25 Burst results for "Lead Engineer"

Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | Last month

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
Unconscious Bias

Mentally Yours

05:06 min | 3 months ago

Unconscious Bias

"Welcome to into the metric cody case weekly podcast about all things mental health I'm Ellen and that and stay, which has to procure girl well. She's a writer, speaker and behavioral scientists. She's join us on the podcast before twice most recently as a panelist on mentally yours live today. We're going to be talk about her new book sway. So you're joining us today to about a new book, Sway. What made you decide to write this? It's been. Longtime coming it was a combination of academic research I, did which was all about bias and technologies had been thinking about bias, and whose views represented and all the whole notion of power and hierarchy in data and I was working Lawton mapping technologies during my phd now so did that, but then also combination of my personal. Experiences as a woman as a woman of color as a woman in jammed the first IMMU lecture woman lecture appointment in appointed in a engineering department talk, leading engineers wideman the UK just navigating these spaces where you feel like. Sometimes you don't fit in you belong and then you kind of feel like you're part of the two words being almost British, but not quite Indiana, and all those kind of things and racially profiled at some point, having to talk to my twitter about race, but also sexism and misogyny all those things that the expediency your life, but that combined with my academic interest and research interests will interdisciplinary notional. What does bias and how it effects society kind of came together announcer allies that he below talking about a lot about unconscious bias in his working. Working with a number of organizations on diversity and inclusivity for a couple of years, and I was writing about it, but then it kind of was becoming like a trendy word, and people were just using it as a buzzword without really knowing what it means, and so I thought that really needed to know and do a deep dive into were Liamine unconscious by stuff in Detroit me a big crested by the o'briens. Worth is actually breaking down what it is. Yeah, it is a big question, and that's what the whole book is about. But in in brief, an Indus very simplistically, speaking is just biases within us those kind of 'em. Affect Us, our decisions and our judgments people on our interactions. which we sometimes are not aware of or reduced voice them or we don't realize them so so there are some explicit references like I would see I refer such vise, screen, or certain studio very explicit, but then when it comes to certain kind of. Implicit things that we have a template brain that are dependent on things we've learned to live these kinds of learned behaviors, but We don't know often that these are affecting the way of behaving and the decision making so those are our unconscious bias, and how can the book out people to understand their own personal biases and prejudices do what I really wanted to do. In a book is Great. This kind of non-judgmental, very non Peachy, and so a couple of people who read the book like Endless Sania indicate shook line, and and they also said that it's a very non-policy kind of non preachy attitude to to bias because people can get very defensive when you start talking to them or devices, and so I didn't really want to. Stand on my soapbox and talk about it, but in the way that I brought in research and facts and evidence, what functional stories also and combined a lot of different disciplines slowly and enter and kind of innovating accessible manner, I hope that s even region they become more aware of how these vices effect. Decisions and instructions in a way that sometimes we not one, but then it helps them gives them a space to actually start reflecting on, get on buses, and this is what people all the readers were reading. Are telling me that they hadn't you convey lie some things that they come across in the book and they are really becoming a Morterero. The kind of prejudices the might carry without them realizing it things they've learned and also wanted to talk more about not just the racism and sexism, but also Regina biases that you can talk about, but also other kinds of biases, helmeted biases like hindsight bias st to scope is in how we interpret information on how politics autism politics affects our view of the world, and on ageism and accents and also big areas. Technology in bias, really wanted to talk to all these things in we by bringing in as many. Studies personal stories and contemporary case as possible so that people get four fledged you a framework of bias.

Morterero Writer Ellen UK Indiana Twitter Sania Lawton Detroit Liamine Regina
"lead engineer" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:01 min | 10 months ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on WRVA

"So the Cavaliers with a twelve point lead engineer they're looking much more crisp on the office of side of things haven't turned it over as much in news flash there start to hit on shots much for consistently here are ready to start the second half Virginia is connected on three of five and looking much better it's a pretty good Georgia tech defense well taking care of the basketball one turn over here in the second half the penetrating the same whether they're taking advantage of the collapsing defense and and give the big mark a lot of credit with those pics com instead of looking to maybe get that shot often over there actually looking consciously for that have stated they watch a lot of field knowing that that's going to be open actually looking to receive that and not being surprised when it comes so Virginia's did a really great job of of executing in that area defensively I think they're doing a good job you can you can about as this game goes all Georgia tax will we see them products in a with a tight enough when they start to press will go to sleep and feel this get wider and wider good awhile since region is good in that position it has been awhile and for George attack they still have plenty of time but this does take that feel of an important structure for the jackets Ramblin wreck we'll start with as well after that time out no one left to right it's Moses right at the top of their better by mommy the dress that was right before hand about the farm farmer the bounce pass on the banks is the right over the phone or by trade our bounce pass on the banks were seated side all lines are that was god is the printer to fly by and then lays it in a close for he is so crafty he is he is happy with the ball inside making good decisions as an example right the deficit down to ten again to check this this is just rooms in our news driving on the left side of the lane now going the other direction with the pass of the portable which the past underneath the Moses right now back out the vote trying to work his way inside you keep a stays with me circles into the little black itself into trouble is going to turn it over got in the no man's land sent right back in the branch to clean out he's going the other way for Virginia jackets get back on defense original set up in the half court with you Hey Cortana midcourt G. T. logo has to stand on the right wing since the teaching now at the right puts it on the floor every time he has the ball use it for the student section two fires in his for fifteen from mom immediately today he's got ten points now you're the second at the shocked looks a little more confident as he's got for those ten you're the second frame or opening five minutes it's right there all the forces that the ships going straight up forty one twenty nine rigidly jackets with a basketball on the drive out a lot of trying to flail around draw the.

Cavaliers lead engineer
"lead engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"I thought it was pretty interesting that it it was I mean there are people aspect is still very much there. I think you have to be pretty careful to about making sure that you define these roles pretty clearly because I think if let's say you are without a person you might end up taking on the way the role of manager in a way that's like too much like the van diagram gets too big and it can burn you out and you have to be careful about that. I think having clear definitions around who does what I think is super important so like have a write up. You know somewhere that like this is what I expect out of a team lead. This is what I expect out of. Manager is what I expect of attack lead and make. I'm sure that like if there is overlap you talk. You actually defined that too just so that you don't burn people out where they're like. That's not really actually your role like it's great that you care about about somebody but it's also that manager's role to like step in think also school as the technical lead to also surface it to their manager due to is almost a can that off is like hey. I'm noticing this. This is the thing you know so and so's dog died. They're you know they're not performing as well or hey. They're not performing. I'm not sure what's up but like they can drop it. It's like drop it in the managers lap and run because you are. You're right you have to kind of figure figure out where those lines cross and what your responsibility I I do pretty simple things to say. Look at us like thank you for sharing have you you talk to your manager about that. Thing should really bring it up with them. Because this sounds like an important thing and then just drop it. I mean it's it's important but but if they come to compass importantly also not read them out to you encourage them. I like what you just did to is like. You're like got to talk to your manager versus like you as the lead going in talking to the manager. You're like hey. Why don't you tell it manager. You and I can work that out but I'll see probably tell your your manager as well yeah and if it's extremely toxic I might say something like it might. WanNa keep an eye on this person but like the team is not seeming right healthy right now. Maybe you should ask some good questions to see if you like that kind of triggers the managed like Oh something's wrong. I should go. Check it out so I have. I have one more wet for everybody Mars Thirty Stacey Crime. Maybe not right and I don't count with you today. I don't know why ah what's the path to being technically because that that is something that I find very frustrating at it's not defined at all as in. I WANNA be a technical leader in some organizations so that would eventually usually be the CTO of some level our VP of engineering. It depends on the company. Vivian is usually people management right well it it is but I think to okay you said on count. That's fine. I'll my path to a manager was literally. League going through bean as a technical lead like I was a lead front engineer and then moved into management and so I think like that is actually a really good progression but what's the path if you want to become technical leader like an architect or of company where I dunno levels but there's like nines or tens or whatever like the highest level all of Engineering there is without being people manager. What's that path look like because that that is really poorly defined question. I don't actually know how to answer. It's it's company is so company any specific it because there there is no one path and I absolutely have these same questions I when I was asked to this role and I was like I'd ask one team lead like hey. I was asked to do this role but this rule seems like it's very people centric and really like on a path towards. Maybe you being a manager. Is this going to help me in a path to being a principal engineer and architect towards like a more technical pass and the an in I got different answers because that role had not been clearly defined in the company so one manager thought Oh yeah that's that's a real you do if you want to be a manager and another man. Eh nother like lead. I asked her like oh well. That's a role that's going to help you for principal to and you got different answers and so that's why it's so I think important tabby clearly defined but also have like all your managers understand what that is and what that means for progression and now it's being very clearly stated like this. Is something that you do. That's good for both I would say. I got this really great advice. When I first run knapsacks more important keeping your boss happy Hebrew partners happy so we can can make your partners happy and you can build your network then you start to use to build trust with people with your partners with your manager with organization the most importantly with your fellow engineers you're kind of thought of as a thought leader that kind of Paul on the blaze at regardless of which company rats you'll be recognized thought in southern most likely naturally if it is in your organization's structure to recognize the tech lead as a level or something thing that I think it will just kind of fallen vet and if it's not like Netflix because very flat and very loose then you're naturally fall into that so before we get into picks out love to hear your one piece of advice from everyone if someone wants to be a tech lead. What's one piece of advice? You'd give them work on your communication white at it. It doesn't matter what level if you want to go the path of management a minute manager or you WanNa be tech lead via principle or architecture something like that. It doesn't matter it doesn't matter how smart you are if if you can't communicate that to get those out of your brain and talk to people like Tony you're saying that is a great point of your you have to sell ideas to people you convince them that what they're working. John is good but like this thing you work on. You need their help and you will need. Everybody's help and just doing that early on your career and just focusing on that. You'll be such veterans in your. It doesn't matter if we can't do any of these weird coating or something like that I'd rather work with someone that communicates effectively fence only solve math rules the I would add to the communication. I love that one gem to me. It's like be clear concise and think about communicating to what's important to that person if you're talking to a PM if you're talking to a designer diner how technical should UV and like how can you be very clear and concise. I think as anyone grows as engineers really funny as like technicals really important communication is key it really really is. I WanNa say something different and I can't because I really think that that's the actual answer to this question. I guess to add to it. A little bit would be you should be someone who can way pros and cons is really important and that's off a subset of communication but that the role of the tech lead is to really elite try and figure out how to accomplish building thing and doing it in the most technically excellent way but also in a way that meets it's business need and like that those are balances and the and you have to be able to weigh pros and cons and do them in a way that doesn't make your engineers angry because your shortcomings or cutting something and making bad technical decisions but also doesn't make product angry because you're not building the best or Arab design as well like not building the best rescue acts because her short cutting something. It's it's a hard thing to do and I think the better you are at like being able to right up something that really it clearly shows the pros and cons and that you've thought about it while we deeply like that that's a huge benefit to being in that role something Marzel Monsieur our Mars is particularly good at taking overly complex subject explaining simply and that to me is like tactical mastery you can explain something to the CEO of the company like a very complex technical aspect and you explain it in in things that are easily understood by anybody. That's means you're in that means you have like master of of what is going on and that that's a really really really difficult to have plus one. Everything ruinous said and then. I'd like to add that. You should be good good at convincing people to do things that they may not want to do or have it on the road map to do you have to convince them why she wanted to it might be advising. Kinda feels very different than what everyone said so far. I think these are all like they're all really really important skills in yes everyone should be developing them but I guess my piece of advice would be apply to a single project purse first and continue to bring that attitude with you to every oh I say the keyword to every every project that you lied because I think really delving elving into that work and dealing with your partners and your communication and everyone else that you have to interface with whether or not there whether they're engineers or not is really important at a micro scale before you we can do that at sort of like a more macro like actual role title scale and sort of you find your way you find your way there by doing that you know one piece of work and and failing a little bit and then kind of iterating on that and doing the work and sort of eventually you build up those skills and you really before you know it. I think it was Tony's point ain't earlier actually multiple angles points. You've built that trust with other people in doing that work that eventually gets you that role so I think you can be a lead lead engineer on a project and you can also be lead engineer as a role and it just really is the skelly applying it up with the skills are really important for. I think everyone's Day to day work. I love that point. I'll glad another point where I've failed many times. Don't get too big for your Britches as like a piece of advice. Don't don't say like hey that architecture that API's all wrong and I think you should fix it. Here's how you do it when your house behind us on fire like like are set like fixed the projects. You're on first and make sure you're in that trust. They make sure you're on that. Trust and you have like everything on your team sort of before you try to expanding your influence to other teams and projects because you have to earn that and make sure like what you're doing a stable and people trust you on that..

technical lead lead engineer engineer Tony technical leader principal Netflix Stacey Crime Vivian Wan VP of engineering CTO Paul John CEO
Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

Front End Happy Hour

10:36 min | 1 year ago

Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

"We often talk about our growth path as engineers. One of those pass could be attack need engineer in today's episode. We're joined by I Tony Edwards to help talk with us about the role and responsibilities of a tech lead engineer. Tony can even brief introduction of who you are what you do and in what your favorite happy hour beverages sure I'm Tony. I'm a Sophomore Inter net flicks. I spend about twenty percent of my time coding favorites vagrancy my favorite happy hour beverage is a Manhattan Bliss. You're eighty percent of your time. Doing I help run. Projects and attend meetings readings all right okay interesting. We will definitely be getting into more on that before we do. Let's give introduction of today's panelists jam. You're started off Jamyang senior software engineer Netflix Stacy London senior front and Engineer Atlassian and also a feature lead for the last year plus on a project which isn't discussed later. I'm definitely curious on that High Mars Julian. I'm a front end software engineer at AIRBNB so a little different than nomad had lost and yet. I'm not a netflix anymore. So I'm a little bit sad yeah a little bit sad and I'm Ryan Burgess. I may suffer engineering manager at Net applets in each episode of the Front Unhappy Our podcast. We loved choose a keyword. If it's mentioned it all in the episode we will all take a drink. What do we decide today's keyword. It is projects so we say the word project projects new all take a drink her. Let's jump in. How would you describe what attack lead role engineer love listening listening like that out of attending meetings the little writing code some architect? Ing squishy socks thing softens architect teens not necessarily really soft yeah. It's not but ultimately gotta lean on your fellow engineers but it's important that you set so the broad strokes folks so a lot more like planning and off front work but then letting other engineers run with something yeah you gotTa Transfer People for sure all right anything else that odds that definition. I think it's an interesting I did ask for definition in the first place because I think every company will execute it very very differently and so it's interesting to hear obviously everyone's perspective here. I think we all have a slightly different definition in mind where the like coating to sort of management management ratios might be very very different depending on where you work. I think that's a fair point is they're completely different. Depending on the company say a lead engineer sewing that is honest honest with themselves about the amount of coding they do. Tony said Yeah. I feel like your son no matter what as a tech lead you're likely coating less. I think in general is engineers in years. We overestimate how much coding we do like Oh. You're you're seeing yourself engineering. It's cutting your your pilots seventy eighty percent of the time and it's probably more like sixty percent of the time we we we got a lot of meetings yeah. I I do think as you become more senior and more complexity of your role that grows hashing that's really funny as your coating actually goes down. That's definitely the way I've seen it in in my house yeah and I like put enough. I've had a conversation with our director about this much. Hey you know I it turns out. I'm starting most of my time. I'm doing network which is like writing. Docs meetings and organizing people in wrangling different projects and like. I don't feel like I'm doing my job. He's like that. Is Your job like your job to get stuff done. No matter what it takes sometimes coating more often than not it's not coating and that's kind of what lead engineers do by the way for the word projects as Mars for wholeness countable thin sharp. I think so I mentioned Fisher lead with the introductions and that's a role. I guess I really haven't heard of that particular. Taylor role until I got to a LASSEN and it's not official like role as in like senior engineer and like a future leader or anything like it's an addendum addendum. It's like a thing that you do as senior or you actually be any level and do that particular role but it's like somebody that let's say you take a team. That's pretty big and you break them up into smaller. smaller teams to work on a particular feature so like maybe on on screen. There's like some small. thing like you're building. They are a card that does X. That's a feature you feature lead it and what that really means. You're trying to help the product manager and the designer figure out anything that needs to happen to get that done from like the technical side so they're gonNA define. Maybe what the product manager and the designer according to define like you know what is and what it should look like and you're gonNA figure out the how and it doesn't mean that you wouldn't figure out how with let's say let's say you're on a future team and you have other senior engineers or junior all levels that you're working with. They're gonNA also figure out how to build this thing but you might run interference or maybe make make it so they don't have to go otas many meetings as you do about the technical implementation. see figure stuff out. Maybe a little bit more so that they can just like go and bills and and not have to be distracted too much. I think that's that's one way to think about it. A switch that up by future too is meaning is you could be the the lead on this feature and insulin so it could be on the lead on the next feature like is it something that's kind of interchangeable totally on insult for the last year more than like a future lead on a huge each screen Bisley redoing the entire poll request experience and that is a massive thing. That's like many many many many many features and actually actually to be honest it was it was too much that was me like almost never coating and doing a lot of like interference in all sorts of stuff and recently. We decided to break that up so now we we have many feature lead. You know people from different levels not all senior. I'm just taking over and owning a little piece of that page in working through plus really Likud. I didn't actually know to feature lead was but it sounds very similar to like attack lead lead engineer whatever it is it's very similar but is very narrow focus on on this particular feature year leading this ever yeah. It's really cool. I think another area that we miss maybe defining on how to describe attack lead. They feel like you're dealing a lot more with cross functional teams. I feel like as an engineer. You're always working really closely with your team. Maybe maybe you're working with the PM the designer but oftentimes there's other requirements come across cross functionally. There's like other engineering other disciplines that need to be brought brought in and you might be that person on goes in Shepherd's that and brings a technical perspective to it. He drew clarify cross functional for those who don't speak Silicon Valley. I don't know if it's is just silicon valley but I've not heard that too much. Okay that's fair. I mean cross functional to me means different functions of the business so that might actually be like like I mentioned PM design but it could also be even cross functional engineering teams. There's like A. Ui Team is a back end team Thurs networking team. There's like who knows what your project needs but you might actually be involved in a lot of those discussions where you're talking about okay how does the the back in interface with the Ui how does the backend interface with a database and those are the types of conversations where I feel like a tech lead might be involved. It's some of those meetings that you may not. I have to have all your engineers involved in like if you're a front end engineer you may not want your entire team there but you wanNA representative and to me that someone who is tackling exactly that can represent your team in those discussions that are broader function of the Costume Sean seeds that good jump. That's okay. I'll take it a home uh-huh affair all right well since it's okay. How could you make it better. I would simplify it right I would I would say it comes as different parts of the business that may not be. It's more than one product area so start with you. Did I think you compile all right now. That was project. Project Project Tares when you're a tech lead. You're the ambassador for engineers and you may be the first point of contact that he was ever had with with your team and so it's really important to make really good impression and if you're trying to get something done obviously that's why you're at a meeting with. This person is really important. He said good context high. Make make sure to explain why what you're doing is important because why should why should they help you. You gotTA show them. Show them the lights instead of make them light. It's very you can get people to do what you want by making them do what he wants or from top down. Maybe you can depend on organization do a top down thing but much better to get them to buy into there. You have to convince people that this is a great idea. That's like psychology right like that's that's like that's. I think what's been interesting choosing to about some of the definitions of this very outward facing and there's a lot of metal work involved but there it's been alluded to before here like internally also at least looking internally within your team. engineers are really really good resources for decision making so we've talked architect eating and making decisions based on unlike technologies to move forward with given the long term context in the projects cutoff line. I think there is external and internal responsibilities as house while put yeah. I guess what kind of skills like we kinda talk about some of the responsibilities but like what kind of skills goes into Vena technically you have. I've been around the block engineering wise. You have to see and you have to have failed. You have to have succeeded. You'll have to have done something of a biggest cope before I I like the failure part because you really do learn from all your past failures of like these are the types of questions. I need to ask front so that my team doesn't fail again. I if you don't if you haven't had that experience you might get engineers that are in that that team that you're on there like this is amazing technical challenge. I can't wait to go down a rabbit hole and work on this thing forever and you're like man. Maybe that there might be a different solution. That doesn't happen before I like the I've been around the block that is added to your point failure that is such a big part is like learning what not to do just as important as learning what you should

Engineer Lead Engineer Tony Edwards Software Engineer Senior Engineer Manhattan Bliss Engineer Atlassian Netflix Engineering Manager Product Manager A. Ui Team Airbnb Ryan Burgess Silicon Valley Stacy London Jamyang Director Fisher Shepherd
Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

How I Built This

07:19 min | 1 year ago

Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

"I got laid off in January of two thousand eight. I was applying to Stanford for business school. I applied there in the fall. All of that year and fast forward I started Stanford September of two thousand and eight crash happens a month later. Wow so you get to Stanford and from what I've read like you didn't really have a sense of what Silicon Valley was and what the tech world was any of that at all so so what what did you like. What was your impression? We got there so at Stanford I got there is two thousand and eight. I was twenty four years old and very quickly I knew as where I needed to be primarily because I saw the twenty four year olds not only making millions of dollars but fundamentally changed in the world and like how come I had no idea about this place. Seriously thought Silicon Valley was a place where semiconductors got made right. That's it that's it. This was before kind of you. Know facebook became what it did witter mujber all that stuff right in foursquare. I say wow I can participate in this and I started to have that kind of hotchkiss moment again right yeah. This is something new but I can you do while you are a student at Stanford you start to reach at a four square league. I mean what what what's the story like what what is foursquare at the time foursquare location based at at ten thousand users at the time. It was getting me explore. My the city is getting me to do things that I didn't WanNa. Do Give me the gym more like how is this thing actually inspiring me and changing my behavior I and I said wow like I. I want to figure this out found. The founders emails on the Internet is the classic story emailed Dennis Crowley the CEO founder eight times and the eighth time he might be back and never forget this. He said he said after all these ideas as I share with them you know what Karma I just may take you up on some of this period. Are you ever in New York question-mark Dan's my wife and I were watching lost binging on loss at the time I remember this very vividly in liver and it look like what should I do in five minutes later I said actually yes. I was planning on being in New York tomorrow. So I booked my flight. That night flew out the following morning. Show at the office and you're like I'm here and what happened. I was thirty six Cooper Square. We were on the fifth floor. They surprised to see you. I opened the door for Dennis was facing the back he turned around and he looked at me. Surprise as if like I wasn't actually going to come and here's this awkward moment like what does he do now and it so happened that there were like two empty desks there. He's like yeah go over there over there and throughout the day I mean he had a meeting yeah couple of meetings and then when he's done with came over he's like all right. So what do you want to do and I was like. I don't know and send him some ideas over email around kind of signing up retailers merchants that sort of thing anyone who's familiar with foursquare very small business focused. We wanted to get merchants on the platform orm to start engaging with their customer. I'll tell you what sign up thirty merchants by the end of the week and get a job and and he's like what do you want your title to be as like a business development because as we're business in it and I go to business school so it makes a lot of sense and how many people by the way how many people worked at four square there are two and a half Dennis Navene they were co founders and then Harry who is leading engineering but he wasn't quite fulltime but I guess US theoretically so he's he gives you challenge signed thirty businesses up by the end of the week and we'll see if we can do and what happened signed up three hundred four hundred. Oh Wow so you end up going to work four square after you after you graduated from Nope is actually in between my first and second year business school so I work fulltime foursquare during my second year school and four square gave me a gift you know because I was so early I felt as it was as much as my company is. Everybody is a family. They were doing something completely different. You know we had folks like facebook trying to come after us and that felt that was energy. I loved it and I felt like my work wasn't done so new. Dentists was kind enough to let me work on the West Coast to allow me to get a platform for people to know who I was after I graduated. He didn't ask me to come to New York. He's like you can stay on the company was growing yeah. There's a lot that I had to learn to write and through that process in not only kind of kind of growing the business. What does it look like to go from two employees one hundred fifty to raise tens of millions of dollars to build something uniquely authentic? It was an education that I wouldn't have gotten alone so you were there three and a half almost four years three years so you decide that's roads course and I'm going to do the next thing and it turns out that you either met or you knew Ben Horowitz the one of the partners of injuries in Orleans and he convinced you to become an entrepreneur residents there. How did that happen? How did you meet yes so when it's on the board of four squares they were the four squares largest investors? I known been not very intimately which is kind of as board member in new of the work that I did. I'm so when I told Dennis that I was leaving the company Dennis reach us on the board told them I was leaving and then Ben reach out to me a day or two later he said Tristan I get it right. I understand and you should not be an entrepreneur in residence reasons why and he said but if you're going to be an entrepreneur resonated with us and what were you going to do entrepreneur residence basically come up with ideas and and pitch ideas to them in theory they would fund those ideas so in as I think about the job is one of the craziest jobs in the world you get paid to think of ideas all day. He said comes to spend six nine months with us to figure this out and I was like I'm gonNA spend all nine months to figure this out residents. It's interesting because I've never met one who's enjoyed myself included but it spending a lotta a lot of time to think about things in an authentic way right you know the lesson I learned in Ben Taught me a lot. He's like tristen. You got to understand that you need to do the thing that you fundamentally believe that you are the best person in the world to do right. We have a unique proposition giving your story to solve that problem again. If you're doing something that's like inauthentic. This is hard enough right. You can't do

Foursquare Stanford New York Dennis Facebook Silicon Valley Ben Horowitz Dennis Crowley Cooper Square Entrepreneur In Residence Dennis Navene Hotchkiss Wanna United States Ceo Founder Witter West Coast DAN Harry Orleans
"lead engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The second was was timeline was was about to be announced. So there was a huge amount of work into that. And then the third one was, you know, this big shift to mobile which happened, you know, kind of towards the end of twenty eleven so those are the three big initiatives with time line. There was a team that was sent to go build time line, and they had a PM in his honor in a whole whole set engineers to do it. And then once they kind of built the easier of time line that ship to employees, the photos and videos parts of that started being handed off to us. They were kind of like, hey, now do like the the real version of this so to speak, so they they built kind of a Ezio photos integration. And then we kind of took it over and and rebuilt it and photos and videos were very very tied together at Facebook. So I very quickly kind of started working on photos through that throughout that process and not long after you started your work on photos. You were a lead engineer or were leading the team disarmed degree. Yeah. I mean, I thought it was doing a good job. But I got lucky I guess, so I was working on video started helping out on photos, and then then got the photos code base, really well and right around then Zach says, hey from smartphones are going to be a big deal. You know, the vast majority of Facebook users are going to be on mobile really soon. If we miss this opportunity where we're going to have a bad time. And so we started pulling all these these people off of you know, the web and middle tier teams to go work on mobile clients, and it just through like tons of people on it. And so my team turned over pretty quick like a lot of people went over to Iowa or Android to start building the the photos product. Over there to build the newsfeed product over there. It's a very quickly. Like, I was the the most tenured person on that team after having been at the company for like east web photo specifically, so this is like web, photos, and the domain logic around photo. So the the mobile client will talk to some peach end points. It says, hey, gimme all the photos, and then there's a bunch of privacy checking and figuring out who's tagged in what? And so we owned the co that generated the HDLC has asked Java script as well as the data fetching and and some of the privacy code. Okay..

Facebook HDLC lead engineer Ezio Zach Iowa
"lead engineer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Former lead engineer, Tim Kennedy arrow, sa-, California lighter than aircraft maker the CEO of that company. Eager pasternack says these craft do not compete with airlines want to be. Delivered directly to the NCAA which said the first human occupied hot air balloon ascended in France in seventeen eighty three moved to eighteen ninety three the German passenger carrying luxuries zeppelin came along that era ended when the Hindenburg crashed on landing in the Lakers. New Jersey in nineteen thirty seven. Radio. Reporter Herbert Morrison the lighter than air gas zeppelin was flammable, hydrogen nowadays, it's nonflammable helium. China has contracted with French manufacturer flying Wales for craft twice as long as seven forty sevens to move cargo to and from regions of the world that lack airports. I'm Greg Jarrett. Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio it is seven nine. And we have fifty six degrees. It's cloudy in Boston. The Trump administration says it will turn back more asylum seekers at the US Mexican border right now about sixty asylum-seekers a day returned to Mexico. The goal is to have as many as three hundred people return per day by the end of the week the end of next week that is meanwhile, the president is standing by history to shut down the border this week ABC's Tara Palmeri reports Trump standing by his threat to shut down the Mexican border next week after search in migrant crossings, and if they don't stop them with closing the border. There were seventy six thousand migrants stopped at the border in February forty thousand of those were families and federal officials say March is on track to surpass those with an estimated ninety five thousand migrants today customs and border patrol announcing that forty percent of their guards have been diverted from the border to process some of those families asylum-seekers returned to Mexico get to come back for a court date on their asylum. Claim CBS news. News correspondent Kenneth critic reports on the possible impact of closing the southern border closure of the southern border could affect the legal ports of entry where more than five hundred fifty billion dollars of goods are traded between Mexico and the US each year. According to the Wilson center, a nonpartisan policy forum, the move could also threaten nearly five million American jobs, including those held in border states like Arizona, which sends about thirty percent of its exports to Mexico. Former vice president Joe Biden is facing allegations of inappropriate behavior via democratic politician in Nevada Lucie, Florida says Biden inappropriately touched her and kissed her at a campaign rally in two thousand fourteen. Julia Manchester is with the hill reading that op Ed by Lucy Flora's one line that struck me in particular. It said if she was working in a corporation or a business, she would she would just go to HR and complained there, however on the campaign trail and within campaigns. There really is no formal structure a lot of the time to deal with that sort of thing ABC's, Adam Kelsey reports and the response of Democrats running for president democratic presidential candidates, including Elizabeth Warren and Julia on Castro responding to the allegation against Biden will ATN event in Iowa, I believe lissi.

Mexico Joe Biden Lucy Flora Lakers president Boston US ABC pasternack Tim Kennedy NCAA lead engineer vice president Bloomberg Herbert Morrison Julia Manchester Greg Jarrett New Jersey California
"lead engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To invite. Yeah. Your the co founder and CEO at planet scale, and Dan Kozlowski you or the lead engineer at planet scale guys. Welcome to software engineering daily. Thank you. Thanks ravenous. I want to start by talking about my sequel scale ability or more generally sequel skill ability when a my sequel database is not scaling, well, what kinds of performance issues does that lead to typically a my sequel that I is used for oil to be transactions for apps that a user is interacting with in real time. So what that means is that somebody refreshes their profile, and they're sitting there trying to see the changes on the screen of the app or in front of the computer, and it takes a long time for for that little spinning wheel to give them back. The changes that they believe that. They've just made. That's just one example of how. It would manifest in app and does the scale ability of a my sequel database compare negatively to that of a no sequel database like mongo DB, so the interior model. No that I was like monger, they could be scared horizontally by adding more sharks or more machines and a single instance my sequel database, you can scan it only by adding more hardware to the neuron, which that particular instances running. So there are some practical imitations to how big a nor you can make for my sequel database. So rather than say that a lot of what you'll see with no sequel databases is a very similar performance profile for alab queries as you would get out of a traditional my sequel database, but like Japan said the real problem happens when you scale up the. Database..

lead engineer Dan Kozlowski Japan co founder CEO
"lead engineer" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"Being with us. What is metro lab network? Well, first of all, Tim, thank you for having me Metrolab is a collaborative of cities and universities and the goal is to take academic research that is happening in in universities and figure out a way of translating that to to the local government policy process to think about how new knowledge that's created. Whether it's related to data science, or engineering or social science, how that can have a positive impact on the lives of residents of of cities and communities. What would be an example of? Such an application is that things like cameras that are then linked to databases. What would be an example? So you brought them cameras. I'll give you an example, the university of Texas at Austin is working on a video analytics approach that uses computer vision and machine learning to understand how humans are moving around their cities, and ultimately, and you can think about that as someone crosses the street with a stroller or on a bicycle or in a car and a computer is able to understand the characteristics of that person's maybe their age because maybe they're walking with a with a particular characteristic that would define someone who's older or maybe someone's walking with a stroller. Maybe a car is driving in a manner. That's unsafe are getting into a near collision. A computer can understand how those how those dynamics are playing out and can it can ultimately funnel back into a policy making process. Because now the city understands how to make urban planning decisions that can create safer streets for everybody. You have a back. Ground you've advise the department of the treasury. You've also had a background working in finance with Morgan Stanley where you are interacted with a lot of state and municipal governments. What have you found in terms of the level of technology that currently exists in many cities? Well, I think like the entire economy. I think the world is becoming more technology and data oriented. I think that it's probably true that maybe cities lag the leading engineering or leading companies in the world just because they aren't able to hire the either because of salaries or because of workforce, or because of the way their resource in budgets. I think that they're not able to necessarily look like Amazon's say, but that's where Metrolab comes in. Right. That's that's where I think we're trying to make a difference. I think that there is not a perfect solution to taking local governments and turning them into into entities. That are that are running on sort of the absolute latest technology. On a dime. I think that by the way, I think there's good reason for that. I think that that as as governmentally should be skeptical of technology. We should be careful not to adopt certain video analytics approaches that may introduce questions about civil rights or may introduce questions about privacy. I think that there's actually an obligation for for governments to be more measured in the way that they approach these technologies, but we do need to figure out a way of embracing what's out there. And and trying to aim that at at the goals that that governments have now. Of course, we have been reporting along with many other news organizations about the wildfires. That are hitting and really taxing the strength of California's fired preparedness and causing great devastation Metrolab can help to figure out how to prevent or at least mitigate those kinds of things in a certain way. Right. So I'll give an example of a project that I think you're referring to that. That was done in partnership between UCSD university of California, San Diego in San Diego County. And there was a project that originally started as sort of bringing collectively so bringing the ability for rural broadband or sorry, Rural Fire stations to communicate with broadband technology. And that approach is actually being used now to do video analytics to understand how fires are are starting when they're starting in respond more quickly..

Metrolab Tim university of Texas UCSD university of California Morgan Stanley San Diego County treasury San Diego Austin California Amazon
"lead engineer" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on Triangulation

"I want to go back and have those same full-body wonder emotions that I had as a kid and like bring all my friends and you know a are and VR technology. This is the first I've been against for twenty six years. It's the first technology that's actually gotten me able to actually create those emotions I had as a kid, how exciting. And so that's why you know, our first game for x. are really is this, you know, follow the white rabbit. It's a game about a magician. That's been a charlatan like all his life until went as magic actually works and the. Rabbit disappears wearing a diamond bracelet. So now everyone wants to follow the white rabbit. So we're gonna go around. This sounds like a lot of fun. Are you going to sell that? Is that going to be a product that's going to be? Yeah, that's going to be a product. One of the first games I magically we will see we will see. So yeah, we're, we're fundraising to get another round of detail into the game. But yeah, I'm the designer in the an the lead engineer on it. And so we're, we're having a lot of fun, so great Nicole. It was really just fascinating to talk to you. Thank you so much, come back again, and we will look forward to follow the white rabbit. I want to. That might be the first game I play when I get my magically. What do you think we're going to have a consumer version of this thing? They, they gave no numbers, so it's not. I'm not. I'm I have my own company, so they've been very smart by the way about that. That's why I think it was smart for them not to show it that they they, even though there's huge pressure on them to show it well, and you can't was with modern technology like this with his lovely flat screen, or, you know, we just did a big. Big, you know, eight foot screen, you know, a experience if it's not in stereo, and if it's not responding to the world, I think this is the other thing, the wonders, great emotion to go for for for these experiences. The other things that the experience really you really want it to be responsive. So I think that's what you know Dr grow boats game does really well is that they will put the portals, you know, on the floor, and you know, in on the walls and then they, the virtual items will respond to your hand passing through them and stuff. And that's what really makes it makes it makes it come alive. It's like it's like the holiday make in Star Trek makes everything disappear. You know, there's no real world in it, but the blending of real world in and virtual world in spatial computing is quite compelling, and I think you need really need to do that for creating law just as much as there can be wonder if it works, there could be huge disappointment when it doesn't. And if you don't want to disappoint people with the consumer product, right? Yeah. You don't want second chance, you don't get a second chance. And then we really don't want to just port port and clone. Existing IP into the space, which is this is really a new medium. Yeah, it's It's a a totally totally new new meaning. meaning. Like insomniacs seedling they had really. They just totally new game little gardening games. She told us about this on the screen saver. Seedling is like a Tamagotchi. In the real world, you get a seat and you have to grow it and planet intended day after day and it grows into your world. Yeah, it responds to it. So like if it's it'll grow out on your bookshelf put it between two books, it'll kind of like loop around them. So it's and it's got you, can I pet it a hummingbird in a game. He can actually like pet a little hummingbird. But how important is the fee haptic feedback on it be?.

Rabbit lead engineer Nicole twenty six years eight foot
"lead engineer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Martinez also trans human launching efforts to extend human life in a chief immortality through biotech and artificial intelligence. Her most recent book called virtually human. The promise imperil of digital immortality is written with Ray Kerr's. Well, the lead engineer Google. Could you describe briefly the thesis of your book? Sure. A lot of the top engineers in Silicon Valley have been working on creating cyber consciousness. Allowing things like Siri to develop greater and greater capabilities until they're really personality operating systems. So would always intrigued me about that. Perhaps because my legal background and I have the PHD in medical ethics, it is what are the ethical consequences of creating consciousness and software? Do we have the right to create consciousness and consciousness, and then just turn it off. Now, your hope is to refund speaking correctly, you know, being transient is to bring immortality and life extension to people both in the body, but also out of body through things like mind clones. Well, that's right. I believe that the purpose of the biotechnology industry in general is to keep people alive longer. So Ray kurzweil was I think the first person to ask, well, when does that end, you know, if you ask yourself that question, you realize that there is no ending point that as long as somebody values their life, we all would like to. Keep that person alive as long as possible. So what will happen to your body when it dies, when my body dies, it will. It will like, you know, well, in the case of me in particular, it will be frozen at a company called Al core in Arizona, what's called Crinan association. And how about your digital self?.

Ray Kerr Ray kurzweil lead engineer Martinez Siri Google Crinan association Arizona
"lead engineer" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"Absolutely yeah life is just too short way too short member to my first coding project was about so outside of school it was automating the creation of counts in this really old ad buying software she staying yeah it was just this process that was taking me sixteen hours of rework to of debt manual data entry and i was just like there's gotta be a better way to do this what is this thing that i've heard of called python because i want to be able to script stuff from an excel document right into the program and that was my first effort coating project outside of you know the standard java things that i did in school ankle number three one thing i wish i knew when i first started to code is pair programming is awesome no i didn't even know pair programming was thing for the first like i was the only u i engineer so i never got to work with someone else in everyone's always too busy for but pair programming is great and it's also great no matter who you are in the relationship for that that is very true i'm finding myself at a mid level right now where i can pair program with our interns in incoming new grads and i learned so much from having the teach them then also i feel no shame in like pulling a lead engineer in and saying okay really can't figure out the architecture for this let's work on it but it really is great i wish that someone had told me that before my first job because i probably would have gone to a completely different startup in grown three times as fast there's no shame and saying what you don't know in fact it's to me really super admirable and i would much rather work with people who are focal about what they don't know rather than pretending that that doesn't exist.

lead engineer engineer sixteen hours
"lead engineer" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"Absolutely yeah life is just too short way too short member to my first coding project was about so outside of school it was automating the creation of counts in this really old ad buying software she staying yeah it was just this process that was taking me sixteen hours of rework to of debt manual data entry and i was just like there's gotta be a better way to do this what is this thing that i've heard of called python because i want to be able to script stuff from an excel document right into the program and that was my first effort coating project outside of you know the standard java things that i did in school ankle number three one thing i wish i knew when i first started to code is pair programming is awesome no i didn't even know pair programming was thing for the first like i was the only u i engineer so i never got to work with someone else in everyone's always too busy for but pair programming is great and it's also great no matter who you are in the relationship for that that is very true i'm finding myself at a mid level right now where i can pair program with our interns in incoming new grads and i learned so much from having the teach them then also i feel no shame in like pulling a lead engineer in and saying okay really can't figure out the architecture for this let's work on it but it really is great i wish that someone had told me that before my first job because i probably would have gone to a completely different startup in grown three times as fast there's no shame and saying what you don't know in fact it's to me really super admirable and i would much rather work with people who are focal about what they don't know rather than pretending that that doesn't exist.

lead engineer engineer sixteen hours
"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So for the first five or six minutes they were just kind of looking around like this is this is really weird i don't even want to go back to my normal reality where things aren't don't don't just shove him never go that's my normal reality do i like this is my is my brain now freaking out until you touch the back of my head at my animal brain went where are you what is and then we got to a point where they were where everybody's comfortable with five or ten minutes in and we just started having a conversation like like you and i are right now i'm just trying to think what it would be like if you feel like you've met somebody in virtual reality in virtual space but never in real space and then say you ran into the airport so it's funny this is these are all things that have happened to me my lead developer teams virtual i i live in san francisco and it doesn't make sense to set up offices here because things are so expensive these days but my lead engineer is in new mexico and i met him after working with him for almost a year for the first time at a conference last year and i knew his body language already because that comes across through the avatars when we're when we're in the studio and we do our stand up meetings every week in the studio so i knew how he moved knew how tall he was that i knew kind of how he looks around had moves his head shoulders even though it was the first time we'd bet in person you know i've read about virtual reality before this is the first time i experienced it and the whole space was so amazing to me that well i confess i should have just been listening to you but i was wandering around it because you can move and pulling every book out on the shelf i tried to pour myself a mug of scotch scotch and had desk i tried to walk out onto the balcony to look at the mountains and the sunset maybe that's not so great to make such a wonderful space that your audience gets completely distracted well i mean one of the things.

san francisco lead engineer mexico lead developer six minutes ten minutes
McCabe says his dismissal part of Trump's "war" on FBI

Capitol Connection

02:10 min | 2 years ago

McCabe says his dismissal part of Trump's "war" on FBI

"Andrew mccabe who was sacked on friday just before his planned retirement has rounded on the trump administration accusing interacting with political balance against him and the fbi president trump tweeted that his dismissal was a great day for the bureau and democracy andrew mccabe had drawn scathing criticism from mr trump who accused him of bias over his involvement in the fbi investigations into hillary clinton's use of emails and russia's alleged meddling in the two thousand sixteen presidential election campaign mr mccabe said his removal driven by the president was part of the administration's war against the fbi china's parliament has voted to appoint the former anticorruption chief wang chee sean as vice president to xi jinping james reid reports the post of vice president has traditionally been largely ceremonial in china but that's likely to change with the appointment of wang cheese sean he's a store child she jinping known as the firefighter because of his record in tackling difficult issues as anti corruption chief mr wang led a purge of the communist party that brought down dozens of senior officials as a former trade negotiator he also has long experience of dealing with the united states all this makes him an ideal right hand man for xi jinping as the chinese leader consolidates his power at home and abroad world news from the bbc a data analysis company which claims to have helped donald trump win the presidency has been suspended by facebook pending further investigations cambridge analytica is accused of using data collected via facebook in a way that violated the company's policies facebook says data from a personality quiz on the site that was advertised as a research app was passed onto companies including cambridge analytica and its parent group which sold intelligence to political campaigns facebook says the data should have been deleted cambridge analytica says it did so when asked to by the social network officials in florida say cracks were reported in a newly built pedestrian bridge in miami two days before it collapsed killing these six people the project's lead engineer w danny pate made the report in a voicemail message to the state transport department but it wasn't picked up until friday he said the cracks hadn't been.

Facebook Lead Engineer Miami Donald Trump James Reid FBI Danny Pate Florida Cambridge Analytica Andrew Mccabe BBC United States Communist Party Mr Wang Vice President China President Trump Russia
Toys R Us "Amazoned"

Tech News This Week

02:02 min | 2 years ago

Toys R Us "Amazoned"

"Amazon you know what it's like to be amazon that's right just like google amazon has become a verb amazon d means your business has been crushed because amazon is either going into or thinking about going into your industry this week toys r us became a probable victim to being amazon d announcing that it's shutting down all its stores you can expect to see fire sales of course all the toys r us stores and much of the merchandise is more than likely going to end up for resale on ebay with ebay merchants going out and scooping up toys for pennies on the dollar and then reselling it to you oh in one quick tip if you have toys r us gift card now a good time to use it okay here's a story that anyone with a pacemaker needs to know and we'll stress that it's something you don't wanna hit the panic button over at least not yet the royal academy engineering is prestigious british organization composed at the uk's leading engineers from all sciences so when they issue a study it's worth everyone's attention especially this one economy says that hackers now pose a serious threat to internet health devices emaar i scanners for example or very vulnerable if they're hacked their images could hide serious health problems and of course they're drug pumps in use in hospitals all over the world if they're hacked they could deliver an overdose could be fatal in most alarming though is that pacemakers which been internet connected for a little more than a decade can conceivably be turned off by hackers that we've known that these devices have been theoretically vulnerable for some time but this warning centers on the fact that even though we know between the hospitals and the manufacturers no one seems to be taking the threat seriously we said don't hit the panic button the aware of the dangers and talk it over with you don.

Amazon UK Google Ebay Royal Academy Emaar
The Future of Apple and Sonos

The Vergecast

01:44 min | 2 years ago

The Future of Apple and Sonos

"Driver who were doomed hold onto your for buys when he phones you can't right now now store down the street i one more this i'd be picking on you the whole time this is shot when is apple going to buy sonos they are going to go so that we're going to have i mean i think apple thing so they made a really great speaker they're very very proud of that speaker but they don't have they need to ship airplay too so they can do a multi room stuff and they need to make a really hard set of decisions around how big their audio we can system is going to be are they going to make a sound bar are they going to make a little one for your bathroom are they gonna make that whole range headphones if they do that then i think they're hardware business so different because every iphone user is going to buy like five hundred dollars more apples stuff that connects into their iphone ecosystem i think a better question is and that's a thousand nightmare about the way i just want to be very clear about the bennett question isn't what is going to buy sonos the better question is when is apple remember that they own the beats had phone company and sell it off yeah jimmy ivy anybody located that man i mean that's it thank you guys so much for coming it's wild to me that we have like winds for the show while to that anybody listens to it at all i will tell you the verge produces a much better podcast called why did you push that button it has a far higher quality than the show actually has along with caitlyn tiffany they're on at four pm today talking about ghost and they've got some great guests gril guests and we have some inhouse sociologist from bumble and the lead engineering manager of ios from bed.

Apple Bumble Engineering Manager Bennett Caitlyn Tiffany Five Hundred Dollars
"lead engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The lead engineer for voice recognition half by do he showed nisam gadgets including a voicecontrolled speaker child although high golfer hotel california okay i guess hotel california is not available so we also try out in interpretation device man that radio program was awesome mager at the end height jamil bounty la she got that one right countdown says that by do is working on ways for people to use voice commands to drive cars through their banking and navigate airports he explains that the task is complicated by the myriad local accents and dylex in china by do uses vast amounts of data and computing power to learn to understand them week extract 100 moss curry's daily collect from the user and we ask a average need have chinese person to our lesson to it see if he can understand the chance are arthurton we'll be that average person in july china's cabinet released a national plan to become the world's leading power in artificial and belgian by 2030 and create an industry worth nearly one hundred fifty billion dollars china's leaders of long taken pride in their ability to mobilize people and resources for megaprojects from the great wall to the atombomb many of had military uses in hey i is no exception the chinese military is focused on the ways in which the disruptive impact of an warfare could enable it to achieve an advantage and will actively seek to leverage the dynamism of chinese private sector advances in ai nets elsa konya she studies the chinese military's approach to emerging technologies at the center for a new american security in washington dc she says china has strengths which could help its bid to dominate emerging technologies especially at a time when the us seems less for focus tom them the devotion of resources to a in the form of investment as well as certain structural advantages the china possesses including massive amounts of data and inge a robust potential talent base could enable china to take the lead and the longer term konior notes that as in the us technological advances by privatesector firms like by do our quickly adapted to use by the military and the police so i asked by do engineer gone young what if the government asks you to do something nick for example threatens users privacy can we thinner.

lead engineer california china us voice recognition washington inge engineer one hundred fifty billion doll
"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The whitefish issue has been a big one in the headlines but like who's the manpower so for the core of engineers so we were given specifically the mission from fema and we service famous lead engineer uh we were then give them the mission at the end of september mission assignment to to kind of lead the the planning and design we have our own contractors that worked for us in we coordinate this very closely with proper my understanding in men please correct me if i'm wrong is that you all are handling what about seventy percent of it and prep has got about thirty is that is that the rare i think it fits initially whoa uh we kinda saive seventy thirty i think was a good estimate may be more 64 forty now in a kind of changes as we get more boots on the ground as you mentioned this is an island lara's all of this stuff coming from end have you been impacted by the jones act so let me answer your first question so most of the equipment is being manufactured in the united states so polls lawyer conductors enslavers you name it whatever it is we have priority to receive that that the bottom line with data's though they're just as a shortage in the united states with those components based on all the damage that was done during the other hurricane so it's been difficult to get that manufacturer gated it in the pipeline and then gloated down to ship from brought here one of the things that i'm really interested in is the standard to which you can read build things under the.

fema united states lead engineer jones seventy percent
"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is physically doing that were where are those engineers coming from were those lime coming from obviously the whitefish issue has been a big one in the headlines but like who's the manpower so for the core of engineers so we were given specifically the mission from fema and we serve as fema's lead engineer uh we were then given the mission at the end of september mission assignment to to kinda lead the the planning and design we have our own contractors that worked for us in we coordinate this very closely with proper my understanding and men please correct me if i'm wrong is that you all are handling what about seventy percent of it and prep has got about thirty is that is that the race i think it fits initially we kennesaw seventy thirty i think was a good estimate may be more 64 d now in a kind of changes as we get more boots on the ground as you mentioned this is an island lara's all of this stuff coming from and have you been impacted by the jones act so let me answer your first question so most of the equipment is being manufactured in the united states so polls lawyer conductors enslaves you name it whatever it is we have priority to receive that that the bottom line with that is the justices a shortage in the united states with those components based on all the damage that was done during the other hurricane so it's been difficult to get that manufacturer get it in the pipeline and then gloated on a ship from brought here one of the things that i'm really interested in is the standard to which you can rebuild things under the law fema has essentially dictated things can be restored to what they were pre disaster are you making improvements.

fema united states lead engineer kennesaw jones seventy percent
"lead engineer" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"When someone is out doing that who is physically do wing that work where are those engineers coming from where those lyman coming from obviously the whitefish issue has been a big one in the headlines but like who's the manpower so of for the core of engineers so we were given specifically the mission from fema uh and we service fema's lead engineer uh we were then give the mission at the end of september a mission assignment to to kind of lead uh the the planning and design we have our own contractors that worked for us in we coordinate this very closely with proper my understanding in men please correct me if i'm wrong is that you all are handling what about seventy percent of it and prep has got about thirty is that is that the raya here i think it fits initially whoa uh we kinda seventy thirty i think was a good estimate of may be more 64 dino in the kind of changes says we get more boots on the ground as you mentioned this is an island where is all of this stuff coming from end have you been impacted by the jones act um so let me answer your first question so um most of the equipment is being manufactured in the united states so polls a lawyer conductors and you name it whatever it is we have priority to receive that that the bottom line with that is the justices a shortage in the united states with those components based on all the damage that was done during the other hurricane so it's been difficult to get that manufacturer get it in the pipeline and then gloated on a ship from brought here one of the things that i'm really interested in is the standard to which you can rebuild things under the law fema has essentially dictated things can be restored to what they were pre disaster are you making improvements to the grid or you just allowed to restore them because they weren't in great shape prestart the mission assignment gives us direction to to temporary repairs.

lyman fema united states lead engineer jones seventy percent
"lead engineer" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"In the back of our truck and so that's word duct was boring um if you're within your curious conduct is just hop on the internet uh type in duct like decked out dot com you go through the cabello in search a duck and you'll see the product come up her in your on your internet and you will understand what i'm talking about yeah that may you're listening to mr greg randolph he is the vp of marketing of their add deck now talked about decked in vehicles storage solutions what's really cool about this too is you know we're we're always going all over the place jubal as an elk coming up going to be taken in atv with him you have your jacked story solution in the better your truck okay unless a jimbo his nissan tighten the all new american titan these are custom fit so every single truck i mean it fits like a glove but they the a recess down from the top which is really nice so someone walking by they don't even know that's back their ages looks like the bottom of the bed which you can actually put let's say you're atv on top of this correct correct though the one thing that so i'm glad you mentioned the one thing that we spent a lot of time uh doing was engineering is product so dr dak we call him tim smith our lead engineer and his team has been uh you know countless hours on engineering is product so the way it's made is actually there's a deal sub frame with in moulded in the black i didn't see polyethylene plastic that you see not just the plastic boxes actually feel that the ports the tax system another two thousand pound payload but an aide tv on their you can put a boca plywood on.

jubal jimbo mr greg randolph vp of marketing nissan tim smith lead engineer two thousand pound
"lead engineer" Discussed on SaaS Insider Podcast

SaaS Insider Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"lead engineer" Discussed on SaaS Insider Podcast

"The my pain points is again sales efficiency a marketing efficiency so if you have something in play they could convince me too again generate mqm cells that sales people will fight over and you really show is interesting i am all ears i will take that call all day long he goes i think there is that opportunity for a marketers everywhere to deliver better leads the sales to tighten up that relationship so if you of something that applies there uh i'm i'm euroregister at has asked them now is there any last tips that you've got listeners today yeah this is only a learned of the start of and i think is is very applicable to both the enterprise and start startups a former ceo had created a little bit of a budget every month he said hey we have any budget were a different lines of business can take each other out for a very fancy dinner on and you don't even not to talk work uh but it was a it was a a line item that these that had to go cross department so marketing to take out engineering or or engineering could jake out sales and i shall not to be so rewarding in terms of getting a better understanding getting to a closer relationship with your he happy i mean engineering usually doesn't want a deal with any any us in the in the antigrass not only not only that had happened but in the uh the lead engineer was the first person who came up to me and said hey david let's go out to dinner.

ceo lead engineer david