever it it it there were polled a guy phenomena uh the word lights going on you know on and off in their home uh their were weird weird found uh in fact i knew somebody ah of a fairly well who had a series of sightings it it started with a object it was hovering across the street in a wooded area they where they live in new jersey and a things started disappearing in their home and we found this thing repeated over and over and over again where things would disappear but they would appear several days.

lecturer agip cia stalking
"lecturer" Discussed on The Longest Shortest Time

The Longest Shortest Time

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on The Longest Shortest Time

"And that's how we got the first sex and classes though that's not what they were called it would be a very special day and the lecturer would come in usually was either a minister or a doctor would come in and explain things to students that brief curriculum is usually supplemented by having somebody on faculty are staff who's in charge of taking individual students aside to talk with them about their sexual habits so in other words one student who gets flagged as a dangerous student maybe she wears her skirt a little high or maybe he has started smoking um they start bringing those students one on one to talk to a counselor in those students are given information generally a lecture about how sex works and why wouldn't should stay away from it and the movement kept going by the early 1920s a more formalised curriculum started being developed for all students regardless of hem length and tada sex education with a capital s was born but it was seen as something that was an unfortunate necessity as opposed to a preferable outcome and and when we talk about sex said in general what topics are we talking about so the early classes it's really geared towards reproduction and that's about it it's really just trying to answer the question of where new life comes from so that for that reason a lot of the early classes are put in um wickets called nature study which is kind of vat imagine biology berry you only talk about things you can see you don't talk about anything that happened to the molecular level on so that version of biology on and i guess life sciences would be the closest that we we call now and in the life science class students would start by watching you know turtles or fish or checks on and then eventually be asked to kind of extrapolate word from their essentially in the classroom setting reproducing reproducing what would have happened in a farm setting you a few decades before.

lecturer
"lecturer" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Responds to your but you really gets a former lecturer with these people who are playing game and as you or you can personally impact the game with your sweet and information that put out there on line um which is actually another element of the game that separates it from a lot of other shows as the voyeurs are huge part of the game watch everything as a happens in they tweet about the show a tweet their opinions their point of view of the events that are occurring about the show as it's happening and then when the nights over the intestines ten reverts winner and they can look at sas and things you exploited and some blair's have learned how they can stir the pot by just tweeting fake information that may not in his crew so it's really interesting to know or is interesting as opposed to wash players you know question you know the things that they see online the but also question it in discussed acl but also believe head at the same time and you know he so conflicted because it's such a intensely face game vat it was just i don't know it's just so overwhelming the sensory overload for them so how difficult is it to produce this show you you do it fairly often it's like well every other month or so yeah i host a shell every other mine i try to be consistent with that sometimes granted there might be like an extra elites brown the last time that i hosted at that i've been pretty consistent at hosting it at least every other month grosso like what's what it what is the process for producing the show like what what are you actually do daytoday to make the show happen.

lecturer blair
"lecturer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"lecturer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"That's how but my heart stores in massachusetts where my often brings renewing going down i knew it will jerry thank you for listening on thank you for calling tonight i hope you'll call again and they want you to know ironically i was i gave a lecture i i was a lecturer today at mit i heard you say that now what you lecture well there was there was a group of business professionals from nearby eighty of them forty of them were from america and about forty them for countries around the world and then people from nigeria today turkey all sorts of folks from different parts of the world and they came here for a program that mit runs every year and part of that was how you as a communications professional dis for folks who were communications professionals at these companies how you interact with the news media and they were three of us who spoke today each of us spoke about an hour at mit this morning and you have to be very smart to go to mit as of course you know but you also cited the very smart just to figure out the campus in mit because no rhyme or reason about any of the building others just me i agree i i will crowley gin and thank you rich in idaho on a whole you up and uvira walkabout jerry it's a pleasure to make your whitens have a great night okay thank you very much now.

massachusetts lecturer america nigeria news media mit idaho mit