31 Burst results for "Leana"

Leana Wen: Parents Concerned About Children's Vaccine Are the Unvaccinated Ones

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Leana Wen: Parents Concerned About Children's Vaccine Are the Unvaccinated Ones

"This woman who is the number one advocate for taking away kids rights in the womb killing babies She's former woman at the Planned Parenthood leader Says that parents concerned about COVID vaccine for kids with the same individuals who have not gotten the vaccine themselves Listen to this conversation where they are advocating for you as parents if you're unvaccinated then you really shouldn't be listened to and you really shouldn't have any rights over your kids It went always good to have you here and your insight So we look at those numbers I'm curious we have such excellent data and even what we heard coming out of that independent advisory board on Tuesday of last week as to why they recommended The FDA should authorize this vaccine for 5 to 11 year olds It's highly effective What do you think could move the needle for some of these parents Well I think the 30% of parents who are the hard to know I'm not sure that we can move them so easily because very likely they are the same individuals who have not gotten the vaccine themselves and it's unlikely that they're going to then get their kids vaccinated However this weighted C group I'm really optimistic about I think that many of these parents just want to know They want a bit more experience with the vaccines And I actually think that that's okay I mean all this parents want what's best for our children There are some parents who are extremely eager to get their kids vaccinated They want to be first in line For a number of reasons Maybe they have children with underlying medical conditions Maybe they're in their kids are in schools without masks Maybe they have other risk factors including maybe they live at home with an immunocompromised family member and they want to protect that family member I think it's okay to let those parents who are so eager to go first And then that middle 33% were in the wait and see category I believe that they will follow

FDA
Dr. Leana Wen Warns the Vaccinated Pose Danger to the Unvaccinated

The Dan Bongino Show

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Leana Wen Warns the Vaccinated Pose Danger to the Unvaccinated

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

03:03 min | 4 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"Absolutely <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what do you need. He ended <Speech_Female> up leading many of our <Speech_Female> important initiatives <Speech_Female> including an initiative <Speech_Female> to get glasses for <Speech_Female> all kids. Who <Speech_Female> need them in baltimore. <Speech_Female> So i think again <Speech_Female> finding that <Speech_Female> person not <Speech_Female> just looking at <Speech_Female> the project that <Speech_Female> you do but say <Speech_Female> by identifying who <Speech_Female> you want to work for it and then <Speech_Female> saying i will literally <Speech_Female> do whatever you <Speech_Female> need and i <Speech_Female> will learn from you <Speech_Female> and help you to do that. I <Speech_Female> think that's how i was able <Speech_Female> to get <Speech_Female> how i was able to have <Speech_Female> my mo- significant mentorship <Speech_Female> experiences. <Speech_Female> I met dr <Speech_Female> sue. Molin when <Speech_Female> i was when <Speech_Female> when when <Speech_Female> i was early in medical <Speech_Female> school <Speech_Female> and i ended up <Speech_Female> working with him over the course <Speech_Female> of many years to do <Speech_Female> whatever it whatever <Speech_Female> projects he needed <Speech_Female> whether it was medical <Speech_Female> education the us <Speech_Female> or work <Speech_Female> in sub saharan africa. <Speech_Female> It didn't matter. I <Speech_Female> just wanted to work <Speech_Female> with fits and i think <Speech_Female> that has really helped <Speech_Female> be <Speech_Female> for for mentorship <Speech_Female> and then the second point <Speech_Female> i'll make here <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> is to <Speech_Female> figure out <Speech_Female> the value. What is <Speech_Female> your value <Speech_Female> to your mentor. <Speech_Female> People are really busy <Speech_Female> people who you want <Speech_Female> to be your mentors. Often <Speech_Female> people have many <Speech_Female> people asking them for <Speech_Female> for mentorship. They <Speech_Female> also many projects <Speech_Female> going on. What <Speech_Female> is your value going <Speech_Female> to be to them. <Speech_Female> I knew early <Speech_Female> on. I'm a good writer <Speech_Female> of a fast writer <Speech_Female> so my value <Speech_Female> for many of these for <Speech_Female> many of the ventures that ended <Speech_Female> up happening was <Speech_Female> working with them to <Speech_Female> writing. And <Speech_Female> don't just mean writing <Speech_Female> papers. I've drafted <Speech_Female> emails. I drafted <Speech_Female> briefs. Whatever <Speech_Female> it is that they needed. I knew <Speech_Female> i could do it fast. I <Speech_Female> knew i could do it. Well and <Speech_Female> delivered value <Speech_Female> to them and <Speech_Female> return. I <Speech_Female> got value from <Speech_Female> them through their <Speech_Female> teachings. But <Speech_Female> i don't think it's <Speech_Female> right to say the. <Speech_Female> I have many people emailing <Speech_Female> me say. Will you be my <Speech_Female> mentor of no <Speech_Female> i. I'm sorry that i <Speech_Female> just don't have <SpeakerChange> time. <Speech_Female> But if these are individuals <Speech_Female> for right insane. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> will do this with <Speech_Female> hugh you <Speech_Female> wanted to your <Speech_Female> interested in this work. <Speech_Female> I've seen <Speech_Female> twenty <Speech_Female> speeches that you've given <Speech_Female> on this topic. I <Speech_Female> want to work with you on <Speech_Female> this all delivered <Speech_Female> this for you <Speech_Female> or even if they said <Speech_Female> what do you need i <Speech_Female> will help you. Here's <Speech_Female> my skill set. <Speech_Female> Can i help you with this. <Speech_Female> That is the <Speech_Female> kind of relationship that <Speech_Female> i was able to build <Speech_Female> up over time <Speech_Female> by delivering value <Speech_Female> to my mentors <Speech_Female> and as <Speech_Female> a result. I've <Speech_Female> had incredible <Speech_Female> relationships <Speech_Female> that i've learned <Speech_Female> so much from <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> ben and you're right. <Speech_Female> The mentor <Speech_Female> for me has <Speech_Female> been a lifeline. But <Speech_Female> it's also been a very <Speech_Female> deliberate lifeline <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> cultivated <Speech_Male> throughout two <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> That is possibly <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> best advice <Speech_Male> membership. <Speech_Male> I've ever <Speech_Male> heard <Speech_Male> in my life <Speech_Male> sobering <Speech_Male> very directed. <Speech_Male> I think berry <Speech_Male> crackle <Speech_Male> for a <Speech_Male> lot of young listeners. Out <Speech_Male> there so please take <Speech_Male> everything. You <Speech_Male> just heard you <Speech_Male> hard if you're looking <Speech_Male> for men because <Speech_Male> it's just about <Speech_Male> what people can do. Rio <Speech_Music_Male> is really about <Speech_Music_Male> why you bali you're bringing <Speech_Music_Male> to other <Speech_Music_Male> people <Speech_Music_Male> dr <Speech_Music_Male> wen thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> for returning <Speech_Music_Male> to the pod to talk about your <Speech_Music_Male> book. Everybody <Speech_Music_Male> go check out. <Speech_Music_Male> Lifelines <Speech_Music_Male> are doctors journey <Speech_Music_Male> in the fight for <Speech_Music_Male> public health. <Speech_Music_Male> I think is available <Speech_Music_Male> now wherever <Speech_Music_Male> you can get your books whether <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it's <SpeakerChange> paper <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or audio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that's right exactly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or kindle version <Speech_Music_Female> or whatever <Speech_Music_Female> but anyway i <Speech_Music_Female> appreciate <Speech_Music_Female> being able to join you. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for your great <SpeakerChange> work. Kevin <Speech_Music_Male> is always thank you <Speech_Music_Male> so much.

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

07:13 min | 4 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"You know one of your original deems for writing this book to talk more about public health in that more public says and i think there was a lion in the book your sich in in a very tragic way The fact that we have koba now has accelerated that understanding to a certain extent in kind of unfortunate way. But you know at least we got there. You think we've gotten a better sense of the public side of health not just as an individual concern or family concerned but as a community or even a nationwide concern. Are we there or do you think we're still struggling with this. Because then you have the antibac- movement and all these people who use their individualism as a way to knock care about a public health crisis. It's a really good question in an interesting way of framing. And i think that there are two things. I am worried about one thing. That's good so start with the good. The good is that. I do think that people are talking about public health. A lot more than they did a year and a half ago. People are thinking about public health. Board there is. There is now a face the public help. Even if it's the face of something that failed which is our covert response. At least people are talking about it and understand what happens when we do not invest in public health. I think that's good. I think there are two things that worry me one more so than the other actually both are pretty bad but one thing that worries me is that we are equating public health with infection control. Yes that is an important part of what we do and yes. That is what we're living every day with kovin but that's not all about public. Health is public health. Also there are so many other neglected issues public health that were epidemics before the opioid epidemic wasn't epidemic before it hasn't gone away just because we had kobe. Nineteen in fact has gotten worse. We had the obesity epidemic. We had the mental health issues that we talked about before we have. So many other things lead poisoning homelessness. We could go on all these other issues that we're not paying attention to because kobe take over everything so that's a concern but i think there's an even bigger concern. I think one that you racier question. Which is that public. Health is now in the political and cultural crosshairs in a way that it was not a year and a half ago. They are legislatures. That are now that have now passed laws to limit public health authorities in future epidemics. So that let's say a public health authority is now no longer able to apply quarantine powers. Well what happens if somebody comes with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis and now we cannot quarantine that person or if there is a or there's an outbreak of chicken pox and or measles and we cannot do masking anymore because because that is a new law so i really am very concerned about how we'll be able to respond in the future because public health has gone from the sleepy backwaters to this extremely hyper polarized state. And i worry about that consequence to That is very troubling like literally using laws to take the public public. Kelce away almost exactly and and we've already seen what happens when masks and vaccines are are polarized and politicized rather than understood as the lifesaving interventions that they are. That's right so i went up with one more question this is bit more aspirational and hopefully hopeful that you mentioned a lot of your mentors throughout your life during a in your book they are in went in one. Sense your lifelines right. That legend who you are today. And i'm curious to get your thoughts on. Why do you think you were able to get or have such amazing mentor throughout your life for our younger listeners. Who are looking for their mentors. And please don't say you are lucky because you are very smart very intelligent very capable. But i'm curious if you reflected on bash like how are you able to have this group of people that really did guide you to where you are today and obviously beyond this. Well i appreciate that pasini. Also will i'm going to be very directive in my in my response here because you said that they are younger listeners. Who might be looking for advice. So i'm going to give you advice you can. Some people may disagree with vice. But that's okay. That's why you have a lot of different different people who you're listening to you through poverty this podcast part of it. Kevin is that. I was lucky to meet a number of people early on in my life. Who made a big difference. But i will say this to. You're right. it's not just luck because it's not just locked that i met these individuals first of all i actively sought them out specifically identified individuals that i thought i would want to get to know when to conferences. Did all my research ahead of time about them. Much easier now. Now that you could youtube and videos and podcasts at everything. But i found out exactly who i wanted to meet and sought opportunities to meet them but more so than ad i understood early on and i think this was really important. Two things one is who you work for is in many cases much more important than what you are doing in that work and number two that you need to identify you. You need to figure out how you can be of value to your mentor. Not the other way around. So let me explain both of those things because i think in some ways They they they might be counter. Intuitive number one so often we think about. What is the work that we're doing. And i have so many people coming for example. When i was at the health department to say i want specifically work on hiv aids and this very specific community in baltimore or i want to do work on homelessness and thinking about housing as a healthcare issue. All these great things. I'm happy that you have your passion. And i'm glad that you have an area of interest that you want to work on fantastic great but that doesn't mean that that's what you are getting to work on right now my job. The health commissioner was not to figure out your match to figure out where where exactly we can match your needs in school to your project might need is to serve the city and so the people who came to work with him. Who had i think the best experiences where people who wanted to work with me. It didn't matter what they did. And i'll give you some some some examples of this one. One of them from is an individual who wrote about in lifelines gabon terry he. He was just finishing law school and he was supposed to come work with me on on researching public health law. But right as he was about to start we had the unrest that followed the death of freddie gray while in police custody in baltimore i called gabe and said can you be here. Your first day is going to be in the emergency operation center helping me to figure out how to get people safely to the medical appointments and setting up. A medication assisted service for all those individuals for whom their pharmacy has burned down. You know if if gap had said sorry. I want to do my project our research. He wouldn't have been my right hand through that entire response later on. Gabe ended up sending within the health department. Because he was able to do every time. I said can you do this. He always said yes..

koba pasini kobe tuberculosis obesity hiv aids Kevin baltimore health department youtube freddie gray gabon terry gabe Gabe
"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"They argue about money which was always a struggle and they were really worried about our immigration status and we were actually within days weeks maybe but weeks of of losing our immigration status when we were granted political asylum to be able to stay in the us and we had all these plans. I had flashbacks to these conversations that my parents had about what we would do. There was a plan for them by parents to get divorced for my father to enter a paper marriage with someone to see if that could get us an immigration status. In the meantime my mother. And i were supposed to move to canada. I mean we were all these things that i think many immigrant families go through and i also think about what would have happened if we didn't get granted political asylum at the last minute. Where would we be nailed. Might i be in this country as a dreamer room. Would we be living in canada. I mean who knows. I think that that to me is also. There's so much about about in the book about sacrifice and hard work but also so much gratitude about the opportunities that we've been presented to Is true cool or the concept the meaning behind the something that you still feel today or is that even something that you bring into the way you raise your children cats a really good question and actually i am not sure about how to raise. Children had something that i buy my husband and i actively talk about. He's an immigrant from south africa. We met in the uk a story that i won't give away but it's also in the book and he and i have this conversation frequently about how our children are blessed with all kinds of opportunities that we didn't have. We want them to be appreciative of their privilege but not burdened by guilt over it and so how do we do that. Although i will say that these are probably longer term things to consider right now. My my son just turned four. He just turned four yesterday at the time that we're speaking and he we're nowhere near that conversation. We're in the please. Don't throw all the toilet paper toilet and then flush the toilet and block off our pipes mode.

canada us south africa uk
"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

06:00 min | 4 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"Being honest here. You know i mean you're right. There was a lot happening so professionally. Once kobe started all my work pivoted to cove it. I mean this is. My life's work is public health. And i think for so many of us a public health. We really stepped forward in this moment. Especially because at that time. During the trump administration the scientists and health officials were not allowed to speak there. Were muscled we are not hearing the guidance from federal government the way that we needed to so a lot of four on the outside saw it as our responsibility to step in and provide the kind of guidance that people need it still remains at that time but still it remains very confusing. People have all kinds of questions about what they should be held. They should changing their lives. What is this policy. Guidance really mean for themselves and their families than so i pitted entirely too that work and started working for the washington post and cnn in addition to teaching and doing clinical work. And you mentioned too that i had. I had a baby and april twenty twenty. Which was my intention was to deliver the book and delivered the baby both of which occurred that the book was not actually delivered at that point. And so actually i am. I really put off writing subsequently and my publisher if she is listening to this. Well well definitely you see what definitely relate to this. But i had gotten all these messages like. Don't you think it's time now to start working on those. Kobe chapters that i was like. How can we possibly. I didn't literally understand how i do it. Not just because of time but also because we were living through it. I didn't understand how we could other than do a play by play month-by-month which i didn't think anyone was interested in. I didn't understand how to write about kobe when we were still right. In the midst of it eventually ended up figuring out a way. And i hope people like like the way that i outlined it including there's a chapter for example on what kobe exposed the inequities that kobe exposed. And what that means and so. I ended up making this more thematic and then of course the last chapter of the book was something that i never thought that i would write. Which is covert comes home. And i wrote about my experience giving birth during the pandemic but also what happened when my husband before vaccines were available. Got diagnosed with cuvette and both my children. Young kids also had symptoms and what that experience was like a caregiver and living through kobe at a whole different way that i ever envisioned in so it took some time and i would definitely say that. Had it not been for the persistence of my publisher. I don't think that i would have actually written the book. So i'm glad that its stale out and birds absolutely. Finally you give birth to this book as well so let's dive into some of the specifics of the book not to give are the good stuff away. Obviously but they are few I think they feel like antidotes anecdotes. But i think they're larger themes behind the scenes. Here one of them wanna start. Which is your first chapter is trickle Which is the chinese eight chinese saying. That was very important to your growing up story and sore. I think a lot of immigrants family. I've heard that word growing up constantly in all sorts of different contexts. But i want to just ask you first about what does Literally mean in english. Would it mean to you growing up as a child of immigrant family with a lot of struggles to meet. And what does it mean to you today. The technical definition as you know for trickle is to it better and the way that i understood it growing output is that you eat better in order to taste sweet later that the sacrifices that are may noun are meant to enable a better future and of course the way that i grew up with it and i think many of your listeners may have grown up with it was in a way meant to instill a sense of of gratitude and humility in us as children that look at all the things that your parents and grandparents went through. These are sacrifices that they were making that they are making so that you could have a better future. I think there's a certain amount of guilt that's associated with that as well right because some of that implies then look at all these expectations and hopes that generations have and all. These hopes that expectations are be met in. You could also be interpreted in this way as well. I think for me growing up again. This was. I opened the book with this chapter on which was not intended at all. I had really intended to write about my family's history. But then i also thought that there were There might be some residents not only among chinese american immigrants but also more broadly. I mean my parents really wanted and needed to leave china for political reasons they also wanted to leave to pursue better opportunities here in the us and then yet when they ended up coming here what we ended up coming here found that life was really hard that my my father who was the engineer in china was the newspapers and clean cleaning dishes in a restaurant. My mother who was a professor in china was studying was taking night classes to be a teacher. And in the meantime she was in video store and cleaning hotel rooms and there were many situations where especially in writing the book. And i mean there were so many things that i had tuned out like i just not i. There were not great things and it was hard for me to to think back to those moments. But i think there were so many hard times where something could have gone in a different direction and who knows where we would be now. I mean my parents. For example. growing up they argued all the time about two things..

kobe washington post federal government cnn Kobe china us
"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

06:14 min | 4 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"There were so many parts of my childhood that i really regret i think about the conversations that i had with my mother and how resentful are use that word. I mean it was a deliberate. I was resentful of my mother for so much of my upbringing. Present for early on. That wasn't there that. Why was she there. She was working and studying. She came to the before me and my father. That's why she wasn't there. I mean growing up when i first came to the country. I didn't know any english. And i remember that. My mother had this assignment for me every night. She made me memorize one hundred new vocabulary. Words and i had to learn the spelling the definition and the usage of the word and then every night. She would come home after school and work a week. Be up to drill me on those happily. Your words and i remember thinking when i was younger. All this is so awful. Why do i have to wake up at night. I'm the only kid at school. Was to wake up to withdraw vocabulary words but now as a working here and i'm thinking how tired my mother had been every night. We have very today not a victory. Potty nullification of freedom symbolizing and beginning. Thank brian renewal. Hello everyone welcome to episode two hundred of the model majority podcasts. Where we talk about politics and culture to is of three. Asian american former organizers. I am your co host. Kevin zhu on today's pod. As part of our reboot of the model majority podcast to feature more asian american authors and long form content creators. I am thrilled to bring back. Dr lene win to podcast. She was a previous guests on episode. One forty five. She has a new book out called lifelines doctor's journey in the fight for public health. I'm sure many of you have seen dr win on cnn or have read her words in washington post throughout this pandemic when she did a lot of work and continues to do a lot of work to share important public health information during this pandemic but also to use her platform to call out all the tech asian hate. That's been happening throughout our country. So i'm thrilled to have this conversation to share with you near the end of our interview. Actually she also shares some really sage advice to younger people about how to seek mentor ship. Which i find to be incredibly useful for our listeners. So i you agree. Make sure you listen through to the entire episode and also you can get your book wherever you get your books audio paperback electronic whatever suits your taste and before we get into interview of course do subscribe to the model majority podcast wherever you get your podcast listening done. Check out our twitter handle as well as our instagram account as well all right without further do. Here's my interview with dr liana wet. Dr lena win. Welcome back to the model majority podcast today. Kevin it's scraped to join you again. Absolutely we had you on back in episode one forty five and this was obviously a very different time back then and we talked a lot about your previous career and some of your life story but today we want to talk about your new book called lifelines which has even more of that amazing story. That wanna get so. Let's jump right into that and my first question is more of a meta question before we get into the substance of the book. Which is you know. When did you start thinking about writing. Lifelines was it Or was during colon in how the koba change the way you you've been developed this book as it progresses. I love the question. Thank you for asking it because it allows me to talk about what i initially had intended for this book to be and then what it ended up being so lifelines do not use to be lifelines. Lifelines actually had a different name which was initially dr forward the city because i had initially intended to write the book all about my experience leading ball health department. I was in still am so proud of the work by team. And all the partners that i did in the city around the opioid epidemic. For example how we were able to save more than three thousand lives in three years our work on reducing infant mortality cutting infant mortality by thirty eight percent in a seven year period. I mean. I wanted to talk about treating. Violence and racism is public health issues in there was more than enough to cover a book based on that but then my publisher actually said to him what i submitted this the baltimore chapters that if felt like feeding people cared and spinach and now the two little kids who. I tried to feed carrots spinach. I can tell you how that goes. And i think by publishers was really dry. That was basically telling people to care about public health. But that the way i should get them to care them was by writing my own story and so i had initially intended to write about my own immigrant story and my story of growing up in including my family and my facing difficult times including times when we were facing experiencing homelessness and i didn't intend to write that but actually in thinking about my publisher was saying she actually had a good point that in telling the story. It's also a story a public health so anyway to answer your question i had written my story you and the story of baltimore submitted it to my publisher in the form that she wanted in february of twenty twenty so this book was actually written pre pre-coded and of course my publisher looked at it and said this is great. This is what i had wanted except that.

brian renewal Kevin zhu Dr lene dr liana Dr lena koba cnn washington Kevin twitter baltimore
"leana" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"leana" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"During this stage in his life. I didn't i didn't have access to this. Growing up i mean winnie the pooh which he loves is amazing. we also recently watched the incredible together. I don't know if that was really age appropriate. But i really liked okay. Well that is the end of our rapid rapid-fire questions you did very well could tell us where people can find your about. Your mind is the name and where they can purchase it absolutely. My book is lifelines. A doctor's journey in the fight for public health in three components. The first is immigration becoming a doctor. The second is working in baltimore in the third. Because i actually wrote the book prior to cova did and then my publisher said what every author wants to hear. Which is you gotta ride over. Not completely but you can't read a book about public health without talking about gobert and so. The third part is about kobe in the last chapter is actually called. Kobe comes home. Because i also talked. About how prior to vaccines became available. My husband and both kids came down with kobe as well. And so another chapter that. We never thought that we would have to be writing but indicates it should be in bookstores. I hope if it's not and you know. Try amazon bars. Noble cadre and when i have a newsletter with the washington post. That is actually launching tomorrow as the time that we're talking so That's the that people can definitely. I'm going to sign up for that immediately and again really. Thank you for that article that you wrote for washington post about sending kids back to school. There's a lot of great information in there that everyone should read. Thank you so much for joining us today. I know you're very busy. And we really appreciate the expertise that you are able to give us today of course and thank you for your wonderful work. I look forward to hearing many more of your podcasts and episodes going forward. Thank you mitchell. Thank you dr.

gobert winnie kobe cova baltimore washington post Kobe amazon mitchell
"leana" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"leana" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"What a surveillance testing. I've never heard that her. It's basically testing everyone so right now. Our numbers are school are pretty much based on self reporting. You feel sick. You go get a test and then you test positive you let the school know my kid test positive or i tested positive if you if you work at the school and that's pretty much what we're relying on but as less you're in texas in texas. You don't have to do that exactly. And if your child has life but you don't have to report if your child has covert exactly and so these are the types of things that a give the virus and advantage and so we to push back on that by just knowing what we're dealing with really knowing how the virus is spreading. We can't do it without the data in our. I wanna you mentioned The most vulnerable time being lunchtime and my family. My husband's twin brother lives a few doors down. He has a daughter who's in the same. A grade is my daughter at school. We have made the decision that we are going to pick up the girls every day at lunch and each either in the car or hopefully if it's nice enough to sit outside their tables outside and it's very complicated it's very disruptive but our school district inexplicably is not following cdc guidelines and Lunchtime is a free for all. Yeah i mean. There are some performance stuff i would say. But it's not meaningful jasmine. Can you explain what the cdc cdc guidelines are for a lunchtime. Yeah absolutely so. Basically the cdc got the cdc says and a k through twelve environment. You know you need to have multiple layers of protection. One of those layers is mask. Another layer is social distancing You know six feet if you can three feet if you can if you can't do three feet that you need to call co hoarding co. Hoarding is basically keeping the same group students around each other the entire day in limiting exposure to other people as much as possible. And so eating outside or co. Hoarding is the best way eating outside. Would allow you the distance And at least A lot more fresh air a lot more open space Versus eating in a cafeteria. Where again you're going to have this situation whereas students are around the most other students in their day and they also don't have a mask on and for elementary schools they're also not vaccinated. Oh yeah so i was gonna say so for cohort and you want to be in your classroom right is. That's that's what you're saying by co-hosting that you should not be in the cafeteria so we cannot do lunch outside and the wintertime in ohio right but what are you guys doing now. That's a good question. I honestly i did not think about the lunchroom until you guys brought it up. Microbiologist sister-in-law is the one who brought it up. I did not really think of it either. I'm going to be honest. it's not. It was not on my radar until she brought it up. She did a lot of the legwork for our family like sort of asking the questions. The answers were pretty bad. I'll just be honest and a lot of times. I mean i have type personality. So when i'm stressed i liked to have redundant controls and it makes me feel like i'm doing something. So perhaps this is what the school district is doing. I don't know. But i just a friend of mine. Sent me an email from her school district. They listed the things in the steps. They're taking and as i read that email and by the way it was from. It's from clarksville tennessee..

cdc texas ohio clarksville tennessee
"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

"In get the vaccine is would have been the vaccinated. Actually were sitting. As when i was the health. Commissioner had one of the highest vaccination rates for public schools in the country. And that's because we brought back the nation's right to people. And so. I think that at this point i fine i mean if if president trump wants to come out where former president trump wants to come out and do a psa or something or vaccinations. Fine i don't think that's actually what's going to move the needle. I think as the combination of the notches and bring vaccines to people where they are. That's going to be particularly important in minority communities that will where access is a major issue. And i'll give you another example from my own recent experience that complicates this further. I was on vacation last. Couple of weeks spent some time with family members including a nephew and his girlfriend young people healthy people and neither one is vaccinated and my understanding. It's a sensitive issue. Is you know they're young. They feel like you know they're okay. They're also politically lefties. A big part of their explanation is they don't trust big pharma and they don't trust the government and i can understand that perspective and that's a part of their thinking in not getting vaccinated and i use that as another example of this is not a simple of fox news watching maga- folks versus the rest of us. It's more complicated. What would you say to young people. Who have that perspective. Can i ask you for your nephew. And the girlfriend if they now had to get vaccinated in order to travel or if they lived in new york and vaccines are now required in order to enter restaurants and and certain venues and gyms would that help to get them to get the vaccine. Or we're not. Yeah i mean. I don't know the answer as i said. This was a bit of a sensitive subject so one didn't want to disrupt a family vacation by putting people on the spot but you make a good point but i'll give you another you know. I heard from another member. Family whose son was very reluctant to get vaccinated but finally did but his explanation for not getting vaccinated is well. It hadn't even been fully approved yet. This was an emergency authorization. It didn't go through the regular steps that fda would normally take for approving of vaccine. That seems like a you know a not unreasonable point to think about when one is trying to make a decision like this. It's interesting so. I actually think that there are two different things that have to happen right now. Whenever we're talking about people who are holdouts one is. How do we address people in the moment if we're talking to our friend our colleague relative. How do we approach that conversation and the second is what are the societal policies that can help us and they're actually taught. I think they're totally different. So in any of these conversations. If we're talking to your nephew if you're talking to this friend it's really important to meet people where they are to approach them with compassion with no judgment but instead ask them about their concerns. I mean if i were listening to this and somebody said they're concerned about about the fact that this is not fda approved. I might say this is a treatment a therapeutic. That's now been given to hundreds of millions of people more people than for basically the vast majority of therapies that actually are approved by the fda that right now it really is just a matter of getting all these other things like manufacturing and storage. That's the reason it hasn't received. Four approval is nothing to do with safety and efficacy should have approved by now. I think that they should explain why it's taking so long. I think that the transparency and explaining what that entire process is would be really helpful. But if i could just go back to them the second point which is i think on a policy level. I think it's different because on a policy level. I think it's time for us to start saying if you are unvaccinated it's equivalent to drunk driving. You can.

president trump trump pharma fda fox news new york
"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

01:58 min | 5 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

"So if there's something if you don't care that much about the disease and you think that there's something scary about the vaccine. That explains why you're on the fence or not getting the vaccine at this time within this group. We also know that nudges really work. That is that vaccine. What's what's a nudge in this context. So i would say an employer that says we're going to implement a testing requirement. Okay don't even quarterback seen requirement caught a testing requirement twice a week. You're going to need to get a Nineteen test but if you're fully vaccinated you do not need to get that test. That's something for a lot of people who are Again there are on the fence. They may see getting the vaccine right now as something inconvenient. Why should they do it. One now. testing is even more inconvenient. And so they're going to be people pushed in that direction because of that they're also other people who just need the vaccine to be brought to them because there's so much else going on in their lives i'll give you an example from from that i talk about in the book. At the beginning of every school year we have thousands upon thousands of families who have not completed tilted immunizations and we and then they ended up not being able to go to school and therefore we we set up clinics to help them to get these. Vaccinations is extremely rare. That we would see a parent who actually has some kind of philosophical or religious objection to the vaccine it just that they didn't really get around to it. They don't object to it but once we are able to bring the back seat to them and had the vaccination drives into school or how buses to bring them to the clinic to get the vaccination or even sports fields in line. People up in get the vaccine is would have been the vaccinated. Actually were sitting. As when i was the health. Commissioner had one of the highest vaccination rates for public schools in the country. And that's because we brought back the nation's right to people. And so. I think that at this point i fine i mean if if president trump wants to come out where former president trump wants.

president trump
"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Skullduggery

"With vaccinated person were on maximum person even if they are both infected with covert or if they're both invested with cova that's one thing but we know that one person is eight times less likely kobe than the other person one other thing that i'll give you that actually come that vaccinated person give me or anybody the disease what. What's the rate at which they are likely to be spreading the. This is a great question. We don't have the answer from the us because the cdc for unclear reasons actually back in april and may stopped collecting that kind of data on breakthrough infections in mild for people with mild illness. But we do have data from israel israel that uk have been doing a better job of data collection. The israeli ministry of health has reported. I think of the last week that they've done contact tracing of their Vaccinated and infected individuals and they've found that eighty percent eighty percent of people who are vaccinated an infected and test positive for kobe team. Transmit copa nineteen to no one in public spaces. Ten percent transmit to one person in a public space. Two to three percent transmit to two or three and the rest of the cyber percent is unknown but the transmission. You separate question earlier. Which is the transition to close contacts. The transmission to people in your household is going to be higher so my take away from this is. Let's say that. If i'm i'm not a i live at home with two backstage shorter. But let's say that it were just me and my husband and we're both generally healthy people. We are not a menace to society as in the chance of us. Getting very ill is very low. Chance of us contracting. Kobe is low. The chance of transmitting to somebody else is pretty low in casual contact is pretty low so we might say if it were just the two of us. We're not going to change any of our activities. We're going to go back to pre democ normal. That's a reasonable decision. We are not a public health threat but because we have unvaccinated children and we don't want to contract to cobra nineteen and give it to our children. Our decision is going to be a war. Going to bask when an indoor public spaces. We're going to at the gym. We're going to go during off hours before a church indoors. We're going to put on masks. We'll going to try to reduce our travel to only the the things that we really need to do. I mean i think these are the common sense things that people need to be assessing when it comes to risk in their lives. You know by the way you talk about in the household and we were talking before about confusing messaging. I heard on cnn network for which you are a contributor yesterday. Dr francis collins director of anti age..

israeli ministry of health israel cdc uk Kobe us cnn network Dr francis collins
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Dr lena win from her appearances on. Cnn where she's a medical analyst. She's commented extensively on cnn and and her washington post column about covert and the precautions. We need to take. She's had a pretty remarkable life which he writes about in her. New memoir lifelines a doctor's journey in the fight for public health. She's an emergency medical doctor and served as baltimore health commissioner. She spent the first few years of her life. In shanghai china her parents suffered through the cultural revolution and her father spent time in prison for his work as a dissident when she was nearly eight she and her father came to the. Us join her mother who was able to move to utah on a visa to attend grad school just before the visa expired ones father was able to obtain political asylum. Dr wen welcome to fresh air. Thank you terry. It's a great pleasure to join you again. You became an emergency medicine. Doctor and public health expert in part because of your experiences a child with really bad asthma. You had really bad asthma. In china you go to the hospital about once a month and then as an immigrant in the us. Your family was poor. You relied on public. Healthy relied on medicaid and emergency rooms. How aware were you. As a child of the relationship between money and access to healthcare. I was very aware of it. Even if i didn't have the words to describe it as you have. And that's because of so many instances in my life. When i saw that people didn't have access to care because they couldn't pay for it. I remember there was a neighbor child who was just a couple of years younger than me who also had asthma. He had a very bad asthma attack. And i remember rushing to help him because his grandmother was screaming for help and i knew what to do for asthma. Also know how terrifying it is to be struggling to breathe and was trying to give my inhaler to this kid. I knew at some point that he really needed to go to the hospital for treatment but his grandmother was too afraid to call for help and actually because we didn't get help for him in time he died. He died in front of me due to this entirely preventable cause and even as i think about this now. This is this images seared on my mind. Because i kept on thinking. This did not have to happen to me. His grandmother was just too afraid to call for help because they were undocumented immigrants and she was afraid of the authorities coming in their family being deported. And i thought at that time and i remember having a discussion with my mother about this. Afterwards that we're in a society where people's lives are valued differently depending on where they come from and whether they have the money to pay for care we knew. Were baltimore's health commissioner..

asthma Dr lena cnn Dr wen china washington post grad school shanghai baltimore utah terry Us
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"He reached out and said hey. Have you heard of black swan records sort of book about it. And it was a small kindle book and we read it and we both were just blown away at. I mean it is one of those stories where you think. You're hearing a story about a guy who started a label but then suddenly you're in the middle of a supreme court case about desegregating. Chicago's south side. And then suddenly you're in this very complex troubling drama about the politics of the color line. It's just one of those stories that cuts across everything in just dimension here like he starts off being mentored by w e b devore's. I found a of course. Probably the first black magazine together. Then he works with. wc handy. They found a sheet music. Publishing company and co-writes saint louis blues and beale street blues. I mean it's just a remarkable story and then there's a whole racial story in there. About what color was he really Embedded in the story is a bit of a personal connection for you One of the grandsons talks about his racial confusion because he grew up thinking he's white and now he thinks maybe i'm really black alike. Was my grandfather black. He was relied skin but apparently he was really black. Better on census report. He said he was white. So you know. The grandson is like really confused And asked like so. What am i and you say in the podcast. You're asked when you were growing growing up. So so what are you know. It's it's a connection that i and my co-creator chima make very cautiously. Because you know we're both middle eastern and You know you walk into a room and people think you're one thing then they hear your name and think you're another thing and then they give you that look to look you recognize. What are you are you some vaguely. Ethnic kind of person and I think of it as the sort of the curse slash gift of the in between us you know where no one can quite fit you into a box that they've got in their head that comes with a sort of a irritation and also a little bit of a privilege depending on which room you're standing in and who you're speaking to but it's something that you know it's funny i every story. I tell it occurred to me in the middle of this project. It has something of that inbetween. Her spirit in it. You know people who don't fit people whose identity or who's worker who's creative spirit somehow doesn't quite sit in the predefined categories. So that's that was my personal connection. It's also kind of a professional like a journey that i just feel like i've been on for the last twenty years we. Your parents immigrated from lebanon during the civil war was at eighty two that they came here. they came here in seventy seventy two seventy two just before i was born and Just as the war was really starting to slide into into chaos in lebanon. Yeah yeah so. You grew up in tennessee father's a professor of surgery at vanderbilt. That's right yeah so Were you like a campus kid. Yeah i was. I mean i would. My after school was basically hanging out in some both. My parents are mothers a molecular biologist. My dad's surgeon and my after school with hanging out in her lab and playing with her lab rats..

saint louis blues chima devore supreme court Chicago confusion lebanon vanderbilt tennessee
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:08 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my interview with dr leana wen author of the new memoir lifelines a doctor's journey and the fight for public health. She has an emergency medicine physician. Cnn medical analyst washington post contributing columnist and former baltimore health commissioner. Her new memoir begins in china which she spent the first eight years of her life when her family emigrated to the us they were poor she had really bad asthma and relied on life saving care from the public health system. You became an emergency medicine doctor and public health expert in part because of your experiences a child with really bad asthma. You had really bad asthma. In china you had to go to the hospital about once a month and then as an immigrant in the us. Your family was poor. You relied on public. Healthy relied on medicaid and emergency rooms. How aware were you. As a child of the relationship between money and access to healthcare. I was very aware of it. Even if i didn't have the words to describe it as you have. And that's because of so many instances in my life. When i saw that people didn't have access to care because they couldn't pay for it. I remember there was a neighbor child who was just a couple of years younger than me who also had asthma. He had a very bad asthma attack. And i remember rushing to help him because his grandmother was screaming for help and i knew what to do for as miles and know how terrifying it is to be struggling to breathe and was trying to give my inhaler to this kid and i knew at some point that he really needed to go to the hospital for treatment but his grandmother was too afraid to call for help and actually because we didn't get help for him in time he died me. He died in front of me due to this entirely preventable cause and even as i think about this now. This is images seared on my mind. Because i kept on thinking. This did not have to happen to me. His grandmother was just too afraid to call for help because they were undocumented immigrants and she was afraid of the authorities coming in their family being deported and. I thought that tom. And i remember. Have you discussion with my mother about this. Afterwards that we're in a society where people's lives are value differently depending on where they come from and whether they have the money to pay for care when you were baltimore's health commissioner. There are so many issues that you had to take on. You were the health commissioner. During the time that freddie gray and just to refresh people's memories you may not remember exactly. a freddie. gray was a twenty five year old. Black man who was arrested by police charged with carrying a knife and taken in police fan in the back of the van he was shackled. But he wasn't secured to the van and he was given what sometimes called a rough ride or at least that's what people think and he broke his neck. His neck was broken during that ride and he died in the hospital..

asthma attack dr leana wen china baltimore washington post Cnn us freddie gray tom freddie gray Black
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:10 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You are an immigrant from china. You moved here when you were around. Eight and Trump when he was president called a the china virus and taking their cue from that. A lot of people in america became very anti-asian. There have been a lot of attacks against asians. Just a lot of insulting behavior directed at asian americans. And i'm wondering if you've been The recipient of any of that. Unfortunately yes and i would hate. Tell you the frequency at which i receive these anti asian comments. I would say that. Every time. I am on air. I will receive actually quite a few messages. That specifically tie me to the chinese communist party. Which is ludicrous. Because by family left on political asylum from china or that will blame me unquote my people for the krone of ours and of course there are many many messages telling me to go back to my own country. Which at this point of course. I'm an american citizen. I am here in my own country but look this is not just about me. I mean there are so many asian american people who have suffered during this pandemic. i mean there are shop owners. Who have had their shops burned down or graffitied over by people directly attributing the corona virus to them. There are people who have been assaulted nurses physicians who have been spat upon and assaulted leaving the hospital by individuals for again attributing the krona virus to them. And i say this because there is a consequence to the words that we have and we really have to be careful about the language that we use so you were pregnant during covert. Your last trimester was when covert was released spreading and you gave birth in april. So i mean people weren't even wearing masks. A lot of people are not even wearing masks yet The other twist in the story is that last december your husband and then your two children got covert and of course as you say you know yours tell your patients like if someone in your family has cove tried to distance from them but if your husband two children have covert like you have to take care of them. You can't stay in another part of the house and never see them so you had kind of violate the advice that you'd give an you understand..

china chinese communist party Trump america
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:05 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Is if you have a mild breakthrough infection or if you're asymmetric but still test positive with the delta variant. Are you able to transmit it to others. We don't have this answer. We know that the vaccines work very well. To prevent against severe illness we also know that prior to delta that the vaccine is protected. You well from becoming a carrier who then spread it to others but with delta variant individuals who gets delta carries a thousand times the viral load. Then someone who got infected with previous variance and so could that person with a delta variant. Are they carrying enough viral. Load that even if they were vaccinated. There's still able to infect others. We don't you know just as an individual. I would like to know what my level of risk is and i just feel like if i don't know what the numbers are for the number of vaccinated. People who are getting mild infections are testing positive. I don't know what my level of risk is. That's exactly right. I mean we do know that if you are fully vaccinated your chance of ending up in the hospital and then die is vanishingly. Small me in my state of maryland here in the month of june. Everyone who died from coveted were unvaccinated around the country. Ninety nine point five percent of all those dying from covert are unvaccinated. And so that's really important to keep in mind. I mean that's what the vaccine is intended to do to keep you out of the hospital and out of the morgue but that said we also on should find out what is our chance of getting cova getting symptomatic covert in some way and i think that critical question are we able to transmit it to others. We just need to know that number and then to make the best decision for ourselves. I think it would be a reasonable decision for example. If let's say that we find out that this we don't know that this is true. But let's say hypothetically that individual has a one in ten chance of contracting krona buyers and giving it to others wants to fully vaccinated that's a number that we can work with and thinking about risk what intend differs from one hundred it definitely differs from one in two and i guess my concern with the biden administrations messing is that they are not incorporating nuance and recognizing that at this point of the pandemic there is a lot of nuance. There's a lot of gray area. it's not clear. Cut black and white as to what people should choose to do where risks people will take on for themselves and for their families and being able to explain. That risk is not undermining the value of the vaccine. Do you think in workplaces where you need to be vaccinated in order to enter. Do you think they're everybody is safe without a mask i think based on the data we have so far that would be a very safe setting as in if everyone around you is fully vaccinated the chance of them carrying enough virus to infect. You is very low. If you're also then fully vaccinated your chance of contracting ovid from one of these individuals is very low.

biden administrations maryland
"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:04 min | 6 months ago

"leana" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm terry gross. You may know my guest. Dr lena win from her appearances on. Cnn where she's a medical analyst. She's commented extensively on cnn and in her washington post column about covert and the precautions. We need to take. She's had a pretty remarkable life which he writes about in her. New memoir lifelines a doctor's journey in the fight for public health. She an emergency medical doctor and served as baltimore health commissioner. She spent the first few years of her life. In shanghai china her parents suffered through the cultural revolution and her father spent time in prison for his work as a dissident when she was nearly eight she and her father came to the. Us join her mother who was able to move to utah on a visa to attend grad school just before the visa expired ones father was able to obtain political asylum but the family was poor and leana wen had bad asthma. The family's on medicaid and the public health system is part of the reason. She became an emergency medical doctor and public health official. She and her husband have two children. The second was born when kovic was first spreading rapidly around america soon after her husband and their two children. god cuvette. they're all fine. Now as i record this morning the cdc is expected to announce later today that it's changing its guidance unmasking and will recommend that vaccinated people resume wearing masks indoors in some areas of the country. That's a change from its guidance. In may that said vaccinated people no longer needed to wear masks indoors when the guidance was issued in may the highly infectious delta variant was burning through india and starting to spread around the world. Dr one was critical of the cds. Make guidance it was a mistake for them to lift their guidance. And may i said so. At the time there were many of us in public health for very concerned because the cdc was relying on an honor system at a time when many people unfortunately were not behaving in the most honorable way. We also at that time did not have nearly enough. People were vaccinated at that time window. Guidance was first issued. Only thirty six percent of the country was fully vaccinated. And we've actually announcing the consequences. Which is that. The unvaccinated began behaving as if they were vaccinated and we are now seeing massive surges again across the country such that the level of infection today the daily cova cases is five times where we were in may unfortunately we're in a situation where the vaccinated are having to pay the price for the actions of the unvaccinated. We are now seeing even spilled over infections such that individuals for vaccinated are getting breakthrough infections again. Not because the vaccines aren't effective but rather because of the high levels of unvaccinated an infected people who are surrounding us and of course there is also a danger to those who are unvaccinated. Not by choice. But perhaps for young children for example under the age of.

Dr lena cnn leana wen terry gross kovic cdc washington post grad school shanghai baltimore america utah asthma china india
Leana Wen Talking About Carrots and Sticks For Vaccinations

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Leana Wen Talking About Carrots and Sticks For Vaccinations

"Listen to lena when this. This woman is a former head of planned parenthood by the way. She's a real piece of work. Talking about carrot and stick listened to her cut. Seventy eight right. I think it depends on the circumstance. So if you're going to the grocery store and the grocery store doesn't have the capacity to enforce some kind of proof vaccination then they have to say that indoor masking means to apply because we don't know who's vaccinated and who's not the same thing for schools schools. You can't expect the teacher in every school to be asking. Well you're not worrying masks. Oh vaccine or not and so. That's the case. Everybody should be wearing masks. But i could imagine there are already concert. Venues workplaces are saying if you are not vaccinated. You can't come or you have to get a negative test and that's what's needed in order to really incentivize sings at this

Lena
Robby Soave Criticizes Leana Wen, Leftist Media for Blowing up Their Own Identiy Politics

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 7 months ago

Robby Soave Criticizes Leana Wen, Leftist Media for Blowing up Their Own Identiy Politics

"Robbie suave a piece he brings up a fascinating point. You know, Listen, a piece about the media. Being involved in misinformation and disinformation is honestly not particularly interesting. I'm not gonna Waste a lot of time of that on my show Media is lying here. Yeah, Great, Dan. Thanks. I got better things to do during today. Listen to you. Tell me the obvious. No, no, no, no. The reason this piece is interesting is Robbie suave. It puts a fascinating nugget in here. He basically talks about this? Woman, Leana Wen, who does some analysts work for CNN. He's a professor of public health in the CNN medical analysts according to the peace And how Leana Wen said. Oh my God implied it would be racist to entertain the lab leak theory. You know, the lab league members called misinformation forever. Suave. He has a fascinating point about that. How the left was so stupid in their rush to call the lab league theory racist. They were so dumb. That they actually Blew up their own identity. Politics argument. Check this out. Let me read the quote from pieces is good. So first. Here's the tweet from Leana, Wen's CNN analyst. She says. I and other Asian American Pacific Islanders are increasingly concerned that speculation over the lab league theory will increase anti Asian hate tweeted when How's that? Goes on. As we embark on a full scientific investigation, we must take actions to prevent the next escalation of anti Asian racism. Uh huh. Suave says in the piece. She did not explain why speculation about the lab League theory would increase anti Asian hate to a more appreciable degree. And speculation about the wet market theory. The idea is counterintuitive.

Robbie Suave Leana Wen CNN Leana Asian American Pacific Islande DAN WEN Suave
Understanding Hesitancy Is Key In Changing Minds About COVID Vaccine

Post Reports

01:41 min | 10 months ago

Understanding Hesitancy Is Key In Changing Minds About COVID Vaccine

"Aerial plotnik is an audio producer for the post and she spoke to leana muhammad about these efforts to better understand vaccine. Hesitancy researchers want to know who are the people who are hesitant. And where does that skepticism come from. And how can public health officials change people's minds and get them comfortable with getting a vaccine and that's where this group the ad council comes in. They've released this. Psa that takes a strategy. That is somewhat surprising. I wanna start actually playing some tape. The covid nineteen vaccines become available. You might be asking yourself. Should i get it. And if i do blood be able to go about life without putting my family at risk. You've got questions and that's normal. The fact is the vaccines are safe and effective. They're going to save lives to get the latest on the kobe. Vaccines visit get vaccine answers dot. Org because getting back to the moments we miss starts with getting informed. It's up to you. I thought it was interesting that they've acknowledged that like you've got questions and that's okay. I feel like we don't normally hear that. I thought that was interesting too. When i first heard this ad i in that it as it's up to you to your part you need to get this vaccine to save humanity and our health reporter. Dante thought the same thing to now. When i first heard that. I thought oh that make sense. It's up to you it's up to you aerial. It's up to me. Dan like we have to do our part to get vaccinated. But when i asked the ad council about that they said no no. It's not about individual responsibility as much as acknowledging hesitancy.

Leana Muhammad PSA Dante DAN
"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"leana" Discussed on Model Majority Podcast

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. <unk> team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and <hes>. These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Lena dr wen lucia lou cnn washington
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
Dr. Leana Wen responds to Trump intentionally downplaying COVID-19

Skullduggery

10:06 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Leana Wen responds to Trump intentionally downplaying COVID-19

"Are now joined by Dr Lino, when Former Health Commissioner Baltimore and. Professor of Public Health at George Washington University Dr Wen welcome back to skulduggery. Happy. To join you always. So as a public health professional. What is your reaction to hearing the president saying he did not want to level with the American people about the severity of the corona virus because he didn't want to create panic. While I. The first thing that I thought about was my patients I think about now my patients who? Lost their lives I think about the patients I treated who survived but are living with long-term effects of covid nineteen will now have to be on dialysis who now president heart failure who have had strokes a nail cannot move a part of their body or cannot speak as a result. I think about all those individuals lost their loved ones. I also think about the physicians and nurses respiratory therapists and EMT's gotten infected because they didn't have enough people. In what it would have meant if they knew, and as they will know about how this all did not have to happen, and so it's just incredibly distressing and devastating to learn about all of this because frankly when you look at. What's been hampering our response the entire time it's the mixed messaging and part of. The commentary around us was well, maybe the mixed messaging is due to lack of knowledge or maybe it's due to incompetence. But as it turns out if this is deliberate and if it's there is a deliberate if there has been a deliberate effort to mislead the American people and the cost is people's lives. What does that really mean in just wanted to to respond to? Two. mikes question about specifically this issue of panic that president trump at the White House of what we didn't want to cause panic. We didn't want to have some kind of fear as as the as the response from the American people will actually the best. To fear is the truth. The best thing in the most important thing that the American people in any people want to known in time of crisis is the truth what is actually happening what do we know? What do we not know? What are we going to do to find this out? What are the actions of the federal government is going to be taking? What are things that each individual person can be doing right now and it is beyond shameful and so devastating that week, this could have been done but it was not yeah. I mean, you know these are this is what you do on a daily basis as a as a physician and a public health professional. It seems to me that if you tell people the truth if you tell them how to mitigate. You give them agency that is exactly how you calm people down. But I guess the bottom line question is, is there any doubt in your mind at all that by withholding information and not leveling with the American people that what? President trump did. Cost, significant numbers of American lives. Well, we have the research to illustrate this. We have modeling studies done here in the US that showed that if we acted even a week sooner, and this is back, we're talking about these at home orders and margin acted a week sooner we could have saved thirty, six, thousand lives. We have our own counterfactual in the form of other countries that took prompt that had a national response that had a coordinated messaging to the public, and we saw for example, the case of South Korean that had their first diagnosis of Cova nineteen. A first goes case of nineteen. The same day that we did that they have infections, deaths that are many many. Fold, less than ours. They have jets ranging in the hundreds versus we have them in the hundreds of thousands. We also know that at that time exactly as you said that we could have given the American people agency I mean I think about there's so many allergies to this right you could imagine if there were a hurricane or tornado that's coming. What you want to do is to tell people there is time there is time for us to take action this you can protect yourself and your family imagine if you find out that the government knew about this impending weather catastrophe didn't tell people visiting they didn't want to cause panic, but actually people died as a result of that. would be the outrage or imagine I always think in terms of clinical analogies. Imagine if a physician didn't want to cause a patient panic and fear but then withheld in important diagnosis bump that patience and by the time the patient found out it was too late and that she was going to die versus if they found out a few months sooner, their lives could have been saved I mean. Imagine that. That's the equivalent of what's happening here a doctor when I imagine you had a chance to listen to the tape conversation between Bob. Woodward and president trump what was going through your mind when you listen to that what part of that conversation shocked you the most. I think was shocked me the most was that president trump had a good understanding of the risks and dangers of virus from as early as February seventh. That he had a conversation with President Xi. Of China which is already another kind of bizarre moment because it seems like it was you know there's been a lot of blaming of China but seems like the Chinese president. Action alerted president trump to potential dangers but president trump was. Can't what these dangers are and was able to articulate how that this was something that's more dangerous of the flu that could affect young people to that it was airborne and therefore is extremely contagious that back in end of January, he was warned by his own team that this could be a once in a generation type of dangerous virus at a he understood it comprises it and could articulate back in. So I, think back to. all these press conferences that president trump has had since then where he deliberately it seems now downplayed the severity of the virus and that. Contrast is so jarring when I think about what could have been done in the meantime. That February seventh phone call with Woodward really leaped out me. Now, I do have to say that I do think it would have been really difficult to persuade the American public in February when the numbers were so low to take the kind of socially distance restrictions and lockdowns and all the other requirements that would have been necessarily would it would have been difficult to get the. American, public on board win. So few cases had been reported in the United States, but that said when you look at that February, seven phone call where trump is telling Woodward. This is more deadly than even your strenuous flew. This is deadly stuff which is precisely the opposite of what he was saying to the public five times more. He said five times more deadly didn't he? But I mean that and on that same day he's tweeting. To the world, I'm the you know the the corona virus would disappear. You know when the weather starts to warm and on March seventh saying no, I'm not concerned at all. It's not. It's that dichotomy of saying privately to Woodward. He thinks it's private because it's for a book that isn't GonNa come out for a while you know, hey, this is really deadly stuff while telling the public don't worry it's all going to go away. That's right now, I'll give you that same analogy for a weather atrophy. Imagine if the president or governor or some other leader knew about this impending catastrophe and is saying this acknowledging this in some private setting but not letting people know whose lives would be directly affected and for do something about it I mean this is. This is not a storm that's going to hit us no matter what we're all going to die I mean this is something that we could actually prevent by taking steps I do think that you make a good point about how difficult it would have been to get the American people on board early on when we didn't yet have diagnosed cases and no deaths in the US that's true but. For Two things one is that the federal government could have been taken that time to prepare and arguably had we gotten our testing capacity up the very beginning way now. South Korea and many other countries did. We probably. Have even needed these dramatic shutdowns. The way that we did eventually, we had to have these shells the point that we did because we had so much community spread and not nearly enough testing couldn't rate it in. If we had the testing, maybe we didn't need those shutdowns in the first place but the other thing too is because the president consistently downplayed the severity of the election, the American people were left wondering what do I do now? Who Do I listen to? Is this even so serious, I mean. We are seeing something as basic as masks as you both know it as we talked about being politicized, and so I think that is key to all this ad. We actually still have a chance to turn this around and I. Hope I'm not sure that this will happen but I do hope that the president. Takes this opportunity now and instead of defending his own past actions says it maybe this crazy wild dream that this could occur but I hope you'll say now. Dan. Here's where we are. This is extremely serious whatever happened to the past happened in the past but here's what we can do moving forward and let science and public health finally lead

President Trump Woodward United States Federal Government President Xi Professor Of Public Health Donald Trump Dr Lino George Washington University FLU Commissioner Dr Wen Skulduggery BOB Cova South Korea White House China
Steroid Dexamethasone Improves Survival in Severe COVID-19 Patients

The Vegas Take

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Steroid Dexamethasone Improves Survival in Severe COVID-19 Patients

"Dexamethasone a common steroid improve survival rates for the second scope with patients in a British study by as much as one third but Dr Leana Wen caution it is a generic that's very cheap and the study results the preliminary results show that it reduces the death rate for very ill patients were on

Dexamethasone Dr Leana Wen
Human trials of British coronavirus vaccine to reach 10,000

5 Things

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Human trials of British coronavirus vaccine to reach 10,000

"The US is betting more than a billion dollars on a vaccine. That doesn't exist yet. The federal government has pledged to pay as much as one point two billion for early access to three hundred million doses of an experimental cove nineteen drug being developed in England. The vaccine is in early clinical trials at the University of Oxford and licensed to British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca. The vaccine could be delivered as early as October but would still have to go through clinical trials before being administered the pledged money from the US as part of Operation Warp speed and effort to make a vaccine widely available by twenty twenty. One vaccine. Trials are happening around the world record paces but as George Washington University's Dr Leana Wen told the Associated Press. You could only move things so quickly. It's important that we have many different types of accion candidates because this is a new disease. We don't have previous experience with developing a specific vaccine. That's been effective against this type of coronavirus because it is new

United States Twenty Twenty Dr Leana Wen University Of Oxford George Washington University Federal Government Associated Press England
How worried should we be about the spread of COVID-19?

1A

08:50 min | 2 years ago

How worried should we be about the spread of COVID-19?

"But doctor when how worried should we be about the spread of covert nineteen the disease caused by the novel coronavirus those of us who might even find ourselves may be far away from California or Washington what what level of concern do you think is appropriate I think that people should be concerned but in the sense that we should be aware ends taking common sense precautions right now you stated that the seat but the CDC said and I agree with them that the risks to everyday Americans is low for the moment but we have to keep in mind that cove in nineteen that this new coronavirus is knew that the situation is rapidly evolving that this virus was just discovered about three months ago and there are now outbreaks around the world and with all these different hot spots happening across the country so we should be prepared for it even though the risk to us individually right now is low we should be prepared for me disruptions in our life if this virus is detected in our communities but there are really simple common sense procedures that we can all take right now including good hands and face hygiene and we can take steps now to think about what would we do in the event of school closures or if mass gatherings in our communities are canceled in the same way that we prepare for hurricanes and other emergencies we should prepare for the potential of a of an outbreak in our communities to everyday preparedness and if you do a little bit each day it's actually not too terribly burdensome to prepare for these things Dr Hamblin you wrote an article in the Atlantic that got a lot of attention you cite research that says in the coming year between forty and seventy percent of people around the world will be infected with the virus that causes code nineteen now that's a scary number forty to seventy percent but but you say it doesn't mean panic what did you mean well I never think that panic is useful but the the virus well the forty to seventy percent number does not mean that many people will be sick or critically ill at all a minority of cases because critical illness and they're mostly among people with chronic conditions and older people but that also is what makes this virus so overall so dangerous is that it can be spread by people who are up and walking around and don't feel that bad the so it that that is a dangerous place for buyers to be usually the viruses that spread like that are just common colds and it's in the interest of a virus to keep its host the person out and functioning in the world and spreading it around to other people if people are kind of walking wounded they can easily spread it versus something like the flu which might knock you on your **** and you know you're sick and you're isolated raid raid and yeah even the flu to do a lot of people it manifests as just a cold you either realize you had the flu and that's part of why it spreads and this is in that this disease in that dangerous zone where it has hi the rate of serious diseases and fatalities but also it is not doesn't universally because that so it can be spread very easily let's talk about that fatality rate for just a moment the World Health Organization released a new fatality rate for coronavirus globally they said about three point four percent of cases have died that's according to the W. H. O. a by comparison seasonal flu the fatality rate is less than one percent this this new coronavirus Italie rate is up there with the so called Spanish flu that we hear about from nineteen eighteen to nineteen nineteen killed millions of people around the world I'm doctor Hammond what do you make of the number that W. H. O. put out three point four percent it's it is hi do you think it's accurate this is a very hotly contested issue among the epidemiologist the disease modelers who I've been speaking to many thanks it is actually lower than that our data are a relatively incomplete because a lot of countries have not been testing and it had not been screening widely so probably not detecting a lot of milder cases so it could come down but that wouldn't necessarily be good ever meet me at the overall casualties that will see globally would be less of a hot debate among epidemiologists especially when such a such a well known organization and it's already like the W. H. O. puts out a number well I want to get to questions that we have from listeners we've been getting a lot of them as you can imagine we wanna take the opportunity while we have our experts here Dr when we got a lot of good questions here's one caller with a number of different concerns my name is Mary and I'm calling from Rohnert park California it's about the corona virus number one I don't understand why it's such a big deal because every year there's a virus or flu and fragile people often die from that to normal so why is this any different because it sounds like it's just another virus is something and number two even though no one were unfamiliar with the between what is the first symptoms and number three if you go to the grocery store do you have to write down your your groceries before you put them away you know because if someone comes to your house may have a cold have to wipe down the doorknobs and faucets so those are my questions so Dr when we have three questions let's do a little bit of rapid fire and deal with these interns how different is corona virus from flu why are we worrying about it so much when flu is so virulent yeah it's a really good question and I've been hearing this from a number of people in different ways one about I think the truth about the numbers right that the flu influenza affect over a million people in the U. S. every year and tens of thousands of people have died this flu season so it is a reasonable question to ask well why are we so concerned about crossfire's when the number of people affected by the flu is so much higher well there is a reason for us to be concerned about it and that's that this is a new virus we don't yet know the trajectory of this virus it could affect many more people as you are referencing and Dr article that that he wrote citing a study it could also be on the we don't yet know about the fatality and the severity the W. H. O. house estimates but that number is ever changing and because this is a new virus too none of us have immunity to it and so I do think it's fair for us to treat it seriously two one to look at this as a potential outbreak that could be and I think we are on the verge of calling this a global pandemic and may in California also asks what are the first symptoms if you are infected this is where we can compare to the flu because the symptoms of coronavirus of cover nineteen are similar to what one might when one has the flu somebody could presents with fever cough difficulty breathing they could also just not be feeling well we know also with club in nineteen some people start with a domino symptoms they might get nausea vomiting diarrhea abdominal pain and it's also important to notice them at the pool at this moment we believe that about eighty percent of those who get infected with coping nineteen have relatively mild symptoms until they recover without needing to go to the hospital or having other interventions and just talked and just real quick doctor when I I I I don't mean to cut you off but we have a break coming up I want to get mace questions in here wiping down doorknobs services faucets in the house a lot of people are doing that wiping down groceries does it make sense to wipe down all the things around you it's not a bad precaution to be taking especially at this time but just know that the way that this virus is transmitted to stir the respiratory route and the best thing we can do is frequent hand washing and wiping down surfaces is a good idea to wash those hands even if the services are dirty if you wash those hands all the time the virus can't get into your mouth or nose that's Dr Leana Wen emergency physician professor at the George Washington Milken institute school of public health were also speaking to Dr James Hamlin staff writer at the Atlantic in a lecture

California Washington
Global markets are slumping for a fifth straight day on coronavirus fears

America's First News

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Global markets are slumping for a fifth straight day on coronavirus fears

"AFN markets in Asian shares that were down today on growing fears that the spread of the corona virus may be unstoppable it's hurt global growth considerably European markets way down this morning to Japan's benchmark closing lower Australia dipped more than two percent South Korea down one percent Hong Kong's hang saying to the Shanghai composite here at home on Wall Street yesterday the S. and P. five hundred losing seven point six percent in the last four days since hitting a record high just Wednesday that's the benchmark index's worst such stretch since the end of twenty eighteen resulting in two point fourteen trillion dollars in losses now Tuesday also marked the first back to back three percent losses for the index since the summer of twenty fifteen Dr Leana Wen from George Washington University told CNBC faith in any government's ability to handle the coronavirus is key and that might not happen in some parts of

Japan Australia South Korea Hong Kong Dr Leana Wen George Washington University AFN Shanghai Cnbc
Planned Parenthood CEO Dr. Leana Wen Is Out

KQED Radio Show

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Planned Parenthood CEO Dr. Leana Wen Is Out

"After less than a year in the job lean a win is out as president of Planned Parenthood and payers minister promo reports that the move comes as the organisation and abortion rights come under increasing attack Selena when left her position as Baltimore's health commissioner to lead Planned Parenthood last September replacing Cecile Richards but now the thirty six year old is out when an emergency room physician was only the second doctor to home the group in a statement posted to Twitter she says she had clashed with new board chairs over quote philosophical differences over the direction and future of Planned Parenthood when's removal comes at a critical moment for the organization several states have recently passed severely restrictive abortion laws that could end up before the Supreme Court ultimately overturning roe V. Wade longtime Planned Parenthood board member Alexis McGill Johnson will temporarily take over the NASA Romo NPR

President Trump Baltimore Commissioner Cecile Richards Twitter Supreme Court Roe V. Wade Alexis Mcgill Johnson NPR Selena Thirty Six Year
Leana Wen out as Planned Parenthood president

John McCulloch

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Leana Wen out as Planned Parenthood president

"On a day when Planned Parenthood reacts to a trump administration abortion restriction it also dismisses its president planned parenthood's says it won't be complying with the trump administration rule that bars taxpayer funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions the organization's top lobbyist says that clinics will stop accepting federal money as they pressed Congress and court reversed the administration's new requirement separately Lena lend a doctor who previously served as Baltimore's health commissioner has tweeted that Planned Parenthood federation of America is board has ousted her after what she called a secret meeting George ones on

President Trump Congress Lena Baltimore Commissioner Planned Parenthood Federation George
Roberta Flack leaves Harlem awards show after feeling ill

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:26 min | 4 years ago

Roberta Flack leaves Harlem awards show after feeling ill

"A grant program for the city's health department from member station w y p r dominique maria vanessa reports baltimore city is suing hhs for cutting a five year grant for it's evidencebased teen pregnancy prevention program two years short almost a dozen jurisdictions throughout the us have taken similar action earlier this week dr leana wen director of the city's health department said the city will lose approximately three point five million dollars in funding she called the cut quote shocking and unprecedented when said the cut will affect twenty thousand students who will no longer have reproductive education classes in school h h s lawyers told the city last july that funding and in june of this year and that funding was granted on a yearbyyear basis for quote programmatic reasons for npr news i'm donate meriva se in baltimore and you're listening to npr news this is wnyc in new york i'm david first syracuse university has permanently expelled a fraternity over an offensive video that fraternity members say was intended as satire chancellor kent civil route announced the expulsion of the fate of tau chapter yesterday the racist antisemitic homophobic ablest and sex's video was part of theta tau sponsored event save rude said disciplinary actions against the individual students involved could include suspension or expulsion the fraternity college is for the video on friday and said its members believe racism quote has no place on a university campus authority block stretch of broadway was closed to traffic atra day the great white way was open only to pedestrians and bicycles from times square down to union square city officials invited pedestrians and bikers tomorrow earth day which is in fact today in a part of the city normally filled with car fumes and noise music and dance mixed with fitness classes and educational activities about a sustainable healthy environment roberta flack was rushed to a hospital after cutting short or appearance at harlem's apollo theater because she was not feeling well tmz reports the eighty one year old singer was taken to harlem hospital in an ambulance friday evening flack apparently felt dizzy as she was about to receive a lifetime achievement award from the jazz foundation of america she was released from the hospital after several hours jazz foundation spokeswoman bobby marcus says that flack was feeling fine but went to another manhattan hospital for.

Lifetime Achievement Award Manhattan Harlem Hospital Chancellor Syracuse University David NPR Dr Leana Wen Bobby Marcus HHS Apollo Theater Harlem Roberta Flack New York Baltimore Director United States Five Million Dollars Eighty One Year Five Year