35 Burst results for "Layman"

Best of: When Americas in Crisis, You Cant Find a Canning Jar

Business Wars Daily

03:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Best of: When Americas in Crisis, You Cant Find a Canning Jar

"We know even though many of us are having much smaller holiday gatherings this year than in any other. You probably still cook too much as you. Search your stash of mismatch tupperware containers to store leftover turkey and apple pie. Listen back this surprising episode about shortages of another kind of container altogether. I they bought up all the toilet paper then. They came for the flower in yeast. As the weather cools they set their sights on fire pits and patio heaters. The latest pandemic shortage is a little more obscure mason jars. Yes mason jars those squat glass canning jars with a screw neck tops. They're used by folks who make pickles sauces preserves and other homemade delicacies. In more recent years they've also become popular with everyone from crafters to hipster bars newell brands manufacturers many of the most popular types of mason jars including ball and brands and while the company has been relatively mum on the spike in sales of these old products. Newell is having trouble meeting demand. So his rival anchor hocking glass which makes similar lines of canning jars marie bragg who owns an online canning jar retailer called the mason jar. Merchant told cnn. She saw customer start clamoring for canning jars and supplies back in mid august. That hasn't let up a spokesperson for ohio hardware company. Layman's told the washington post that canning supply. Sales are up six hundred percent over last year. The company's having trouble getting jars and litz it's waiting on the equivalent of a ten year supply of canning products from some vendors. The report said there are a few factors contributing to the shortage. I while mason style. Canning jars and screw tops can be reused. The metal disks that create an airtight seal can only be used once. So when demand surged the discs. Were the first items to sell out. A shortage of glass is also complicating things before the pandemic imported glass was hit with tariffs increasing. The cost then when the pandemic hit us porch shutdown. Making it tougher to get glass at all. The pittsburgh post gazette found the pandemic has also contributed to the shortage in other ways. Bread calls it the sour dough. Two point zero with more time on their hands during the pandemic people planet bigger gardens and anyone who's ever seen the sheer volume of tomatoes or zucchini. That can come from one. productive plant. Knows there's no way you can eat all of that produce before it goes bad. People also have more time to spend in the kitchen cooking up all of those canned goods in the meantime government. Officials are worried. That cantor's may resort to unsafe methods of food preservation. That includes reusing canning. Discs can increase the risk of botulism a rare but serious illness. They can be found in food. That's not properly preserved in a statement to cnn. Newell brand said it has increased. Glass production found additional lid manufacturers and take another measure to replenish stock. No word from anchor. Hocking home cantors are turning to marketplaces like ebay and amazon to find the jars and lids they need but horrors have moved in jacking up prices the last time the us face such a canning supply shortage. Congress got involved the quote. Great canning shortage of nineteen seventy-five had worried home. Kanter's demanding answers from congressional representatives and then president gerald ford a series of hearings determined that live makers weren't colluding to price gouge. Instead they were facing a material shortage an unanticipated spike in home canning similar to current circumstances. There's no indication that the current shortage will go in front of congress this time around but perhaps it's nice to know that the nation can show bipartisan support to solve something like a serious canning pickle. The

Newell Brands Hocking Glass Marie Bragg The Pittsburgh Post Gazette Newell CNN Layman The Washington Post Apple Newell Brand Mason Ohio Cantor Hocking Kanter Ebay Amazon Gerald Ford Congress
U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:44 min | Last month

U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

"The uk government appears to be trying to use the news that a covid vaccination has been licensed for use in this country to create good pr around brexit but england's health minister matt hancock who claimed fast tracking the pfizer vaccine was only possible because the uk was able to act outside of european union. Regulations has been firmly contradicted by the chief executive of the h. r. a. the body that handled the process. Well joint for more. On this by vincent mcilvanney. He's a political reporter and one of monocle twenty four regular contributors. Welcome back to the globalist vinnie. Can you tell us how. The story unfolded i. We had the great news that the vaccine had been licensed then matt. Hancock really dived into controversy. That's i think there was a genuine needle relief and celebration yesterday that the government made this announcement and they'd obviously planned this. Kathleen they have. The scientists going through detail televised press conference yesterday morning just to the public in very layman's terms. How the vaccine had been approved what it would do how it would be rolled out and then we have prime minister's questions where boris johnson and stone had a pretty friendly about They did simply questions about how the rollout would happen. it was. It was quite a public education session then in the afternoon the government seem to trip over itself They started to say. There was a bit of pushback from the germans at the brit. Saying that this was you know a real day for british signs that this was great for. They don't this and then. My ankle comments on braxton. Also jacob re smog sang we could only approved vaccine so quickly because we've left the eu last month we change regulations vaccine didn't need eu approval which has slower and this ready then lead them into problems because that has been debunked has been fact checked by various organizations to say that. That's not the case. It was actually permitted under eu law And that was the point. Made as you mentioned by the head of the ease at medicines regulator on wednesday that this states could act unilaterally and false tracking it. So it's very strange that they have tried to do something which shouldn't be political. Shouldn't be kind of you know doused in one camp or another particular when it comes to leave or remain when it comes to brexit which is still divisive issue here in the uk at a point where we still don't have a brexit deal and then negotiations are ongoing to try and sully it somewhat by putting it in minds of some of the public with brexit is not a good idea and as you say germany took exception to this. Yes they did. They perspective said quite rightly in this european achievements. And perhaps the british government's if they done this. I with the oxford astra zeneca vaccine something which we expect to happen in the next ten days or so then they could claim you know a real big moment for british science and claim that the own but to claim that this landlocked. Because you've fast track vaccine that was developed at the over. The you know in the comfort. And that's gonna be coming from. Belgium is a bit of a strange move by the government. This is the government absolutely desperate for some good news. We have the worst death figures in europe and yesterday was another six hundred forty will so debts in the previous twenty four hours we the west infection rates and so you know they are really desperate now to make sure that they can trump it some of these achievements as their own and i notice. Boris johnson appear to roll back a little bit when he was asked about it later and he talked about international efforts and really quite successfully dodged the question. Yes he did. i think he knows. And perhaps the scientists said got to them that you cannot tie this to to brexit something. That is incredibly divisive and that pass. It wasn't true you know. There's enough missing formation going on about of cave nineteen vaccines that. The government really shouldn't be contributing to it and this something that she came up pm cues and the prime minister sort of echoed that said labour had put out last month and m seems the government will be moving forward that there will be some kind of penalty and fines in put in place to stop the misinformation and the spreading of anti vaccine summation on social media and on the social media platforms themselves. Something that they will have to watch out for. We're waiting for details on that still but it's not a good idea that the government would be putting out false information itself on that same day. Of course this isn't the kind of stuff damaging stuff that we're seeing spreading conspiracies about what the vaccine will do to you. But it's still doesn't help you sell your message somewhat. Absolutely i mean this. I suppose was an attempt just to trumpet. britney's truly global. Yes to trumpet global britain. Something that trying to do. It's also you know the final few days really off. The brexit negotiations going on central london images lost night if boxes and boxes of pizza being delivered to the negotiators so they won't see talking late into the night prisoners facing a real problem and i think part of why the government probably wants pasta quickly. Is that if by the end of this week. We don't have a deal. One becomes very unlikely and so at the end of this month. The uk will leave the european union now. All countries have struggled with their economies. Jerry the pandemic but imagine the double whammy in twenty twenty one of britain also suffering the effects of that no deal brexit. We know that it would be hugely detrimental to the economy and so britain than any country around the world needs to get its workforce vaccinated. Needs to have them feeling confident. Needs the well to think that this is a place that you can come and trade and do business in because it's safe and they need people back out there as much as possible working and so the vaccine really is so critical to be rolled out here to make sure that life can get back to as much as normal as possible because the economy is facing this double threat unlike any others around the well. The yes are repercussions in europe full brexit but not to the extent of the areas here in the uk. I mean the prime minister has warned that there may be logistical problems. Getting the vaccine out particularly to care homes. Yeah that's right. And i think we have to look at the separate vaccine. Say of the fis at biotech. One has very specific needs so has to be stored at just under minus seventy degrees centigrade and has a lifespan of about a month as well and so they don't want basically it cannot be moved again so we're getting the first eight hundred thousand off the forty million order coming from belgium in the next few days. Now that number you have to divide it by two. Because you need to inoculation say britain's ordered forty at that means twenty million people can be vaccinated and the clock is ticking to make the most of that investment in this vaccine to get it to the most critical people but because of the coach storage requirements. It seems that they're going to need to put it into key. Sentences rather than sending out in small batches perhaps to you know local pharmacy. Or a cabaret miss. They thought they would. So what will happen is it will go to places like hospitals where they have that cold storage than going to put it into centers so the nightingale hospitals that have been built and also places like sports stayed the emc. Say think as well in those kind of facilities and instead of bat say you have in town eight also cathodes instead of the vaccine going in small batches of the cabins because of these requirements on the storage. Because it doesn't like they moved too much you will instead means academy ten dis on trips to those senses to the hospital in order for them to get inoculated. Have to do that twice at intervals of two weeks. And after the second vaccine injection seven days later they will then be a not some killer's this they will then not be able to for the effects that there's a slight effects of the vaccine it's being described as a bit like hanging over by some participants in the study. But you will then be guarded against covid nineteen but they used the is one for the most critical people. Nhs staff a care home staff the most elderly in society those most at risk and they need to use as much as possible as quickly as possible at because then what i think will happen is the much cheaper and easier to store and distribute ox sudanic vaccine which is the one that britain has invested. Most in will be the one that most of the population gets

Brexit EU Matt Hancock Vincent Mcilvanney UK Boris Johnson Zeneca Britain Pfizer Braxton Hancock Kathleen British Government Matt England Stone Europe Oxford
Atlanta-based Delta avoids US tariffs by sending new Airbus jets on a world tour

Marketplace

03:16 min | 2 months ago

Atlanta-based Delta avoids US tariffs by sending new Airbus jets on a world tour

"Yeah, they're still happening. China, Of course. Also we have put import taxes on a bunch of European goods. French wine Scotch whisky, Also Airbus airplanes. But Delta Airlines, a buyer of the aforementioned Airbus's has been reading the tariff, fine print and it has been paying off, said Philip wrote the story for Bloomberg. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Kay. So in in layman's terms here if you could. What is Delta doing with these new planes? Yes. Oh, does that's doing something really interesting with the new plans and instead of usually flying them to the U. S, as they have in the past. What they've done instead is fly these planes overseas. Essentially if the plane has any hours and flight, aside from the delivery to the U. S, and testing that would make it a use plan and no longer subject of tariffs because the tariffs only applied new planes. Very tricky. You gotta know the laws. So give me an example. They Delta plunks down. However much money. It is for a new Airbus And it takes off and flies to wear and does what Sure. So take one plane example. The A 3 21. Delta bought a plane from ever US, which was built in Hamburg. The plane flew from Hamburg to El Salvador. It stayed there for over two weeks. And then from there, it flew to the Cayman Islands and then a chance. Atlanta and, most recently, that plane's been flying between Atlanta and Montego Bay, and it has shaved the company. How much money would you guess? So based on the list prices of the aircraft it could have saved as much as 270 million, although airlines don't actually pay the list price for planes, and so the true savings could be much smaller than that, given that most airlines get massive discounts on new plane purchases, But still, Delta has decided it's worth it to go through this goat rope just to not have to pay. However many millions even single digit millions of dollars. It isn't Paris. Absolutely. I mean, the U. S. Has collected over $55 million in tariffs in the last one year or source and said Arabs came in what I hear you saying is that other airlines are not doing what Delta is doing. And they are paying that there's Yeah, that would seem like it. It would seem like those airlines are being charged with tariffs. We should be clear to. This is 100% legal, right? I mean Delta's going by the letter of the law. Absolutely. I mean, the entire strategy rests on the language that classifies the plane as you was once they've flown for any reason other than for testing and delivery. Even as clever as it might be. And as money saving, as it might be. There is some institutional inertia and some inefficiencies that Delta is dealing with here, right? Absolutely. I mean, the fact that they wouldn't really be able to import those plane directly into the US and obviously, that means you have to sort of find places for those planes. In the meantime, it does have some impact on the efficiency. But then remember that you have the covert crisis of the moment. And that sort of helps because you don't need so many plans at the moment, given the fact that there's so many plans that on the ground at the moment, and airlines are trying everything that they can to save money, so this is one sort of tool in the arsenal. Said.

Delta Airbus U. Hamburg Atlanta Bloomberg KAY Philip Montego Bay El Salvador Cayman Islands China United States Paris
Another Pandemic Shortage Creates Canning Chaos

Business Wars Daily

03:33 min | 2 months ago

Another Pandemic Shortage Creates Canning Chaos

"I they bought up all the toilet paper then. They came for the flour and yeast. As the weather cools. They set their sights on fire pits and patio heaters. The latest pandemic shortage is a little more obscure mason jars. Yes in charge those squat glass canning jars with a screw neck tops. They're used by folks who make pickle sauces preserves and other homemade delicacies. In more recent years they've also become popular with everyone from crafters to hipster bars newell brands manufacturers many of the most popular types of mason jars including ball incur brands and while the company has been relatively mum on the spike. In sales of these old-timey products newell is having trouble meeting demand. So his rival anchor hocking glass which makes similar lines of canning jars marie bragg who owns an online canning jar retailer called the mason jar merchant told. Cnn she saw customers start clamoring for canning jars and supplies back in mid august. That hasn't let up a spokesperson for ohio hardware company. Layman's told the washington post that canning supply. Sales are up six hundred percent over last year. The company's having trouble getting jars in lit it's waiting on the equivalent of ten years supply of canning products from some vendors. The report said there are a few factors contributing to the shortage. I while mason style. Canning jars and screw tops can be reused. The metal disks that create an airtight seal can only be used once. So when demand surged the discs. Were the first items to sell out. A shortage of glass is also complicating things before the pandemic imported glass was hit with tariffs increasing. The cost then when the pandemic hit. Us port shutdown making it tougher to get glass at all. The pittsburgh post gazette found the pandemic is also contributed to the shortage in other ways. Bread calls it the sour dough. Two point zero with more time on their hands during the pandemic people planet bigger gardens and anyone who's ever seen the sheer volume of tomatoes zucchini. That can come from one. Productive plan knows. There's no way you can eat all of that produce. Before it goes bad people also have more time to spend in the kitchen cooking up all of those canned goods. In the meantime government. Officials are worried. That cantor's may resort to unsafe methods of food preservation that includes reusing canning jar discs which can increase the risk of botulism rare but serious illness that can be found in food. That's not properly preserved in a statement to cnn. Numeral brand said it has increased glass production found additional manufacturers and take other measures to replenish stock. No word from anchor. Hocking home cantors are turning to marketplaces like ebay and amazon. To find the jars and leads. They need but hoarders have moved in jacking up prices the last time the us face such a canning supply shortage. Congress got involved the quote great canning shortage of nineteen seventy five had worried home kanter's demanding answers from congressional representatives and president. Gerald ford a series of hearings determined that lid makers weren't colluding to price gouge. Instead they were facing a material shortage an unanticipated spike in home canning similar to current circumstances. There's no indication that the current shortage will go in front of congress this time around but perhaps it's nice to know that the nation can show bipartisan support to solve something like a serious candy jar. Pick

Canning Jars Marie Bragg The Pittsburgh Post Gazette Newell CNN Layman The Washington Post Mason Ohio Botulism Cantor Hocking United States Kanter Ebay Amazon Gerald Ford Congress
The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

The Chalene Show

04:59 min | 4 months ago

The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

"In two thousand and seven researchers at Oxford. University started looking at the brains of newborn babies and what they found was pretty Dang interesting. What they found when comparing the brains of newborn babies to the brains of adults. Was that adult had fewer get this fewer neurons in their brain than newborns did kind of interesting ha and that was very compelling for the researchers they wanted to. Why would babies have more neurons? If obviously, adults are more skilled and smarter et Cetera they can do more and they wanted to know, okay. What was going on in the brain? What they discovered is a concept that they now call synoptic pruning. Okay and here's just a really layman's way of understanding synoptic pruning. It is our synapses think of them as if you. Don't use it. You lose it. Our synapses are a fancy way of describing the connection happens between two neurons in your brain. So it's as basic idea that your brain if it doesn't need those connections, they they kind of fade away if they don't get used to frequently they disappear if you will. So let me give you a more tactical example this. So let's say that the country the world is in the middle of a pandemic and everyone goes into lockdown and you decide to every day of the pandemic to go roller skating. Now used to do it as a kid, but you haven't done it in years and years and years. Well, what happens is when you're a kid you, you could do like shoot the duck and you could roller skate backwards and can do all these really cool things and you were very, very confident on your roller skates. But now you're an adult and you're putting on your rollerskates again, and while some of those sit ups, are there the connections that used to exist between them have either weekend or they fallen away? But you star roller skating every single day for like six months. And your brain begins to strengthen these connections. So it's not only physically are you getting better at it? Mentally you're getting better and the more you practice the stronger those connections become in those connections start to get faster and more efficient. So when the first time you through on your rollerskates, you're like, Whoa Whoa it felt like it literally felt like the first time even. Though you've done it for years but now you're throwing your roller skates and your body knows how to respond when you start to lose your balance. It doesn't make you nervous. The brain builds these stronger faster connections and you start to develop skills much more easily it feels second nature. In fact, you're no longer thinking about it. It's a biological process that happens in our brains. And it's these biological processes, these synapses, these connections that allow us to make habits the type of habits where you're not even thinking about it you're just doing it. It's the same process that happens when you're in your car, you're driving somewhere, and then suddenly you're getting off an exit and you're like, what am I doing? This is my exit. This is just the exit that I normally get off on your brain wasn't even thinking about it though synapses were happening without you even being aware of them. The synopsis are so strong that you don't have to think about it. You don't have to discipline yourself to do these things. They just happen an example of that might be brushing your teeth and example that might be robbing. Your is in the morning example that might be sitting up in bed and opening up your phone. An example of that might be before you go to bed you get coffee ready for the morning. These are things you don't even think about you just do them over and over and over again. And the more we repeat on the stronger those synopsis become the question is, how do we get ourselves to the point at which we've repealed it? So often that the connection is there, the synapse is strong and we no longer have to rely on discipline or thinking about it. We've developed a habit a habit that is strongly connected in a pathway in our brains. The answer is something bj. Fog Habit expert in Stanford University Researcher Calls Implementation intention in other words stacking one habit on top of another pairing a new habit he wants to develop with one that's already been established. One that already has the synapses connected hardwired. We all want to develop healthy habits. We all want to have those habits that make it easier for us to just get through the day and not have to. Rely on discipline and I have to remind ourselves or to beat ourselves up. When we forget to do something, we want these habits yet we've been told by the media, buy books by authors, Experts that habit is the act of repeating something over and over and over again, you've probably heard the myth that it takes twenty one days thirty days to form a habit

Oxford Stanford University Researcher
California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

Environment: NPR

07:22 min | 4 months ago

California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

"The People Fighting California's wildfires include our next guest chief. Chris Donnelly is spent twenty two years as a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake California. Good, morning sir. Good. Morning Steve. How are you this morning I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well we we began this this fight probably on Saturday morning about six am and what we did I was get all of our people out of Huntington Lake. Huntington has about probably five hundred and fifty summer cabins in an additional hundred and ten. Condominiums, we had thousands of people at Huntington and Once I had is on the fire, very clear to me that he was going to burn into Huntington and lives were at stake. So we spent most of the time getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But of course, because of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas, vacation areas where. There for the summer there for vacation there camping have had to be evacuated emergency ways. you said you got is on the fire can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah. Honey. Lake is quite unique word seven thousand feet, and we are the reservoir for a very large electric generation facility. That's two thousand feet below us. Virtually down a steep just just a cliff. and. So when I heard a sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about five thirty in the morning on Saturday. I called our dispatch and and and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about fifteen to twenty minutes away. And look down into the Canyon to about a thousand feet below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning wins started upslope of Valley. That that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about seven thirty. Our our teams, we we knew this was coming eventually with so much deadened down and the droughts over the years. And temperatures have been drier and well, it's been hotter and humidity's dryer. So said so much deadened down is this mostly forested area that we're talking about This heavy forest. Read for in white for as much as eight feet in diameter. And Bark Beetle infestations probably killed a third of that forest and Ecorse was. Caused by not not too much water much hotter temperatures in the last ten or fifteen years. and. So we have a lot of lot of fuel out there in the forest. You you focused a lot clearly on the evacuation is everybody out safely so far as you know from your area of responsibility. Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verified that everyone was gone, and then at that point, we had lots of strike teams which are groups of fire engines each. Totaling about thirty five engines by about two PM. At which time is started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department, our one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well this helps to explain number that we've been hearing the past couple of days we're told this fire is zero percent contained. Is this a circumstance and of course, it's true of all wildfires to some extent circumstance where it's abundantly clear that the massive -ness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point to it does not look good. Has. The fire actually reached the the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes. We have loss cabins of on the western end of the lake. All communications are down into the area I am not there at this moment. So it's very difficult to get serious information but about six PM last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said, all crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. Okay this is copulated on the north side of the lake, and so a mid mid way on the shore you retreat retreated to a more defensible place is what you're saying. Thank you for much much better said, yes, Gotcha Gotcha I want people to know if they don't that you are as you describe it a brother in the Catholic church maybe a layman would think of you as a monk that is another thing that you do besides volunteer firefighting for twenty two years. How does that inform the way that you think about an event like this? Well you know I'm a teacher at Saint Mary's College and I've worked with kids since probably nineteen seventy. So it for me, it's all about caring people and touching hearts and. It's it's that center of people that I worry about the most you can rebuild cabins and you can go somewhere else but it's the people. So you know just a a little. Thirty second bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a PA announcement directly to people about you need to get out now. Yesterday I called her and told her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that are great. Grandfather that cabin in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty. And her grandmother talked about the moments out playing in the woods and collecting pine cones and. As she broke into tears. I. Thought. How many stories like this am I going to be hearing? And how hurtful this all is. Income on their summer cabins, they gotTA someplace to go, but it's the hurt and the loss and. Tens of thousands of girl and boy scouts that. Were at Huntington. And Church camps and private Anson. There's so many lives. So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about. It's about the people. And all the all the loss. Donnelly thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to. Chris Donald is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in California facing massive

Huntington Huntington Lake Huntington Lake California Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Chris Donnelly California Steve Ecorse Chris Donald Upslope Of Valley Officer Saint Mary's College TA
The Benefits of Vitamin B6

Diet Science

06:06 min | 5 months ago

The Benefits of Vitamin B6

"Michael McCaffrey. So she wants a topic for this week. This week, we are talking about the benefits of Vitamin B. Six interesting. Yeah, I know there are eight different b-vitamins, but they each have they worked together as a group, but then they each have their own unique role in the body. So vitamin B. Six is one. Of those vitamins that is very crucial in the functioning of our immune systems It's it's important for the production of red blood cells, which is haemoglobin. It works in our liver to help us detoxify things and it's also important for our brain neurotransmitters in the brain. So it's a very important vitamins. Today wanted to talk about some of its benefits in its food sources. Right let's dig into this vitamin B. Six yeah. So how many bees are there? There are actually eight different B vitamins. Okay. So here comes a layman's question share there are. Many many other letters of the alphabet. Why are they? All these crammed into be? Is there a purpose for that as some kind of scientific thing for that or no? Well this is a good question. If we go all the way back to you know how vitamins were first discovered and then kind of isolated in the foods they they came up with You know like the first one was a so yeah we're using letters as the names for these vitamins and we're logical to me. But what happened with the bees was that I thought there was only one th one type of nutrient that was. A B. Vitamin and B vitamins have the. Distinct role in the body of helping to convert our macro nutrients and energy. So like it's it's what helps turn our carbs in our fat and proteins into energy within ourselves. Pretty important. So so it was I. thought that there was only one of those that did that and later it was discovered that there are more related ones relate and so they started nate numbering them you know one, two, three. Okay or What's really interesting is there's there's an today we know that there are eight different numbered. B.. Vitamins but they don't go in order like really weird. It's like you got be one B two and b three but then there's no vitamin B four and then it's b five and B six and b seven but no eight and there's nine but no ten or eleven, and then there's a twelve do they relate to something? Important or or or are they all over the place? Oh, well, they like I said, they work as a group all involved in energy production within the body but then they also have other roles like individually. So for an and so what happened with the numbering of the bees is just you know to fill fill out that story is that some of those ones like vitamin B. Four in vitamin B., not I'm I'm sorry V. Ten. Or Eleven th. It was later discovered that those were they were compounds that are needed in the body, but they're not necessarily a vitamin. So vitamins have a very specific definition that they Our Body can't make them on its own until we have to get them from foods and those particular compounds that were originally thought to be a vitamin and had been given a number for a be vitamin were later found that they actually are not. not necessarily only needed to be derived by foods at our body can actually make them on its own from other materials, and so they were you know no longer called vitamin before vitamin B. Ten and eleven. So they have different names vitamin before is now called Choline Oh shall. Be Four. But then it's not a vitamin because it's right. Exactly. So yeah very interesting. Little Vitamin B eight is now known as Inositol. which is a compound that it our body can make on its own. We can get it from foods as well, but it's just not considered a vitamin anymore or what about vitamin D? Vitamin D. now, that's an interesting one because yes, we can make it within our body completely completely within our bodies. So that's an interesting one because there is controversy around that whether is this actually a vitamin or is it hormone right? Because it has hormone like activity? So I am like The rabbit. Right. So anyway, tell us about vitamin B. Six. So Vitamin B. Six is if important, you know like I said in in energy production within the body, but it has these other roles and some of those roles are You know detoxification but specifically, the brain functioning this is really important because it's involved in the production of several different neurotransmitters in the brain Namely Dopamine Serotonin and something called Gaba is G. A. B. A. but that stands for Gamma buroric acid and these all require vitamin B. six in order to be formed in the brain. There they all help us feel better, they definitely do and here's one of the things is I think a lot of times when we speak of vitamins and I try to explain this in layman terms to people about what's going on in our body bodies like a big chemical reaction going on in there. But think of it more in terms of like maybe a recipe and maybe even specifically a baking recipe like cake or something that requires specific amounts of certain ingredients in. If you don't have enough of what you need that recipes, not gonNA turn out right? You know you might still get something, but it's not gonna be perfect, right? It's not going to get you what you really want. It's not gonNA taste the same and might not have the right texture Nov that. So if we don't have enough of a specific vitamin that does its particular roles in the body than the whole thing is impaired. So. Like if you don't have enough B six, you're not going to be producing enough

Michael Mccaffrey Dopamine G. A. B. A.
The Benefits of Vitamin B6

Diet Science

05:12 min | 5 months ago

The Benefits of Vitamin B6

"Michael McCaffrey. So she wants a topic for this week. This week, we are talking about the benefits of Vitamin B. Six interesting. Yeah, I know there are eight different b-vitamins, but they each have they worked together as a group, but then they each have their own unique role in the body. So vitamin B. Six is one. Of those vitamins that is very crucial in the functioning of our immune systems It's it's important for the production of red blood cells, which is haemoglobin. It works in our liver to help us detoxify things and it's also important for our brain neurotransmitters in the brain. So it's a very important vitamins. Today wanted to talk about some of its benefits in its food sources. Right let's dig into this vitamin B. Six yeah. So how many bees are there? There are actually eight different B vitamins. Okay. So here comes a layman's question share there are. Many many other letters of the alphabet. Why are they? All these crammed into be? Is there a purpose for that as some kind of scientific thing for that or no? Well this is a good question. If we go all the way back to you know how vitamins were first discovered and then kind of isolated in the foods they they came up with You know like the first one was a so yeah we're using letters as the names for these vitamins and we're logical to me. But what happened with the bees was that I thought there was only one th one type of nutrient that was. A B. Vitamin and B vitamins have the. Distinct role in the body of helping to convert our macro nutrients and energy. So like it's it's what helps turn our carbs in our fat and proteins into energy within ourselves. Pretty important. So so it was I. thought that there was only one of those that did that and later it was discovered that there are more related ones relate and so they started nate numbering them you know one, two, three. Okay or What's really interesting is there's there's an today we know that there are eight different numbered. B.. Vitamins but they don't go in order like really weird. It's like you got be one B two and b three but then there's no vitamin B four and then it's b five and B six and b seven but no eight and there's nine but no ten or eleven, and then there's a twelve do they relate to something? Important or or or are they all over the place? Oh, well, they like I said, they work as a group all involved in energy production within the body but then they also have other roles like individually. So for an and so what happened with the numbering of the bees is just you know to fill fill out that story is that some of those ones like vitamin B. Four in vitamin B., not I'm I'm sorry V. Ten. Or Eleven th. It was later discovered that those were they were compounds that are needed in the body, but they're not necessarily a vitamin. So vitamins have a very specific definition that they Our Body can't make them on its own until we have to get them from foods and those particular compounds that were originally thought to be a vitamin and had been given a number for a be vitamin were later found that they actually are not. not necessarily only needed to be derived by foods at our body can actually make them on its own from other materials, and so they were you know no longer called vitamin before vitamin B. Ten and eleven. So they have different names vitamin before is now called Choline Oh shall. Be Four. But then it's not a vitamin because it's right. Exactly. So yeah very interesting. Little Vitamin B eight is now known as Inositol. which is a compound that it our body can make on its own. We can get it from foods as well, but it's just not considered a vitamin anymore or what about vitamin D? Vitamin D. now, that's an interesting one because yes, we can make it within our body completely completely within our bodies. So that's an interesting one because there is controversy around that whether is this actually a vitamin or is it hormone right? Because it has hormone like activity? So I am like The rabbit. Right. So anyway, tell us about vitamin B. Six. So Vitamin B. Six is if important, you know like I said in in energy production within the body, but it has these other roles and some of those roles are You know detoxification but specifically, the brain functioning this is really important because it's involved in the production of several different neurotransmitters in the brain Namely Dopamine Serotonin and something called Gaba is G. A. B. A. but that stands for Gamma buroric acid and these all require vitamin B. six in order to be formed in the brain. There they all help

Michael Mccaffrey G. A. B. A. Dopamine
How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

The Small Business Radio Show

16:08 min | 5 months ago

How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

"Well as your company grows or looks to save money especially people expenses. It's always good to look at the best tools and process run your business. The right tools and processes can help you either scale, your business, or running more profitably hit help and Tony Ward with the President of zero for the Americas. He has twenty years of experience in senior leadership positions with global technology companies including Microsoft Australia linked in spark, serving monkey and dropbox Tony Welcome to the show. Bearing talking. So first of all, tell me how you doing doing this pandemic you and your family. Yeah, it's actually we moved here from Australia in January? So my twelve year old my wife Celts in. I would say, pretty easily the worst time deposits. Hundred Years So. One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighteen Exactly, it's all upside from your very I would agree with that. Well, a lot of small business owners right now are trying to figure out how they can more effectively run their business with better prices with cost-saving apps where do you start? On The first thing I would say is that cloud technology I think has been we'll be seemed to be a real. Savior for a lot of businesses particularly through coded and. I give you an example I think everything from the front end of Your Business. So you know looking appointments things like timely. I can see a of people using figuring out new ways to market their business like your facebook and Google. In fact, if you'll get facebook's recent results that added a million new advertisers, a lot of those are going to be small businesses trying to figure out how to get more people in the door and then things like zero put back. Then to figure out what is actually going with your business and I know everyone is all talks about Cash is king and casual super important. But when you have a shoebox little receipts, it's very difficult to figure out what's happening with cash flow. So and I, kind of you don't running out of cash is almost like. An Iceberg and the sooner you could see coming the sooner you can potentially avoid it and so things like that. Help you do that are really really important always. But in this time, even more important to figure out what's going on your business and just automate as much as you possibly can to free free up your time to work on the business versus in business I think too many small businesses. Honesty that they're gonNA try diy everything and there are certain pieces of software that you can use action at free up to do things in your business. So Tony and your point of view where you actually start because I always say that you can't do everything at one time. What's really the tip of the spear? We'll the first thing that I would do, and this is a really interesting stat when you compare the US versus other markets that were unlike strapping young candidate UK in the US around thirty only thirty percent of small businesses have an accountant or bookkeeper. It's very much a diy mentality and what I would say to people is look we we get personal trainers we get coaching all the time and our daily lives. Yes. Seventy presenting small businesses don't have a coach don't have someone to go to and really talk about their business. And when you think about it, it's a lot of small businesses of debt their house on their business yet they don't necessarily see the value or having thought about getting our coach. So I would say getting a calendar bookkeeper, get a businesses visor it's going to be the best money era we're GONNA stand. So let me ask you a question about that. Why don't people do that? Because I agree with you so many people have no idea what's financially going their business why don't they take that step? Is it that they don't think they need it or they don't want to know what's really going on. Inching. Research over the last six months in their research. It's something to do the pioneering spirit of America where people believe I can do myself do it yourself and what we're trying to say, we tried to move people from Diy d I t do it together and so our research shows us that if A small business ties zero, and they're using an accountant bookkeeper, their survival rates, Shuki sixty percent higher over five years so. Logically. You think I should do that I think part of it is people get so passionate about their dream of writing because they just get into it and usually take some sort of compelling events tax issues or whatever, and when the most secret lies are I would think you know. Clan up from what you're GONNA do and you're probably enemy our data shows you can be more successful Malaga. So that's the first thing I do. Then you're kind of bookkeepers probably GONNA look how you're running your business and and work out with software like zero and others where you making money where you're losing money record to save money. You know and right now what you should be doing is you know renegotiating with your landlord if you can't if you have physical space figuring out of their other avenues, other ways, you can actually get your product to market that maybe aren't a traditional retail sense. So you seeing things like shop with Wind Amazon just explode 'cause you know businesses are trying to figure out how can I sell more product or service in the virtual world because physical world is so challenge that Obama. Tony I wonder if these are the same people that don't balance their checkbook. I don't have the date on that, but you'd argue, yes, I think that's probably true. You know what? They say the penny look after the pennies. The dog themselves. So yeah to it's probably reasonable. It's because we're not really taught these kind of financial concepts in school. Actually it's hard to understand what the profit and loss statement says. The balance sheet says the cash flow statement says and many times there with the wrong accountant that really doesn't take time to explain to them. So they kind of keep their distance from this stuff. I think it's been a chicken and egg I think a lot of our accounts into the paper is there really they want to get into advisory services? That's all they see the growth and Really are passionate about the small businesses that they look after. Talking to some of our Council peepers, curious cove experience, they're really struggling because they're talking to small businesses who are potentially business potentially losing her house. So I think small accountants want to do this, but they kind of need to be invited into the Party needs created a couple of products lately to try to help on accounts to give a reason to actually have that conversation. So something called the business sack shot thirty castles state and our new. Features inside zero where you can literally see in real time what's going on in your business and the thirty day cash will actually give you some insights as the white new should do Ingram plain English for a small business like collect these bills. Hey, this you're gonNA run into cash unless you collect these deals unless you delayed payment of these other bills so. And one thing zero does really really. Well as we we talk in Layman's terms. I think about my Mama's a hairdresser right Sheila Ramos along for twenty five years. She didn't get a peer now or anything like that. Say we use terms like money owed money owing inside zero because like okay I kind of that because I get money all money that's oats me I don't really get profit and loss credits and debits into council I think. Financial Literacy to your point area in small business is is not great because people just want my mum's London runner hairdressing Salon. She didn't WanNa do the books and I think making it easier for people to run their business and having software advisers that that do the boring accounting stuff is really critical to successively small. Wanted to brag about financial literacy because when I sold my last business in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine told this toward many times before I lost a million dollars off the sale of the company because I send my balance sheet nine MBA for northwestern university. So that's nothing to be proud of. It's it's really really challenging running a small business. You brand businesses I've had small businesses you spend so much of your time and effort certainly some people think are GonNa start a cafe a lifestyle. It's a lifestyle business. Alright sixty seventy, eighty hours. It's it's really really challenging. So anything that software due. To free up some your time to have more time with your family or to grow your businesses is really what we're trying to achieve. This idea of the three day cash flow because again, every business goes out of business. The exact same reason they run out of money and during the recession cash definitely slows down what suggestions would you have for small business owners for managing their cash flow during this period of time. The first thing I would do I would be really really hard core on any money that's actually ot you to collect that to be the squeaky wheel because a squeaky wheel gets the oil in this where we are right now there's a lot of money owed and certainly there are the ones that are actually really persists. are the ones that are going to get it. I'm I would be as I said before I be trying to renegotiate any kind of a large expenses that I have either get more favorable terms or reduction in order to protect your cash flow and then I would be thinking really creatively how I could get on routes to market for my product or service. So if I could I sell more online, there's really creative things that people are doing like I was talking to somebody today who they got a haircut for the first time in you know since March since the lockdown started. Your hairdresser had a physical salon. She wasn't able to have people in anymore. So she was literally going to people's houses and she said now that she probably wasn't going to reopen her physical business that this is really going to be the future of her business and then she was selling product, which you know is generally high margin she had that on. A website where she was promoting products and All the same time. I think you're gonNA see more and more of that sort of creativity. My Wife's still you know getting a personal trainer she's doing it over soon call right so she's not physically going to see this personal trainer personal trainers still making money, but they're doing it over in know a virtual environment versus a physical environment. It's really amazing because there are things that we're doing now that we never thought could be done remotely like my wife again, it's teaching Yoga classes remotely and I'm taking karate class remotely. It's really quite amazing what you can get used to. Yeah I just think it's the Sunders. Certain the research that we have is they're growing they're actually seeing this as as an opportunity and you know there are other business I really feel for you know Pasta Taliban businesses retell the that are doing it really really tough with someone are figuring out new channels new ways to do. So for sure there's GonNa be winners and losers. Like. There isn't every single economic downturn. Feel like it's kind of like a game of musical chairs things are going well in the economy. Excuse me. Things are going well in the economy and all of a sudden the music stops you don't know if you're gonNA have a chair. Yeah and I think you know the really smart service savvy entrepreneurs out. There are going to figure out ways to be successful, and there's going to be just like integrates recession. This is going to be a whole bunch of starting the kind of the hypothesis that we haggas. Particularly millennials every Neil you talked to, you seems to have some side side-hustle right and what's happening is is a lot of people are losing their their jobs, their side hustles becoming their main hustle. So you're gonNA see a whole bunch of new businesses come out of this, and some of them will be really successful on some will some won't make it, but you're definitely seeing green shoots in new businesses starting out. When should people actually choose zero? Of course the elephant in the room is always quickbooks. Why do people choose zero over quick? Book Solutions. I think one of the main reasons they choose it is very easy to use. It's very simple. It's very non accounting language. It was you know we created the category of small business cloud accounting. So we we don't have a desktop business we've always just had a class business so. It's it's built for the cloud doesn't it's not coming from the desktop and moving to the cloud. So I think ease of use. And just. Talked about being Hashtag. Beautiful. It's really nice piece of software to use very intuitive. and. One of the things I find that small business owners make as far as mistake is they don't set up a separate accounting system for their business. They just do it as an extension of their personal accounting system, which really is a problem. Yeah sickly sole-traders when they start out a lot of rooms are mixed kind of discolored business and pleasure or their personal encounter banking account. I would say that that is you know five starting a business. The first thing I do is I would set up a business bank account right and I would basically get some sort of accounting software whether it's you know zero or what have you I would look for the line of business software that is kind of the market leader in the category that I in. So you know in construction, they'd be Pro Gore finding you know running a hair salon. Be Timely find getting all my kind of soft were sorted out, and then I would find a really great accountable infect around flights ten percent of our accountable keeper channel. The people that are zero advisers are almost acting like managed service providers were there. Basically providing a stack of software plus advisory services to small businesses for a monthly fee. So the small business doesn't need to worry about. Well, what should I choose choose? Their their adviser is basically saying if you're in this particular industry, this is the the bundle of software that you need to run your business and all manage it all, and I'll help you with coaching. You run your business and I want everyone to hear what Tony is saying because to many times we don't spend any time setting up the infrastructure for our company and that's really easy these days with these cloud. APPS Tony. It's interesting. You know long time ago when Islands University announced doing. It. Guidance was eighty percent of your time. You're doing it should be planning twenty percent doing and I don't think that's much different for business I think, generally some small. Rush out and getting to it, and they don't think about the planning side of it. But if you don't build the foundations thinking about building a house with the foundation isn't rock-solid. You know, how are you going to build that twenty story building? If you have aspirations to grow your business, you gotta get the foundations down. You GotTa get a coach just set it up right from the start in your our research shows you're going to drastically improve your chances of being successful. We'll Tony I appreciate you joining the show where can people get more information about and that's spelled x. e zero? Zero DOT COM and check it out. There's you can get on there for a free trial and. I hope everyone loves it up everyone stay safe I. Hope all the small businesses out there. I know you're doing itself. We're here to help. Just, take care good life and. Hope you're joining continues to grow.

Tony Accountant Cloud Americas Cash President Of Zero Facebook Tony Ward Australia United States Tony I Microsoft Australia Barack Obama MBA Sheila Ramos Islands University Google
The Allergic Load

The Plant Path

05:16 min | 5 months ago

The Allergic Load

"Hey there everybody say Jay here the School of Evolutionary herbalism, and in this week's episode of the blog, we're GONNA be talking. About. Addressing allergies you know this is a really big thing that a lot of people struggle with especially in terms of seasonal allergies here we're kind of in the early stages of summer here, and this is that time where a lot of people get really affected by a lot of the pollens in the air and dealing with upper respiratory stuff and and so I just thought it was a very pertinent thing to share with you at this. But. Also thinking about like, why do we get allergies right like what are what's at the root cause of that? Why is it that sometimes, we have an allergy when we're a kid and then it goes away but then it comes back later in life what's going on there. So in this episode, talking a little bit more about some of the underlying physiology behind allergies and why they can come and go and and what you can do kind of on a on a foundational level to try to not just treat allergies with herbs. I'm not really going so much into how to treat allergies with herbs so much as what are some of the fundamental things that you need. To Do to address that root cause of those allergies. So I hope you enjoy this week's episode of the evolutionary herbalism blog and I read I have been working with a medical herbalist for over a year. My initial concern was my seasonal allergies that have gotten consistently worse over the past five years I knew it was something deeper, most likely related to my gut health and sure enough the majority of the support and guidance I have received has been around digestion absorption and elimination. Great sounds that sounds like a good approach. That's probably what I would do to. However this is my second year using daily nettle infusions starting in January until around May to help with my seasonal allergy symptoms and has definitely helped but listening to the video here made me reflect in my reliant on nettles. What exactly are they doing in my body that my body isn't able to do for itself time to dive deeper great. Great Question C.. I just want really start off by. Acknowledging the place that your question is coming from, which is wanting to get to the root cause Just being really reliant on an herb to keep a symptom at bay. But as you said, diving deeper into what what's going on here, why am I having these allergies? What's at the root of and what can I do to? Cut that route so that I just don't have this problem anymore right So. I would say, generally speaking with our G type symptoms I would agree that the gut is an important area to focus on. One way that it was explained to me and this is something that I learned from the herbalist Paul Bergner. And he explained allergies. In. A way that made a lot of sense to me, which is basically that and this is going to be kind of shared in Layman's terms but. Essentially that the body has a certain. Tolerance of. Antigens or things that the body comes in contact with that, the immune system responds to Let's say for example, that the body has a hundred points. So to speak of an allergic load that it can tolerate without generating symptoms, right? So you know maybe you're. Maybe, there's some cats that you have. A little bit of an alert out allergic allergy to and they take up maybe seventy points, and then you maybe eat food that your body isn't super. Doesn't really like that much, and that takes up another twenty nine points, right. So now you're at ninety, nine and. And then all the sudden. The grass pollen. Starts, spitting out it's pollen and you walk outside and that Paulin. Fifty points of an allergic load. Well, that just tipped the scales, and now your body starts having an allergic response to that pollen right. So oftentimes, the approach to treating allergies in general is to look at the different areas of life and try to reduce those potential. Allergen triggers now, obviously if you like. have an animal that. Lives with you it's not like most people weren't going to get rid of their animal's. But if you're safe for example, eating food that you're slightly intolerant to, that's something that you can work with.

Allergies School Of Evolutionary Herbali Paul Bergner JAY Paulin
Human remains found in Texas amid search for missing soldier

KYW 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 7 months ago

Human remains found in Texas amid search for missing soldier

"Development in the investigation of a missing soldier in Texas would told people she was the victim of sexual harassment. Army investigators searching for a missing Fort Hood soldier have found partial human remains in an area of interest. Near the Layman River in Belle County, Texas. Private first class Vanesa G Yn has been missing for more than two months and foul play is suspected in the 20 year olds disappearance. There has been no confirmation of the identity of the remains.

Texas Fort Hood Layman River Belle County Harassment Army
Who Is Strong?

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 8 months ago

Who Is Strong?

"Just about everybody had one. Strong's exhaustive concordance of the Bible. Seem like you have a Bible and somewhere next to it. You would have strong's concordance. It was first published in eighteen ninety. It contains a numbering system for Hebrew and Greek words. And it has eight thousand, six, hundred, seventy four, Hebrew roots that are numbered and five thousand, five, hundred, twenty three Greek roots that are numbered. This is massive this work, this exhaustive concordance, showing where every word in the Bible could be found with its book, Chapter and verse. It is massive in this before computers before software programs, and before search engines, which means this work was all done by hand well, this same strong also served as editor of the massive ten volume. Cyclo Pedia a Biblical theological and ecclesiastical literature. It was published from eighteen, sixty seven through eighteen, eighty one. And if that's not enough this same strong, finally worked on a committee that produced the American Standard version of the Bible for thirty years. This committee labored from eighteen seventy one until the SV was published in nineteen o one. Charles Hodge was one of those editors Pantheon of scholars of the day one hundred and one editors all worked on the American Standard version, and one of those one hundred and one was the strong. So, who is he well? He is James Strong. He was born in New York City on August, fourteenth, eighteen, twenty, two. He died in New York in eighteen ninety four. He wanted to be a doctor when he was young, but he went off to Wesleyan University in Middletown Connecticut and there he studied Biblical languages among other things he was really layman, and he had a fascinating career. He organized a railroad company, and then built the flushing railroad in the eighteen fifties. It was later incorporated in his actually part of the the railroad subway system of the New York road today. He also served as a mayor of his hometown on Long Island. He taught for a while in Vermont. But his main career was at drew theological seminary, and there he was for twenty five years just prior to going to drew, he was the acting president of Troy University, and sometime in the eighteen fifties, he published an article that the Methodist Church should establish a seminary and the new. York vicinity to train ministers for the Gospel. He was mocked for that article. There were many who thought that you shouldn't train ministers that God just hand picked them, so they should be God trained, not man trained, but strong persistent, and he was soon joined by others and drew theological seminary opened. He was part of what was called the strong five who were among those five who started the seminary. The early president of the seminary was James mclintock. He knew strong back from their days when they were working on that ten volumes cyclope. That massive edited work that strong also served on so the two of them together set off with some other faculty to establish drew. One of his colleagues at drew, said this of James Strong. At night in the library, he worked like a plow horse, but in the lecture room he was a Colt. No one ever went to sleep in his class unless he wasn't bad. Health or an embassy saw well. That's what they thought of James Strong. He spent thirty five years working on the strong's exhaustive concordance. It was published in eighteen ninety. It became a standard text, and as I said just about everybody had a copy of strong's concordance. Well, that's who strong was and I'm Steve Nichols the thanks for joining us for five minutes in Church history.

Charles Hodge Strong New York City Cyclo Pedia Editor Steve Nichols James Mclintock Long Island York Acting President Troy University President Trump Vermont Methodist Church Middletown Connecticut Wesleyan University
The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:48 min | 8 months ago

The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

"Today. We're going to go off on a different subject here about kidneys. You guys haven't heard us discuss kidneys very much in the past episodes but we thought with everyone being a little bit on the fearful angry side we would address kidneys because they very much have to do with those emotions. So the name of this show today is called the kidneys connection to our emotions. And we're going to tell you a little bit about what to look for when you might suspect it your kidneys what you can take to help. Get them better and we also have a question at the end that we're going to answer. So Dr Lewis. Could you tell us why you have chosen to discuss the kidney connection today on our podcast? Well Yeah I'd love to. I chose to do this because Janet wanted to. That's right that is true. You know I think the main thing is is because the throughout this Kobe stuff that I think is you know crock. Crap but You know we. We've been told things so long so loud. You know you can tell a lie long enough and loud enough people begin to believe it and so saying stay safe Co home. Stay home be safe in. Its implying that US people like me. That think it's a crock that get out or sinful and where. The enemy were being brainwashed. Folks you've got to think past that and I'm absolutely amazed at the people that choose. It's a choice. They choose to cower down in fear and and we've noticed that people are more agitated more irritated and that's me because I can't believe that idiocy that's going on like trying to get into home depot and his lap. Geez there's one hundred and fifty feet between everybody but you're worried about how many people walking in the store and one of the reasons that we as a society besides the mental spiritual they're throwing at us is because we're eating incorrectly. We're drinking to excess with when it talks when you talk about alcohol. Excessive to me is very little but Done tight much and we get irritated because we're putting our her kidneys under stress. One of the worst things you can do is have high blood pressure that you don't take care of either medically or naturally or both because at high blood pressure can really calls all kinds of problems with the kidney so please please please take care your kidneys. It it's incredible is super important but kidneys are their damaged from all sorts of things like certain drugs are really really tough on the kidneys and you have to watch that and you know. Have your doctor that puts you on the medications to monitor that but heavy metals our society full of heavy metals. It's full of solvents. It's of a chemotherapy. Does that Different Benham's snake insect spider and I went through a lot of that after God only knows how many Brown recluse spider about gotten and it will wreak havoc on your kid. He's poisonous mushrooms. I don't know anything about that because I don't experiment with those mushrooms that grow on cow patties like some people. I know Do it because it's a psychedelic psychogenic psychotic or something Pesticides and we know we've got pesticides all over the. It's really really really common in our food. Which is a sad thing and herbicides and people say but I'm not around our besides York Janet. I was coming to work two days ago. And there's the Texas highway department spraying herbicides. Oh Good God but you know us a goat to eat but we have done that to ourselves with the poisons in our society and renal failure and not even failure but when you put your kidneys in stress it can add to things like congestive heart failure diabetes or diabetes slash Metabolic Syndrome. Can put pressure on your kidneys. It can go both ways and lock said before the chronic hypertension a bad thing liver disease liberal ever you got. The liber is like a woman. The Lib rain happy. Ain't nobody happy. And then you have diseases. The autoimmune diseases like Lupus and sickle cell. Things like that There are people that have genetic tendencies the have issues with Kidneys like poly cystic. Disease and kidneys. Are They Tennessee to have mineral accumulations that she usually calcium? And we see that into your analysis. It'll say crystals calcium oxalate. Now you know. We can't make any claims about supplements but if you're having calcium oxalate stones that usually means you have a lack of magnesium or potassium to offset because we get minerals that out of balance. And that's the problem with our society mentally and physically because we get out of balance we forget to laugh. We forget to you know have a good time and I just love people that come in here and I'll go hug their neck and watch them freak out or I'll shake their hand and it's like you know we've been doing this for tens of thousands of years and it's not an issue in. Don't you enjoy the HUG and s? You're actually I do I. I like the way you social distance dot because I don't social distance. That's one of the things we're missing. Now is the social interaction. That is way way more important than any other thing now again. I I said disappear. Podcast AGO that they're scripture somewhere to Bible. I forget probably proverbs but is a wiseman foresees danger and takes precautions K. And I think that's a smart thing to do but the Bible also says in Titus very plainly. God didn't give you a spirit of fear so quick fear crap You talk about stones oxalate downs in nineteen seventy four when you say stoned rattling talking about oxalate stones. The ones that are GONNA be urine. Just what would those manifest in normal? Layman's terms that someone might understand that. They may have a kidney problem. Kidney Stones you know very sharp pain in the back and you know This is because one sweetheart of a sweetheart patients or no the different parts of magnesium and we're getting people that say well. I have this symptom and they want me to diagnose Office set a symptoms everytime time Janet. I give a list I say. Be careful though because these same symptoms can go with a different organ. Be careful how you diagnose off of just symptoms but one of the things That you can bet your bottom dollar as you're deficient in magnesium so I had this sweetheart patients they can you explain the different types of magnesium. I'm saying that because there's plenty of research says if you take magnesium it buffers The bad side effects of calcium or calcium oxalate stones that that's research that and it says be six. Pp and potassium so let's talk about. Magnesium purchased a little while because magnesium can take the anxiety irritability that we are feeling and. I think is obvious in my voice. It's like oh good. God quit despair crap but if you take magnesium there's actually research says magnesium if it's the right form can work even better. I'll stress anxiety. Depression era ability and anger than many many many drugs and again we can't make claims that but the research says it so let's talk just briefly about the different types of magnesium if you poop once a day or less unietd magnesium citrate now. We have that for people. They say about once as normal permissiveness common. But it's not normal. He got three trains in three trains. Out Is Janet says about three meals and three meals out so citrate because it was bound citric acid. And that's a pretty large molecule. And that's why you don't get enough in a multi vitamin or multi-mineral. Because it's a large molecule. Takes up too much. Real Estate It's a mild laxative. And so it's it's a great choice. Then you've got magnesium oxide folks it. They're putting oxide in your multi-donor multi-mineral throw it away. Because that's the cheap crap that yes it works as a laxative. But you don't really absorb it where you can absorb more the cows of magnesium citrate then you got the magnesium glassy night and it's a pretty gentle form that's what I'd generally suggest for people that have hypertension It slower going through the system. It absorbs a little bit less water. So you end up. Absorbing more of it It glasses night. Actually it's Connected to an Amino. Acid glossing blessing is incredibly incredibly incredibly important amino acid to help form neurotransmitters and calms your nerves.

Janet Bible United States Dr Lewis Different Benham Liver Disease Metabolic Syndrome Lupus York Texas Kobe Disease Tennessee Layman Wiseman Titus
Liposuction and Fat Transfer: Why the VASERlipo Reigns Supreme

Art Beauty

06:09 min | 9 months ago

Liposuction and Fat Transfer: Why the VASERlipo Reigns Supreme

"Rough. Can you start by telling us? What is these are liposuction? So liposuction is liposuction. Removal of fat from areas. That we don't want How that is done on Is done through a variety of different means and yes. A lot of people know laser liposuction. It was extremely well marketed. Probably one of the best marketed Devices out there and there are a number on the market now Bazars is a little bit different. It's unique in. It's it's been around since the early two thousands. I was the first person in the DC region to have an used the device. And it really has become the Go-to from body contouring standpoint in my practice in its unique in that it uses ultrasound so vezer is actually an acronym that means vibration amplification of sound interview residents. And all it is is a description of how it works Underscoring how gentle it is on the cells In how precise it can be body contouring sampling and you bring up a good point with the gentle on the cells so this is a really good option for people who want to transfer fat correct because you can sort of maintain more of that fat. Yes keep it alive. Yes absolutely okay. And and more so than other types of liposuction cracked. Yes some mechanical liposuction. Which was the original It's Everything we do is based off of comes with a lot of sheer exactly a lot of shear forces There is trauma to the cells and so the number of cells that are actually a viable and available to transfer is low. I in order for us to optimize that. We need a way to gently. Tease the cells out of their native environment in respect their respect their membranes being able to Then in partitioned them up into smaller and smaller packets because those cells are there in a very happy environment. They're getting nutrition from all kinds of sources and as soon as we disrupt that we disrupt their entire nutritional capabilities so when we transfer back in. We need small packets of cells. That can do something called drink from the environment. Assault called cellular ambition And in in extracting the cells the visa does an excellent job at not only protecting those cells the creating really small packets that when we transfer them Are going to be a lot more likely to Be able to drink effectively until they can establish their own nutritional sources in their new environments. I hope that's that's a long to break it down like a little bit more in Layman's terms And we do like the science who. I'm not steering away from that but just to take a little step backwards when you remove fat and you're thinking about transferring it Ryan you've done this But you know the Brazilian boatlift. They transferred but they can do it into the boobs. They can do it into the face And you take it out of the body. What is it about eighty percent? I'm sorry it's more like fifty percent of the fat dies correct. The viability can be as low as about fifty to sixty percent all the way up to around eighty percent with more just mechanical liposuction. Laser on the other hand really is just totally. Destructive does not delete very much did vital on the On on the back end so that wouldn't be available to us but with the adviser In the way it works the viability is somewhere between eighty eight and ninety four percent in those studies when we talk about fat transfer. You know the first thing that comes to my mind is okay. If I'm putting it into Ryan did his pack survives to put it into my breasts or God forbid my face. They do it. A lot under the is correct. Yes How do I know that I'm going to have even results? That's always a question there I only in in doing this for twenty years. I've only ever seen something that I would call significantly. Asymmetric fat takes There's a lot of planning that goes on. How process the cells which portion of the cells that we use For transfer out of a clean cells. That always those of us. Who Do it? Regularly helps optimize Any lack of symmetric or or where it takes one place and doesn't take in the other. I I would say the only time I've ever seen that happen in the buttocks Is someone who Will acknowledge that I wasn't very good about positioning. I stayed on my left side. More than my right and that kind of pressure will definitely have an effect over time We try and educate patients pre-operative Li on those tiny little nuances. So so if you have a fat transfer of the phase in your face sleeper and you face uh sleep on your left side that side probably GonNa have more pressure it maybe a little more swollen because is dependent on early on but when we get to final results. Patients may see that that that pressure lead side Or pressure affected side Has has less of an expected. Take than the opposite side. Saloon. We how long do you have to? You know. Only sleep on one side or make sure that you're sitting evenly or I don't know not favoring one side of you have about left door not sleeping on your chest your face? We prefer to put patients in suspended animation for like six weeks Using on wouldn't it be? I really protecting it for the first two to three weeks is the critical period. That's that's the most important period beyond that It's unlikely the cells have started to establish themselves What's going to survive is definitely going to survive at that point unless you have some unexpected trauma to the area The likelihood that anything would change from Ford small

Ryan Bazars Assault Ford
CDC weighs loosening guidelines for some exposed to virus

KCBS Radio Morning News

04:45 min | 10 months ago

CDC weighs loosening guidelines for some exposed to virus

"Let's start with that last note as we bring in doctor Bob Wachter on the KCBS ring central New Zealand he's chair of the UC San Francisco department of medicine to doctor Walker if you heard the CDC is talking about some loosening of guidelines on the assumption that people are a symptomatic and have been exposed to someone with the corona virus makes sense to you at this point it's time to begin thinking about it but I don't think it's time to begin losing the guidelines certainly in the bay area we had an extraordinary success in ramping down and tamping down the number of cases in the number of deaths and at least the public health authorities an epidemiologist that I'm talking to do not say that it's time to to let up just yet okay so based on what you're seeing there John I know you spent a lot of time every day crunching numbers looking at lots of research lots of people what's your take this morning on where we are on this curve in the bay area the mayor has is really one of the national success stories we certainly have seen cases we've has had tragic deaths but the toll here's been massively less than what you've seen in places like New York in New Jersey as of yesterday the bay area had nine deaths from from covert nineteen as opposed to the the nine eleven type numbers and in New York which is extraordinary we've had a little bit more than six hundred cases and at least for now it looks like the curve is very flat and doesn't look like we're going to get much higher that the daily toll is going up by twenty or thirty new cases a day and we've had one death every three or four days but it's just a a very very different scene here then you see see on the TV or when I talk to colleagues in New York let me ask you a question as to governor yesterday and that is you know sort of a layman's question here if the ascension is we don't have a vaccine so we don't have a way to prevent people from getting this other than what we're doing right now how long can we or will we have to do this to keep from simply all flooding back in history to getting sick yeah it's a great questions and and we're it's it's something on everybody's mind it it it appears that what's likely to happen is in sometime in the next four to eight weeks I think it's on unclear exactly where we will be but we will at fully in the bay area be at a level of cases that is low enough that we begin to loosen some of the restrictions some people can begin moving around more freely I think everybody will still be wearing masks for awhile and then we're going to need very very aggressive testing and very aggressive contact tracing so my analogy here is of the wildfires we will have tamp down the worst of the fires but they're still the possibilities of members out there in the hills and you have to watch for them when you find them you have to you have to surround them you have to make sure that they don't spread and I think that's the situation we're likely to find ourselves in sometime in in may and you've written about this is phase two this is the time where we go from what we're in right now to whatever's next what are the key things you think will have to happen before we get there or as we get there well that that that that when we get to that phase release determined by how little virus there appears to be in the community and there still is some and we're still seeing new cases every day so we're not ready for it yet because if we let our guard down now there's every minute you know ninety nine and a half percent of us in the bay area have not been inspected or are not immune to the virus and so there's there's nothing about the viruses change we can still get it cuts that store credit spreads but when we get to a point that there's another hospital capacity and there is now there is enough there's enough testing and we're ramping that up at UCSF and elsewhere so that there's widespread taste testing we have the capacity to do the kind of contact racing that when we find a case we can look at all of the people who've been around that person and make sure they all get assessed and potentially tested that's when we're ready to go and we have to start with we're still seeing the curve going up every day it's not going up exponentially as we'd feared but it is going up every day we have seen that curve go down in a sustained way and we're not there yet it's it's it's probably it's certainly several weeks away so some hard questions about the time when we can begin to move around and that is how do we decide who gets to go out first yeah I heard it's going to be a really hard question as I wrote last night on Twitter I think this phase has been relatively straightforward stay at home six feet away wear a mask when your hands pretty straightforward every fall under that it gets harder and more complicated as we as we move forward so I suspect that people at the lowest risk will have more freedom of movement in the beginning I think older people people with chronic diseases who if they get the virus the outcomes are worse might have to still be more careful even as we begin moving to the new phase hi Dr Martin thank you so much for the time this morning Dr Bob Wachter is the chair of the UC San Francisco department

Bob Wachter New Zealand CDC San Francisco Doctor Walker
Voice Assistants, Mental Health, and Pandemics with Roger Kibbe

Alexa in Canada

04:42 min | 10 months ago

Voice Assistants, Mental Health, and Pandemics with Roger Kibbe

"Great. Well thanks Terry. I really liked to think about this is I think. A Better Title from my talk would have been using voices since to help. Maintain our mental and physical health and these very very challenging times whom I really briefly I carry mentioned a developer Vangelis for Vive labs division. Samsung behind bixby on my twitter. Handle is at Roger Kibi. I just personally two daughters. I live and was raised in the San Francisco area. Uc Berkeley graduate actually have a degree in psychology by work intact so handsome my interest in mental health goes back to what my degree is back in school although I work day-to-day document bixby. This is all about. I'm GonNa talk a lot about Alexa. I'm GonNa talk about Google Assistant I'm GonNa talk about bixby. This is for the world of voice assistance this presentation. So what's happening? So two major things Rawal aware the traumatic event of coronavirus cove nineteen And Its impacts upon the world. In order to mitigate this in a flat in the curve for all asked to be social distancing really that's leading to social isolation for us so two major things are happening from a mental health perspective when you think of when a traumatic event there several issues that arrive People get stressed health issues arise. There's a feeling helplessness. Feeling OF PANIC SUBSTANCE ABUSE ARISE ARISES POST. Traumatic Stress Syndrome is a problem and in social isolation. Has its own mental health issues as well loneliness. Depression health issues anxiety substance abuse. So scientific term non kidding the layman term really have a kind of a double whammy from a mental health perspective going on. We're this horrible disease. Rampaging globally and the you know. The way to mitigate is is obviously isolate ourselves but in isolating ourselves. We also increase some of the challenges from a mental health perspective. And I just have a bunch of headlines from major news outlets there that you know this is not unknown. People are starting to talk about this and be concerned around this so the question I wanted to God answer is how can you use your voice assistant that you have in your home? Run your phone today to help with us and I have a bunch of areas by think voices could really help with some of these mental health challenges that are arising because up cove in nineteen and because the social isolation a raw feeling but first of all maintaining connection. I really liked what Terry said. what was it? Social were physically distancing. It's socially connecting. I thought that was fabulous in a great way to doing it and so I think about how can we socially connect well all voice assistance? Allow you to make phone calls and why that's important to give voice assistant. You're smart speaker is a far far better conference. Call tool in your phone. For instance signed encourage people is that but even more exciting and interesting to me is using video calling so I've been on a bunch of the zoom based virtual happy hours and it seems my life sits on zoom Mostar workweek on now. But you know I'm not GONNA ask my mother-in-law to learn how to use zoom on the other hand is she had a google device with the screen. It'd be a simple saying Alexa. Call my mother-in-law's name and then we could chat and it could be a video conference and we can all share that likewise google has the same way. Hey Google video call you have to set up do out there but I encourage people. I think it's a great way to stay. Connected is via these video calls or video conferencing. I think the very best and easiest way to do that in a non professional setting is quite frankly our voice assistance with streets because they have built-in and they made it so so very very easy to stay connected and that so critically important and we can't go out and interact the way we normally do with people on a day-to-day basis off stay connected stay connected with friends and loved ones music video calls to do that.

Social Isolation Google Alexa Terry Bixby Samsung Uc Berkeley Twitter Developer Roger Kibi San Francisco Vangelis Rawal Mostar Depression
Aviation Q&A: Turbulence Apprehension, Test Question Bank, and More

AviatorCast: Flight Training

06:31 min | 10 months ago

Aviation Q&A: Turbulence Apprehension, Test Question Bank, and More

"Tips for conquering apprehension of turbulence. Airplanes are made to handle pretty much. Anything in terms of turbulence. Unless you're in something a thunderstorm. There are some caveats to that. You know you might. You might have some other areas where people could argue. You could over stress the airplane. The basically you need to learn about maneuvering speed. Maneuvering speed is where you're basically not going to break the airplane during situations like this in. Airliners they call this rough air penetration speed so yeah look into that but in terms of how much you can handle. The airplane can handle a lot more. So don't be worried about that. Yeah the airplane can handle a ton even these even these these smaller planes that we fly the aren't narrow baddeck. They can still handle a lot. Where can I find a good test question? Bank Andrew Study Material for the private pilot knowledge. So of course you know you've got to go through ground school. I I think that's first and foremost I haven't online video ground school. You can enroll in this second and start your training. Sports has a really good free testing bank. That you can use there. I know there are some other sources. Asa Prep where they do one as well that you can download as an APP on your phone so bunch of sources where you can get it. There are quite a few of them thoughts on doing. Cfi double around the same time. I think it's good. You know if you're in the mindset of teaching and taking your test based on how good a quality you're teaching is meaning your your flight instructor check rides then. I think absolutely I would go. I go your CFI first and then your next. Some people go double next and see if I next but I don't know I don't know why I just think I just think the cf I'd done. I get the hard way and then do the AA. Add on right after that. So Yeah Bang. Bang get him done best resources or ways to learn systems if not mechanically inclined asked by one of my former students. Maybe she is forever student. Sarah Sarah just isn't mechanically inclined. You know that that's one of the areas. Where she she always needed some extra time some extra help and so I went through it quite a bit and I think I think the biggest thing for me about systems is yes. There are systems books. You can buy you. You get a lot about the systems in in the hack. There's plenty of of nerdy stuff out there. Okay stuff you can get really deepen but the thing for me is. I just want to know the common sense of what that system is actually doing. And so that I can know the ramifications if I see some sort of development some sort of you know out of place problem while I'm flying. I want to know how those things were so that I can start to troubleshoot so while some people really nerd out on getting into the super technical details of causes propeller and how it all works which is one of the most complex things That we have in an airplane also one of the most amazing simple things but so it causes feet propeller you can get really deep on that subject very very deep and eventually you might get there but you gotta just take it one step at a time. Understand more about the theory or the process the common sense on how it's working the layman how it's working and they're start to build the technical details from there. That's how my mind works. I think a lot of people's minds work that way. Of course you have the people that are just super smart and can can just take on a bunch of technical and engineering information. I was never really that way. I want to know the common sense of how the how the system works what it's actually doing. And then from there I can over time bill the technical knowledge on top of that because even though I know quite a bit about a constant speed propeller for example I know that if I die back into the books again and again and again I'll just learn more and more and stack on top of what I've already done. So that's my advice. There crossland aviation who happens to be a corporate pilot tips and tricks across landings. I heard recently as like a recipe. If you're in for crosswind landing first off into the wind so you're preventing the drift of the airplane but you don't want to just land like crowd into the wind rights. He might be turned into the wind and tracking down the runway. But what you need to do is you also need to align the nose with the runway. So that takes rudder so aileron into the wind and rudder to align with the runway. But it's GonNa Change. You're down throughout. There's going to be trees around hills Different Bits of wind gusts or whatever usually so buildings blocking the wind cetera. Right it's just going to be different as you're going down. So someone mentioned it recently like Jambalaya recipe or whatever your favorite dishes. That maybe has a variety of spices and things. But you're just GONNA do a little bit more or a little bit rudder or a little bit more this a little bit more that. It's like putting spices into a recipe. Okay or or whatever you're putting into just a little bit more a little bit here and there and that's going to get you on track And and it is. It is kind of that process right. Because as you're going through the crosswind landing you are constantly making little tiny adjustments that gets really critical and quick. When you get in the final phase where you do put deal into the wind. Align with the runway in sometimes even touch down into the windward will I as you touched down but that low energy state tends to weathervane. Some funny things can happen. And that's where you really gotta be on the ball to get her down just takes and UH works pretty well so I encourage you that if you haven't instructor to go out there and practice it in the real thing I know that crossland aviation doesn't need it. He's pretty amazing. So that's for your guys benefit

Crossland Aviation Instructor Sarah Sarah ASA Corporate Pilot
Digital Economy: Digital manufacturing

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

09:17 min | 10 months ago

Digital Economy: Digital manufacturing

"Innovation in manufacturing technology spots new original industrial revolution today. The integration of digital technology and manufacturing equipment is said underpin the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution a testament to the height of expectations for the technology. However they're mixed signals on how fast and how effectively this integration is taking place for two thousand eighteen study by two thirds of manufacturers globally. That only just started not even begun that digital transformation strategy well recently though the US of business index found that manufacturers let forward in Iot adoption one measure of the blurring of digital and physical operations between two thousand seventeen and twenty twenty in this episode. We discussed the potential. The challenges the future of two dimensions of digital manufacturing firstly the integration of digital functionality in manufacturing processes to monitor manage and predict performance and to linked together participants on the value chain secondly additive manufacturing or three D printing which is by necessity a blend of physical and digital systems. My guests are Dr Lau. Hong-gi director of the Digital Manufacturing Design Center that Singapore University of Technology and Design Chief Operating Officer for Asia bearings manufacturers. Schaffler I started our conversation by asking class. How far digitization has progressed at the company? All right so I would say digitalization. In surplus started already twenty plus years years ago. We have a huge department where we build our own machine and we always. We're going to take data out of our processes none of the data and our machines are or processes so this is a long history already and dealing with data and trying to improve our processes for sure Last last year's we saw acceleration in the market for available technology in the IOT landscape. Globally increased we call probably the next industrial revolution or singing makes so in the last review. We became very clear where we want to go with digitalization. And how we should approach the challenge. We're talking about digital semi-autonomous plants and for that we have a clear scope and proceeding how to transform our existing plants in this case. We're looking at four dimensions. One would be the holistic process to ensure the into and perspective so that means supply to customers for Valley Stream we also looking at digital technologies starting to collectively and Architecture. We also look at the workforce involvement of our employees or people our customers and For sure we are looking into data management. I think this is a key key. And so we are looking at all the key areas of development for example virtual reality artificial reality and three D layouts artificial intelligence reprinting digital shop floor management and for all of these topics. We have started an accomplished pilots so we learned on the way and now we are in the midst of implementing them through our own production network. Which of those any of those. That are actually having an impact on the way you produce products so far or are they still in an experimental phase so the way of our production changed in the way that they'd via able not to have real time data so that means make better and faster decisions to steal our processes to utilize our equipments much much better in terms of our products when we look into three D. printing or simulation We increase the speed of development and optimization of product itself for sure the supply chain management is his benefiting from real-time data and connectivity from from suppliers to our factories off from ourselves to our customers. And I think tremendous change. We see also in how people work in our in our plot and our factories This job scope is changing of enhancing. Or I think the responsibility of our people from standard old school manufacturing processes to more bring more intelligence more decision making more steering and managing processes. When you think about the progress as you mentioned there that digitization really back began for companies such as yourselves twenty years ago. Do you think progress is being as fast as you'd have expected back then I think not because there were always a lot of ideas in our heads and missing. Technology are not affordable or too expensive technology was always hindering all with a dream of how connected machine and let them machine talk to each other. I think that's a very old idea but really to do it. In a holistic way to not have only one data set talking to each other or transferring one data set two for one machine to the other but also now being able that these data sets being analyzed and then there's a qualified answer of Algorithm to the next process. This only has been available in the last couple of years. So we see exponential increase now availability of possibilities which we can really implement in our own production flows that's great what are the dimensions of digitization in manufacturing you mentioned there was three D. printing or additive manufacturing Hoagie? Ten to fifteen years ago. We heard a lot about three D. printing. There were predictions at every home would have a three D. Printer at one point but I don't think that those predictions have come to pause and we don't seem to hear for the layman. I don't seem to hear so much about three D. printing or additive manufacturing as. I used a what's happened there has it. Has It lived up to the potential or is it quietly being adopted just behind closed doors? I think am is definitely happening. In manufacturing sectors in Singapore alone We are already seeing the Almost complete value chains of industries from companies that provide software for these. I threw equipments to mature suppliers and Increasingly Service Bureau as well. So companies who adopt. Em for in house productions. So so I would say perhaps from a consumer perspective We don't see products as at densify if meet with three D. printers because Today's allow the adoptions are mostly at the component levels so so I guess that's why consumer and see it that way in himself You know what you've just said ten fifteen years ago when three D. printing wars perceived as something. That's GonNa Change drastically how you know our products on meet. We are going to be able to make our own product at home. That's not happening I think that's mostly at this. Point in some adoptions of the technology. It's a lot of hobbies part of part of that. Is that the material us for three printings Some of them are not necessarily something that you would use at home. So but but I think in terms of the manufacturing sectors. I think it is very exciting. Now what would you say has been the impact so far of additive manufacturing on on a manufacturer's as you say it's more of the level? What impact is that had on the industry? Well I think. Firstly I see a lot of the technology centric adopting am processes or Three D. printing processes because the nature of Eddie manufacturing processes allowed the idea generation prototyping to make in very fast speed as compared to traditional Soros sequential Solo. Way of doing things were in design on design. Things and mature engineer comes in and decide what to use and production for comes into decide what manufacturing processes can shrink. They are so. I think that has changed quite a fair bit in terms of how Sarah fons a product or technology. Centric kind of start up As able to move much faster compared to traditional Serov startups Besides that I think in the solve the more established industries like aviation's Maria of shore the ability through very quickly Produce in house brought for in house use has also changed quite February of the supply chain in these industries as the industry learned to not just replace parts with their in house editor processes. We all see industry recognizing the other advantages are impresses for examples with an processes the number of parts and components can be substantially lower than traditional tradition away of making things so the design of product. Or whether it's replacement or an product Essentially different form than traditional product to manufacture. It floor

Digital Manufacturing Design C D. Printer Eddie Manufacturing IOT United States Singapore University Of Techno Dr Lau Singapore Design Chief Operating Officer Sarah Fons Engineer Director Increasingly Service Bureau
"layman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"layman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Okay and we can't stop playing who who did are we taking three set points that is my point that is my point units we just sat there we just talked about some of the greats of the game taking mid range jumpers because they are that good I I I will say I think this team for that role they missed Jake layman more than I think a lot of people realize I'm not I look I like Jake layman Jake layman hasn't played in a month yes I play in a long I thought I and I think we can see that his presence so play the same way when somebody is not available for months is that what you're saying now I don't think it matters who's on this roster the walls are gonna play the way that they're gonna play it and I guess I have a little bit of an issue with that as much as I love the walls eighteen a no weather sports six five one nine eight nine eight nine two two six if if if quarterback goal was down in the back ups not after what this passes but he's able to scramble in uses legs you know what the office according is gonna do use his legs six five one nine eight nine nine two two six wolves win tonight snap a losing streak one oh five one oh four over the Sacramento Kings we'll take your phone calls next this is my my shows to the Max weeknights six thirty to nine and this is in real life I'm on after maxi with late night from ninety to one AM with only live a local TV sports talk in the Twin Cities and we cover it all Vikings Gopal's Timberwolves twins in the wild was a school for some great outdoors if it's happening in Minnesota we're talking about a week the radio that's for sure six thirty to nine it did late night from ninety to one right here or news talk eight real W. C. seo all your.

Jake layman Sacramento Kings Minnesota Vikings W. C.
"layman" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

43:43 min | 1 year ago

"layman" Discussed on Embedded

"Welcome to embedded. I am any c._e._o. White and and i'm here with christopher white and welcome to the don't panic geochemists. I'm john layman here co hosting and other crossover show and this week. We've got special guest dr eric to find out now. The field is different whoops. I'd i understand that <hes> in a it it when i'm engineering something when i'm building something sometimes with software i get irritated when a half to.

christopher white john layman dr eric
"layman" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"I I like that. like. In your little leading. And you say that again, he's about restaurant. A bona fide star here. Go on McMahon third place, and this is his debut on the Cohen. Player of the month. Ballot. But I am going to go out on a limb and say he's going to be on here. Well, I don't know. How long will be doing this Jake Leon here whole bunch who's this? I don't wanna go ahead. Jake layman, but good keep going. I like me Jake layman. But this kid looks like Steve Nash and the analytics era, Steve Nash without a conscience. Trae young. Making room making rookie of the year legit race. But I'm just saying the hawks don't feel bad about that deal. Right now. This kid is lighten the world on fire. He told everyone anybody who'd listen, he told them. Hey, I'm going to be as good as Luca. I liked the confidence. Not so sure about that. But he's backing up at a monster month average twenty three and nine this month and trae young had the best clutch plus minus in the month of February plus forty two in twenty six minutes man's was thirty scorn twenty seven points twenty seven minute or twenty six minutes and maize man brought. And look the Chris thing that's in March. So that he's already got a nice little lead into the next month. Boy, I like this kid swagger so trae young third place on the ballot well-earned and Mike said he's going to be on here. Whole bunch of times come up and his number two second place and boy, Mike, right? Had. I don't know. I I don't know. It's not a great seat there in Toronto. But he he was in the building four in the biggest Honus factor moments of the season so far that was Kalat, quiet, Leonard. And man, I tell you it made me wins watching this ally. Co why Leonard just absolutely ruining? Tomorrow rosen. Good return Toronto. The man at mid midcourt just pulled his pants down spanked him but took the ball cruised in for the game winning dunk. And obey the way that wasn't co is only. Last fifteen second game winner of the month. He's the only guy who had to those one was a little elbow. Jumper four seconds left to Brooklyn. But man that tomorrow Rosen strip and oh my goodness. Got cold blood? Is it comes? I got a great story all fit for all to about that whole situation. It'll be in the director's cut. All right. Who is taken. The crown is Luca again. I don't think it's Luca again. No, no, no, no, no. Hardens on a two month win streak, right? This is a man who he has a celebration that fits the honor. And was Mark twice this month by dudes on the opposing bench and in both those games. Ice in his veins. Daniel Russell came back to close it out. It was by Tristan Thompson in Cleveland, and he went and just lit up to three o teeth. But boy he lit up in that third OT. It was mocked by getting my my rookie bridges confused, the rookie bridges in in Charlotte and Charlotte batches and yeah. Bye. Bye, Charlotte bridges. He came back and. Allow domestic off a huge comeback to steal that wind..

Trae young Jake layman Mike rosen hawks Luca Toronto Steve Nash Jake Leon Tristan Thompson McMahon Charlotte Leonard Daniel Russell Cohen Chris director Brooklyn Kalat Cleveland
"layman" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"And being as far to the left of that spectrum as you would you know, if you're thinking of this is being on the right side of that spectrum is type two diabetes and fatty liver. Disease and things like that. It's being as far to the left is possible. There's only good things come from that. And so if somebody comes to you, and they know nothing about other body works or their health in general, or the first thing that you do survey or to kind of wake them up about the importance of this and speak to them in layman's terms. For. I don't know. That's tough question. I guess it's just sort of a little bit of Osmo SIS. I mean, I think going through the labs usually invariably requires that I'm pointing them in the direction of something I've written in the past or hod cast I've done so that they can kind of understand things a little better. I mean, most problem based learners, so we learn best when we have a context in which to learn. So there's not a lot of purpose in me trying to explain to a patient disag- -nificant elevated LP little a or having an ape e four Gina type if they don't have it or before they know if they do or don't have it, right? It's a bit of an abstraction. But once patient sees that, oh, you know, I'm one of the in twenty five percent of the people that has we four, gene. Or one of the eight to ten percent of people. It has an elevated L P little then it becomes a lot easier from point them in the direction of work of already done on those topics. So that they can now be a little bit more focused and understanding what those. Things mean, and what the implications are for management disease. Obviously, it's a very complex than human body. Do a lot of people that you see can come in with the idea that insulin resistance, and they own a prevent and cure diet is the best tool for that. Just given the popularity over the last few years and your involvement with kind of expanding the space. Yes. I think some people just sort of you know, kinda come in thinking. That's that's the answer in. Can certainly not felt them for assuming that that's my favorite hammer. You know, what I'm out there looking for nails. But, you know, the reality of it is I think of a ketogenic diet is is simply one tool infected so tool. That's a subset of one of the broader ways that I think about nutrition, I think about, you know, everybody starts out in the same sort of place, which is they're consuming this pretty crappy standard American diet, and from there, generally, the two easiest things to make alterations to are the timing with which they consume foods time restriction of feeding without really any attention to what they're feeding. So you're not.

fatty liver Disease diabetes Gina twenty five percent ten percent
"layman" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Layman to subside to I am going to stun. You I subscribe now two zero. Is that right? Yeah. I used to subscribe to quite a few travel magazines, but that industry is really thinned out. And it's because of all the stuff that's available on the internet and Tripadvisor dot com is a website that really has taken away a lot of the space that used to go to magazines. There's so much information there about destinations and things to do places to go things to avoid that. I'd say is you try to ramp up your knowledge about what you want to see and what you wanna do trip. Tripadvisor is the first place that I would go. Whether you're doing a trip by car, you're doing a trip an RV flying somewhere. Whatever I I'm able through trip advisor to find out. It's not always going to be right. But I'm able to find out such a great amount of. Information in depth, and generally very up to date. Okay. I'll certainly keep that in mind. I've used it on the timer team for trips, and I'm just never be in that retirement on the horizon from him kind of certain a form of beco- list of a person that I really wanna go to when they have the time. Do you wanna fly at all or these all going to be by road? It's going to be a little Bolton road and flying. I gotta tell you about a website for travel bargains by air. That is the best. There is it's called Scott's cheap flights. Okay. Ten ready to go. I'm gonna write that down. Scott's cheap flight. It's amazing. And Scott has a free version and a paid version start with the free version, and you're going to see that you can see the world for so much less money than you ever thought. It will stunned.

Tripadvisor Scott Bolton advisor
"layman" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on WTVN

"On top of it and you gotta believe given the fact that Bobby layman used to. Jump on top of corvettes and beat. The windshield out. Of, them this would be pretty good by him I would think yeah I think this is going to be very good for. That dealership because star power is good for marketing. And so factor Mark Wahlberg is putting his name on that dealership you would expect that you, know he'll be and the ads assume he'll be making personal appearances his. Partner in the in the venture Feldman auto group up in Michigan we talked to him yesterday and. He said that he expects Mark will be. Regular presence in Columbus so that'd be interesting to see going forward do you expect regular presence as long as it's not? Three, feet, of. Snow or regular twelve months out of, the year yeah, no yeah probably on the. On the good, times, but you know I. Would, expect TV, that? These two. Are. Partnering, on the wall burger burger chain that, that he's got going there and he's already. Got one in Columbia. Are one in he's building them in in, Cleveland and Cincinnati so I think it's only a matter of time before he gets one of those in Columbus so I think he's going to deepen his is Mark here and he says he. Wants to expand into more dealerships whether. That's here or. Elsewhere, I think it's an open question but yeah I would expect a lot more Walberg news in Columbus I I did a. Little polling on our Twitter page the top vote. Getter would you buy a car from Mark Wahlberg Chevy thirty eight percent of people responding said, if the price is good yes so I mean there's a practical group. Of people that live in Columbus and I mean I appreciate the glitz and the glam and you. Know hey if you gave me a Walberg. Or on the side I'm in but really it's what's the deal and I don't care who signing the paperwork of the? Price, is, right. In the rates right I'm in yeah, no I hear, that and and But again the, thing I would expect was if he actually showed up, at, that dealership that that's gonna that's gonna pull people in there to, at least come and take a look you know it's gonna it's gotta work on some live and to your knowledge there. Was? Never any. Shot, at, Colin at Marky. Mark Motors I wouldn't have so that would have been catchy Well I mean, if he'd talking marketing if that's what it's about what the heck not we talked earlier in. The..

Mark Wahlberg Mark Columbus Bobby layman Mark Motors Walberg Twitter Partner Colin Feldman Columbia Cleveland Michigan Cincinnati thirty eight percent twelve months
"layman" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"I know it because that's what it's all about so when i'm thinking about okay so now he says to me when you have ms this is layman's terms doctors when you get a mess they start to form crystals on your brain when it fills your brain up it starts going down your neck and that's how people end up with whether it's crutches or canes or wheelchair he said that's really hard to reverse he goes but it can they can help he said but when you go into hyper chair for twenty days for over an hour hour and a half because bringing you down and bringing you up so say you're in for an hour and that's what they call the dive and then you take on five days and go in for twenty out five four sets of that at twenty and five he said when i had my brain scanned when i came back out of that virtually the crystals were gone and he said so i've just kept it up ever since then and the only sign i have he said he's in his right i think it was his right pinky that goes numb once in a while he said but i live in purchase or something like all right i've been hitting the head you've been hitting the head numerous times everybody talks about concussions well i don't you know i'm sixty two now i'm not just thinking about that concussion i'm also thinking about i got friends fathers who have dementia don't even know who the hell they are well what if i do the preventative maintenance of the hyper chamber for my brain but i don't have any problems yet but you know that's how i always have done shit ice my body even back didn't hurt because i know if i don't ice it when i wake up it's going to hurt so beating up my body i was always trying to be a head of the curve so what i've really learned i just wanna get on my blood work which looks amazing this dr fisher and she's seventy and i told her i was doing and she said dallas she goes all i can tell you it's never gonna.

dr fisher dallas twenty days five days
"layman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Colin delvin and andrew layman who just signed with the literary manager at intellectual property group literary management who discovered colin and andrew screenplay via cover fly dot com in case you don't know cover flight is the industry's largest database of top screenwriting competitions and unproved screenplays searchable by industry pros were looking for good film and tv scripts from emerging talented writers your scripts and scores are automatically tracked on cover flies writer dashboard and it's free to join so don't wait go sign up at cover fly dot com and while you're surfing around online you should already know this but final draft has been the number one selling screenwriting application in the world for over twenty five years final draft automatically format scripts to industry standards allowing riders to do what they do best tell stories final draft is the professionals choice in the industry standard used by filmmakers such as oscar winners james cameron in aaron sorkin their newest release final draft ten offers great new features like the beat board in story map that help you build your story from the ground up final draft also offers reader and writer apps for the iphone ipad making creativity truly portable and guess what final draft is happy to offer thirty percent off to listeners of this podcast just go to final draft dot com and use code qa podcast at checkout that's the letter q in the letter a podcast all one word and that will save you thirty percent off of final draft ten so get right in willia but now without any further ado let's jump right onto the stage in my sold out screening at the los angeles film school right after i introduced cowriter rhett reese and co writer paul were nick to chat about their latest film deadpool two.

Colin delvin writer willia rhett reese andrew layman james cameron aaron sorkin los angeles nick thirty percent twenty five years
"layman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"layman" Discussed on KOMO

"In real layman's terms what is the head tax well first off charlie they don't want you to call it a head tax the proper name is a progressive tax on business seeing that they wanted to do progressive taxation in the city of seattle but it really is a tax on big business and what this is is top hitting the top three percent of businesses in seattle they wanted to leave out small business people in this tax so it's basically five hundred largest companies in seattle that's three percent and this money would raise seventy five million dollars per year for five years to go to pay for in total about eighteen hundred affordable housing units and then every year that money fifteen million dollars of that will go to some of the services that will be very visible to us like picking up the trash and cleaning up camp so homeless camps and criminal diversion and as well as some shelter beds and some of the obvious things at the city's doing now but keep in mind that this is going to be over and above what the city is already putting out for homeless services this year at sixty four million dollars this'll be an added seventy five million on top of that and again it's only for the big businesses like amazon and starbucks but also businesses like malino foods which is a grocery chain it's been a supplier for grocery stores that's been around for a hundred eighteen years that deals with very small margins but yet they're gross income makes surpasses the twenty million dollar level and so they were going to have to pay the tax and they're not happy about it matt have any companies come out in support of this not to my knowledge no there's not been anybody but clearly a lot of people at city hall at five o'clock in the less than a half hour councilmember salah is supposed to have a rally on the steps of city hall in promote to promote the tax getting her her people that like what she stands for in fact i think the seventy five million per year is too low in her mind she was asking for a hundred and fifty million dollars per year but even at at seventy five million these top companies if you have a fulltime employees they'll be paying five hundred dollars per employee now if you do the math thirty thirty thousand downtown employees for amazon times five hundred you're.

seattle amazon malino foods city hall councilmember salah starbucks three percent seventy five million dollars sixty four million dollars fifteen million dollars hundred eighteen years fifty million dollars twenty million dollar five hundred dollars five years
"layman" Discussed on Flintoff, Savage and the Ping Pong Guy

Flintoff, Savage and the Ping Pong Guy

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on Flintoff, Savage and the Ping Pong Guy

"Yeah it was it was partly to do with me don't get me wrong i'm not going to talk myself out of it well it was the ball i'm just trying to i'm just trying to i'm not talking yourself opie i'm just trying to tell you the difference in oven the ball which is in the perfect condition to swing or reverse swing so i'm saying is in the leads of the australians is so important to get that ball that way they were probably thinking playing against africa we're getting be all the time we need to do something and you can see the temptation right joe oh i'm not sure you like motoracing right grown today though it was quite close but usually the best car and if you add that to the best driver will win most grom pries the best guy will probably win the grand prix so are we say in cricket then the team who gets the best ball use the bowl the best little win mole the lose another team with the best bowl was will win so the ball's a lot to do with the bowl and keeping the bull yeah and being what's the word in the roy layman's question about obviously i've been the best balls that will he's a is the best but could pull that looking within the mo in how look after a cricket bowl that's actually into a different strategy look at pakistan in the nineties.

roy layman pakistan africa
"layman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"That's absolutely that's absolutely correct there is something that i would like to share with the with our listeners you know they're autism there is not enough information out there so it only makes it that much more difficult for family friends schools etc to help those that have an artistic issue and i just like to clearly state that they have come out with a number of things that they've tried to link to being what autism is a nineteen oh eight there was a pair of psychiatrists diagnosed what they now call autism a schizophrenia well that's very went on for years however then it was another pair of doctors that came up with a different diagnosis that diagnosis was the complete opposite of schizophrenia and again some of the treatments they were using then at that time not only were they ineffective but they made things worse ultimately moving fast forward to where we are now the when they talk about viruses infections vaccines that cause autism medications women when they're pregnant what they may have eaten what they may have done consumed that was dot for a while to be a cause of autism i'm here to tell you they are all miss nothing but miss nothing they do not have anything that can be pinpointed that is a cause so that anybody can prepare take better care of themselves before the child is born they do not have answers but the key here is ask your questions you go to the doctor be persisted as russell layman's mother was taking him.

russell layman
"layman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"It was crazy so i'm reading this article pack are schedules to the bramley panic at the thought of an activity free day when we're out we can't you know look at our list we got to look at the phone we got to look at the email we gotta be constantly productive so there's that but he's getting back to dr layman and the pilots dark lehman said okay so here's the deal ninety percent of all airline captains are first border relief children but oprah that's what he said at the time he said oprah here's the deal do you don't you want that i don't know if you use the word anal retentive but i will anal of describing myself that anal retentive person looking at the gas gauge san quarter of a tank pretty steep headwind you know i think we'd better put this plane down and get some more gas as opposed to the baby in the family who's flying the plane who says a quarter of a take two hundred mile headwind we'll make it thank you see that's the difference it'll be close but we'll make it right exactly so the busy people their brains are hooked on this dopamine rush because they find pleasure in fulfilling these tasks even though i contend that sometimes the pleasure drives you crazy 'cause you just like to sit down i mean that's been one of the beautiful things quite frankly about the the wing i get the busted wing here you know that in portray the bad shoulder yeah nemo had the surgery and and we've got the sling on it there after right after i do my several times a day i i have to ice it is i literally just have to sit down for about a half hour and do just pretty much nothing that's gonna drive you nuts but it's been kind of good i sort of enjoyed it okay good i feel like i'm sitting there thinking my god i'm getting fat i'm just sitting here getting fat i know him i.

lehman oprah dr layman dopamine ninety percent
"layman" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on WLOB

"All right back here tonight rain except for game two of the hockey quarterfinals we've heard from the vein perspective stabbed to hear from providence head coach nate layman it we got up with the seventh year providence coach a few moments ago will they may and got the jump on you there the first greek came back again in the second game back and finally got the goahead the goal of satisfying win for it was a good win that mean we had to chase the game the whole pretty much the whole game uh but it was a good win it's i think earlier in the season we wouldn't have won that game um you know and it just kinda just shows kind of how far teams come a little bit throughout the year which is a good sign you know because it we lost the same way the exact same weight reit we lost the game four nothing or or they scored cut a two two one two of their first chances in in you know we cut imploded we try to do everything all ourselves and uh so i thought last night we did a better job of just kinda are just playing the game any any got some uh you know good contributions obviously wilkins score in the game winner but everybody kind of chipped in a little bit yeah i mean we we need we need to find the obviously secondary scoring in to get a goal from our third line and to get a powerplay goal from conway that was really good hockey was tested obviously voter black bears in and particularly that second period their main glorious chances that he turned away yeah.

nate layman conway hockey wilkins
"layman" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on Slate Money

"This after you no reason for bitcoin going up all going down there was a bunch of talk about the reason why bit cling was going down with something something ted this something so now aaron you can tell us what tether is and yeah what is heather tether is a co as a protocol i believe that is tied to the dollar and it is meant to smooth out all the volatility in the bitcoin world that's a very layman's and her an and somewhere along the line there's a company which claims to have a bank account in like denmark holland or something like that where they claimed to have hundreds of millions of dollars which are backing up all of these tokens because with very much goes against the idea of that kind and in a favorite part of this scandal is that almost every part of it seems to mere everything about central banks that cryptocurrency acolyte heat i mean that that is that is what's happening in every piece of it i mean even the exchanges even the wallets which are now getting hacked in which are running into their own security problems them yesterday we saw that coin base was accidentally overcharging people by seventeen to fifty times just like taking repeat deposits and this is something that if a if a bank did that people would be losing their minds and coin base had been doing it for two weeks before they even told anybody about it and to be clear to clean base is i mean it's hard to be definitive wrote this but i would say the coin base is the biggest and most established in most blue chip of all of the in the us i think outselling employer outside of the us that's not the case but in the us for sure they are on a outside of the us it's just a free for all but you but every exactly outside of the us it's a free for all i mean is that anyone even outside the us who has the kind of copperbottomed standing of long green dot info i'm not sure if you're familiar with them their one on the other their base in london on i mean not on purpose actually said that way they can.

heather tether us ted aaron denmark london two weeks
"layman" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on 1A

"Where to explain carter layman's terms what hydroxy urea does for sickle cell patient and what makes it effective so um hydroxy areas that great medication half of the treatment of people with sickle cell anemia so really focused on the folks who have s s disease i'm we talked earlier about the red cells changing shape and that's because the hemoglobin molecules inside that red cells stick together so hydroxy earlier it increases fetal heamoglobin which is another type of of human globen and in the presence of fetal hemoglobin it's much harder for those haemoglobin molecule statistical to stick together and we see less of the red cells changing shape less breakdown of those red cells and it's a very effective therapy in decreasing the frequency of crises i think them sort rashly crises union those brought to paint called exactly three theory those painful episodes and i think that the tragic stories and when he fame mentioned m it really speaks to the need for access to high quality care and comprehensive care to help man all of these aspects of the disease including the appropriate use of opioid therapy and can you talk about the new treatment that came online last summer i think it was started lance from what does that do that's different than what hydroxy urea does or does he do the same thing but better so l glued mean as the new drug that was just fda approved it it is an amino acid acid um that uh decreases crisis frequency it works under a different mechanism than hydroxy urea m hydroxyurea probably am because it works in a number of different ways so i mentioned one way it works it which it works which was by increasing fetal hemoglobin at has a number of different ways it works it's probably in the.

carter layman lance hydroxyurea
"layman" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on The Big 98

"Gene bobby layman chevrolet grades flurries producer raven in florida at tampa serial killer has been arrested finally after almost two months on the run in vegas the man not the belies yellow the amount he stole is still being investigated no one was injured and finally export is the college football playoff ray he's or how many champion clemson is the new number one fall by auburn oaklahoma and wisconsin who knew story bobby bones show to celebrate the release of chris devil tens new album from a room volume to we want to send you to stay alive a concert is be awesome to chance to win three days to nights the chris stapleton winter league the fair hotel two tickets to the show eat to meet chris staple novak stage an autograph guitar all of that that's crazy priced vita by ufg nashville our man i don't even know what sex go to babi bones dot com the keyword is contests let's the calls conduct riverhead bobby jones dot com keyword contests and dinner right there matt kuchar okay if you.

florida clemson wisconsin bobby jones matt kuchar Gene bobby producer tampa vegas football chris stapleton chris staple novak nashville three days two months
"layman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"layman" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"She terms yellow math bonner dr led layman's you paul moloney ag name wild when the world win bonner who grass oh they say she dad on winter when there came a killing for all and the monets you name wild thus in in a live pete lau she ran iran god by the darker them by planted but there came on early snow it's been a lin wind and now the six oh jeez.

layman bonner paul moloney ag