35 Burst results for "Lear I"

"lear i" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

07:48 min | Last week

"lear i" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Over three years ago we fantasized about getting the chance to talk to certain showbiz icons but we figured it was mostly a fantasy. Well one of the people on our list is here with us today and we couldn't be more thrilled about it. He's a writer producer director activists and one of the most influential largest in the history of popular culture as a writer. He's created material for dean martin. Jerry lewis danny thomas frank sinatra danny kaye. Bobby darin bob newhart. Dick van dyke and henry fonda to just name you as a producer. He's brought us popular films such jazz divorce american style. Start the revolution without me. The night they raided men skis fried green tomatoes. This is spinal tap. Stand by me and the anti-smoking setire cold turkey which he wrote and directed but it was his work as creator and producer of the groundbreaking series. All in the family. Sanford and son maude. Jeffersons good times. Mary hartman mary hartman. One day at a time and fernwood tonight that reshape. An reinvented television. Comedy and forever change the medium itself in a career spanning seven decades. He's won four emmys been nominated for an oscar and received lifetime achievement awards from both the writers and producers guild of america. He's been honored with a star on the hollywood walk of fame and was one of the first seven and these into the tv eye. Tattoo me hall of fame and in nineteen ninety nine. He was awarded the national medal of arts by president. He's terrific memoir called even vase. I get to experience. And he still working at the tender age of ninety four where pleased to welcome to the podcast Man hoist route to this day. There see his name included on. Richard nixon's enemies dairy norman. Lear and who happened to make it. Also to gilbert godfrey his podcast. Is that the longest central. You've ever receive norman log fucking into in the history of intro. The these interests canosa work is in a bit yari. I hope not at the moment. Although we we would be making a certain gyna- history. Hey tell us about your podcast. You said you were doing one to yes. We started with amy poehler about four weeks ago and i think the last one i did was with kevin bacon. I've had a wonderful time i love. I love gabbing. This is going to be fun. It's a good medium. i can tell already. Okay now now one thing that chip price me about we were looking up self about you and i always thought of usa you know normally or just he's just this ju- liberal and instead. Where did you find. Besides you liberate your like a bad ass. World war two hero. Well i served in world war two and flew Fifty two missions. Actually i did fly fifty two emissions but when they sent me over we were on a mission basis. That meant every time we flew in my case from foce italy. Sometimes we got credit for two missions. So i flew fifty two missions but halfway through my tour of duty they took off the mission basis and put us on a sortie basis. Assorted was every time you dropped. Bombs sometimes on missions we get credit for two emissions. So the statistic. Is i drop bombs thirty five times and flew fifty two missions. I'm an american. So of course i use the larger figure so i flew verity to emissions but drop bombs only thirty five times and you act surely rolled in u Enlisted i mean and the sources. Yeah was in the book that she is a college students. You could have gotten a deferment but you chose not to. Yeah no i chose not to. I wanted to. I wanted to kill the matter of fact my My wife and i flew to visit our friends. The john emerson was the ambassador to germany. For the last several years and john and kimberly and we decided we were in europe. We would visit them if they had room and they could take and they did and we were flying debris lynn and i remembered the one time we bombed relent. I flew out of italy. I was the radio operator and gunner and the radio operator was closest to the bomb bay doors so i was the guy who thirty five times. When we drop bombs looked over and saw the last bomb drop out of the bay. And i was the guy who could notify the pilot that the last bomb had left the bombay and he could close the bomb bay doors so i had the experience of looking down watching our bombs fall out of the bay all those times and then gather with the bombs from the other planes around aside. Be watching hundreds of bombs. And i remember thinking as i'm looking at these bombs from everywhere dropping. Well what if one bomb misses the target and hits a farmhouse and i remembered thinking and i clench my teeth when i say because that's what i was feeling at the time and i and it was screw him. I didn't give a shit then. Some hours later flying back. I remember asking myself if somebody came up to me with a pencil and paper and mr lear. You signed this. You will mean forever that you didn't care if a bomb hit a farmhouse and to my toes believed that i would never sign such a thing never but the fact of my life thank god is that i was never tested. It never happened.

Richard nixon Jerry lewis europe john Mary hartman mary hartman john emerson dean martin thirty five times fifty two emissions fifty two missions kevin bacon gilbert godfrey today two missions two emissions germany Sanford one Dick van dyke
"lear i" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

02:29 min | Last week

"lear i" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Guys frank here and gilbert and i are still getting our sea legs back after a long holiday an even longer and a very tiring year..

Teledyne to acquire Flir Systems in cash-and-stock deal valued at about $8 billion

MarketFoolery

05:33 min | Last week

Teledyne to acquire Flir Systems in cash-and-stock deal valued at about $8 billion

"We're going to start with the deal of the day. Teledyne technologies is buying clear systems in a cash and stock deal. That's in the neighborhood of eight billion dollars which is a pretty nice neighborhood. Flare systems is in the business of thermal imaging cameras and sensors shares up about twenty percent this morning shares of teledyne down more than seven percent. Anytime i see that disparity jason the first place my brain goes is people on wall street thinks to teledyne whatever they think of flare systems. They think taliban overpaid well i mean. That's that's certainly possible. I mean it's very much in line with that. Typical move that we see with with the acquirer stock getting hit because the burden of proof ultimately shown them to prove that this is a sensible acquisition I do see the interest though here in a little context of systems a company. I've been following for a while now and it. It's actually a recommendation in or augmented reality beyond service of added in there for for a while and understanding that business. I definitely understand the interest coming from teledyne here. And so i i forms. What flare does you mentioned. Thermal imaging mean that ultimately is what they are into thermal infrared imaging. They consider themselves the world's six cents if that gives you any idea but They they make their money by selling cameras and sensors and the related technology with that main focus on thermal and infrared imaging in these are these are cameras that can can do all sorts of things from detecting elevated body temperatures to chemical biological radiological nuclear explosive threat detectors so they have industrial side of the business which generates about sixty percent of the of the company's total revenue in the defense side of the business. Well which generates about forty percent in similar business is is to teledyne but is it. There's not a lot of overlap. I think teledyne is really interested in that thermal focused in given the the neat things thermal is doing. I can understand the forward-looking the looking major acquisition getting that thermal technology. So this is as i said. The deals worth about eight billion dollars. Teledyne is on. Its own a thirteen billion dollar company. Yeah do you think does that. Strike you as odd. It always strikes me as odd when when we see a deal and the acquiring company is not dramatically bigger than the company. They're buying yeah. It is it is a bit of a not quite a merger of equals but but close to that in again. I think the main the main idea here is being able to bring all of this. Ip in house in leveraging that to to the fullest extent. And and. I think one of the interesting things about flare is that it's it's a vertically integrated supply chain so that means they keep their supply of their manufacturing basically in house or they control a lot of that and inflator until nine together that both companies that really value and protect their ip right their intellectual property in this sensor market. But because there's no overlap there not something where they're going to be talking about would link alita trimming the fat and whittling away unnecessary expenses in leading part of part of business. Just because there isn't really that much. Overlap i mean sure there will be some some consolidating costs that come with all this and Whatnot but when when you look back to the thermal imaging nature the stuff that is doing one on one of the things. I really like business up like for a while. They do a good job of partnering up with other tech companies out there in doing really neat new things and so another company. I've talked about on this show before in a stock i also answers is a company that actually partners with clear. F- lear an ancestor partnering together in order to deliver detection solutions for assisted in assistant driving autonomous vehicles. So flare ultimately like you see this. This debate as to whether lied or thermal imaging is is the more appropriate platform or censor for for autonomous vehicles and lied just kinda like laser detected distance. Assessors light has some shortcomings particularly when it comes to adverse weather conditions and flair because that thermal imaging is seen seen as a better option as opposed to guide. Our for autonomous vehicles is fleeing an ancestor doing a lot of work in that autonomous vehicle market. While that's very nascent. And i think we're still a ways away. I just think it goes to show the type of technology that you're dealing with here. And they're also part of those those microsoft hollow lenses in all of the different applications that you can undertake those things so it's just. It's a lot of neat technology. They're are very focused on protecting that. Ip i understand why television would like to bring that in house in it. Sounds like they're going to pay. They're going to pay a fair price. And when i when. I recommend that the stock was trading around thirty two times earnings and this this implies about thirty six times trailing earnings so they're not paying through the nose i betcha flare could probably held out and gotten a little bit more out of it but it. It's it's i think fair price for good business.

Teledyne Flare Systems Taliban Jason Alita Lear Microsoft
How those $600 checks are likely to be spent

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

How those $600 checks are likely to be spent

"Three months. Most of the money stayed in the bank people spent about a third of their tax. Hilas says there are two reasons. A lot of people didn't spend all the money right away. I those who still have their jobs and income didn't need the money to pay their bills and with pandemic shutdowns. It was hard to shop and travel the money away. Meanwhile americans who had lost jobs and income tried to stash away. Whatever stimulus money they could people had expectations. That crisis would be very long in. Their income. Might be disrupted for a long period of time. This time around you know us thinks that even with vaccination underway. There's still so much economic uncertainty that most people will try to save some of the money again but that may be harder with this second round of stimulus checks nine months into the pandemic. Millions of americans are still out of work and unemployment benefits dwindling. John lear is an economist at morning. Consult lower middle income. Americans who really have very little savings have gradually had to eat into their savings because they don't have the income to cover their expenses each month. They're likely to spend their stimulus right away on. Necessities food rent utility bills and car payments. I'm mitchell hartman for marketplace. The relief package also includes several types of aid for small businesses including a new paycheck protection program. And it's different from the last round. In a few ways. For example this time business owners can claim tax deductions for payroll and other expenses. Their p p p money covered small business advocates welcomed the change but as marketplace's justin ho reports owners. Still face a lot of uncertainty when it comes to their tax bills before the new relief package was signed into law new york city cocktail bar owner ushwyn day schmo just wasn't sure when he should apply for forgiveness on his. Ppp loan and how that would impact his bill even wait to do the forgiveness application until next year. It's just a waiting game. The new round of

Hilas John Lear Mitchell Hartman Justin Ho Ushwyn Day Schmo New York City
Sarah Fuller becomes first woman to score in Power Five game

At Home

00:39 sec | Last month

Sarah Fuller becomes first woman to score in Power Five game

"Diversity. Soccer player turned football player made history ABC is Brian Clark explains There was college football history Saturday in Nashville. Sarah Fuller has become the first woman to score a point in a power five college football game call on Lear Field after Fuller kick the first of two extra points in her second game with a a Vanderbilt Vanderbilt football football team. team. She's She's the the goalkeeper goalkeeper for for Vanderbilt Vanderbilt women's women's soccer soccer team. team. She She had had joined joined the the football football squad squad after after they they were were short short on on players players because because of of covert covert 19. 19. That's That's something something I've I've really really appreciated appreciated at the end of the day, they treated me like an athlete on gets the best second asked for Vanderbilt lost 42 17 to Tennessee. Brian Clark ABC News, a

Football Sarah Fuller Lear Field Soccer Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Brian Clark Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Women's ABC Nashville Fuller Vanderbilt Tennessee Abc News
Vanderbilt's Sarah Fuller Becomes First Woman to Score in a Power 5 Football Game

Ric Edelman

00:24 sec | Last month

Vanderbilt's Sarah Fuller Becomes First Woman to Score in a Power 5 Football Game

"College football history on Saturday in Nashville, Sarah Fuller has become the first woman to score a point in a power five college football game. Fuller kicked two extra points in her second game of the Vanderbilt football team is heard on Lear Field. She's the goalkeeper for Vanderbilt's women's soccer team. She joined the football team after it was short on players because of covert 19. Vanderbilt lost 42 17 to the University of Tennessee.

Sarah Fuller Football Lear Field Nashville Vanderbilt Fuller Soccer University Of Tennessee
A big year for Bad Bunny

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:41 min | Last month

A big year for Bad Bunny

"Welcome back here with me from her home in washington. Dc is npr. Music and latino contributor. Stephanie fernandez hi stephanie. Hey steven great to have you so as we mentioned in. The bad bunny has released three albums in two thousand twenty the first y h l q. Md l. g. That's yoga lo que. Mais della ghana. Or i do whatever i want came out in february not long after bad bunny performed with jennifer lopez shaquille and j galvin at the super bowl halftime show. You'll find your haga made lagana at number seven on. Npr music's list of the fifty best of twenty twenty then in may bad bunny put out an odds and ends compilation called los que. No iban asa lear or the ones that were not going to come out. And now he's released ultimo tour del mundo which translates as the last tour of the world. The new album was written and recorded in quarantine and bad bunny had said it would be his last album not surprisingly he has already walked. That back a stephanie. Near the beginning of this year you interview. Bad bunny for a pitchfork profile called day in the life of bad bunny introverted superstar. Let's start with your thoughts on the new record which feels more restrained and reflective than the album. He put out earlier this year. Absolutely well let me start by saying that. It's been a crazy year for bad bunny. Output has been insane and prolific. and he's proven more than once that he can put out a great record. I really liked this album But i'll confess that i i i. I felt some fatigue at the fact that this is the third bad album coming out. And i'm a big fan of bad bunnies. I've been following him for a long time now. But i also believe that there's time for an artist to slow down into you don't need to put out so much music that being said. I really liked this album. It's really grown on me. Since i first heard it definitely appeals to the mo and may clearly bad bunny has also been listening to a lot of new metal and pop punk in quarantine. Well let's talk about the differences between this record and the one that he put out at the beginning of this year. That was kind of a more hard charging album in this one. As you said is is a little bit more mo absolutely. I think you know there has been this temptation to compare the two albums because they've been his two biggest releases. This year i think at the end of the day. they're such different projects. He was really trying such different things with them. That album iago looking at it. I was really focused on going back to the heart of puerto rican thrown from the early two thousands in the late nineties. The kind of music that bad listen to growing up the latin pop landscape now sounds a lot different than the music. Bad bunny loved growing up. And you know john that has historically not been widely accepted in latin pop and latin mainstream until the last decade. And one thing that he acknowledged to me when i interviewed him as well as you know something that was really the main focus of this record. Was you know undeniably making this sound of the music that influenced him growing up the artists that really deserve the shine when it comes to the strides made in this genre and this album is more about honoring a different kind of music that he loved growing up which is rock and rock and program spaniel and pop punk and i think what you really can see across. His body of work is just the deep respect that he has different kinds of music that he loves as well as this nostalgia. I think both records really have a lot to do with nostalgia in this way. That's really interesting to me especially in a year. That's been so difficult for so many people. Some many of us are finding comfort in music. That's not new music. That reminds us of more comfortable more simple times as it were. Even though these two albums are really different they both have really special offerings. Well one thing. I wanted to talk about it about this new record wanting that immediately jumped out to me as somebody who did a certain amount of coming of age in the nineties there a couple of songs on his record like to deseo loma harder. And you'll vito c. That are very tinged with all rock. Sounds like really kind of nineties. Rock sounds taught me talk. Yeah you know. This album has a lot of guitars. Sad guitars brad guitar. He's kind of teasing out this kind of pop punk and nu metal side that he has actually alluded to in previous work on his debut album sandra he had a song called dynamo moscow allowed which was really a pop punk song and people were so surprised to hear that from bad bunny and on your looking like he had llamas mignano which is like one of my favorite songs this year and a that just absolutely bursts into this new metal rage moment that is just so so registered so good and i think you know i i. I didn't think anything could match with those two songs. Made me feel. But i couldn't stop listening to to the settled on my heart. I really think it's like that. Riff is just so heart. Sick and tortured and cathartic. It's a little bit of that success. Mada below gun mental burden sep putra dot com the company. I think you can kind of get a sense of the exact angst. That's at work here but can you walk us through what that's about. Yeah you know. That song is kind of a classic reflecting on a break-up ballot and it's kind of a self torturing acknowledges wasn't great to you and i hope that one day you can forget about me but it's also just really indulging in that feeling and i think that's something that somebody people can relate to maybe a lot of people who've spent a lot of time alone in this year of in thinking about so. It's got a lot of sad. Bob's for reflecting on on these sad moments but also got a lot of really happy moments. I wanted be just kind of give people a sense of place about where he kind of fits into the latin music world like he is a boundary pushing artist. He's pushed a lot of these of gender presentation He sings about gender relations in ways. That feel really fresh absolutely. I think you know for several years now. Bad bunnies kind of establish this reputation for himself as a political or outspoken artist. And it's a label that he wrestles with. I think he is breaking a lot of barriers in terms of challenging masculine in latin pop. And he's really kind of an outlier. In terms of how vocal he is about these issues in two thousand nine hundred and he was really involved in the protests import. The frigo demanding the resignation of prepared for ceo in the past. He's also really challenge these ideas of gender presentation as you mentioned. You know he'd paint his nails and he'd wear skirts and bad. Bunny received a lot of praise for that and it was a big statement to a lot of his fans as much as he's gaining so much praise especially this year he's also had a lot of moments of public learning you know he's resisted this idea of becoming like a spokesperson for any group of people or report the frigo and earlier this year. You know a lot of fans were disappointed that he took several weeks to respond in support to the black lives matter movement and eventually he released a letter expressing his feelings and kind of saying himself. The thing that so many of us had already come to the conclusion to which is that. You know you can't rely on celebrities at the end of the day to lead us forward and social movements to be the voice of progress. I think bad bunny has made a lot of big statements that challenge how latin pop's most visible stars approach politics but then again on and trap have always been political and bad bunny is not the first and i know he won't be the last. Yeah you mentioned. His relationship with puerto rico. I think that's one thing that really jumps out about him. Could you talk a little bit more about that. Absolutely i think what definitely sets bad bunny. Apart from all of his peers in the industry is just how committed he is doing right by his community and worked to recall. Specifically i think in all of his music you can tell that. He's striving to remain authentic. And there's so many little love letters to community on this album samples the legendary astrologer welton on the penultimate track. His famous sendoff muccio more. He shouts out puerto rican and latino legends in general like leveaux the ruben blah the song and then latinos like real manna. You can tell that. He's he's aware that he's operating within a lineage. He never leaves any doubt about who he's trying to uplift and who is trying to represent here and he closes the album on a classic puerto rican christmas song comparison performed by today obama hegna which is a group from his hometown of vega baja. Your old it's kind of odd. Because it's like he's not on the song. Obviously it's recording from the fifties. But it's a song about how some people have jubilant joyful christmases and others spend it in sadness or in poverty. It is a farewell to a year. That i think all of us are happy to see go and i think you know though. He sits at this place of enormous wealth and privilege and fame. I think he's really at the end of the day driven by this desire to remain

Stephanie Fernandez Hi Stephan J Galvin Lagana Iban Asa Lear Haga Deseo Loma Vito C Shaquille Brad Guitar Llamas Mignano Jennifer Lopez NPR Ghana Super Bowl Steven Stephanie Puerto Rican Washington Sandra
The Dylan catalog, a 60-year rock 'n' roll odyssey, is sold

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

08:23 min | Last month

The Dylan catalog, a 60-year rock 'n' roll odyssey, is sold

"I got a question for you. Are you doing fan. Bob dylan fan. I'm okay with them. But i'm not a hardcore you bet. If you're if you don't like dylan you better get ready. Because you're going to hear a lot more dylan. I'm telling you why. After i tell you about shed concrete this homeowners and builders out there you know what i'm gonna tell you. My brother-in-law greg at the folks that shake crete they have a huge selection of pre cast concrete steps. You got to check this out. There's a tv commercial. Would meet in it and you get to see all the great steps that they have to offer but you can do that on the website you can stop by and see whether you're building a new home where you need to replace an old staircase. Shay has great vibes with designs for any home. They're veiling concrete. You can customize your steps with beautiful stone granite or brick. New staircase can dramatically upgrade the front entrance of your home. Maybe that's tom brady. Inches el ni. They can't seem to unload. There's little bungalow thirty three million dollar home. Maybe they have to upgrade the steps. That's how you do it. Most cases can remove your old stairs and heavy walking a new set of front steps within hours. And just like that. Your host looks better houses worth more and maybe trying to sell it. Maybe it helps you sell it. It's new steps they can. They can really help you move that old home and make it look better and so quicker you can learn more about chase pre cast concrete steps steps at a concrete dot com to stop by one of their four state of the ad for scillies. All over new england. I bob dylan. And i love these stories because this this is what the taylor swift it. Which means that they will wake up and actually have some interest in this topic. Talking about my girl taylor. Swift sold her music catalog to what's his name scooter braun. Oh yeah and then complains. After bob dylan sold his music library for three hundred million dollars. That's right And by the way He sold is popularly. Seventy eight which is another one of those amazing miracles. The bob dylan still around still kicking. Well did you hear what he said about this jerry region. But here's what's going to happen you me. We'll be watching You know football game. We're watching wednesday night football thursday night football tuesday night. Football game mini mini games That around these days and there's gonna be a commercial for flow or he'll be commercial for you name it Gimme gimme some tv for apple apple. Lot of apple commercials. That's a good one apple amazon target. And it'll be Some of my friend is blowing in the wind blowing in the wind or something blue. What's blue some blue jet blue. And they'll be tangled up in blue. You'll go what bob dylan. His stuff is going to be of vera readily available companies to put in tv commercials. Because bob dylan sold out. It's bob dylan's if you don't like it if you think you know that he's Not that kind of guy that he wouldn't ever seventy-nine by the way he sold out. He took the money. God bless him his family's gonna why he needs the money but his family is going to be fabulously wealthy for generations but companies like target nap bullen and whatever flow what is flow sell insurance. Press gress yes i defense. They're going to be able to play. Dylan's pay whatever the going rate is and they could play it and you'll hear it all over the place just like you here. You know the rolling stones in some cases or taylor swift and other artists who was amazing. When i read the story it was about some of the other artists of fleetwood. Mac sold theirs for like. I get the number here here. It is eighty million dollars they sold. It wasn't even the whole catalog eighty million dollars. Fleetwood mac and dillon skate. Like columbine could probably name more wallflower songs and he can bog way. Bob dole i. It's right over my head. I have no idea i look. I'm surprised he got three hundred million. Based on the fact that that ship has sailed a long time ago dylan receives a lump sum between two hundred and four hundred I'm not sure what the what. The stevie nicks sold their publishing catalog for eighty million dollars. The dylan portfolio six hundred songs while other bands who have sold their catalogs sold. You know taking the money. Blondie barry manilow and the estates of john lennon and kurt cobaine. I believe john lennon the beatles. Paul mccartney bought them for like a ridiculous amount of money Like eight hundred million. Paul mccartney owns well. Didn't jackson by michael jackson and then mccray jackson and a falling out story there. But there's only one to look up jerry. Three hundred million eighty million two hundred to four hundred million. What did what did brian. Wilson's father sell the beach boys catalogue for another against the wishes without the kids. Even knowing and i think he sold it for like seventy dollars and a coke or something new never spoke to his father again obviously but if the beach boys is the one you would want because of the catchy jingles. Yeah that's true point and that the father sold it for nothing. He had no idea what he had. And what the value of wasn't a guy goes. Hey i'm gonna dig deep here. I'll give you five hundred dollars. Whereas i sold and brian wilson was never the same after it happened. It's a good point. But i think dylan's got a lot of those you know catch even though they you know might be whatever. The revolutionary songs at times they are a change in blowing in the wind and songs like that which will which will fit nicely in commercials. And we'll be sick of them all with and i'm sure he had control over it and limited the exposure but i guarantee you. He sold the rights to some two songs to some commercials. I assume right Yeah i guess. So i mean i don't blame me if you're gonna die soon and you wanna take care of you. Offspring kids grandkids. You say. What the hell. What do i care if not be capitalizing on all the different changes that are going on in the music industry. I bet it's like a five person team that he has controlling the catalog right. Like it's a he. He owns time. Bob no one said a need the money for anything the the couple couple of years ago. Long before covid were dylan on went on tour and performed at three hundred nights in a year three hundred nights in one year deal and he was like seventy five and i don't know anyone that went to see him. He wasn't playing the big rooms anymore but he's just addicted to performing and singing his songs and i must have just an insane amount of money already. I mean just. But it's like what bob cousy sold all his Collectibles always memorabilia. He said what do i need it for. This is going to pay for my grandkids education. And can you blame him for that. I wouldn't. I'm a big lira. Guy when it comes to rock and roll. If you consider dylan rock and roll and dylan for what i again. He's not my bag particularly. I don't have any bob dylan on my phone. But his his lyrics. If back on my i always think that you know if you get ten best lyrics of all time. You don't need a whether they know which way the wind blows is one of the great lines right and i'm with you. I'm a lear. Emma word man to and i love you know singing along to whatever tangled up in blue and he. He won the nobel prize for whatever writing. Poetry didn't show up for the award. You know. I believe. I believe greta thune. Berg was second so she'd go toward for him but no he won the nobel prize. I think he blew the market and show up to get the thing and these the only singer or songwriter to win to win it

Bob Dylan Dylan Apple Scooter Braun Football Taylor Dillon Skate Shay Tom Brady Blondie Barry Manilow Paul Mccartney John Lennon Kurt Cobaine Mccray Jackson Greg Swift
Dallas-Area Native Sarah Fuller Becomes First Woman To Play In Power 5 Conference Football Game

SportsCenter All Night

02:09 min | Last month

Dallas-Area Native Sarah Fuller Becomes First Woman To Play In Power 5 Conference Football Game

"Was made on Saturdays. Vanderbilt's Sarah Fuller became the first woman ever to play in a power five football game. Here she goes, and here's the kick. It is kicked in. Script down and recovered at the 35 yard line, and there it is college football history. Vanderbilt's Sarah Fuller becomes the first female Play in a Southeastern Conference or a power five conference game. You heard it from Joe Fisher Lear Field. I'm G college. She's Vanderbilt's goalkeeper Fuller. It becomes a pioneer, becoming the first female to play in a power five football game. She came onto the field for the start of the second half. Deliver that squib kick there was grabbed at the Mizzou 35. I was their only attempting the Commodore's loss to Missouri Covert 19 protocols and restrictions left Vandy with very few options, prompting the team to reach out to this. Soccer team for a help fuller on how she defines the history she made on a broader sense, honestly, haven't taken a second to soak it all in. Really. I just think it's incredible. That I am able to do this. And all I want to do is be a good influence to the young girls out there. Because there were times like I struggled in sports, but I am so thankful I stuck with it, and it's given me so many opportunities. And it's I've met so many amazing people through sports and I, you know, I just want to say, like literally, you can do anything. You set your mind to like. That's that's the number one thing. ESPN soccer analyst Julie Found E on SportsCenter Go Go after it run for it, Do it Absolutely, but also understand, Right. There's some risk involved, and I think Sarah knows that I mean, but I think we're hungry in a year. That needs some good news, hungry for some good news, and you think about what Sarah Fuller has done. Already with soccer If you go back to what she did at Vanderbilt with soccer, I mean, they went on this incredible SEC tournament run where the team wins, is the seventh seed. And so she's just continuing this good news and streak of good news preventable, So I think it's tremendous. And as a parent, I would say absolutely, honey.

Sarah Fuller Vanderbilt Football Joe Fisher G College Fuller Soccer Missouri Espn Julie Sarah SEC
Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

Live Happy Now

05:40 min | Last month

Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

"Welcome to episode two hundred eighty eight of live happy now. This has been the most unusual and for many the most difficult year in recent memory. What's gratitude got to do with it. This is paula phelps. And this week as we celebrate thanksgiving as seemed like a great time to talk about how important gratitude is not only at thanksgiving but as a daily practice live happy ceo and co founder. Deborah highs sits down with me to talk about gratitude and other practices to make this unusual thanksgiving more meaningful deborah. Welcome to live happy now once again. You bala it's great lear- especially this time of year. I'm really loud. This is where my times a year. And i'm really excited for checker broadcast. I think we have a lot of talk about. Yeah because anyone that's listened to this awhile knows at both you and i are gratitude junkies so who knows what happens when we get together and talk about it. We're getting more grateful for each other. That's there you go well. This year is been unusual so it puts gratitude in kind of a different light for a lot of people because there are so many people are dealing with loss whether that's loss of loved ones lhasa. Work loss of the freedom that they had to move around and see people so in your life and in what's going on in your world. How are you approaching this thanksgiving and and with your gratitude loss. And i think the one that we're all feeling and not the biggest loss in terms of scale obviously losing a loved one is much more significant loss but the biggest loss in terms of one that i think everyone is feeling a little bit of is a loss of community and as we're going into the holiday season i think that's even more intensified where we might get together with large family gatherings in our family can't travel in or is uncomfortable traveling in or you know for whatever reason were not going to be able to have the typical large family gatherings holiday party corporate outings. Happy hour's wage cycle bureau were be sprayed. I think we get a lot of our sense of community for mos activity. So when we're talking about what we're doing for me. It's what we do work place that to make sure that number one. We are expressing our gratitude. It is the time of thanksgiving after all but also what are we going to replace that so we don't lose out on that sense of community one of the great things you can do and i got a couple of days. This is not my own idea. Is you can take the time to do something. That is a little archaic. And i've gotten a couple of gratitude notes from soups and written letters. Telling me how regretful it is that we won't be able to get this year. How much we're looking forward to getting together next year. And how much more forward and then sharing your on in your life fashion letter to knees. A great idea. Xpress browser this holiday season and the person who receives it one. I i was just talking with someone this morning. About how on a male junkie. And i was like i am too you know and so when we get something. That's handwritten these days. That's incredibly exciting to receive is and you don't have gotten that one that not only was it. Handwritten but person full photos of their social media of jehovah's used it on the computer and talk to me about how much you know and it was family member said how much they were regretting that they were to get together with us this year but they had all these positive memories of last year that he thinking of us and we couldn't wait till next year we put on game that simple but it really took time and energy on their part i or we know from evidence base that even the act of writing that liar heightened their gratitude heightened their happiness low. An it certainly certainly heightened mine. It was a wonderful surprise to get to that in the make so if someone that is a great practice in an earlier this year we had talked to the woman who did the three hundred sixty five days of. Thank you notes and she wrote. Thank you letters to people. So if someone's going to do this there are certain things that you should include are certain practices that you can do to that will trigger more gratitude for you. Is that correct yes. There are more gratitude. So you're speaking about the interview that you did with. Nancy davis cup i at the hankyu project on. Yeah there's a lot of chips about how bright the right thank you and right branching water but one of the things that that is. My favorite is specity. B very specific in order for it to resonate. It's like when you think back to your childhood. You can think back to your childhood in general doesn't resonate on a single something and then you can start team sabre that you remember the way set way. Something smell away. Something felt when you're writing a gratitude letter if you can be specific about what you're grateful for a moment in time or something. The person the reader is the opportunity to savor that memory. As do you you get the opportunity to save that memory and it just heightens the sensation of a tube. Ecorse cruiser overall wellbeing. It's great. I love

Paula Phelps Deborah Highs Lhasa Deborah Nancy Davis
Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

Here & Now

11:05 min | 2 months ago

Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

"The nineteen eighties were good to michael. J. fox the actor shot to fame with roles in the sitcom family ties and the back to the future foods at backup. Don't have enough road to get eighty eight rows row but in nineteen ninety-one age of twenty. Nine fox was diagnosed with early onset. Parkinson's disease in two thousand. He founded the michael j. fox foundation for parkinson's research organization has raised a billion dollars to find a cure through it. All fox found a way to maintain his signature optimism until twenty eighteen when his sunny disposition took a significant hit fox underwent spinal surgery. Then a serious fall that forced him to confront his mortality. He writes about that year in his new book. No time like the future which is out this week and michael. J. fox joins me now. Welcome here tell me about that fall. Well i when dealing with my thirty thirty. Th year outlook parkinson's so that that kind of had handle on been ahead. Spinal tumor had surgery on that and it took me a while to learn how to walk again. I'd barely learn what getting when i of course declared independence until they could walk on my own. And i belong in so i got up. Walk into the kitchen swift flooring shattered my arm and all the dean indignities that was for some reason cutting blow so you as you say you were dealing not only with parkinson's for many years you've just gone through this incredibly dangerous surgery to remove a tumor from your spine. Just spend a moment there for a minute. How serious was that spinal diagnosis in was pretty seriously lifting for a while for a few years. But he's been in a benign and static wasn't doing anything from the dodgers. Just watch that check on every now and then so when the last time that checked on it had grown quite considerably was actually on spinal cord itself which then made Something that Attach because they can't in any way touch her to remove some spinal for when you touch it. But johns hopkins adopted feodor. When's your with me. Discuss the risk. The risk of not doing it where i would be paralyzed by now by as we speak from when win puts me that way i realized yeah and then there you are lying on the floor in your apartment in new york city. Your arm shattered. You'd gone through all of these challenges and gotten through them for the most part right. So where do you think the darkness came from. Why did you so desperately lose that optimism that to become known for some reason it was almost instantaneous last lemon unknown lemonade Unbelie it was angry myself for taking for granted Detention in the in the care they put into my health in my in my life and you know what family Asked me to be careful. When i said don't be careful. Careful careful Carelessly walking too fast and it was two kind of full of pride of of at my might chievements to understand the risks of taking an inadequate To at risk in all the time engine Physical therapists who put me at risk and anti alexander myself I agree as said about how they push china's within a bum. Catchy raised the land myself. They get passes the nothing it was like. I started thinking with the parkinson's community i Optimism tennessee. And i kind of said it'll be okay and and really there are people that had a misery index lot higher needle. Lend me with a broken arm. Bagging car is these are people who've lost lives homes country family children woodward by bam. Who am i to tell them to be have to miss it online on the slowly a rag or i can see why you would be angry but what about scared was scared to well. Isn't that what happened. Was that came out of that. Here that come off the floor and heavily armed fiction which function in a. I would let examined all these things. Fear aging gratitude. Just all of these things came through my mind. And as i made notes on them out for no reason Lebron you're going through something with take contemporaries in alabama a. He's not that. I said let's deceased together into the story of what happened and how i lost and regained my commitment. How might new. Optimism is kind of a little more informed with a little more realistic eating. Be realistic at the same time. You reminded us for those who need to be reminded how precious thing it is to walk. And i found the way that you described your relationship with wheelchairs to be very powerful at one point in the book said that. Unless you know the person who's pushing you can be a very isolating experience in fact you compared yourself to a piece of luggage and then you went on to say that if we could ever just look at each other in the eye we would recognize our shared humanity. And i just want to thank you for that. Because actually i had never thought of that before and those are probably things. I imagine that you for granted at some stage in your life as as being and i talked about that will move momentum me my life and and how i was always moving in in my job is an actor. Energy do stunts or having physical representations of what was happening or as an athlete another good one persona in so. When i look at things i will shares do thing one to have been nail biting person. My whole life into be can't walk in the other thing about being in the chair. Is that for me personally. I'm i'm i'm someone who is easily recognizable. Everybody knows intense speed familiar with and even if they don't know me as a privilege of what i do but when you're unsure you just a piece of luggage and pushing Order hotel something. He's escaped me from point being open to get five bucks in so you just stay in you push Facing the wall can't get into the verbally again. Like you will not have Beings open as they are. They might as well. Apple's own smoke last bubbles. Is that people to be going on with him. Well let's talk about your acting career. The thing that made it so that people recognize you on the street. You've gotten roles in recent years. The didn't hide the fact that you had parkinson's symptoms but actually incorporated that into the role such as louis canning of courses. The lawyer on the tv drama. The good wife with listen to a scene there. I suffer from a condition turtle disconnect asia which is released a funny word for neurological disorder. And it makes me do this. And this i if you just look at me all of us to it so and i won't mind in the book you say that you're ready to accept the your acting career is over to an extent i i laugh in fact it's something surprisingly something to change but yeah the last couple times. I acted i actually. I haven't played warners again anyway. Resume lines difficulty for some reason. Always been some interesting. Even with. I look at her family. Ties scripted from five minutes Show and i just said they photographic memories Position where i didn't know struggling with the lines Lear capital in time in hollywood going off assessing what. What is the deal. But unlike him in that movie. Who's parading himself really angry when i found myself in that position. I said i'll gable. This isn't working so maybe we'll find some other way to do it or not. Do you also say you may be done with gulf another thing that you've loved. How is it letting these things go or acknowledging that it might be time soon to let them go. Insights about acceptance and gratitude and acceptance. Part of it is what is accepted into circuit. That is what liz i can deal with that. An investing came endeavor to change it. But if you don't accept the and be more blog that be cranny of your life Adjusted so. I accepted the fact that i assume golf club too hard. I fall down in a like boohoo. I'm falling nanosecond. Only now therefore i don't put myself in that position again fall down on but maybe one day i'll be treated in a way or find some way to get so. I don't fall down in the gulf again. I'll be grateful for it. It's just a matter. Is that come compartmentalizing really. It's taking inventory seeing where that fits in your life and the losses that have had are more than compensated for by my family my friends by the role habit in the parsis communities it change to relationships with people on the street to how much i enjoy reading how much film much writing is less to joe you live. I'm speaking with michael j. fox whose new book is called no time like the future and optimists considers mortality and michael. Similar listening to this may have just been diagnosed with parkinson's and that could be very frightening for them as you. Well know in fact you become an ambassador of sorts. For for folks with parkinson's what's your message to people who've just recently been diagnosed as i was talking to manually. Today's few was just diagnosed in like me was diagnosed. Daytona nine Items that was twenty nine years ago. So i did. I said for you. Being diagnosed a twenty nine means for sure no doubt bank on it. Better write it down. It will be here in your lifetime. And how much credit can the fox foundation take for that. I will take not moods. It'd be happy happened. We we are the largest funded research in private sector but never a mission. Our mission is we have a thing. When we first started we about how to structure foundation dissimilar brought up endowments down like e bala money said on this again and said we won't be doing that. Come to go out so we operated on then in the set aside purely motive. Where would you do it. It's your model that each is trying to get this work done as quickly as we can for people in. It's been so yeah. Optimism is is a driver knows every night. You because because there's no sense doing something again at least argue for michael j. fox thank you so much. Be well you to

Parkinson J. Fox Parkinson's Disease Fox Foundation For Parkinson's Spinal Tumor Michael J Michael FOX Dodgers Johns Hopkins Louis Canning Tumor Woodward New York City Lebron Tennessee Alabama Neurological Disorder China
U.S. stock market falls on plunging retail sales

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:00 min | 2 months ago

U.S. stock market falls on plunging retail sales

"One of the things we do on this program so that you don't have to is keep an eye on the incremental changes in this economy and then once a trend reveals itself put that into big picture context thus mitchell hartman starts us off today with this morning's report on retail sales up just attach three tenths percent last month less than expected and way less than september. Seeing how the consumer goes is how this economy goes. Here's mitchell with that promise to big picture context if you have anything to do with the retail business. Something you don't wanna see. Is this kind of fall off. In sales growth. In the fall october's report is actually a bad omen for the holiday season retail analyst committee on a chef ski at. Cf are a research predicts. This'll be the first year since two thousand eight that annual holiday sales. Don't go up john lear. At morning console says lack of new fiscal stimulus from congress is dampening consumers appetite to spend so is the pandemic when you see the number of new cases spiking as it is currently we see consumer confidence in the us decrease. This is not an equal opportunity retail slowdown. Though says analyst nick shields at third bridge main street retail is weaker than big box retail. He says smaller retailers have a harder time dealing with covid restrictions and transitioning to online shopping. Shield says if more of them shut down it'll hurt. The entire economy. Big brands will have fewer consumer outlets and commercial landlords. We'll take a hit. They do serve a lot of massive retailers like the department stores like walmart target but they also have small business and medium size retailers shield. Says we probably won't know until early next year. After the holiday shopping results are in how many smaller retailers are going to throw in the towel and shut down for good.

Mitchell Hartman John Lear Nick Shields Third Bridge Mitchell Congress United States Walmart
Virus surge breaking infection records across the US

Post Reports

07:48 min | 2 months ago

Virus surge breaking infection records across the US

"Across the us. Lear seeing a record-breaking surge in kobe cases on thursday the us reported more than one hundred and fifty thousand new cases just a day alone. The scary thing about it is that if you look on a curve. It's just going straight up but we don't know where this curve ends. We don't know where the peak is. This could be just the very beginning of the curve. That's mine one a science reporter for the post. He's been looking into why there's been such a huge spike. In kobe cases this part of fall surge. A lot of experts were warning about getting colder. People are moving indoors but also i think there's just this pandemic fatigue people are tired of taking precautions that plays a huge role. You've got a lot more activity going on. You know back in spring. Even the summer a lot was still shut down. People were not going out there. Being more careful you've got a lot of economic activity resuming and that's gonna lead to you know more spread. I also wonder if there's personally like a fear factor here. I feel like if you think back to how he felt in april and may just felt like there was this sense of being consumed by fear of getting sick and hearing all the horror stories and that fear is there. I think that because so many of us are living our lives. It's easy to forget like well. You know it's like. I'm gonna take precautions to the best of my ability. But i'm still carrying on with my life and i wonder if that has started to edge out a little bit of the precautions. That people were taking previously totally. I think that's like a very big factor in this. It's just we're you know there's this whole all this talk of like we're learning to live with it. That like really downside of that is we really are learning to live with it in that. Just you know a thousand people dying. Every day is like a matter of fact if he told someone that you know in january like you know. In a few months we're going to have people just dying in droves day and people aren't gonna care would be unthinkable back then. So where are we seeing the most intense hot spots and outbreaks right now there are hot spots are concentrations especially in the midwest and the west. But it's everywhere this time you know. In spring it was new york and california in summer you talked about the sun bell. Texas florida georgia. But this time. It's just everywhere. The hardest hit spots though are a lot of these places. That didn't have it before. North dakota wisconsin montana. These are the last frontiers untouched by the virus. And once it's reached there it seems like is just taking off and for the places in the country that are experiencing these outbreaks for the first time. Are there particular challenges for them. That's different from something like new york where they have now had multiple experiences with going through this rise in cases. There's the problem of not having experience a lot of hospitals In new york california they have lot of that built inexperience in their. Icu's there's also this factor. That's hard to talk about but it's just politics a lot of these harder hit states right now. They're republican conservative. These are a lot of the states for the people. Listen to trump. When he said you know you could wear a mask or not wear mass. We can learn to live with this just as bad as the flu. These are kind of the key audiences for that. And so when it's hitting these states and people are not reacting to it like you might have seen in some of the democratic states that's a really potent factor as well so obviously we're seeing this very precipitous rise and the infection rates. But what are we seeing in the death rates and the number of people who are dying. The greatest thing that's happened in our fight against the virus is we've driven down the death rate and it's just the wild success that is attributed to we know more about the virus like you re think back to those times in new york. You had doctors kind of discovering Pruning people's bodies like putting them on their stomachs turning them. You have icu nurses who just know you know went to put someone on ventilator better and when not to when you do everything you can to avoid that because of the death rate that comes with that so a of this. It's just hard one experience. And that's the thing that's really worrisome. This time around. All those icu. Staff that is really specialized expertise. You can have nurses come in from other departments and try to help out but as those hospitals get stretched thinner and thinner in the icu expertise. Kind of ood evaporates death rate. There's a very good chance of it rising. And it's not some like set thing that's in stone. Once you achieve this death rate will never go up again. It changes and fluctuates. Even between states can change and fluctuate That's so interesting. I hadn't thought about that before. Because i feel like at the beginning of the pandemic so much of our conversation was are they're going to be. Nf doctors healthcare workers. What happens if some of them get sick. How is staff gonna be stretched thin just from the perspective of human bodies to throw at this problem. But now what you're seeing. Is that this improved. Death rate is only because so many of those healthcare workers actually had that experience from the last seven or eight months and that in of itself is not something that we can rely on as the problem gets larger. Yes what's going to happen this time around. Why people are so worried about this. Wave is very soon. You're gonna see all the problems that we had before starting to pile up but new ones too on top of that. So we all this time. But we never really fixed are shortages of p for all the trump administration's talk of how they were gonna take charge the really just refuse to use the powers. They had in the last few months to push companies and coordinate our country's manufacturing distribution of ppe and same thing on testing. I mean there's been a really great increase of testing. We've increased by a lot but the demand for testing is awesome increased dramatically. So there are those past problems. But you're also gonna have a shortage of expertise because last time if you remember a beacon call in third doctors and nurses that came rushing to help with the virus everywhere across the country. You can't you can't send people certain place. Everywhere is running out of doctors and nurses in icu expertise. That's something that is really concerning this time around. So if this is what we're already starting to see and we're here the middle of november. Obviously it's getting colder. More people are going to be indoors at the rest of the winter. And then there's also thanksgiving and christmas and these times of year where it feels really really difficult to just say. I'm not going to interact with anybody. How do we expect this to continue to unfold in the next couple of months. Yeah this part. I feel bad i feel like every time you invite me on the show like really tessa mystic. But there's so many things that are kind of pointing this the wrong way so you do have like the holidays coming up if you look at what happened in canadian thanksgiving which is earlier than ours. It trove infections way up there. There's a lot of worry that the same thing is going to happen with a double whammy of thanksgiving christmas. You have colder weather which makes helps the virus survive better with less humidity the pandemic fatigue which is going to increase. But there's this added thing now where there's also this political coal polarization. That is very dangerous so if you think about it. We have ten weeks until the biden inauguration during those ten weeks people are saying well. You know we're going to reset. The effort will get our ducks in a row. And we'll do it right this time. In those ten weeks you could have the infection rate. Doubling

Kobe New York Lear California United States North Dakota Midwest Montana Wisconsin Georgia ICU FLU Florida Texas Tessa Mystic Biden
Oregon voters to decide on decriminalizing heroin, cocaine and LSD

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Oregon voters to decide on decriminalizing heroin, cocaine and LSD

"Will decide Tuesday whether to legalize possession of small amounts of hard hard drugs, drugs, a a ballot ballot measure measure on on Tuesday Tuesday We'll We'll give give Oregon Oregon voters voters the the choice choice of of making making the the Beaver Beaver State, State, the the first first in in the the union union to to legalize legalize possession possession of of small small amounts amounts of of heroin, heroin, cocaine, cocaine, LSD LSD and and other hard drugs. Under the measure, people caught with amounts for personal use would have the option of paying $100 fines or attending you. Free addiction recovery centers centers would be funded by annual marijuana tax revenues collected by the state and excess of $45 million Lear's two dozen district attorney's urge a no vote. Three District attorneys, including the top prosecutor in Oregon's most populous county support the measure. I Mike Rossia wins news time one of

Beaver Beaver State Oregon LSD Heroin Cocaine Union Union Prosecutor Mike Rossia Marijuana Lear
Understanding Cartesi with Augusto Texeria and Erick De Moura

The Bitcoin Podcast

05:05 min | 3 months ago

Understanding Cartesi with Augusto Texeria and Erick De Moura

"What is cortege? What does it? What does it do? Why is it differentiated from other projects in the space? A. High level like your. Quick, pit dive into details. Right right. So high is that we? We saw the this deficiency around skill ability particularly around. Scaling Computation right because if you want to if you want to see blockchain's as a platform to run. Computation, which is probably the objective of. The and Another block chain of Sports Mark Contracts. A. Platform for competitions is quite precarious in indifference on dimensions right now, especially different dimensions of skill ability. Of course, there are many problems that attack me skill ability in different ways. Which shows to tackle the problem of over how many Strickland's sections it can run per unit of time. So basically, Skilling competition, that's where we started from. But what's really differentiates us from other scaling solutions the fact that we. Also. saw that there was another deficiency that was often overlooked. Namely the ability for people to develop. Smart contracts or APP logic using mainstream software stacks or using. Resources Right. So if you if you're going to develop a War Japanese. Solidity. For instance, you're going to have a language limiting. You don't have gossips like the final system or anything that an os with give to you. So what if we could take? Let's say the West like Lennox and run it in a decentralized way so that that's Basically our most. Unique. Opposition here. That's why we are second lear that scaling computation Yo preserving the the security guarantees of the line blockchain like sheer we also providing Like a fool west where people can develop their. The logic. And how do you do that? Let's let's say like. How do you? How do you maintain the level one security while providing that scale like it's the seems to be a trade off somewhere. Right so so basically we are. We moved from global consensus local consensus, right so imagine that you have the APP. If you're thinking about the the aucoin that's on the blockchain, you need basically the consensus of everybody because everybody's using is involving the ledger. Now. If let's say, let's take another radical exemplify wants to develop a chess game on the blockchain and I play chess with you. Right we are to only people that are interested in that in that match. Then thousand people running full knows they're not really caring much about what you're doing who is winning that game. So in that case, when you have a local consensus, it's much cheaper to just have the people that are involved that they're interested in in the in the competition, the results of. What is happening there to validate? Or to participate in whatever is going on for that yet. So So. What you do is that that you basically you allow the blockchain vice computations that are basically Lennox virtual machines they have. A boot, a file system by Dr They have an input tribe. They have a program that they're gonNA run and they have an output drive. So this basically specified on chain We can explain that for later on but these competition runs off chain on the on the van. And because if Yemen is fully deterministic self contained and it also produces miracle proofs. Of the. Of the states and the Merckel tree route to hash of its entire state. We you are I able to Make sure that all violating notes gets the same state at the end of the computation. And if they happen. To. Disagree Right. then. Another data can can start disputes. And proved to the blockchain, that's the first civility was. Involved in a fraud or cheating the result of the competition. So it's basically an optimistic approach von Daters glamour would would claim a result for consultation. And if someone happened to disagree with that result they can. Keep. Proved to the blockchain. Vets. Honest. Solution is. Actually true and enforce it in the blockchain.

Blockchain Yemen Von Daters Strickland Aucoin Fraud
Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Edition

03:22 min | 3 months ago

Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

"The Department of Justice just announced a settlement with Purdue Pharma, the drug company makes the opioid OxyContin. Critics accused Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family of helping to fuel the prescription opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is covering this say there, Brian. Hey, Steve. How are you? Okay. What are the terms? Look, this is a complicated deal. Basically what it means is that produce farm is going to pay out about $8.3 billion the Sackler family. The owners of this company will also give up control of this firm, which they really created and helped popularize opioids over the last 20 years. The Justice Department says. A lot of this money many of these resource is will go to communities around the U. S. Hard hit by this addiction epidemic. Remember about the quarter million Americans have died from prescription opioid overdoses alone on the cost of these communities of recovering even before the corona virus pandemic. This was a devastating public health crisis. And what the Justice Department says is that this deal will rout funds to those communities. One other interesting detail is that Purdue Pharma will now become a public trust company, and that's very controversial. That's something that a lot of critics have pointed to is as something of deep concern. Although there is some criticism of this agreement already, even though it's just been announced, What is it that critics would say It's not enough in the Sackler is giving up the entire company and some of their personal fortunes. Well, One of the things that's happening here is that the Sackler family will walk away with much of their personal fortune. This deal, Steve calls for them to pay out about $225 million in their personal assets. Critics, including New York Attorney General Leticia James, who has sued the Sackler is directly say that's not nearly enough. She put out a statement just minutes ago. Saying This doesn't hold them accountable for the pain and destruction left by what she described as their greed. Another thing that is really interesting here is that this Public trust company will still have to see the details of how it's organized. But this will sort of put the government in the job of producing opioid medications. This will put the government very closely in connection with a company that caused one of the major public health crises or at least contributed to it. Over the last couple of decades. A lot of state attorneys general say they don't like that arrangement. They think it creates a kind of umbrella for the sack, Lear's and produce that could prevent future prosecutions. Well, how are communities that are hard hit by opioids supposed to get the money from this deal? A lot of that is still we're going to see how the details of this process works. What the Justice Department said today is that this will provide extraordinary resource is they also say that under this newly organized public trust company opioid medications will continue to be provided. Remember, these medications do actually have a medical purpose when they're prescribed appropriately? They say that this will rout resource is both in terms of medications and funds. Too many of those communities Brian, Thanks for the update, always appreciate it. Very good. Thanks,

Justice Department Purdue Pharma Sackler Brian Man Purdue Steve Leticia James Lear New York Attorney
Amy Wedeking Shannon, Chief Commercial Officer, Prima-Temp

Outcomes Rocket

06:57 min | 3 months ago

Amy Wedeking Shannon, Chief Commercial Officer, Prima-Temp

"Welcome back to outcomes. Rocket saw Marquez here and today I have the privilege of hosting Amy Shannon. She is the chief commercial officer at Prima temp. Amy is passionate about applying data analytics to clinical science to advance the democratization of women's health care and ultimately outcomes she has led commercial activities representing. The spectrum of healthcare from population to personalized medicine amy hold roles in sales leadership business development, and finance with ally Lily and Guidance Corporation as lear of sales and marketing at Medical Simulation Corporation, amy inner team identified, and created a new hospital market never serviced by simulation industry focused on areas of high economic and mortality impact. Amy represented well, talk a machine learning data driven. Enterprise Company. and. Lead sales and marketing for flagship biosciences and a is driven computational tissue analysis platform to support drug development. Amy Has served as an industry advisor to the Leapfrog Group on patient safety a facilitator of the medical ethics course at the University of Colorado Medical School a volunteer with the Colorado Bioscience Association and is a strengths finder coach. All in one career is a pretty impressive And Amy's great is professional passion as leading and developing teams. She earned her bachelor's degree in Molecular and cellular developmental biology at the University of Colorado and her masters in Business Administration from Duke University. So it's a privilege to have you here on the podcast, Amy and really really thankful you could join us. Thanks for the kind introduction saw and honored to be here and I've really enjoyed learning from your other guests that have been on the podcast previously. Thank you. Yeah we appreciate. It, we definitely want to get diverse perspectives that that are out there in healthcare, and yours is quite unique and I'm really excited to dive into what you're doing with your team at premature before we do get into that though amy, I love to know what inspires your work in healthcare. We'll take saw really from the very beginning of always been fascinated with bioscience and healthcare at. That's been my passion interest pretty much solely and his corneas may sound I really love the fact. That your day to day worker Labor actually helps people. It's an incredible opportunity reward. But beyond that I'm really fascinated with intricacies and complexities of bioscience both on the level of a human body, as well as a healthcare ecosystem, and so if you think about the biological system design like the indecrompt and neurological electrical systems and how they influence each other, it's fascinating and then you take that macro level and you think about healthcare in the synergies and collisions of biology technology and behavioral. Economics. And Policy and psychology, and then salt the end of the day really just the individuality of human beings living out their lives You know they make some really intriguing intersections and I think it's fascinating to thrive at those intersections and a great place to be challenged intellectually emotionally, and then those intersections are really advancing the quadruple aim of healthcare care especially with application of Ai and our company. Prem- attempts doing just that were applying ai to biometric signals to understand what's happening in the body. While it, it's fascinating work and you know you've had spent some time in previous leadership positions with other companies in a you see the future there and so talked about really biometrics. So you know exactly how you guys are focusing on biometrics what biometrics is in particular to to what you guys are doing and how exactly you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Let's do well. Thank you. Well, really we're using biometrics to empower women to make informed healthcare decisions and our. First application is infertility. So just to step back a little bit fertility starts to decline in women in their thirties and therefore many of us who are waiting to have kids were a little bit older. It makes conception and maintaining a pregnancy more challenging and the there's new data coming out from the World Health Organization that shows that one in four couples in developing countries have been affected by infertility Suda moved to your question about biometrics we use what's called advanced, Cronin Biological and circadian. Science to be able to pull up that biometrics. So it's all about when something is happening. So chronobiology biology's is a science, understanding the phases and operations of physiological and hormonal in systems of our bodies, and then applying time series analysis to that and being able to predict and understand a variety of medical conditions because each of these bodily systems they have rhythms to him and those rhythms our cycles are specific in each individual. So in other words, they have those rhythms they impact. Things like sleep and eating and women's monthly cycles. So when we do something critical like when we have intercourse to get pregnant or avoid pregnancy or even wind during the day, we might administer a drug therapy. So effective and has the fewest side effects. So think about that saw you a morning person or a night person I'm a morning person. Okay. So that's really controlled by your biological clock. So I've the night person, but I've had to kind of force myself in between work and kids. To be more of a morning, but that's not naturally what my body wants to be in on the weekends off fall back. So your morning, maybe I'm more like I didn't even think about that but maybe I'm more like that. Okay so What does your body do? Oh, on the weekends I'm up. I'm baby. Right, exactly. What's up? Yeah, that's interesting. Okay. Okay. That's fair Okay. So this is a bow. You know applying your your normal circadian biology to how things work out. So we do is we measure biological patterns that are controlled by the clocks, and so we do this with biometric of body temperature. So temperatures a proxy for physiological activities of our body. We've got a device or wearable Caprio in that measures core body temperature on a continual basis and core body temperatures really the gold standard, a circadian science, a very rich information signal, and as one of one of our advisers stated from a diagnostic perspective, it's like taking a blood draw every five minutes and the kind of information you can pull from that. So for our. First application, we're using that information to help women identify their fertile window for pregnancy, and then many women don't even have a window because of underlying issues. So we can provide this very high fidelity information through this continual biometric that can be used to diagnose and then track the effectiveness of treatments for those underlying conditions, and then we believe that we can apply these biometrics also to contraception to menopause to sleep disorders and eventually clinical areas such as the timing of delivery of drug therapies like chemotherapy for maximum effectiveness.

Amy Shannon Clinical Science Chief Commercial Officer Marquez University Of Colorado Medical Simulation Corporation Prima Temp Enterprise Company. Menopause Ally Lily Duke University Colorado Bioscience Associatio Guidance Corporation Leapfrog Group Caprio University Of Colorado Medical World Health Organization Prem Cronin Biological
The Voice Of Hunger Games - Sunna Wehrmeijer

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:52 min | 3 months ago

The Voice Of Hunger Games - Sunna Wehrmeijer

"Sauna. So yes. Yes. Okay. I am not even going to attempt your last name. That seems a general consensus. So please enlighten us. Lear mayor. Veer Maher okay. Yes. When you hear it. It's much easier to latch onto versus when you just see the spelling. SIMBA RANDOM H is in there too. You know you don't expect. So. You are quite the composer with a long list of projects that you have worked on and accolades and. including the nomination most recently or is this my looking to emmy nomination? Yes. Eh need the any. Nomination was very recent. Yes. Yes. Okay. There you go. Well, amazing to have you on the crew musician podcast. Taking the time. Thank you. Absolutely as we just discussed I believe you are true superwoman with three young children. Composition career and a studio that you're building. I mean, wow, you're juggling. Yeah definitely. Juggling. Dropping dropping lots of balls don't worry. You're crushing a lot of them too. So I think it all goes hand in hand absolutely, and we met through Derek Jones over mega tracks right? That's right. Right. So thank you Derek for that. Okay. I have a few questions that I like to go through. The each episode and it varies as we go and heard the guest but basically I just want us to be a fun conversation about you and your love of music and how. You. I got bit by the Bug Music Buck. You know talk a little bit about your history and what that was like. Well, should I stay You from the Netherlands. I'm from the Netherlands. Yes. I mean. Yeah Yeah. It is also actually. I love being dirt, it's great. I can say all kinds of stuff from this blame it on being. Young, I mean I definitely started. I mean Dick and around for lack of a better you know. Word at the piano at a young age is coming up with little tunes. I never thought I would actually do this as a living before i. MOVED TO LA three. I studied composition. and The Netherlands but also because I didn't really know what else to do I never fault I could actually. Be a composer. Until I set foot in La and just. Smelled the air and was really inspired by. Everybody around me. But But. The The music bug was definitely I mean being from the Netherlands is great because it's a great country but. I mean, there's a reason. Probably there's no word for film scoring. It's untransparent like scoring a film like the verb doesn't exist. Because there's not that much made and I felt very. I didn't fit in at the compositions because nobody likes Joan Williams nobody likes. Nobody like, Melody. That was just not thing the thing to do and I love all those things. That's what I you know. That's why live for. So I never really fitted in like I said until until I went to a found. So many people who felt the same so I think. I'm very happy I went and stayed for. A long time. Well, that's awesome because US Americans you know oftentimes, we can be so single minded. So it's nice to have people from other parts of the world come in and bring different perspectives and newfound appreciation for the the craft itself yeah I mean I. Love. I love the American view on film and Music. You know I think it's suits me much better than. The continental sound. That's great. Yeah. Did you have? Did you have a primary instrument that you were always more drawn to growing up and in school or? I, mean, I play piano That's my. Thing is I wouldn't call myself a pianist. It's the thing that I play to to us to impose on I used to play guitar when I was younger sixteen and stuff but I. Know it's not something I ever. Want my thing. I mean, piano is still my go-to thing. I like to sort of mess around on instruments but I. Think. Someone said one. The the worst musician you are the better composer you are. They probably said that they were terrible musician themselves. I, I'm. Not. I don't I don't play much for fun. If that makes sense I composed for fun you know

Melody The Netherlands Derek Jones Veer Maher LA United States Emmy Lear Dick Joan Williams
"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

06:54 min | 3 months ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"It and I was I worked hard I don't mean like I didn't work hard but I I think what really got may I go to university was that certainly I did have to work. Whereas I did I hadn't had to before So I would I mean even once I'd finished my undergraduate degree, I would never ever imagined. I'd be doing a PhD. What what what what do you say you folks think about them about about the potential of doctor needs they're I think they're just astounded my I'm very lucky both my boss mother's live with me. My dad's mom for pretty much all of my life and my grandmother for five or six years of my life and my nan was dead. So proud God bless her soul. She had a little Photo frame that was up in her living room that had my undergraduate graduation picture my Master's graduation picture. And then in the middle, there was a picture of my dad when he graduated from his sort, of course that he did at some point and she's like that's in there as a placeholder until anybody doctorate. God Rest her soul and I think my like my parents name of my parents. Well, my mom dropped out the university to move to England and marry my dad and so neither of my parents have have a great what University degree that didn't go to university and go and get their degree and do what I've done and I think they're just Amazed they're very supportive. I remember when I was looking to go to university and and it wasn't the sort of thing that was questioned by my school. Like it was like a you're a high-achieving students. Obviously, you're going to go to university and I were going to my parents and talking about it and my dad was like, yeah go to university but don't go unless you know you want to do with my thoughts of that. No one had ever said that to me before because it was just sort of like our education system is very geared towards just going to University and I don't think it's the right things are a lot of people and I think it's really detrimental to a lot of people to be pushed into it or not be given the opportunity to think about it and my parents are very big on me thinking about it. And I really appreciate that and I think I was very lucky to have that and as much as I have no idea how I ended up doing a PhD atleast birth. Was going into my undergraduate at least it was very thought through but now I think that they're very proud of me. Kulaks sure, it's mostly well. Good Lord. I mean I feel proud of myself because let's face. I'm I'm possibly a member of the family by extension. Oh, yeah, your your your your mistake cousin or something. When we do the if you've seen the the the website that we have we've got we we do the the the the Irish we are at Crest or Shield Bots what however they they like to sell placemats and tablecloths and and and and and coasters nowadays and that's awful. So I may well have to have the wrong. I'm not sure there's one for the year will be no. So would you mind if we did the devaney one know go for it? Did anyone it's a really weird one because it's it's it's kind of the red hand of Ulster. Yeah, we kicked off on the Brits. I'm funded by the SRC and my conference last year was in Belfast to Belfast the first time my life, and I was like All those so I was in Palestine in June and had been had seen the walls and like it was an incredible trip like you must suck but did that and then I was in Belfast like three months later and I was like, oh my God. there's there's walls up like still up here the same as I've seen in in Palestine Jeremy my walls dividing communities and I was just like absolutely shocked and astounded that as someone who Has lived in this country my whole life. I had never been made aware or I'd never realized I like I knew that there was stuff going on, but I just I didn't realize that there were still walls know. I mean like it was like the the troubles were sort of the thing that sort of happened maybe but it's it's ongoing and it's it's painful and it the scars are still there like physically across the landscape and and it is shameful and it is frustrating when people don't recognize it or talk about it and I think the amount of people in my life who voted for brexit and who lived through the troubles and who went I said to them after the brexit vote being like well, what about Northern Ireland and what about the city like it's can you not see how this is going to complicate the situation in Northern Ireland and they're like, I never even thought of that and I was like War was happening in our country like dead. Whatever your your feelings on those $90. It was happening in somewhere that is ruled by the British government like in in the country life that you live in that was going on and you just forgot about it and it didn't occur to you like it. It's so so it's shocking and it really speaks to the ignorance within I don't know say The British public like it is within the British public but the ignorance is facilitated by the fact that we we seem to want to just erase anything that might look negatively on on Britain from our education system and from a military history sort of us. and just the fact that people can forget to know mean I it's it's just shocking. You've been listening to the plastic podcast tales of the Irish diaspora. We all come from somewhere else with me don't have any a my guest leaves and music by Jack the Vanek find out more about us and subscribe at ww.w. Patrick Podcast, or you can pay us a visit to Facebook Instagram or off the plastic podcast has been sponsored using Public Funding by Arts Council, England..

Belfast England Northern Ireland Patrick Podcast British government Facebook devaney Britain Ulster brexit SRC Jack Palestine Vanek Arts Council
Dallas - Brown’s TD Run Lifts West Virginia Over Baylor 27-21 In 2OT

KRLD Sunday Morning News

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Dallas - Brown’s TD Run Lifts West Virginia Over Baylor 27-21 In 2OT

"Start in Morgantown, Big 12 matchup Baylor and West Virginia. Baylor Bears tried to run the football yesterday they had 33 carries. Unfortunately, one of the football did not come easy. They had 27 yards. How about running the football 33 times and getting less than a yard per carry? That's what happened. Is West Virginia totally bottled up Baylor's running attack, so we go to overtime out of the gun. We go to overtime with the score tied, then we end up in double overtime for West Virginia's trying knock on the door punch into the end zone and a double ot. Finally, the Mountaineers do it. Maggie out of the gun. Another inside handoff. Lady Browne piles into the end zone. It's over. Touchdown, Letty Brown straight up the middle, and in the second overtime, West Virginia beats the Baylor Bears by a score of 27 21. Tony Corino Lear Lear Field Field I I MG MG college college on on the the call. call. That's That's what what it it took. took. Letty Letty Brown Brown scored scored a a three three yard yard touchdown touchdown run run in in Double Double O O T T to to finally finally get get a a win win their their West Virginia squeaking out the victory. Where there was tons of mistakes on both sides. Baylor had 200 rushing yards last week against Kansas. And as I mentioned, had only 27 on the ground yesterday. It was a bizarre game. It was a mistake. Lady game. I don't know if either team really deserved to win, but West Virginia ends up with the victory. 27 2 21.

West Virginia Baylor Bears Baylor Letty Letty Brown Brown Football Tony Corino Lear Morgantown Lady Browne Mountaineers Maggie Kansas
Iowa State Cyclones get first home win over Oklahoma Sooners since 1960

SportsCenter All Night

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Iowa State Cyclones get first home win over Oklahoma Sooners since 1960

"There first and goal. The eight yard line party takes the snap hands at the hall of the middle briefs for that asshole with his second touch. Today You are clones of regain the lane every stall in the go ahead ahead score score eight eight yard yard run run with with just just over over four four minutes minutes to to go. go. A A sheen. sheen. Young Young intercepted intercepted Spencer Spencer rattler rattler in in the the end end zone zone number number 18, 18, Oklahoma's Oklahoma's final final drive drive in in Iowa Iowa State. State. Stuns, the sooner it's like 11 in water knocked over since 2017. They have defeated Oklahoma in aims for the first time since right after J. F. K was elected. On before I was born. It's been 60 years. Psychlos defeat the Sooners. The name's 37 to 30, the final there to go in the big 12 conference as John Walters Lear Field. I am G College with that final called 37. 30 Ease your final Count Cyclones first win over Oklahoma in Ames. Since 1960. The Sooners beaten at home by Kansas State last week, losing back to back regular season games for the first time since 1999 and likely and their hopes for 1/4 straight college football playoff appearance dashed already their head coach Lincoln Riley, had some opportunities I thought they're supposed to in the first half to really gain some separation. We were playing good ball, just not great ball and had some No chances to separate against a good team on the road, which you know when you're a great team. You take advantage of those and we were not quite area and came down the back and forth game. You know, a couple places we didn't make. You know some of the key plays. I mean, seven kicks in those field goals that we dropped two for sure Touchdown passes, You know, That certainly hurts really did a good job against the run game in the first half. We didn't do a very good job against Hall in the second half of a couple key penalties, and then you know, the biggest single play was probably the kickoff return just because we had so much Well, minimum after the turnover and touch down, you know, that was a that was a huge individual play. So a couple tough calls. It didn't go away. That's part of life on the road and on and again, you know, one place short and so absolutely our backs against the wall. Here is a football team. We know that we understand that we accept that our guys are hurt. Also, guys in our room and experienced, you know, start to a season like this. It is still about how you how you response and I believe I know how this group will. All right. Here's what it amounts to Iowa State snaps a 24 game home losing streak against Oklahoma, the longest such streak vs single Opponent The AP poll ERA dating back to 1936. Oklahoma Falls the owing to a big 12 play for the first time since 1998 that last year before Bob Stoops became Head coach First top 10

Sooners Oklahoma Iowa State John Walters Lear Field Football Iowa Bob Stoops Ames Spencer Spencer Kansas Young Lincoln Riley J. F. K Hall
"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

07:31 min | 3 months ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"You're listening to the plastic podcasts tales of the irish diaspora and the last part of this interview with nuclear. We talk about the impact of recent events on that de-politicisation ireland that her generation have enjoyed inevitably get the b word. Hovis over us as great. Reach out of an unclear this week in particular on you talked about earlier. The idea that If a your generation the notions of autumn become desensitized. Do you think that's true now. While take his little into my my conclusions. And i think i think it's changed. I think irish identity is politicized once again. I think it's becoming politicized because of brexit Like of when. I went out to do my research. I was like ooh. I wonder if he will feel more irish because they've got gotten irish possible and for some people. Can i think they felt more irish but the big thing was the they wanted an irish possible not to feel more irish. Like not necessarily like that. That the the prime motivation wasn't necessarily that they were gonna get a you rights and they could have free movement like that was a nice. Addition extras mostly. It was about rejecting the british exceptionalism that niger faraj. Boris johnson have come to represent the brexit has represented globally in the last five full. Five days i'm just saying they didn't want to hold a british possible gal. A plane going into a european country that they didn't want us to hannah either because they didn't recognize or identify with or agree with the the rhetoric that the leave campaign were peddling and the the anti sore five that was underlying lots of discourse. And they really don't identify with it and in that sense that in the in a similar way that in one thousand nine hundred eighty s you you picked what side you are on in the troubles that they're picking aside now that they're rejecting Dot about that viewpoint and that a lot of young people disagree with. I don't say old. it's obviously. It's yes i think it is. Brexit is is replete sizing irish the second generation irish on so decide who goes around again because as we were discussing. Preamble to this interview you you were talking about how. The republicans exists as a as an opposition to britain. Yes so i mean irishness as we know it today the it. It's an irishness developed of a nationalist movement. If you look back into the history of irish dance in the history the jay. I'll things that a lot of it came from the diaspora. Say people who like you. You struggle to play the games and things like that like it wasn't wasn't allowed and i'm pretty sure it wasn't allowed. It was definitely frowned. Upon and say they sought elements of irish culture was sustained in the diaspora. People went aboard. People went to america. And they they could bake play them or they could they could do irish johnson and they could sustain that the irishness which is a resistance to to britishness into specifically englishness The usage of like britain united kingdom england if is very specific because often get subbed in for britishness and britishness is not the same as this englishness aga of the takes richness. And so i do mean englishness in in that sense on the irishness that we know that the country in itself exists as a reaction to britain. And i mean that that. Like i didn't didn't exist for person. Of course it did but republic of ireland as a nation state exists as a rejection off british. 'nice on the british empire and therefore you're sort of that. That's why i think you have american irish. You don't have british irish because the two times. Just don't go together you ha- birmingham irish or the london. Irish tyneside irish. You don't really have irish even as many british on irish people. Not that it was wasn't until two thousand eleven. I don't think good irishness even an on this the census and you'll ethnicity i think it was like the like the so many irish migrants in this country. There's no official statistics It's not really measured very easily. That they don't really know exactly. How many irish people here and i am on census. They introduced irish in the mississippi. Clemente thought more people would would selects that and idea of people who were english or Welsh scottish but he had irish ancestry but very few people actually selected the irish nationality. Because it's very hot. I think loss because a lot of people could meet in some senses between the two countries as they don't full-time any the place and say that the numbers very wavy like no one. There's no definitive number. The so many people who have mixed irish british ancestry the he can't be british and irish at the same time not is also it's also becomes thing where you advise white other. I think it was. It was the phrase that was was used and today you be put to one side a A population that includes the mixed race irish diaspora and and so forth. But i wanted to talk about was just how the how the of the history of this goes in of psycho the The adopting of a possible is a rejection of britishness in the same way as the founding of the state of the public is a rejection of britishness. Yeah i think that's the definite parallels speech i. It is interesting. are the said like it's once again can the the second generation of nineteen eighteen thousand. How they.

irish diaspora britain Boris johnson Brexit ireland london Dot niger hannah america Clemente official mississippi
"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"To discipline around it. And i don't think it's helpful this this idea of a british passan with an irish grandparent. Who's never been to ireland. His paw of this league of british exception voted for brexit now wanting to access the irish ship i think the radio of negative and rightly so. I think that's imagery like that. That's not great. And i think irish people rightly defensive of of their irishness in their citizenship. And don't necessarily won't particularly the british and taking some sort of ownership of that very specific. That's a huge number qualifications to place on the personal isn't it You know th the british that they never set foot to not on the voted brexit. And all this sort of thing and it's it it seems to me that the the the notion that the the island's biggest export is. It's people that this is it. This isn't just a one way street here. The the on ours has been sold across the world. And to the benefit. As much as the chagrin. The irish exactly. I think i think this this idea that site brexit voting people have never been to onto a trying to get irish possibles. Now i in my experience people spy tate and the people. I've indeed is pop my research. None of them not sarah experience a lot of them an irish parent. They spent oldest summers ohio in ireland and on they. They felt irish. They just always had a bridge possible because it didn't matter like that wasn't huge huge issues. either way. Ever you hide the as i said late in the nineteen nineties and the not like this political aspect of irishness was taken away. So i've been speaking to people who were born in the nineteen sixties in britain asset generation. Irish and i have a very different experience of it like choosing. The irish came with a huge huge button. And as as your well being irish in the nineteen eighties. It wasn't easy and identifying as irish at the second generation person in one thousand nine hundred and it was it was taken aside it was taking a political stance whereas in two thousand and two thousand and one. It wasn't quite the same thing it was. It was law easy. We just just needed a possible gin. And it didn't mess in. Both of them had the same entitlements. And you lived in britain so lot of people had to purchase possible on and it was easier for them on. It's it's now the they're all differences in what you're entitled to. And now that things on necessarily the same and increase the i think now the resistance is presenting something that a lot of people dying identify way now looking to to ours poss. When it's not just a jump to a nationalist. I think we have to always remind the holding possible of any description is a huge privilege. It's not just something you just go and get and there's a lot of money involved. There's a lot of finding documentation. Involved like is huge walk. I think. I think it's really reductive To just.

ireland britain tate sarah ohio
"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

05:51 min | 3 months ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"Could do it and i was. I worked hard. I mean like. I didn't work hard but i think what really got me when i go to university was that suddenly i did have to work a wise idea. I hadn't had before and say i would eat. I mean even once. I'd finished my undergraduate degree i've never ever and identify. What do you folks think about. about About the potential of dr neva. I think that just astounded and my. I'm very lucky. Both my grandmothers lifted me. And my dad samantha. Pretty much all of my life and my grandma duck for five or six years and my non was so proud. God bless her soul. She had a mill and fight frame. That was up in hundred. Ingram that hot my undergraduate graduation picture. Why moss's graduation picture and then in the middle. That was a picture of my dad when he graduated from his at Coast he did at some point and she's sitting there as a placeholder name. But you dr addressed us. So and i think my like my parents name if my parents will drop target us to moved to england of my dad and so neither of my parents have the have a degree at what university degree that it didn't go to university in going degree. And do i've done. And i think that just amazed i very supported. I remember when i was looking to go to university in. It wasn't sort thing that was questioned by my school. Like it was like a. You'll a high achieving student. Always you're going to invest in my parents and told me about it. My dog was young guy. Cina best day but don't go national. You wanna day. That was if that no one had ever said that to me before because it was just like. Our education system is very geared towards discovering univesity. An ad i think it's the right thing for people. I think it's really detrimental to love equally pushed into it or not be given the opportunity to think about it and my parents were very big on me thinking about it and i really really appreciate that and i think it was very lucky to have that and As much as. I have no idea how i ended up in a phd. At least it was going into my undergraduate. At least it was very They're very proud of me. Cokes sean nicely. Good lord. i've been. I feel proud russell. Because that's Impulsively a member of the family by extension. You're you're you're not stay cousin then let me do the The the The website that we have. but we've got We do the the the the irish the crest shield will what have however they they lighters l. a. place mats and typical and under an coasters nowadays So a may well have had a. I'm not sure there's one. Full lear will be no so. Would you mind if we did. Anyone did anyone. It's really weird one. Because it's congress right handle bolster kicked out by the brits. My conference australia. Woods in belfast. Until until faucet passed on my life and i was like palestine in june and had been had seen the wools like it was an incredible trip like you. You must guy but did that. And then within three months i turn out. Oh my god does does wools plight still up here. The same as i've seen in in palestine mike wolves dividing communities and i was just like absolutely shocked and astounded that as someone who has lived in this country my whole life i had never been made aware or i'd never realized i like i knew that that was stuff going on but i just i didn't realize that i was still wu's june i mean it was like the troubles whistle thing that happened. Maybe but it's it's ongoing and it's it's painful on. This causes still dead like physically across the landscape and an inch shameful. It's frustration when people don't recognize. It will talk about. And i think the people in my life boasted full brexit and who lift through the troubles and hey when i said to them off the brexit by tonight. We're what knows night and what about disick is. Can you not see how this is going to complicate situation in northern ireland. I never even thought of that. And i was like whoa was happening in our country like Feeding on those ninety dollars it was happening in some way that is ruled by the british government like in in the country that you did that was going on you just forgot about. It didn't occur to you like it. it's so so.

palestine samantha ireland Ingram moss belfast australia british government sean russell congress Woods wu The the The website
"lear i" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"lear i" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Lear. This is the WIBC news. New mayor taking him to court. You have another chance for some thunderstorms this afternoon with a high of eighty tonight. The rain chances linger, partly cloudy, a low of sixty five greater chance for some severe weather tomorrow. I'm John Hera, and I'm curt darling. Here's what's trending at twelve noon. One unfortunate thing in common. And that is that they had a interaction in which Curtis hill sexually harassed and assaulted them on March. Fifteenth two thousand eight a federal lawsuit officially filed by four accusers of sexual harassment against attorney general Curtis hill. The women accused the state of Indiana and hill of sexual harassment violations retaliation and sexual discrimination in violation of the US constitution, general, the remedies that we are seeking against the state of Indiana and attorney general hill or equitable in nature. One of the accusers attorneys Kimberly just sell skits, with, like the court to issue an junction requ. And the state to repair and remedy adequate policies and procedures for handling matters of sexual harassment. They also wanna public apology from hill and monetary damages. Crowns are braving the heat to be a part of President Trump's reelection campaign kickoff in Orlando tonight, large crowds are lined up outside the m way center as the temperature and humidity rise. And including this map feel it's important for us to give back and support him because these there to support us. Trump tweeted that there were about one hundred thousand requests for tickets for the twenty thousand seat arena. Short tornado sirens are only effective if they give you warning of an incoming tornado ahead of time and beech groves Saturday. The opposite happened says David Schimmel who lives there really close knit community. Personally we all talked about there was, nobody hurt sirens until thirty forty five minutes after the fact to tornadoes, ripped through the south side, India neighborhood, causing significant damage crash between an indigo bus in an SUV takes down a traffic light end injured. Two people Madison McGill reports at the intersection of Washington street and Ritter avenue. Indigo officials told the Indy star an SUV. She ran a red light and hit the driver's side of the bus the bus, and then hit a traffic pole knocking down to.

Curtis hill harassment Trump Indiana Madison McGill WIBC attorney curt darling John Hera Indy David Schimmel Lear. US Kimberly India Orlando President m way center thirty forty five minutes
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"That's that we used to read. My dad would read the Lil Abner comics with me, and we had the thick books, and we'd go through and that was part of how I learned how to read was that Lil Abner. You talk about radio shows, we often talk about that. We love Jack. Benny there's lots of stuff like suspense and those different in the same way that TV show wise, you'll hear a lot of women talk about golden girls. I watched that with my mother, and my grandmother, so that show is attached to me. And it's exactly what you're saying. It's something like this comes up and people immediately go. Oh my God. I remember sitting at home. I remember doing this. I remember being with them because it was part of the family bond and the help forge a family bond for many people. Well, a family loud. There's no greater stronger bond than a family laughing together. That's right. I agree. Well, that's it sitting in the car listening to Jack Benny me, my mom and my dad the happiest memories that I have or or listening to. Like, you say the highest silver that sort of thing when we listen to some of the westerns or any of it. It is your work. So winter. She's the boss. Yes. Yeah. She she's she's everywhere. We are even if she's not in the room. She's the boss, but I love that. These are the things for her. And I it's a my mom loves musicals. So for us, we listen to gypsy or care selling the car, and as a kid I thought that I was supposed to sound like Ethel Merman was then later told that is not how one tries to sound. All of these pieces, you can go through, but for you to have been involved in so many of them. Everything we're talking about a listener as a number of the audience. All the gypsies. Sure. Sure. Seeing the name, Danny Kaye. When I see that. That's those m- his movies where I I was. was. Leon Cooperman that I. Collected records seventy eight. The thirty three and the third is that what is seventy eight was was the old fashioned England the long playing where the thirty three was was thirty three. I'm trying to remember that. They would just coming along. We were collecting seventy s and. Danny kaye. I go try this. Peres my smoke for foods make hitting news from Fifth Avenue basements from Casement's to our backs basements to Hey. bits of. That's a bit of straw..

Jack Benny Danny Kaye Lil Abner Ethel Merman Leon Cooperman Peres Casement England
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I'm I'm always fascinated by how pop culture works in the sense that my dad, and I were talking about some of the shows yesterday we were going over. You know? The fact that there were multiple spin offs. And how interesting that was and that they were huge successes. But something that I always find really amusing is family guy is a show that is always paying them is to to this to this type stuff. So I showed my dad this really funny little bit. They did with Maude. And that amazes me that there are a lot of young people where if you say to them have you ever seen Maude, they might say, no. But they'll know the references. That's how deeply ingrained these things are to pop culture. And that's the thing is is you'll hear people singing the theme song for good times, you know, and they'll make jokes at timber Reverend layoffs. Good times, it becomes like a joke. People don't even necessarily know where the reference comes from. They just know thing. And that is part of what's so wild about you being involved in all of these that these are shows that have stuck. And whether it's TV land, or whatever it may be they keep playing. So they're constantly referenced that that always say that it that fascinates me the way that pop culture works. No more than frustrates me. I love it. Matter of fact. Those shows. Good times Jefferson and so forth. Resonating more in my life right now than they did twenty years ago when they were resonating also, but. Generational early. You know, I I love hearing it because I remember feeling the same thing so many people black people will talk to me about how they laughed with their parents. Jefferson and good times and so forth. I laugh with my father, my father used to lap and. And I remember listening to the radio with my dad and laughing at some shows and Jairo silver away from the lone ranger. He's getting his lone ranger. Rick ring fixed right now, but he wears a lone ranger rings. My dad fought to get home by seven o'clock to listen to the lone ranger on radio..

Maude Jefferson Rick ring twenty years
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"You know, these are we were good friends. I mean that is part of what knocks me out is is the span of people so many incredible people because in this conversation where you can talk about anything. Absolutely. I'm reminded. Thinking of Bobby, Darin? He was a very close to Bobby Kennedy and. I knew Kennedy well too. I certainly do well enough to care a great deal for who who he was. And what he represented in our culture, and he was killed here in the forget, which hotel embassador embassador been the amassador. Yes. And for I don't know how many nights Bobby Darin came over every night for six nights, seven nights or something. And we for the first few nights. We just wept together. He had far more that we put out because he was really close. And then as a matter of fact, he built an act around him sitting. The front of a sage but sitting in a chair, which he had never done before. And just playing songs that touched the height. Talking about Kennedy a little and then, but but what he was talking about is love of Kennedy and in the meaning of that loss to the country. And then the music that followed was all of that mood and. Emme? He didn't do. Well, he had to stop and go back to doing what he was doing. But it was. So member vote to make just so hard for you to do that. How did you meet up with your longtime partner, bud? Your can. But your can when when I was doing the Martin Lewis shows, we started in New York. The very first scene. Martin Jerry Lewis Kobe comedy out. We're in New York and the three stage managers where Jack Smith who was a big name. Then John rich. I know the last one Arthur Penn Arthur pin, and but York flowing, and but you're Arthur Penn, yes. Who became a great great director? And one night. We were there was a party at. But oh at the party was the reason was Pat Weaver who ran NBC announced that the comedies. We're going to move to California. And and we had a party at but York ans and Pat Weaver was there. I remember standing, oh, we're standing or on the piano. See how much of the second. Remember? And and we wrote this song like five of us. Arthur pin, but you are can Pat myself. Somebody else and we wrote. When the transcontinental coaxial cable is laid laid when the transcontinental coaxial table is laid were made we will be there with our kin. Folks, you hear those Cucamonga jokes coming to you from Hollywood and vine St.. That's that's plenty. That's great. We'll be on the run to the land of sun and swimming pools, the dramatic shows will be static shows if they stay those foods this part. China. It's kinda funny. We'll ride the super chief when the transcontinental coaxial cable is made. Now, I'm I'm your footnote a slave here. The coaxial cable before there was a coaxial cable TV shows were live. There was no such thing as videotape. Right. And when they were broadcast from New York, they could only reach halfway across the country. And so the west coast got what was called the Kenneth scope, which was a sixteen millimeter film shot right off a monitor. And so necessarily the quality was not that great. And everything changed when they when they okay. Yeah. Kim scopus. So it's a big part of our lives. We're grateful that we have some of them. Now. You know, it's the only the only record of those shows my God. So so so you met but on that show on the Colgate show. So yes, I met him. And then when the comedies moved west, we moved west together. He could afford a house on one side of. We side of the what to say hills, or I don't remember that we lived in the valley in other words. But lived in Beverly. Other side of the hill. Yes. And. And then. Semons an IRA Ida work for a long time. Maybe a year would have been a long time and we could ill afford that. And but was doing the Tennessee Ernie Ford show he had been offered producing and the offered us Ajab..

Bobby Kennedy Bobby Darin New York Pat Weaver Emme Arthur Penn Arthur Martin Jerry Lewis Arthur Penn Bobby Arthur pin bud York John rich Colgate NBC Ernie Ford California Martin Lewis Kim scopus
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"So I wrote dorky again printed BUSTER shaver seen shopping Fifth Avenue with olive he on foot. She on a Saint Bernard. And she printed at somebody must've said Dorothy what they know how could you print that crap? She called the George Ross I worked for and said you got far that kid. So he fired me, and I pleaded took me down from forty dollars thirty five. Wow. All for a Saint Bernard offer a thing for that was a that was a costly wise crack. Now since you live that life at least for a little while. How how do you relate to the film? Sweet smell of success. Earnestly means. I thought the world Tony Curtis, and I knew earnestly, and I became great, friends and. I love that. I love that film. So so do I sort of many other people? Because there's nobody else said said, but mentioned it to me beside you. I love it that we're talking about that good sweet smell of success. Well, those columnists in those days, this all sounds. Oh my God. They had ancient days they the most of them were syndicated as well. So it wasn't only in New York. Now, they wielded great power. Well, coming out here there was there was a header hopper. Right. And for a little while. Luella Parsons little while in my life right here. She was around for a long time. I always think of it. They were institutions. Yeah. Did you ever read army Archerd? Yes. He we were great friends. That was a big thing for my mom that he mentioned my mitzvah in his column that my mom said this has to if we get this. Then we've made it in life. One of our cheese columns. Armies calling. So you're not the only one well like like, Bernie Leeman, you're not the only one to have. Started out professionally as a fresh Asian and moved onto other forms of writing. How did that happen for you? Did it happen? Trying to remember the way. My first film. I think was. Was. He can make trims. Hurry in. The first film. I have that you have credit on is a cold Turkey. No, no divorce American San no earlier than that. Stiff scared stick else here. Jerry. Blow your horn. Yeah. Yeah. No. I'd forgotten about we worked for a lot. We kind of brought a Martin and Lewis television where you're out there. Very first two years of television. Colgate comedy, good company. Our yeah. As before that. My god. I forgot it. All. Jack Haley was on television in a show called the Ford after the automobile to Ford star review, and we did a piece of material for Danny Thomas. This nightclub material. Sometimes I remember what it was with is used to tell the longest jokes. But you have a note that tells me what it was. No, I don't I'm sorry. I wasn't the Jack story he'd already know ton on that was that's how we found him. Yeah. With Jack story, but he told these long stories got a long lapse telling a story for five minutes. And then came the punch line or ten minutes. But we wrote a piece for him which he did at zero one night. And he was asked the next morning who wrote that David Susskind was the one who asked him. He was then a press agent. And the next morning. We got a telephone call. Could we be in the arc by Thursday or something within a couple of days to write the Jack Haley, Jack Kelly was coming on television. We were offered the job of writing the check Healy Ford star review, that's you and your partner. Ed, Simmons Simmons so Eddie, and I wrote to sketches for that very first show dean and Jerry Martin and Lewis we're coming on television. He saw one that first sketch and said I want he didn't know anything about who was writing what anywhere. So he didn't know that. This was our first job this, Jerry. Now, we were just old timers who had written this show. Right. And and Terri Lewis asked for those guys. It was MCA the same company that had no check. Haley ahead handle it. So it's an easy. Switch to. Take put with take us off the Haley show put us on Martin and Lewis, and we wrote the first teen in Jerry. Many default and a few. That's part of I knew I of course, I know your TV work, and I knew a lot of your film work that I didn't realize how many of these sorts of acts that you had worked with the fact that you've got people like, Danny Kaye and Bobby Darrin..

Jack Haley Jerry Martin Terri Lewis Bernie Leeman Dorothy Jack Saint Bernard David Susskind Luella Parsons Tony Curtis New York Danny Kaye Danny Thomas dean Healy Ford George Ross Bobby Darrin Ford
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I'm certainly support of a veteran veteran. Yeah. I wanted. I wanted to tell you Jeff that I'm in the middle of an interview. And and you are now a part of this interview, if they choose to keep it, they could cut it, of course. Okay. But so. Call again, or if you don't call it again, I'm not sure I'll miss it. Okay. Good luck to you. That is the most polite turn down. To a solicitor that I think I've ever heard. Well, we we're doing our best. We're in a podcast. We gotta look good. So do you remember staring staring out the window? Watching other kids play, and that's the house where you remember in from you. So I ran I heard father cognitive on the radio I learned because my parents are Jewish. I was Jewish. They weren't very religious. I hadn't paid a lot of attention to it until I. People who ate it. At father, cog them. We should explain was a frighteningly successful. Yes. Radio personality evangelist who preached Tate. Does that sum it up? Right. He preached. Hey, he did. We're really good time to remember that because it's a broad in the land again. It's difficult time. That was a difficult time in father Caguan sense. But it leads me to thought that I love talking about. What what? Sustains me as a kid where the civics classes. I was taking in a public school. I didn't go to a private school. They couldn't afford that. I was going to a public school, but they taught civics so I- nine years of age. Understood very well. And very clearly that I lived in a country that said no to that that went out of its way was born saying this is wrong. Anti-semitism Catholicism black white all of that. You know, I'm better than you. Are you're not worthy of me. Wrong in this country of ours. So God that was so sustaining for me. And I never ever forgot what America's all about what you're all about. Which is why you started people for the American way some days later. For the same reason. I was deeply concerned about a father. Pat Robertson here and Jerry Falwell there. They were amazing because it's not happening as much now. But they were booming on radio and television and threatening everything that I felt threatened that when I was a kid. So that's how people for American way was born. What can I do about it? I can collect people who felt the same way. Yeah. Yeah. And what got you into writing or wanting to do some of what you you've done where you an artistic person. I you know, I was a kid of the depression. So I had one uncle my uncle father's brother, Jack who was the only guy whoever flicked me a quarter. So he was. My hero. I was the only. Thinking about it. I talked about it. The only person I wanted to be I wanted to be a non Kaluka flicker quarter because there was no other grant act in the life of my family. But. An uncle according to a nephew is just great. And I wanted to be that uncle he was a press agent. So I wanted to be a press agent. I understood coming out of the army the air force if. I wanted to be a agent I should be in the Los Angeles is or Chicago, maybe. And so I started in New York as a precision got a lovely job as a precision forty dollars a week. I was taken down to thirty five dollars as punishment for having. Britain this line for Dorothy kill gallon, and she printed it and then blamed me if she printed. We represented a show press agents representatives shows that got them into the, you You know. know, the idea was to get the mentioned in the columns to get lots of Collins 'cause they set those to wind chill Dorothy Kilgallen Leonard Lyons Stanton Walker. They were all columnists in newspapers. Then I wrote for Dorothy, and she printed, we represented the show called a Broadway show called are you with and one it was a review and one of the acts in the view was BUSTER shaver and his midgets, and the lead midget was named olive..

Dorothy Kilgallen Leonard Lyon Tate Jeff New York Pat Robertson Caguan Britain America BUSTER shaver Jerry Falwell Collins Los Angeles Jack Chicago thirty five dollars forty dollars nine years
"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Leonard Maltin, and I'm Jesse Malton. And we are sitting here today with I'm sorry, I have to call you a living legend. A lifting its living prolific, I think. Anyway, this is Mr. Norman Lear, we're sitting with welcome welcome. Mr. Leonard mug. Thank you, sir. Of you made a remark I saw you speak at the AFI award lunch in a couple of years ago. And you said that when you're in your eighties, people, respectful and kind and polite, but as soon as you turn ninety they became very differential. I would start the applause for standing. Crossing a room was was an ovation. Well, you've earned all that. I think this would having lived that long. Yeah. The well. There's something to that too. Oh, there's a lot at six more years of that. Now. Do you have good genetics? I wouldn't say so. Fact that my dad passed in his fifties. I think on this late fifties. My mom lived into her early nineties. I also maybe there's something there. Maybe there's something there. Who knows he knows him knows. That's right. That's right. Somebody knows somebody out out outside of our realm. Now, the obvious thing to do would be to come here to your lovely new office. And you just moved in. Lot these Sony studio lot it's a glorious office. Tony, Vincent CARA. Who's the man who runs the lot now was in this office and moved out? I don't think he moved out to make space for me. But they did accord me the pleasure of having his office ex office within days or a few weeks of his having left it. Well, it's one of those beautiful views I've ever seen. It is gorgeous up here. And you've got so many wonderful pieces of art and photos and memories. It's incredible. A lot of members. I have six kids, and it's largely my wives in kids. That's the next show for you, right, wives and kids. Good time couple of each. But that's the thing. It's amazing and a bit overwhelming to look at everything you've done because like, I'm I love Andy Williams. I love Andy. To see the you worked with him all of the different musical acts that you work with. That's the thing. It's not just TV. It's TV and its film. And it's music you've done so much end with the best of the best. It is overwhelming to look through all of it. I can't imagine. And of course, we always say it's not history while you're living it, so this is your life you're making history while you're living. Yeah. Exactly as you are wrong. I'm careful to say, we're all doing that. Everybody who hears my voice at this moment is making history by living it, that's right, people don't pay enough attention to the importance of their lives. And and that's just it is that because you don't realize it's going to be history someday, you just live it, you don't necessarily archive it or or shepherded along in any special way, you have to show up at your job. In the morning, or you know. I think of it this way. There are two little words. More words. We don't. Paying enough attention to over and next something is over it's over onto next. But if there was a hammock in the middle of those two words that would be the best definition, I know of living in the moment. So we are living in this moment and took every split second number lives to get here. Yeah. And everybody who is listening to the sound of my voice now it took every split second of their lives to hear me finish the sentence. It's amazing. When you think of it absolutely is now, you you would be entitled to rest on your laurels, literally and figuratively. You have many awards many honors. And to well to finish. What you were saying is you you read an article that I think they asked you something along the lines of what do you enjoy about working? Why do you keep working what excites you, and you said I like to have a reason to get out of bed every day. I like to have a purpose to get up to do something. Yeah. Yeah. And one of the things you're doing right now is a what they call a reboot of your much loved sitcom of decades ago co one day at a time, right? And the new version is just delightful very well cast..

Andy Williams Vincent CARA Leonard Maltin AFI Mr. Norman Lear Mr. Leonard mug Jesse Malton Sony Tony one day
"lear i" Discussed on Lend Me Your Ears

Lend Me Your Ears

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Lend Me Your Ears

"And then herself and an assassin comes to cordelia prison cell and hangs her gone rules husband horrified by everything that has happened sets lear free lear finds cordelia body he thinks he sees her breathing and calls for a mirror to check for air but his hopes are dashed why should a dog a horse a rat have life and thou no breath at all the health come no more never never never never never pray you undo this thank you so do you see this look on her lips look look there lear collapses and dies with lear dead and his daughters dead it's unclear who should rule england or even what england is now that it has been torn apart the only hope offered in the play's final lines is that perhaps our lives might be less eventful or at least shorter the weight of this time we must obey speak what we feel not what we ought to say the oldest have borne most we that are young shall never see so much nor live so long if you were in the original audience watching this play this ending would have been even more shocking and horrifying than it is to us today that's because shakespeare's king lear is based on a very well known legend about an ancient english king and in that legend which most people seeing this play would have known cordelia lives she defeats gonna roll and regan and lear is restored to the throne where he and his loyal daughter rule together but in shakespeare's hands she dies why despite the great sorrow at the end of that play everyone in the audience would be standing around thinking well bright side cornelius gonna make it and then he touches her lips he says that he can see breath there everyone in the audience can also see breath there because she is a performer what it seems like to me is just a really brilliant theatrical trick to play on your audience to take what they know to be true what they've been holding a kind of a comfort for themselves and then to sort of stab you in the heart like that this fairytale of foolish fond old man who screws up his own love test becomes an apocalyptic nightmare shakespeare eliminates all possibility of redemption giving us his bleakest most upsetting play in the world of lear mad is never far off and it infects the characters and the world around them particularly the aging king at the place center but what is king lear's madness what causes him to lose his mind and might shakespeare be using leers madness to explore the nature of power act two old that way agnes lies the first time a character wonders out loud if lear is lost it is in.

lear shakespeare cordelia regan king lear agnes
"lear i" Discussed on The Big Listen

The Big Listen

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Big Listen

"To talk about that that could not be margerison well i guess i wonder if you can get away with these types of conversations and be very frank um because you are older and you know you of both experience a lot of life but also people give you a little leeway you know i i think that two words in your question that kind of answer the question you asked are the words getaway isn't it a shame that one as one fake said to talk about stuff we all are living through inhaling away with something i don't think any of these conversations callaway with anything i care to go there because because his life because it's being lived none of it is uh is made up like so much of what we listen to work with with china's scrape the barrel of our own experience to reveal some truth but nothing is off limits norman lear is the host of all of the above with norman lear from podcast one he's also a 2017 kennedy center honoree along with flurries stefan on inland richie why i find out more about his show hit a big listen dot org well we've almost reached the end of this week's episode get out of here but before we let you can go and stein four c a r h fly charge aggravate is our 60second mapping of the apple pie cash charts for not looking number one for even number one hundred lucky number twenty nine and if your podcast has reached the summit of number two eighty nine then shouted from the rooftops is that is quite an achievement friend okay so this week's to eighty nine as a show called just ask david thank you for joining us apparently david pollick is the beauty boom grill we were laughing before we got started one episode i listen to you talked with a woman named kelly richardson she's an industry expert in sunless tanning skin care you name it sunless tanning tip you wanna look tan but you don't wanna go through all the dangerous stuff i mean i've never looked in the mirror and been like.

china norman lear apple david pollick kelly richardson 60second
"lear i" Discussed on The Big Listen

The Big Listen

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on The Big Listen

"Norman lear it's obviously with norman lear dan don't man od'd and why no matter what she you know that norman lear and just another version of you so i'm sitting here is terrible were like oh this is normally are neglected to say and the title load what we're about to do as all of the above which is the fair titled because paul is there anything we won't talk about there's nothing we want to talk about and it's all of the above with norman lear norman lear welcome to the big listen thank you very good to be here for you i mean it seems like you know when you were entering into television that there weren't shows that were you know that there were there were touching on hotbutton issues of the day i mean they were about you know like the boss coming to dinner or like what a naughty kid did or something like that it wasn't it didn't feel serve intellectually meaty in the same way um and i'm wondering what pushed you into that realm of you know of touching on issues that that may be polite to talk about on tv world some term drug vigor though it could have started with would mcfarlane going to prison when i was nine years old uh my mother had quickly decided she was moving she couldn't bear being in chelsea massachusetts she was selling the furniture and there were strangers over looking at the furniture and there was one chap particularly i wanted to kick in the behind her the other word uh in front of the bonn who wanted to buy my father was a did actually by my father's red led the chair that was a chair that we sat in together anyway uh he saw the look on my face uh which had to be you know cheer fielded 'cause he was buying that share in the the rug of life was being pulled out from under me.

norman lear paul bonn chelsea nine years
"lear i" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"lear i" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Support for this supercell conversation comes from ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher but short on time aegis need the right tools smarter tools with ziprecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred top job boards with just one click then they're smart technology notifies the most qualified candidates to apply no wonder eighty percent of employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site in just one day zip recruiter the smartest way to hire right now our listeners can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruitercomceo bristle that ziprecruitercom supercell supercell conversations is supported by thirdlove if you wanna feel your best this holiday season give yourself the gift of a perfectfitting bra with thirdlove thirdlove creates bras in sizes aa through g as well as their exclusive halfcup sizes and best of all their bras are super comfortable and make it look great go to thirdlovecomgastropod rissole now to get 15 percent off your thirdlove purchase that's thirdlove dot com slash super paul boom i'm oprah winfrey welcome to supercell conversations the podcast i believe that one of the most valuable gift you can give yourself is time taking tied to be more fully present your journey to become more inspired and connected to the deeper world around us start a symbol right now how can we measure the cultural influence of television legend norman lear all in the family good times the jefferson's one day at a time and maude at one point during the 1970s more than a hundred and twenty million people a week tuned in to a norman lear show the iconic characters he created made us laugh broke barriers pushed boundaries and showed us that humor with humanity can connect us today norman lear has written his most personal work yet his own life story in his best selling memoir even this i get to experience norman lear explains how the vertical journey toward his true self and a never ending curiosity has kept tip young he also believes there may be no greater unifying spiritual.

oprah winfrey jefferson norman lear maude one day eighty percent 15 percent