29 Burst results for "Lawrence Summer"

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Short Wave

"Lauren in our episode last week you told us about facebook how the company has built its headquarters on the waterfront and at sea levels rise it and the cities around it will need to build defences to keep the water back and the big question in that story was was a fair amount for facebook to pay for those defenses. And today we're talking about whether buildings should happen at all in areas vulnerable to climate change. And it's a story that involves another tech giant google. Yes and for google. The situation is a little different. And i should say google is among npr's financial supporters. Yep disclosure Yeah they recently bought a lot of property in sunnyvale with plans to build a major expansion on it. it's actually more than seventy properties close to the shoreline worth almost three billion dollars. Whoa okay that's a lot and what's there now. Yeah this neighborhood. It's known as moffett park. It's really an office park right now. There's lots of these low rise office buildings with lots of big parking. Lots what google wants to build is different. It'll be offices of course but also housing which isn't in moffett park right now and it's it's not for employees necessarily. It'll be on the market for anyone. They're also envisioning green spaces and bike paths basically walkable neighborhoods. That's the direction. A lot of cities are going in. Right yeah. I mean getting people out of their cars and moving away from the suburban model. Yeah and changing. Our land use is a key strategy for dealing with climate change and cutting carbon emissions but climate change is also a problem for this neighborhood because sea levels are rising and rising increasingly. Fast right okay. So how soon will that encroaching water be a problem fairly quickly. I mean there's already been about eight inches of sea level rise over the last century. By mid century san francisco bay could see about a foot to two feet and by the end of the century. It could be as much as seven feet. If humans don't substantially cut emissions so basically every high tide is getting higher and the risk of flooding is greater if there's a storm or wins that create bigger

lawrence summer lorne Npr emily lauren california
Sen. Ron Johnson Comments on Biden's High Spending Disaster

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 4 months ago

Sen. Ron Johnson Comments on Biden's High Spending Disaster

"Joe Biden said the other day at what they called a town hall meeting in one of his more coherent moments. That, uh, in effect, spending more money by spending more money, he will reduce inflation. Are you aware of any economic theory ever devised by mankind that holds that position, sir? No. And I know what his, uh, you know, economic advisor to Democratic President Lawrence Summers definitely would not agree with that, Martin. I'm wondering Facebook will pull that down sense of that bit of disinformation. We've got a president. That's a one man. This information gaffe machine himself, and, uh, it's amazing. He's actually going to Facebook, including with them, but take down other people's and disinformation. But here's what concerns me. Since he is the executive branch since years, the head of the Democrat Party, I don't think he's alone in believing this idiocy. I think when you look across the island, the United States Senate, you have a cabal of individuals who either agree with that or don't give a damn. They are prepared to spend trillions and trillions of dollars more. They think it's all free money. They think the they'll be able to do whatever they want to do no matter what. How do you deal with the How do you negotiate with people like this? You don't you have to. You have to resist them.

Joe Biden Lawrence Summers Facebook Martin Democrat Party Senate United States
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Stephanomics

Stephanomics

07:20 min | 5 months ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Stephanomics

"Candidate will find you. Indeed hiring tools help you cut through the noise to hire faster and smarter. If you're hiring you need indeed get started right now with a seventy five dollars sponsored job. Credit to upgrade your job post at indeed dot com slash be news indeed dot com slash. Be news offer. Valid through september thirtieth terms and conditions apply. I think laron. I agree that this is looking more. Like the late sixties at transition to the early seventies and that has implications for bounce dollars. We've covered that. I'm more worried about the inflation in financial assets and what that means for returns and bubbles that are developing 'cause there's a massive amount of liquidity around and it's being thrown around so that it's difficult environment For those returns to be justified. I think we're building kind of bobble. So on i think inflation in financial assets and so on is as an issue related to liquidate. Anyway you think about it. What's happened is the net worth of Of of americans. Most people in countries is higher than it's ever been. I mean all of a sudden it was a big boost. The net income yet production isn't so what you've seen is a lot of people. Got a lotta money. Which they're still holding at and they put into the stock market and everything and interest rates. Go down and they borrow and that is a dynamic. That creates a bubble. And that's what i would say is the main the main issue agents say that the division of labor of this panel raise talk more about financial assets but i share his concern about asset price inflation and i would say the idea that lower returns of led higher asset prices while at transition. It's taking place everybody's enjoying wonderful capital gains. There's been a tendency for people. Like me and ray to warn for some years now. Bad long-term term returns are going to be lower on assets. We've been saying after some years and people who've been in asset markets. Have done very very well. Because even lower tau even higher capitalization ratios rice earnings ratios asset price to rent ratios have been taken place and i suppose some people are probably concluding that the warnings are on lawrence as a consequence of that. Nobody knows for sure but my feeling would be that the warnings are now union war valid because the conditions precedent Basis for warnings have become even more true with the passage of time. Both of you have you come at it. From different perspectives. You may put different shades on it but us clearly think that there's some potential bumps coming down the road and or risks that we need to be much more concerned about larry. Now you wish that that stimulus in the us have been spent on different things the beginning of the year that might actually support the supply side of the us economy and other things that we mistakes if you like have already been made in your view. But what's the best response if assuming that the feds and indeed other policy makers except your analysis. What's the most constructive response. Now that wouldn't itself 'cause a lot of volatility upset this asserted sponsors probably will in the short run some volatility upset but i'd like to see signals that overheating quantity as Baubles are now seen as major risks facing the american economy. And i'd like to see a program of structural improvement for the supply side. That is still a paid for by tax increases as the response and a reduction in the amount of populace transferring of cash to our troops in the economy. I think we know that I probably larry. I agree on just saying very simply. There's a ton of money around And the value money goes down and how much it goes down relative to goods and services and how much he goes down to financial assets. It's gonna go down to both and that relief raises financial assets and it changes capital flows in important ways. I think that it it. It's easy to say that the fed should tighten and i think that That they should put on the brakes and a little bit. But i think you'll see a very sensitive market and a very sensitive economy because the duration of assets has gone very very long and just the slightest touching on those breaks has the effect of Ring markets because of where the price and also Passing through the economy. We have to keep in mind since the cyclical peak in nineteen eighty one every cyclical peak and interest rates and every cyclical trough has gone steadily below the one Before it until we vid zero and then every quantitative easing in other words purchasing of money buying of money and purchasing bonds as been greater than the one before that isn't debasement of the value of the currency in one way or another. So i think the i think the challenge of the fed is going to be able to balance those in a highly political sensitive environment because of this wealth glad clash so it's difficult position for the fed. I think that's that's that's cheap is we've had on the book. What leadership in the post pandemic world looks like. I knew we focused a lot on this as financial peace and but it clearly has global implications as well as implications for the us economies on for the next few years. Thank you very much to both of you ray. Dinu and lord somers appreciate you joining us. That's it for this episode of steph and we'll be back with more reporting on as when as analyzing the global economy next week but you can get more in the meantime in the bloomberg terminal or websites. I'm by following at economics on twitter. This episode was produced by magnus henriksson with thanks to ray value larry solace and lisa archambault. Mike sasser is executive producer. Stephanie mix and the head of bloomberg pocos his francesca..

Could Dirt Save the Planet?

Short Wave

02:04 min | 7 months ago

Could Dirt Save the Planet?

"I'm only here with npr. Climate correspondent lawrence summer. Hey lauren hey there so you have a scoop on a job opportunity. Yeah i do. It's a job in a growing field it deals with a hot commodity occa- and you know there's some opportunity there. I met someone with this job. His name is padma pelly and he's a dirt broker. Oh what a dirt broker. But he's not a fan of that title just to be clear. I hate that name. I'll be honest with you. Dirt has that negative connotation you know you gotta go wash up rate so dirt That's what you got for us today. Yeah his actual title. Though is land use manager works for granite rock which is a construction materials company but his job is really important because of climate change and right now he gets a lot of phone calls about dirt. Okay but from who exactly like who needs dirt so badly well where i met him is a good example of that On the shores of san francisco bay in the east bay and was on top of an earthen levee so basically a big pile of dirt that separates the water from the land but it was in rough shape. It's very much lower than it should be right now and very much narrower than it should be right now. Yeah that sounds bad. I mean levies are what prevent flooding and protect people and homes. Yeah exactly so. Pat helps get the dirt there to build up the levees and this area needs a lot around one hundred thousand dump trucks full. Well that's a lot. Yeah so he finds the people who wanted to get rid of dirt like construction projects that maybe you're digging out underground parking garage and he connects them with restoration projects that need it and there's more demand than he can handle right now because the oceans are rising with climate change and coastal cities are scrambling to defend themselves. Whether it's you know building levees or restoring marshes and for that. They need dirt and

Lawrence Summer Padma Pelly NPR Lauren East Bay San Francisco Bay PAT
How Climate Change Is Setting The Stage For Natural Disasters

Environment: NPR

03:26 min | 1 year ago

How Climate Change Is Setting The Stage For Natural Disasters

"In addition to being the year of covert twenty twenty was also a year of extreme wildfires and hurricanes in part because global temperatures were among the hottest ever recorded. here's npr's lawrence summer. If you caught the weather report in phoenix arizona visit you heard one number over and over alright jamie. We are hoping for weather. But i know just hovering around these hundreds. It was over one hundred degrees a lot on a record breaking one hundred and forty five days all well. Basically almost everything set records. Marvin percha is a meteorologist. At the national weather service in phoenix. I've lived here a long time. I grew up here in the seventies. And i've never seen anything quite like this. Phoenix also doubled. The number of days at spent above one hundred and fifteen degrees and those extremes are dangerous. Almost three hundred people died because of heat related causes in maricopa county another record number certainly with the overall warm earth. It makes it more likely to get these extreme temperatures and those temperatures set the stage for other disasters. Twenty twenty hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been thirty named storm so far a new wreck. Warm waters in the atlantic fueled the most active hurricane season on record and many storms intensified quickly building strength faster-than-expected. The records kept falling in the western u. s. two or wildfires burned more than nine million acres. Tens of thousands of people fled their homes. Some with only minutes to spare three states california oregon and colorado had the largest fires in there recorded history. Dan mcevoy a climatologist with the desert research. Institute says heat was one of the reasons when you have elevated temperatures and extra dry atmosphere. That really makes the fuels more flammable. An easier to burn a hot dry atmosphere is thirsty. He says it's like a sponge pulling moisture out of plants and soils that creates the conditions for fires to move fast and burn hot on the landscape in the west is normal. We need that fire but the thing that's changing is how quickly they become. These large megafires mcevoy's done studies showing how he will dramatically increase. This fire danger in the west but even he's surprised to see it. Play out so quickly this year is i mean. How many times can we say the word. Unprecedented christina doll is a climate scientist at the union of concerned. scientists events. Like that make it really hit home for climate scientists that this is not just something theoretical that. We're predicting it's something that we are living through. Twenty twenty is basically tied with two thousand sixteen for the hottest year ever recorded at almost two degrees above average but whether it takes the top spot is beside the point though says the last five years or the five hottest on record since eighteen eighty. And it's only expected to get worse for me personally. I think that there's not going to be one. wake up. call that spurs the public in the us. And our policymakers into action. It's more the accumulation of all of these events and all of the heartache as incurred because of them that heartache she says should be a reminder that the more fossil fuels are burned. The more years like this. We should expect to see lorne summer npr news.

Lawrence Summer Marvin Percha Phoenix Hurricane Dan Mcevoy National Weather Service NPR Maricopa County Jamie Arizona Christina Doll Union Of Concerned Atlantic Mcevoy Oregon Colorado
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Shea Stevens. A wildfire. Bernie, north of Sacramento, is now the largest blaze in California History after consumer over 731 Square miles as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports a new study. Shows that Maura Americans are at fire risk than previously thought. The August complex fire has now taken the top spot at almost half a million acres burned for other fires. Still burning are also among California's top 10 largest. Hotter climate, along with overgrown landscapes is fueling that growth, fire, experts say. And more and more homes are being built in fire prone areas about 60 million homes are at risk, according to research from the University of Colorado Boulder. Many of those homes aren't built with fire resistant materials and the majority of fires that threaten them were caused by people. So a key step is stopping those fires from starting in the first place. Lauren Summer NPR news During a campaign stop Thursday in Michigan. President Trump had more dire warnings about the nation's future if he loses the election in November, Trump narrowly lost the state in 2016, and recent polls show him trailing Joe Biden. Michigan Radio. Steve Carmody has more with Air Force One is a backdrop literally surrounded by thousands of manly massless supporters. The president took aim directly at his Democratic opponent in November. If bite wins. China wins If Biden wins the mob wins if Biden wins the rioters, anarchist arsonists And flag burners when Trump talked about bringing back manufacturing jobs in Michigan, though the state's manufacturing sector has actually lost thousands of jobs.

President Trump Joe Biden California Shea Stevens Maura Americans Michigan Radio NPR president Michigan Bernie Lauren Summer Lawrence Summer University of Colorado Boulder Steve Carmody China Air Force One Sacramento
How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

Environment: NPR

07:50 min | 1 year ago

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

"Since the pandemic hit air travel in the. Us is down ninety five percent the morning rush hour. Traffic report has become a necessary. Many of you are asking what impact all this is having on the environment. So Lauren summer is with us. She covers climate change for NPR. And it's good to have you back. Lauren Hi Ari. Let's start with a question that a lot of listeners have asked this one comes from Walker in Ames Iowa the oil consumption due to know car travel and almost no air travel must be much less. Is this lack of carbon dioxide production low enough to meet the goals of the Paris accord is more than enough just to remind listeners? The goals of the Paris accord that was to keep global temperatures from going up two degrees Celsius with an aim of less than one point five degrees Celsius What's the impact of this slowdown of the global economy? Lorne yes so as you might expect. It is having effect on global carbon emissions largely because demand for oil and coal has really fallen. And this is all over not just a US right. I mean so. Scientists are starting to put out studies projecting. What would this look like by the end of the year? If activity continues you know we all stay locked down a little bit and they're coming up with maybe an eight percent drop in carbon emissions For this year now okay. That would actually be unprecedented. I know it sounds like a small number. That's bigger than the drops during the last recession or World War Two But here's the thing that is about the level scientists save. The world needs to be cutting emissions every year until twenty thirty to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. That's you know that one point five degrees Celsius that you mentioned and I think scientists are also pointing out you know shutting down. The economy is not the way to kind of reach. Those long-term emission cuts right right. These bigger and missions changes like switch to renewable energy. Okay we got a lot of questions. Also about some of the short-term environmental impacts of the pandemic. This one comes from Lois in Raleigh North Carolina. This is the most beautiful spring filled with crystal clear low humidity days here in. North Carolina is having fewer cars on the road or the factories closed affect the weather brought about the global shut down factories. Might that be affecting the weather here. I've heard a lot of people wondering about this actually clearer. It is yes in a lot of cities it's gotten cleaner you know. People are driving less in some cities. I mean car. Traffic is down. Forty fifty percents. Planes are not flying either. So that's actually helped improve local air quality But it is very important to say. The weather plays a huge role in your local air pollution. So if it rains you know it clears the air and the spring typically is not like the summer. It's not our worst season for air pollution. Other places actually though haven't really seen much of a drop because there are things like factories and refineries that are still emitting and you know trucks are still on the roads. Goods are still being delivered to stores. Right I understand you've been talking with some scientists who are studying the effect of having so few cars on the road and the well. What are they trying to understand? Exactly yeah I mean. This is a particular interest in cities that have really problematic air and in those cities you know. They have to try to figure out. What can we change to improve air quality? I mean this is actually kind of just a real world test of that one. Scientists told me that you know this would be like if in Los Angeles for example. A third of the cars on the road were switched to all electric cars. Don't burn gasoline. They get electricity and in California. A lot of that comes from solar and renewable. So it's cleaner. We have one listener. Who wants to know whether this pandemic environmental damage? Here's Valerie in Arizona. We hear a lot about the air pollution being reduced but not much about the increase fiction styrofoam especially in food service. What about the possible? Negative effects on the environment from Corona virus. That's a good point. All these restaurants that have switched to delivery or takeout. That's a lot of plastic. Yeah I think people are seeing a lot more containers. People are also seeing masks and plastic gloves kind of thrown on the grounds. I think the pandemic is affecting our efforts to reduce plastic waste For Example California. Just put a sixty day pause on its plastic bag ban and that's out of concern for frontline workers right. They're the ones that are handling people's reusable grocery bags when they bring them into the store. Starbucks also is is not refilling those reusable coffee mugs for that same reason. It's about reducing exposure and are groups. You know they've been largely supportive of these temporary measures because people's lives are on the line but I think they're keeping a close eye to make sure that these are actually temporary measures. Right and these larger initiatives to reduce plastic waste kind of comeback at some point if you have a question for NPR's Lawrence Somerset to us at NPR dot org slash national conversation or on twitter use the HASHTAG NPR conversation and our next listener question comes from Laura Intel Keaton Alaska. What effect is this virus having on? Wildlife? I'm thinking of the fact that there's less people out and about and that means there's more room for wildlife I've seen some photos of a Lotta ducks resting in a parking lot while bores and sheep walking down the street. There's a lot of this on social media. Is it just that were home more? So we see the animals more or the animals actually coming out in places that they didn't ordinarily yeah. I mean that's hard to tell right. A lot of us are kind of just looking out the window. Maybe seeing things we didn't see before but some of it is a hoax. Right on social media you know. Maybe you saw those dolphins that were. They weren't actually there. Yeah I'm sorry about that but this they're actually real effects. Scientists are trying to study. You know I spoke to one wildlife rescue center in California. That said you know right now. It's seal and sea lion pumping season. You know every year some pups are concerned because of human interference like people or maybe dogs getting too close and so they're kind of that this year they merely a reprieve for them because some beaches are closed Another really good example is Wales. There's just less shipping traffic right now. And so. The oceans are less and wheels are very sensitive to sound. It's actually Something scientists after nine eleven because there was also a drop in shipping traffic and scientists could actually measure that stress hormones in right. Whales went down during that time period. Interesting we got a question about what's happening to environmental regulations during the pandemic Mike in Portland writes to the EPA suspended environmental rules so companies. Don't have to follow them any longer. Lauren Bizarre Policy Change while everyone was focused on the disease. Yeah in in March the EPA announced that it would not be finding companies if they failed to report their pollution data during the pandemic so an example of this might be that a refinery is reporting. It's air emissions to make sure that they're complying with Federal Clean Air Laws. The agency said that this needed to happen. Because the pandemic is making it harder for staff to collect the safety data and and do social distancing at the same time environmental groups really push back quite strongly. They felt this was too broad. It sent a message to industries. That maybe they would have the freedom to break environmental laws if no one was really checking during this time period just on our final moments so many of the changes were talking about depend on social distancing when the economy returns to something like normal are the gains. We've seen going to be reversed right so we all are starting to get back in our cars and fly. Go back to work industries ramping. Up You expect these of short-term Games are going to go away. I think there's some hope that the behavioral change though like maybe we'll all work from home it's possible. Npr Science correspondent Lawrence Summer. Thanks for answering these questions tonight. Thanks

California NPR Lauren Summer Paris EPA United States Raleigh North Carolina Iowa North Carolina Walker Starbucks Los Angeles
Pelosi: House 'close' to striking deal with Trump on coronavirus response package

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Pelosi: House 'close' to striking deal with Trump on coronavirus response package

"Breaking news from Capitol Hill as House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi announced that she is close to an agreement to legislative deal with the trump administration on a package that could be passed tomorrow to deal with mostly the economic effects of the Corona virus and Donald Trump has not been involved in the negotiations is treasury. Secretary has done the president's job for him because the president is not in the mood to speak with Nancy Pelosi and reportedly believes that Speaker Pelosi would humiliate him if he involved himself in the discussions. This is of course one way of looking at the other way of looking at it as Donald trump humiliates himself whenever he opens his mouth as he did last night. While Donald Trump was addressing the nation last night for ten minutes from the office stock market futures trading started to drop dramatically and then when the market opened today proceeded to crash by the largest amount since nineteen eighty-seven losing almost ten percent of its value today. Harvard economics professor and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers tweeted hostess sets. What I believe is a new world record for presidential market value destruction. Joining us now. Is Jason Furman? The former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers. The President Obama. He is now professor of the practice of economic policy. At Harvard's Kennedy School. Thank you very much for joining US tonight. Professor Ruin what. What would you suggest the government action that could be taken now? What action could be taken to deal with what we're seeing as the economic effects of this crisis? Lawrence this is the most serious economic crisis. This country may have faced since the Great Depression bigger than what we faced in two thousand eight. Two thousand eight was terrible. It was devastating but most people kept their jobs. Many people kept spending right now. Everyone is cutting their spending large swaths of the economy. People's jobs are at risk. And so once you start to think about that the answer to your question of what we should do the more. We can do the better so my next question was going to be. Is this one thousand. Nine hundred eighty seven or is this nineteen twenty nine which you've already answered that it's closer to that of maybe about six months ago. I reread John. Kenneth Galbraith book the Great Crash About The nineteen twenty nine stock market crash. And when you read the things people were saying As it was already underway as the crash was happening others so many people who sounded like Donald Trump that saying it will bounce back as the president said today the stock market will bounce back. Don't worry about it Larry cudlow the other day saying invest As it's going down you know you'll be very happy with that. Of course it's dropped dramatically since Kudlow said that so just to set this of for our audience perspective you are comparing this now to the nineteen twenty nine crash of the stock absolutely and you know the difference is it depends on what happens if we get through this virus and the next two months then maybe it bounces right back if it takes us nine months even at that point if we find a cure for the vaccine a lot of damage a huge amount of damage will be done to companies to workers on to unemployment of type. That would persist. And you could take a long time to to recover from so I I'd love to have more reassuring things to say for Lawrence but I just I am. I am worried right now. Well you're confirming what. I've been feeling in my my amateur way about this but so this presents an enormous policy-making challenge because when you talk about things like payroll tax cut which the president mentioned a few days ago and it died instantly when the Senate Finance Committee chairman said he wouldn't even consider it. That could come back. But a payroll tax cut to a person. Who's no longer on payroll Doesn't work the way it bye-bye in the stimulus way. You might have wanted it to a while. That person was still on the payroll. That's absolutely right so what I think we should do. Is Number one everything. We can do on health free testing which is in the house legislation. I think that's terrific. We're GONNA eat a lot of hospital beds. A lot of ventilators. We're going to need that fast

Donald Trump Treasury Secretary Lawrence Su President Trump Professor Speaker Pelosi Harvard Council Of Economic Advisers Chairman Treasury Jason Furman Kenneth Galbraith Secretary Kennedy School Kudlow Larry Cudlow
China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

Environment: NPR

03:07 min | 1 year ago

China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

"China's efforts to control the corona virus have meant many residents stayed at home in factories. Just shut down. That had an unintended effect. Less air pollution cleaner air can improve public health. Maybe even save lives joining me to explain why that isn't so simple. In China right now is NPR climate correspondent Lawrence Summer. Hi Laurin I Rachel. All right first off just explain. How big the drop was in air pollution. In China it was significant. It was down a quarter two third in some places compared to the same time period last year. And that's because people have been driving less but the big thing is coal consumption because power plants and industry has ramped down. We're starting to see an uptick. As China's activity is increasing. And that hasn't been true everywhere. Beijing actually saw an air pollution spike outdoors and February. Because there was a weather pattern trapping the pollution there okay so if power plants factories were running less that also means carbon emissions dropped. That's right about a quarter now. That's a tiny fraction of China's yearly emissions but it still substantial because China is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world so even that Short period of time in China equals would a state like Illinois or Ohio emits an entire year. Wow so even though. It's only a little bit over a month that we're talking about for these improvements. It's substantial enough to make a difference in people's lives. Yeah even a short term drop in something like air. Pollution can actually have benefits and a good example of that is the two thousand eight summer Olympics in Beijing to improve air quality during the Games government officials limited car traffic and they shut down factories and researchers actually tracked people during that time period and they saw improvements in cardiovascular health and lung health. They found that babies whose mothers spent their third trimester during the Olympic Games. Were born with heavier verse weights. Okay so that was years ago our people in China right now. Seeing those benefits yeah. It's a good question because the potential is really big here. You know. It's estimated that air pollution is linked to more than a million deaths per year in China. So I put that question to Jill. Baumgartner she's an environmental epidemiologist at McGill University. It would be a mischaracterization to say that the crow virus was beneficial to health because of these air pollution reductions in addition to tens of thousands of people who were impacted by the virus in China place stress on people's lives and on the healthcare system and lots of other sectors. She says that people with health conditions other than cove in nineteen may have not been getting the healthcare. They really needed during this time. Period and people may have spent more time indoors so they would have been exposed to more secondhand smoke potentially or indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves which are used in some parts of rural China. Presumably though as the corona virus is contained in China. This drop we've seen in emissions is going to be a race by the fact that the factories the power plants. They're going to go back online and return to normal right. Yea and of course. There's an incredible human toll here associated with this reduction in emissions and there's also a high likelihood that it's going to be canceled out as China tries to make up for its economic losses and really starts ramping up power plants and factories in the near term. Npr climate correspondent. Lauren summer. Thank you

China Beijing NPR Lauren Summer Laurin Lawrence Summer Olympics Jill Mcgill University Baumgartner Games Government Illinois Ohio
Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

Environment: NPR

02:54 min | 1 year ago

Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

"See if you can guess what this sound is Bacon frying. Maybe a crackling fire. Nope it is underwater snapping shrimp there only a few inches long but among the loudest animals in the ocean. Thanks to climate change. They are getting even louder. That's according to new research and that could affect a lot of other sea life as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports dive into tropical seas and that crackly sound is hard to miss them very easily. They tend to live in colonies or they're clustered closely together. So you hear this chorus of them Erin. Mooney is a scientist at the woods hole. Oceanographic institution whose steady some of the many snapping shrimp species around the world. He says that sound comes from their massive claw and they can really close that claw really really fast and it makes them bubble in the water and when that publ implodes that's what makes the popper the snap it even creates a tiny flash of light and it's surprisingly loud really similar to a large ship or large scale or even some sort of like Underwater HAMMERING DURING WORLD WAR. Two researchers were sent to investigate the noise because he was interfering with the Sonar Navy used to find submarines Mooney and his colleagues looked at snapping shrimp in a lab and the wild and found that the warmer gets the louder. The shrimp are and the more they snap. Warmer water makes them more active as Mooney recently presented to the American geophysical union and oceans are warming with climate. Change says Steve Simpson when we look at any type of global change. What we realize is that there will be winners and losers. Simpson is a professor of marine biology at the University of Exeter. He says sound is incredibly important underwater. Because it's hard to see very far and oceans are already getting noisier because of human impacts fifty thousand ships sailing around the world carrying ninety percent of world trade ad louder shrimp to that noise and it could further stress other animals that you sound like fish that grunt is a sergeant major a small Atlantic coral reef fish. It could mosque the ability of fish to be able to communicate because it will create a higher noise floor. Crackling sound then swamps. Any of the sounds that they might be wanting to listen out for. But there's also a chance that louder. Shrimp could help other organisms since then says when fish clams and coral are young larvae their free swimming floating in the ocean current. They're ready to find a reef to go and make their home and they use the sound. That's coming from that community as a cue to find a place to settle. The sound of snapping. Shrimp is an advertisement. That reef is a good place to live. Which is why Simpson and other. Scientists will be watching the oceans soundscape closely at a time when so many things are changing

Mooney Steve Simpson Scientist Oceanographic Institution NPR Sonar Navy American Geophysical Union Lawrence Summer University Of Exeter Professor
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By thanksgiving KQED science reporter Molly Peterson thanks you're welcome the wild fires that because those water problems are perhaps the most destructive symptom of the warming that California is experiencing all over from its reverse to which mountain tops but scientists are finding that some places are warming slightly less than others those places are called climate refugia and they could be important safe havens for native ecosystems KQED science correspondent Lawrence summer has more. it was pretty cold the morning I met Deanna do lead which was weird because it was the middle of a summer heat wave you definitely need your winter coat with you was the one I came up this morning I had the sweater and the vast doing the superintendent of devils post pile national monument it's a steep mountain valley just outside of mammoth lakes in the Sierra Nevada. enjoying the cold are about a hundred violet green swallows feasting on bugs hatching out of the river in this meadow it's really cool on their rounds are the most dazzling emerald green color amethyst purples this family stays colder than the ten thousand foot peaks around us doing first noticed that when she started working here almost twenty years ago that's the opposite of what you expect was even colder than I ever anticipated it would be so she started working with scientists who install dozens of temperature sensors and they figured out that something special is happening here it's called cold here pulling basically a giant mass of cool air just sits here thanks to the valley shape these high walls and east and west side actually limit the amount of sun the mountains above cast a huge shadow on us preventing the air from heating up in the morning and not air is trapped here because the valley has a very narrow opening at one end or the granite walls come together and so essentially that cold air bottle necks up into this meadow and makes it even cooler as much as eighteen degrees cooler in the morning compare to land a few thousand feet above it Dylan says that means this valley could be buffered shielded from a warming climate it'll still be affected but even a few degrees of difference could help the ecosystem survive doesn't mean it will survive forever but it's given us time to look at additional conservation strategies due in says the park service is already looking at giving this valley extra protection.

Molly Peterson California Lawrence summer Deanna superintendent Sierra Nevada. Dylan KQED reporter ten thousand foot eighteen degrees thousand feet twenty years
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Test by thanksgiving KQED science reporter Molly Peterson thanks you're welcome. wildfires that because those water problems are perhaps the most destructive symptom of the warming the California is experiencing all over from its reverse to its mountain tops but scientists are finding that some places are warming slightly less than others those places are called climate refugia and they could be important safe havens for native ecosystems KQED science correspondent Lawrence summer tells us more. it was pretty cold the morning I met Deanna do lead which was weird because it was the middle of a summer heat wave you definitely need your winter coat with you was the one I came up this morning I had the sweater and the vast doing the superintendent of devils post pile national monument it's a steep mountain valley just outside of mammoth lakes in the Sierra Nevada. enjoying the cold are about a hundred violet green swallows feasting on bugs hatching out of the river in this meadow it's really cool on their rumps are the most dazzling emerald green color amethyst purples this family stays colder than the ten thousand foot peaks around us Dylan first noticed that when she started working here almost twenty years ago that's the opposite of what you expect it was even colder than I ever anticipated it would be so she started working with scientists who installed dozens of temperature sensors and they figured out that something special is happening here it's called cold here pulling basically a giant mass of cool air just sits here thanks to the valley shape these high walls and east and west side actually limit the amount of sun the mountains above cast a huge shadow on us preventing the air from heating up in the morning and not air is trapped here because the valley has a very narrow opening at one end or the granite walls come together and so essentially that cold air bottle necks up into this meadow and makes it even cooler as much as eighteen degrees cooler in the morning compare to land a few thousand feet above it Dylan says that means this valley could be buffered shielded from a warming climate it'll still be affected but even a few degrees of difference could help the ecosystem survive doesn't mean it will survive forever but it's given us time to look at additional conservation strategies due in says the park service is already looking at giving this valley extra protection.

Molly Peterson California Lawrence summer Deanna superintendent Sierra Nevada. Dylan KQED reporter ten thousand foot eighteen degrees thousand feet twenty years
Girls vs. Boys: Brain Differences Might Explain Tech Behaviors

Armstrong and Getty

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Girls vs. Boys: Brain Differences Might Explain Tech Behaviors

"Wall Street journal gonna be in trouble for this one girls versus boys brain differences explain tech behaviors. parents are both boys the patriarchy does discrimination misogyny and hatred to Jack remember when the president of Harvard Lawrence summers lost his job for saying boys and girls have different brains and that's why they're more boys excel in math or science or whatever it was their biological reasons why there tend to be more guys than girls interested in math. and he had to be that that ruined the fat tend to leave Harvard over their name but. when this this this is one of the first examples of this in modern history even though there was plenty of data to back him up and no data to back up the critics he stepped down as president of Harvard he might run out of Harvard yeah because these people are fanatics he was right making a difference those well that's one of the first examples that because that was when early and bombs presidency. quite awhile ago but that. the first facts don't

Wall Street Journal President Trump Lawrence Summers Harvard Jack
California ex-governor launches climate partnership with China

All Things Considered

03:32 min | 2 years ago

California ex-governor launches climate partnership with China

"Today former California governor Jerry Brown and now that he's leading a new partnership between UC Berkeley in Tsinghua university in China KQED Lawrence summers spoke with brown about the new initiative called the California China climate institute and she started by asking him about his history of working with China on a climate deal and what he envisions this institute will do and what it'll look like a decade from now it will do something really important at this moment in history and that is open doors with China at a time when they're being closed throughout the American China overall relationship in the door opening will be in terms of climate change dialogue joint research working together on a problem that matter what other problems exist this one is shared by the Chinese a by the Americans by everyone in the world and what have you heard from that university and from the Chinese government you know what they really like to partner with California and this institute on what in particular who we have technical exchanges on cap and trade carbon pricing appliance in building efficiency battery storage zero emission vehicles those are all policies that California is pursuing as well as China and we need to mutually strive to do much much more California's do more in the most places in the world but it isn't even a fraction of what it will take to get zero net zero carbon emission. same with China there's still growing their missions so even though there's a lot of good things going on good research some good laws and regulations we need to step up or invision and that's the point of the institute to bring a trained scientist policy leaders and other people who can have some impact together is there a reason not to leave the through government channels is there reason to do it this way well if you were maybe governor present I could do to official channels but building that I'm gonna work through the university it's a venerable institution that has the brightest people in the world connected to it and certainly UC Berkeley and shin want Beijing are real power houses and I'm gonna do my best to. direction without power at reducing carbon emissions your message and work on climate change quite a bit what was the biggest challenge to getting the things done that you did get done in California. Lucia. the way it is the way we are we talking about a fossil fuel civilization that is incredible from the mention the use of coal and then oil and then all the dim forms of transportation this is driven mass prosperity and driven major population increase now we're talking about is changing the basis of our civilization to renewable energy to elegant at kinds of manufacturing good living so that we get on the side of nature and not create the kind of. awful negative feedback to we're doing

California China Climate Insti China California Uc Berkeley Lawrence Summers Jerry Brown Chinese Government Beijing Partner Scientist Official Lucia.
World Economy Edges Closer to a Recession as Trade Dread Deepens

AM Tampa Bay

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

World Economy Edges Closer to a Recession as Trade Dread Deepens

"Bloomberg reports president trump's escalating trade war between the US and China could be nudging the world economy towards its first recession in a decade former U. S. treasury secretary Lawrence summers told Bloomberg in the U. S. alone the recession risk is much higher than it needs to be and much higher than it was two months ago as China depreciates its currency as part of its trade war with the U. S. it's also hedging its bets it's buying lots of gold it's bought more than ninety four tons this year gold today past fifteen hundred dollars an ounce a six your

Bloomberg Donald Trump United States China Lawrence Summers President Trump Fifteen Hundred Dollars Ninety Four Tons Two Months
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mostly cloudy today with a chance of showers throughout we'll have highs in the fifties. The time is eight twenty two it's morning edition on I'm Brian watt. Just a couple of months in in twenty nineteen is already a historic year for police transparency in California. That's thanks in part to a new state law that took effect January first opening public access to internal investigation files about serious police misconduct and major use of force. But we're also learning more about these cases because a group of journalists formed a coalition to seek out and report on them he Qaeda criminal Justice reporter sukey Lewis is one of them. And she joins me Eisuki. Hi, brian. So I know as soon as the year started, you guys just started filing requests for these documents. What happened? Yes. So January first at midnight. You know, we sent out this massive batch of public records act requests to hundreds of agencies. Across the state state agencies sheriff's departments local law enforcement, and we've been really stunned by how many requests we've been getting back in a more than ninety agencies have provided some kind of response, and in some cases, it's just an index. And in some cases, it's deep investigative files, including body Cam footage, and all of that and has the reporting that you've been able to do from these materials had any impact. Yes. O'brien just last week last Thursday charges were dismissed against this woman, Catherine jank's out of Rio vista who through our reporting kind of came to light that her arrest was actually a wrongful arrest, and she shouldn't have been facing those charges. And so the DA there dropped the charges against her. And here is a cut from her boyfriend, David O'Reilly who was just talking about how grateful they are too. Can have this behind them. We've been worried about that ever since that night. When all this crap happened. And it's like a major relief for us to not have to worry about that part. And they more. I remember that story. But you filed a lot of requests are you getting something back on every one of them? No, it's kind of a mixed bag. Some agencies are just stalling kinda dragging their feet saying they're having trouble finding the records. You know, some are telling us in six months, we may get some and then others are refusing outright. And when that happens lawsuits. Yeah. So across the state and a number of different counties. Police unions are suing to block access to these records, and the argument that they're making that they were trying to make even before the law went into effect on January. First is that the law is not retroactive. So does not apply to records already in existence? As of January first twenty nineteen. Now that is an argument that so far the judges in these cases have not largely. Been buying only one judge so far in Ventura County kind of preliminarily said there's merit to that argument. But it is for the time being kind of stalling and stopping this access to records. And even you know, the attorney general has said that they're not going to turn over records until this this issue of the lawsuits settled in the courts since okay acuity is actually joined a lawsuit against the attorney general to sue for access to their records in his possession about you know, law enforcement employees of the apartment of Justice. Thank you sukey Lewis. Thank you Brian now to more investigative work by another reporter the science teams Lawrence summer as a candidate for President Donald Trump promised to get more water for California's farmers. He's followed up on that promise by speeding up key decisions about the water for two thirds of the state millions of acres of farmland in the fate of endangered salmon. In her investigation. Lauren has found that speed is cutting the public out of the process. It's also undermining the work of scientists who make those decisions she joins us in Lauren. Let's I get clear on what is being decided yet. These are decisions that control California's water how much goes to farms and cities and how much has to stay in the ecosystem for endangered fish. And last fall, President Trump put out a memo that was very specific about this decision that it had to be made under unprecedented time pressure faster an ever has been made before the last time was ten years ago. And this is a lot of red flags for people because right now at the interior department the nominee to be secretary is David Bernhardt who was a former lobbyist for Westlands water district, which is a heavy hitting agricultural water district. That's been very aggressive to getting its water supply and these decisions control the future of endangered fish as well as the fishing industry. Yes. That's because they can. Control these massive water pumping plants in mid delta. They move water hundreds of miles a mistake. But they are so powerful they actually can kill and threaten endangered fish like endangered, salmon. So what these rules do is? They actually limit the pumping when the fish could be harmed, but that actually limits the water supply that farms and cities get so what's happened. Now is the US bureau reclamation has put out a new plan for wants to run those pumps, and it would mean more water for central valley. Farmers potentially be not so good for the fish. So what did you find in your investigation? So there's this plan out. There are two federal wildlife agencies those biologists there have to look at this plan and say, well is this going to dry fish to extinction and some emails under the freedom of information act from these biologists that have a lot of concerns in them already one is now that they have to do this review under this brand new time pressure from the president. They say they don't have enough resources to do it. They're understaffed and they have to make incredibly. Complex scientific decisions. I mean, this is water goes hundreds of miles either fish with very complicated life processes, these are not easy decisions. And they're going to have to make them in sixty to eighty percent less time and they've done in the past. And so that's the scientists worried about how they could do their job. What about the public the public? Get a say in this. Yes. So the last time these decisions were made the public could really kind of see what was happening. And that's because these decisions got some independent scientific review that's pretty standard in science, right? Other scientists read your work and tell you what they think the last time they had outside scientists review it the public can go to those meetings and see what was going on. But with this brand new time pressure from President Trump this time around the public will not have any access to information who will have access actually is the water districts that will be getting the water, and that's because of new federal legislation that says that the water districts get copies of these decisions when they're in draft form, and they get to provide comment about it when the public. I will not. Thanks, lauren. Thank you. Science reporter Lawrence summer, and you can read her investigation online at kqeDorg slash science. You listening to morning edition on. More news after a break. I at eight twenty nine we'll take another look at commute.

President Donald Trump reporter Brian watt Lauren California sukey Lewis president Eisuki attorney Qaeda Ventura County DA David O'Reilly US Catherine jank O'brien Lawrence summer Rio vista
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:15 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Newsom announced he will abandon plans to build two massive tunnels under the Sacramento. San Joaquin delta to carry water to the central valley and southern California the twin tunnel plan originally conceived under the Schwarzenegger administration was slated to cost nineteen billion dollars. And it sparked intense opposition from environmentalists who said the project amounted to a water grab that would destroy delta ecosystems governor newsome's new plan calls for a single tunnel. And is estimated to cost about a third less than the original project. And in this hour, we want to discuss what a one tunnel plan would mean for farmers urban water users and the environment and joining us. I is Wade crow footy secretary the California natural resources agency and welcome to the program. Wait growth. Thanks for having me. Glad to have you. And I think the place to begin with you. If we could get a big picture. I'm looking at the title of this hour, I have delta project scaled back to one tunnel. Now what and we have to wait a couple of weeks, probably before we. Find out about cost and time line to give us a sense of what the governor's directive means in terms of the process now sure thing, so when governor Newsom gave the state of the state last week, he first of all indicated water will be a priority for the administration to address in coming years. And that's a big deal. Given the water needs that we have in the state between cities agriculture and the environment. Secondly, he was really clear about his desire for a fresh approach specifically on conveyance or what we've been calling the tunnel's being very clear he does not support the current proposal. The so-called twin tunnel proposal and instead supports smaller single tunnel. Conveyance at the delta, and then third, and and really important is he made clear that this discussion around the tunnels cannot happen in isolation. Modernizing conveyance to the delta is one piece of the puzzle. And we really need a portfolio. Folio approach across the state to meet our water needs into the into the new century until look forward to talking about that. Well, we're going to go through a whole new permitting process, for example. Yeah. That's a great question. And and we're working through those details. So there's obviously been a lot of science and analysis on the needs of the delta and the potential for modernized conveyance over the past decade or two. And so the goal is to utilize the science that's been done, but then obviously to comply with the California environmental quality act and all the permanent requirements so utilize what we can. But then, of course, go through the, you know, the new permanent processes needed. So we are going to have California water fix. Well. I I don't know if it'll be termed that the governor made clear that we he he believes we do need to modernize the way that water moves to the delta keep in mind upwards of twenty seven million Californians rely on freshwater to the delta. It's a major risk of earthquakes. Which has been well established and climate change means sea level rise in salt water intrusion into the delta. So, you know, we believe that the safety of our water supply for, you know, walk of three quarters of Californians really relies on on modernizing, the conveyance the specific characteristics of the size, location, etc. Obviously, you know remains to be determined. Again. We're talking about the change in the two tunnel plan. That was under governor Brown will now be one tunnel in Waco foot with secretary of California natural resources agency. Also joining us for this hour Lawrence summer here in studio science and environment reporter for acuity. Welcome Lauren morning and here in studio. Jeff mama to is a senior fellow at the public policy institute of California, America's professor of earth and planetary sciences at UC Davis and welcome Jeff. Thank you. Good to have you both here in studio with us, Lauren. Let me begin with you. This seems to be well. Sort of victory for environmental activists, doesn't it? I mean, I think it's still being determined. I mean, this is decades now that we've been talking about this tunnels project in California. And there's a reason that nothing is quite happened yet. It's very very controversial. I mean, people think of it as kind of the missing piece of California's entire water system. I mean, this goes all the way up from the northern part of the state and Shasta dam on the water goes all the way down to LA and San Diego. It's also use in the south bay here in the bay area. And it just so happens that the water has to go through the delta, the Sacramento, San Joaquin delta and the way it's designed now has been really really bad for that estuary and the animals that live there. So this tunnel has been held up as a way to save some species as tunnel has been held up as a way, maybe that we would destroy these species. It's all depends on what it looks like and how you design it. And that's why we have so much debate over it. Well, there's going to be less cost that seems to be certain but back in two thousand nine the department of water was talking about what one hundred and forty million dollars an hour in the billions it'll be very expensive. No matter what it will be paid for by the water user. So those are the water district's that actually get the water. So it's not. Something that would actually go to tax payers, but you know, those water districts have to have it pencil out for them. They're not going to pay for a very expensive project. If they don't get the water that they want from it, and Jeff if I go to you on this. What does this mean in terms of limited capacity for us management? That's a good point. But at the same time the emphasis is going to be on the urban, isn't it? I think what I learned brings up a really good point. You have to pay for this. This is not going to be funded by the federal government is not going to be funded by the state government. It's it's the beneficiaries pay and the capacity for paying for this is highest in the urban areas where we can pay a lot more for water rather than the agriculture regions of the state. So one of the when you think about downsizing this thing and making it smaller the emphasis is really likely to be on the urban supply again because they can pay and also it's it's it's it's a fact of life that the economic return on investment in an acre food of water in the urban. Environment is certainly very very high, and yet food is such a staple and so much of it is producing the state and the coaching remind you and all your listeners, California is an agricultural powerhouse. And the and the area of the state that is served by the delta is the richest agricultural region in the in the in the United States in one of the most important in the world. We can't lose sight of the fact that agriculture requires water is a throughput to manage their industry on the San Joaquin valley is a major issue here in the water supply to the San Joaquin valley is is extremely important as well. What does one tunnel made about groundwater? Oh, it means a lot. This is this is the problem. Learn learn got this right? You cannot view this in isolation. There are a variety of things going on which are going to be extremely important and the single tunnel plays a role in it at the top of the list is the decision by the state in two thousand fourteen to require sustainable management of groundwater ground zero for this is the San Joaquin. In valley tomorrow, the public policy institute of California is going to release a very large comprehensive look at the San Joaquin valley. And there's some there's some tough tough messages in this that is an area that's going to have to reduce their water use by almost two million acre feet that is a lot of water to reduce and it's going to cause a lot of land out of production. And this is because they have to balance their groundwater use. But they rely right now almost ten percent more than ten percent of their supply comes from the delta because the thirteen percent if you don't maintain that supply from the delta for delta for them. You are looking at some really tough choices and trying to balance the groundwater. So again, these things can't be considered an isolation because there's tremendous pressures on delta. Let me go back to Wade Crawford only has a few more moments with US Secretary to California natural resources agency. And Wade you're hearing some of the concerns what are the concerns that? The state has an I'm wondering are you going to have more environmental reports demanded? Yeah, I would say. I would concur with Lauren and Jeff first of all that the status quo is broken. So it's really hard to defend what's happening right now in the delta fish populations are dwindling, water supplies are becoming less certain. And so from our perspective the status quo is not an option, and it's true that the discussions around tunnels or modernize conveyance has been decades in the making. But the reason that's persisted. As an issue is every means a problem. I would say we collectively fail. If the discussion on water and California is reduced to a debate about a tunnel or tunnels, we need to do so much more. It's recharging groundwater basins from winter rains. It's capturing storm water in urban environments and using it later, it's actually making conservation. Like we did in the drought away of life. It's recycling. Water. We are not going to meet our needs as a fifth largest economy in the world in the state. Eight of forty upwards of fifty million people unless we take a portfolio approach, and I think that's what I'm really excited about as it relates to what governor Newsom sad last week. It's really this question of conveyance and so much more. And so I look forward to helping, you know, flesh out the details in coming weeks on on what on what those portfolio items are secretary Kofoed good to have you with us. Appreciate the time. Thank you. Michael take care swayed crow fluid secretary, California natural resources agency, and let me go back to Lawrence summer. We were talking a little bit about what this means Lauren for farmers and for the bay cities urban areas, what does it mean for the environment and particularly in light of climate change. Yeah. I mean, I think we've had now more than ten years of discussion about these two tunnels he's twin tunnels and figuring out what it means for the environment has been a central question. Right. Because one of the problems that a lot of biologist point us that we're taking a lot of water out of his estuary, and it's been bad for salmon. It's been debt. For delta smelt. And so now that we're going potentially to a one tunnel that has to be studied. And we've already spent a lot of time studying to tunnel. So one of the big questions as well. Do you have to start those studies over can you just build on what we already know? I mean, people point to the fact that it depends on how much water you take. And how you take that water. And that's something that that that permanent water resources, and and Newsome administration actually have to put on the table going have see little rice though, which makes me think again of climate change. What is going to be more salty? But aside from that we have to be concerned about climate change, your I sure because you know, we want fresh water right going into our Akwa and pipelines. Right. If we get more salty water coming up San Cisco bay into the delta. That's actually a very big concern. Also for bay area water supplies as well. So Jeff should we build or not Bill? That question. So as you can imagine the public policy institute of California, we don't take a position on build or not build. But I wanna I wanna put it in the stark stark contrast, and this is the same thing we've been saying for the last decade and all of these debates, you have a choice, you can not build and then choose to adapt to declining reliability and amount of water from the.

delta California San Joaquin delta governor Newsom Lauren governor newsome Jeff United States San Joaquin valley secretary Sacramento institute of California San Joaquin Secretary public policy institute of Cal Lawrence summer Schwarzenegger governor Brown
"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Else any white lives in the tiny town of Russell, New York. She says the government shutdown fell to her like bad strategy a standoff in Washington that hurt regular people way out here in rural America just seems like there's other ways of doing it. Then, you know, putting people out of work, and, you know, losing their income. Then just seems like there's gotta be a better way. But I don't know what that would be white says she to still backs the president and still wants his wall, built polls show the overwhelming majority of conservative voters still trust is leadership. But her doubts about the wisdom of the shutdown. Down are reflected in polls that show Trump losing ground in recent weeks nationwide. Even with some of his core. Supporters white men without college degrees evangelical and registered Republicans. Brian man, NPR news, canton, New York. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Nearly all the lettuce in this country has grown with water from the Colorado river, which means a nineteen year drought along the river has far reaching implications. Neighboring states are still trying to come up with a deal by Thursday to avert a crisis. Lawrence summer of member station. K Q E D And NPR's, energy and environment. Team reports the Colorado river touches seven states goes through the Grand Canyon and reaches the faucet of forty million people from Denver to Los Angeles. But it starts as just a trickle high in the Colorado Rockies. One of the cool things about a snow melt is it's really efficient. Tens of getting a river. Brad Udal is a climate scientist at Colorado state university a few summers ago, we were at the very spot that run off becomes a river. No question. Nineteen year drought. Here has been bad. But climate change is making things worse. You heat up the climate. You are going to get fundamental impacts of water cycle. We've known this for almost fifty years now a warmer atmosphere. Sucks up water drying, it out of plants and soils Udal says that.

Colorado river NPR New York Colorado Rockies Brad Udal Colorado state university white Brian man Washington America Trump Lawrence summer president Grand Canyon Denver Los Angeles scientist Nineteen year
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Record that I've had has just been something that happened for me. It's about being myself and through the years that ride will be been down and down in straight. And I'm fine with that. Because here I am thirty years later and giving full in the records are being listened to and the old fans. Are there? The new fans are there. I'm quite grateful that I get to live my life doing what I love and that I can still be doing it with the best in front of me. You not want to chase trends, quite the contrary your trendsetter, especially when it comes to fashion sense of style. I guess where did you get that? How did you was watching a parent? I would think a lot through my mother and through growing up in New York City in those early seventies is really influential being around all of these artists musicians writers that had a flare. You know style. That's also what got me into interior design and architecture, you know, being around all these people that express themselves through their clothing through their interiors and and their art. Yeah. Your daughter recently said that that was actually part of what was tough growing up knowing that you had such a cool dad and of cool mom that they were such fashion plates. I think the coach said like dude, can you just be low key a little bit. Just a shirt that. I can't see your nipples through would be so dope. We were thinking Miami. At the time. It was hot. I don't think that explains a multiple times that you've had. Sure. I mean, you know, she. Yes, she had to grow up with that. And what's it like seeing your daughter now flourish, and because it's the most beautiful thing ever. I mean, I had no idea which direction she was going to go out go into and I. I thought she would not go in this direction. You know in your parents are doing it, you kind of want to go the other way. And then all of a sudden she started acting. Additioning getting parts where this come from. I'm supposed to show you on the clinic. And now I looked at her and it's just beautiful to see that. She did it on her own. Did people know who she was because of your parents? Yes. But that lasts about five minutes. L toilets for Shiels comes on your skills. And she kept us out of it. I I didn't want to be a part of it and she has her own direction in her own vision. And I watch her and I learned it was really beautiful to see one of the things that's interesting in the last few months. We've also seen is that you're quite friendly with Jason momoa, who's married to Lisa Bonet. Your ex wise. My brother absolutely, do you pull that off its most people can't do. It's funny. People the reactions I went to go see him host Saturday Night Live. You guys have matching ring then. Yeah, he well. He gave me one. Yeah. After the after the show he gave me one of his rings. And but it's interesting to see the reactions. From people like how do you do it? And it's so amazing, and what an example, blended families and love and respect for for us. It's just normal. You You know? know?.

Lisa Bonet New York City Shiels Jason momoa Miami five minutes thirty years
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"And that's why the earth is running fever. All right. So the oath is running fever. We are now caught up in a debate, and you apart you one of the authors of the government's recent quite cataclysmic climate report, which the president dismissed, but I mean, it was really devastating. Okay. About the economic impact. You know, the what you said was a threat. Multiply the military Kohl's this a threat multiplier. Just just explain explain that we care about a changing climate not because it's increased the average temperature of our planet by one or two degrees c we care about it. Because that warming affects almost every aspect of our lives, the description of a threat multiplier, I think is the most apt one because it takes the things that were already concerned about we're concerned about producing enough food about keeping the economy healthy about having sufficient water about working with with countries that are suffering from political conflict and strife will worried about providing safe places for people to live and today climate change effects, all of those things the US national climate assessment really address what I feel is the most dangerous in widespread myth that the largest number of people have bought into and that. What is the myth that? It doesn't matter to me the climate assessment brought this issue home to every region of the US every sector of the US it pointed to very specific ways that people are already being affected whether by Sunday flooding along the east coast, whether native American tribes that are being forced to abandon their incestual lands already due to see level rise in a row Shen, whether increasing risk of water shortages, stronger, droughts, greater heatwaves, it brought all that down to the local level where people live, and it helped us understand that we're already being affected. And in fact, we are already starting to respond, but not fast enough and people are starting to respond governments in China in India in all sorts of places, they get it. Now, the youth the young people of the world are really concerned about this. Because obviously, it is the world that they will inherit I just wanna play abide a little pot of speech from young girl. Swedish girl at the latest climate conference, which took place in Poland. Here's what she said. You on not mature enough to tell it like it is even that burden. You leave to children. But I don't care about being popular. I can't about climate Justice and living planet. So there is that young go putting the adults at the time it conference on notice and say, you just not getting it. This is our future. And you are not protecting us you leaving it to us. What are the solutions? Catherine Heyhoe what we really lack is a vision of a better future. When we talk about climate action. We're presented with two opposing Pakalitha, visions one where climate change continues unchecked which could mean the end of civilization as we know it not the end of the planet. The planet will be fine but the end of civilization because our civilization is built on the assumption of a stable climate. And then on the other side, we have this apocalyptic vision of well, we have to throw away everything that makes our current life, so comfortable, no trysofi. No water. No cars nothing. So we're faced with these two opposing visions of the future. No wonder people are more afraid of of the one where we throw away all our modern technology versus the one where climate impacts affect us. But the reality is neither of those has to happen. We need a positive vision of the future where we do continue to have abundant energy for all not just us here in developed countries, but people in every country around the world, but that energy comes from clean sources that don't pollute our air or water and will never run out on us. We need to have this positive vision with is abundant food for people with there's water vailable to people with their safe places for us to live climate change is a threat multiplier and it.

US fever Catherine Heyhoe president Poland Shen China India two degrees
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Whereas we've you the impacts very distant far off. They don't really matter to us. So to address this I have to do two things that are very uncomfortable for a scientist to do. The first thing is rather than engaging with people from the head as we often do with data and facts and charts and figures, I have to engage with people from the heart sharing with them from my own heart. Why I care why this matters to me and to people that I care about and love in the second thing. I have to do is something that we scientists are not trained to do. And that's why we need everybody on board helping with this. We have to talk solutions. And so love talking about examples. Of where companies like a solar panel manufacturer in San Antonio took in oil patch workers who lost their jobs when oil prices dropped and retrain them to do solar panel manufacturing or the fact that Chinese company went into Wyoming and trained coal miners in Wyoming to do wind energy installations, we need to think to the future and people who work very hard coal miners deserves the opportunity to continue to contribute to the new clean energy economy. Much of the clashes. You've just described also includes sort of a faith based backlash can you? Explain to us. How you explain to your faith based community that you can have faith and be a committed Christian and also be really rigorous atmospheric scientist as you all so when people say, oh, you know, God's in control. So humans can't affect the planet. I point them to Genesis one where it says that God gave us humans responsibility over every living thing on this plan. And when they say that humans can't affect something big as planet. I say, well, let's look at revelation where it says God will destroy those destroyed the earth, and then when they say, well, the world's going to end anyways, I point them defense alone Jons where people back then were saying, oh, the world's going to end any day. So we don't have to work anymore. We can just kinda sit back and relax and wait for Christ to return, and the apostle Paul wrote to them and the possible is a little salty at times, and he said get a job support your family care for the orphans and the widows and the poor. We don't know what the future holds. But we do know that rate here right now, we are called to love others as we are selves have been loved by God. So, you know, why do you think what is the root of in many pods of the Christian community in the United States? You know, people are encouraged to believe the opposite of what you say. Why is that? The reason is because we have confused our politics with our religion for many people, unfortunately in the United States today. Their statement of faith is written first by their political ideology and only second by the bible, and when the two come into conflict as unfortunately, they often do these days they will go with their political ideology over their face. Tell me about the polls because this would have countered if people believe that this climate change, but but a majority believe what the majority about seventy percent believe that climate is changing because the evidence is right in front of us. Wildfires are burning about twice the area. Now in the western US. They would without a changing climate hurricanes are being super sized by factor of thirty forty percent more rainfall falling today than they would've would've one hundred years ago. So seventy percent of people agreed that climate is changing in about the same number agree that plants and animals and future generations, and even people in developing countries would be affected, but only. Minority agree that we are selves will be affected and even though just over fifty percent do agree that climate is changing to human activities. There's a strong identity gradient the number one predictor the United States. Whether we agree climate is changing, and humans are responsible is not how much we know about the science. It is simply where we fall on the political spectrum the further to the right. We are the less likely. We are to agree with simple facts that we've known since the eighteen fifties that by digging up and burning coal and gas and oil we're releasing heat trapping gases into the atmosphere. Whether wrapping an extra blanket around the planet trapping heat that would otherwise escape to space..

United States scientist Wyoming atmospheric scientist Paul Jons San Antonio seventy percent thirty forty percent one hundred years fifty percent
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"She's also an atmospheric scientist who was the lead author on last year's damning US national climate assessment. And Heyhoe told me that when it comes to climate. She prefers to crunch the numbers than rely on anyone's interpretation of faith, all political ideology. Katherine heyhoe. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Let's first take the FOX about carbon emissions. We just saw that report from Bill and he demonstrates vividly the closures of US Cole, Don around the country. And yet the latest report says emissions up, and they up something like three point four percent in Twenty-eight. Explain to us why that's happening the carbon intensity of energy production is actually going down. But the natural gas serving as a bridge so to speak between Cole and clean energy has pretty much come to the end of its term. And so while we continue to use more and more energy, and while coal plants are closing a lot of that energy is still coming from natural gas, even though here in the state of Texas wind and solar is growing rapidly. Okay. So talk to us about Texas because you know, the rest of the world the rest of the country sees it as a sort of a bellwether state. And they believe it. To be pretty much conservative and reliably sort of corporate and reliably fossil fuel since a lot of fossil fossil fuel energy comes from Texas. But what are the actual facts? How is Texas doing its pod in the climate debate, Texas is a very interesting place to live for a climate scientist. I do live in a very conservative part of the state where the majority of people would say that. Yes. Climate is changing. But they'd be hesitant to attribute it to humans, Texas, also has the highest yo two missions of any state. And of course, it's known worldwide as an oil and gas producer. But Texas also leads the US in wind energy production, and it's rapidly climbing to the top and solar energy production as well. And from my own perspective. I study what climate change means to people in the places where we live Texas is one of if not the most vulnerable states in the nation to the. Impacts of changing climate. So describe that for me because obviously we've seen the hurricanes. We know what happened in Houston. But tell us a little bit more because I think the interface between climate and people climate and all communities. Nah, actual neighborhoods is something that hasn't been hasn't gone across what enough it's also to thirty thousand feet worth of science. And then on the other hand the denies so tell us about you know, what it see and how vulnerable it is. I completely agree with you. And I feel that that is the missing piece in the puzzle of what's preventing climate action. We feel as if the impacts only matter to polar bears are generations or people who live far away. Whereas in actual fact, we ourselves are being impacted here now in the places where we live by changing climate. And one of the main ways that we are affected is when climate change loads the dice against us. So.

Texas Katherine heyhoe US Cole atmospheric scientist FOX Bill scientist Houston producer thirty thousand feet four percent
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Wall has been controversial from the beginning. With many critics concerned about the now debunked facts and figures at the White House puts forward to support its construction. Scientists share a similar concern over false information and demagoguery when it comes to the environmental issue of fossil fuels verses sustainable and clean energy. We talk about how to cut through the full suits with climate scientists, Catherine Heyhoe in just a moment. But foes, I'll be weird talks to coal miners in Pennsylvania who just like the wallows would promise the world by then candidate Trump. Across america. More and more coal fired. Smokestacks are smoke free the power plants beneath them cold and dark the minds that once fed them abandoned, but for the past couple of years miners, and their families, let themselves believe that a coal comeback was on the way, thanks to promises. Like this. We are putting our great coal miners back to work. He's tried to get their votes. He isn't telling them the truth. He's lying. He's lying to them. You used to work in this month? I worked in this mind. I was face boss for fifty two years. Arts Sullivan worked in and consulted on minds around the world. And he bristles every time. He here's the president claim to be the savior of coal, and that really disturbed me because these are really good people. These are the people that I've spent my life working with. And if they have the truth they will make the right decisions. If the president was honest, he would explain to those folks that mine's like this are never ever coming back to life again, not because regulation, but competition cold just cannot compete with cheaper cleaner natural gas. When and solar. That's the reason. More coal fired power plants have gone on a business in the first two years of Donald Trump and the first four years of Barack Obama another twenty or expected to go down this year. And if a minor is higher today chances are he'll be digging to fill the demand. In india? Do you feel the president gave these communities false hope? My my opinion. Absolutely. I mean, I'm an expert. He's not like what he was campaigning. I asked my talk to people, and I said what you're playing how you bring about co because I could be brought back if these plants would come back up and deregulating stuff will help this much. It's not going to help a lot trunks. EPA? Now led by a former coal lobbyist in Andrew. Wheeler recently moved to lift Obama era caps on how much poisonous mercury and how much heat trapping carbon power plants can pump into the sky, which really worries climate scientists like Penn State's Michael man, we're already experiencing impacts of climate change that could have been avoided had we acted two decades ago when we knew already at that point that there's a problem in order to save life, as we know it man says rich countries need to be on carbon-free electricity by twenty thirty which means eighty percent of Kirk. Coal reserves need to stay in the ground. I think there's enough resilience in the system that we can withstand one term one four year term, Donald Trump. I'm not sure we can withstand too. So what would it take to unite people on this issue of climate change, the science at least is settled and comprehensive on this show? We will not give moral off factual quivalent to the handful of denies out that, but we will make it a priority to highlight the way forward and to examine solutions. It's a cool to reason which has long been championed by the award winning climate scientists Catherine Heyhoe she is a committed Christian. She's married to a pasta..

Catherine Heyhoe Barack Obama Donald Trump president Sullivan White House Pennsylvania Wall america india EPA Penn State Wheeler Michael man Kirk fifty two years eighty percent
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Percents et cetera. But once you get to the tippy tops on your ten million dollar. Sometimes you see tax rates as high as sixty or seventy percents that doesn't mean all ten million dollars taxed at an extremely high rate. But it means that as you climb up this ladder, you should be contributing more. She seems down a lot of homework. Paul Krugman is supported to even though the Republicans call it sort of insane voodoo economics. I mean, that's my would bud. What do you think? I mean when you stand on this issue now going forward, especially to correct the inequality. The congresswoman is right. We need more progressive taxes in the United States the top one percent and the top tenth of a percent and the top hundred of percent, they should all be paying more than they are in order that most Americans the Americans I saw my trip can pay less and can get better Medicare benefits stronger social security benefits. She's quite right about that. What's the right way to do it? I think communists, have mostly come to the view that it's a better idea to close a whole range of loopholes than it is to just set high tax rates because when you have high tax rates as we did in the nineteen sixties. It turns out that people take advantage more and more of the loopholes, and you don't actually collect as much money as you're hoping to. So I she's right in spirit and calling for more progressive taxation. But I there's room for a very productive conversation about what the right way. To do. It is. I'd rather see us get there with measures that stop people from avoiding taxes by putting it abroad or by putting it into real estate tax shelters were by using financial engineering to avoid taxes, and I can raise very substantial amounts of revenue certainly a trillion dollars over the next ten years, probably more from the very top of the income and wealth distribution, and that's what we should do in order to fortify. What government does of for most of the people who are the bedrock of our country. It's really a fascinating moment to see all of this now in play of secretary summits. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us today. You know, what's smart kicking off twenty nineteen by planning out, which rolls you need to hire. For and you can start by.

Paul Krugman United States secretary ten million dollars ten million dollar trillion dollars one percent ten years
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"I still support him on what he's doing. Because in the end. It's the greater good. The only way for us to get this problem really fixed for the next generation is to punch through it. Now. Okay. So two different opinions to pharma's, a soybean pharma a pig farmer. One supports the tariffs and one sees the definite problems with them. But what is what is the way out of this? Now, the Chinese have said, I don't know whether you think that you said that you think is likely to be a solution. But this state media who said look if we were going to rise a rather raise the white flag and surrender. We would have done this much earlier on when not going to. China's not going to surrender. But they're certainly practices that China's should be adjusting. There's no reason why American companies who want to do invis- business in China should have to enter into a joint venture with Chinese partners where they give overall they're all their intellectual property, and then they get kicked out of the joint venture a few years later. That's a wrong trade practice, and we're right to wanna see that changed. So they're legitimate issues that China came compromise on, and I think they've signaled a willingness to compromise what they have also signalled is that they're not going to buy into a theory where the United States is the leading technological country for all of history. And they're not allowed to try to catch up. They're not going to accept that. No sovereign country would accept that. I think we have to be very careful in the United States not to project a sense that our goal is to hold China down. Our legitimate goal is reasonable fairness for American producers like the fairness that Americans provide farm producers wanna do things in the United States. I think if we can confine our demands to that. And if China can approach this in a spirit of compromise. I think we can work this through. But if China thinks that they can just go on a buying spree that manipulates the trade deficit statistic. And that that will resolve the problems. I think they're making a mistake. And if we think we can reasonably aspire to stop China. A country that has standards of living like they were in our country in the nineteen thirties from growing rapidly. That's not a reasonable thing of for us to think. And so what we have to do is find some kind of middle way. So let's get back to the US economy. And how it affects people, of course, with the new elections with the mid terms, a whole new wave of congress people have been elected, many Democrats with you, call them, socialist Democrats, and they have raised questions about who. The humming economy is actually benefiting America's economy is doing well employment is is very good. But who does it actually benefit? And I ask you because you have written prominently about a recent road trip, you took across America, and you say that it's shaped reshape Pab so focused you'll view of people in their relationship with the economy, and how it's working for them gave us a broad. Sense of what you've found on that trip. For somebody like me who's spent his life the east coast with occasional visits to Cal to to California. And who hasn't spent much time in the heartland of our country. It was a very very good. Experienced. And what you realized was that. There were people who worked very very hard who frankly didn't have their eyes glued to CNN or the New York Times or news shows, but we're concerned with what was happening in their communities who wanted their children to get to have experiences. They hadn't been able to have and to live better than they had and who were worried about the future. And I think that more of our economic policy. Needs to be directed at those people in a hard working middle class, and we need to make sure that our economy's growth isn't mostly for technologists in the San Francisco area and financiers in the New York area and scholars in the Boston area. And I knew that I said that many times, but I saw it in a different in a different way as we drove through. I would South Dakota and parts of Wyoming and Eita. Well, it must have been as you described very eye opening for you..

China United States America congress New York Times San Francisco New York CNN South Dakota Boston Cal California Eita Wyoming
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Issues around Chinese trade practices. Yes. There are problems with China taking our technology from US companies. But to kind of administration declares that. Canadian steel is a national security issue for us to kind of administration that suggests putting tariffs on European automobiles is somehow thing we need to do for our national security. That's a kind of administration that's going to have minimal credibility in pursuing. The valid American objectives with China and the president needs to understand that he has done. What other presidents have not done? He has bragged and treated the stock market when it was going off as a reflection of the glory of his policies that wasn't right. Right, but live by the sword die by the sword. And in a period when we appear to have a much more volatile stock market. That's also going to be seen as a reflection on his policies so beyond the president himself and his policies and the politics of all of this. There is the very very serious issue of the global economic health. And you actually, you just mentioned just there the possibility of recession you've just written a piece for the financial times in which you flesh that out. What signs are you looking for? Oh, I think what what has to look for is the spending willingness of consumers the investment willingness of businesses and the signals that are coming from market participants judgments in financial markets to assess the likelihood of a downturn. We're certainly not in a downturn yet the Christmas season in the United States was strong as best we can tell and certainly hiring with substantial in December, according to the employment survey, but if you look at some of the more forward looking indicators, what businesses are saying they expect in terms of orders in coming months. What consumers buying? Intentions are what's happening to the price of products. What's happening to the price of commodities? Those are sending a more troubled signal, and that combined with very substantial uncertainty around the European economy and various problems that seem to be rising in the Chinese economy. All create a sense that certainly the peak rate of expansion globally has probably passed and we're going to see slowing, and whenever you start to see a slowing the prospect or possibility of recession is something that you have to reckon with. And let's not forget the apple Hsieh's, and the kind soul some significant losses. So it's not just as you say. Growth slowdown in manufacturing slowdown in the United States. But as we in China, but as we would discussing these talks are going into an unscheduled third day and just ahead of that. There's been a lot of interviewing and sound bites and commentary from Americans from farmers who are being affected by this. I want to play you now to differing opinions of buy-american American farmers on this whole tariff war issue. Just listen the second. I would tell him that farming and agriculture is a global business that we cannot be protectionist. China imports sixty percent last year of the soybeans that we go in this country. And that's a good thing because it helps our balance of trade our buyers there want to buy from us, but they're not going to because of what's going on at a higher level. I know people who probably won't be here next year the farm, and that's that hurts everybody because the egg egg industry is the basis for rural communities here. It supports our economics. Put the tariffs where they did to retaliate against Trump. Socks that I'm losing money. But I soon be me losing the money then the whole United States for years on end..

China United States president Trump apple Hsieh sixty percent
"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence summer" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. President Trump is seeking the approval of the American people citing what he calls a humanitarian and national security crisis on the southern border in funds, though, illegal border crossings have been falling dramatically over more than a decade. It comes of course, as a partial shutdown of the government continues to impact hundreds of thousands of Americans and disrupt important corners of the entire nation. Like, for instance, the very TSA security system. The president surely wants in place at airports and other entry points while in Beijing talks between the United States and China over the bitter trade dispute set to enter an unscheduled third day and the stakes are immense for both countries. And also for the health of the global economy. These are the first face to face discussions, the two sides of held since President Trump and g. Agreed to a ninety day truce in Argentina made last year. And here to discuss all of this is Larry Summers. The former Treasury Secretary in the Clinton administration and director of the National Economic Council under President Obama MRs secretary, welcome to the program. Good to be with you. Okay. So that whole lead up about the crisis the government shutdown, but the big big picture, of course, is the global economy. And that's where you come in. What is your prediction for what the negotiators have been doing up until now? Book. I think they have probably been clearing away underbrush in the negotiation. I'm sure they have resolved some issues. I'd be very surprised if they resolve all the issues, it's gotta be better that people are talking. It's gotta be better that people think it's worthwhile to continue the negotiations. I think the prospects are good, but not certain that some kind of agreement will be reached before the March first deadline, but let's not be confused. The real issues the question of whether the United States and China to countries with vast economic power, that's political power can happily coexist in the world. That's a question that's going to be defining international affairs for decades and come and even if we resolve this trade dispute, there's a great deal. That's ahead of us and one has to say that the degree of truculence that has been observed particularly on the American side is troubling. Let me ask you because we've seen with the wall and all the facts and counterfacts I mean, what the administration is saying about the wall on not born out by the facts. And what the president started to say at the very beginning of his administration that trade wars a good that they're easily winnable that we will win seems to have sort of also boxed him, but his what he said on Friday, just as this round of trade. Negotiations was gonna get underway. John is not doing well now, and it puts us in a very strong position. We are doing very well. But would take it in billions and billions of dollars. And I hope we're going to make a deal with China. And if we don't they're paying us tens of billions of dollars worth of tariffs. It's not the worst thing in the world. So there's a lot to unpick there. The this whole issue. He says China is doing badly. I think he implies worse than the United States in this trade war that gives him a very strong bargaining position. A strong negotiating hand. What do you make of that? What he said was mostly Malange of confusions to start with. We're taking in billions of dollars from American consumers and American businesses who are paying higher prices because of our tariffs. It's Americans who are paying these tariffs, not the Chinese second, the main problems, the Chinese economy have are the problems of changing a state enterprise economy into a market economy and the slowing does not primarily have to do with our tariffs. Third the president vastly overstates the comfort of our own economic position to look at consensus economic forecast. People are now saying there's a forty or fifty percent chance of recession within the next two years. That's the right. Reading of what financial markets are saying. So our. -sition isn't so strong. This whole idea that somehow trade wars are good things is really a very serious misjudgement. That's going to do a lot of damage to many of the people who the president professes to care to care most about yes, we should be addressing..

president President Trump China John United States Christiane Amanpour President Obama Larry Summers National Economic Council London Beijing Argentina Clinton administration director fifty percent ninety day two years
Lawrence Summers, Carlos Gutierrez and Mike Pompeo discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

02:10 min | 3 years ago

Lawrence Summers, Carlos Gutierrez and Mike Pompeo discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"And seven thirty am in hong kong nine thirty am here in sydney paul allen and i'm doug krizner at bloomberg world headquarters in new york at the top of the hour we'll get the open of cash markets in tokyo sydney and seoul in two hours time china hong kong and we'll be back from a holiday and i guess about an hour and a half taiwan will begin trading they had the dragon boat festival holiday yesterday so this is going to be the first opportunity for them for those markets to react to the escalating standoff on trade between china and the us and speaking of tension between the us and china z t will be a stock to watch in the china's session today shares have been clobbered since they resumed trading last week now the us senate has passed a defense bill that would reimpose us penalties on c t you might recall the president trump lifted sanctions on the company is part of a trade negotiator with china will have more on that story coming up in a moment when we check markets with bryan curtis right now this hour's top business stories is the war of words continues and is heating up between the us and china of a trade secretary of state mike pompeo today calling china's appeals for more trade over this quote a joke pompeo made those comments and mitch michigan where businesses would likely be hit hard by a trade war with china in the meantime makes commerce secretary carlos gutierrez says investors ignore trade developments at their own peril people are talking about whether we're going to be in a trade war whether a trade war is coming make no doubt the trade wars here we are in a trade war and i'm surprised that it's taken the market so long to recognize that guitarists is currently the coach at albright stonebridge group are got a warning today from the former us treasury secretary lawrence summers he says developed countries are not prepared for the next economic downturn and he says that central banks should be wary of raising interest rates just because inflation is slightly hot google is investing five hundred fifty million dollars in cash in china's jd dot com that's says the us.

Lawrence Summers Carlos Gutierrez Mike Pompeo President Trump Senate Seoul Tokyo Bloomberg World Google Hong Kong Albright Stonebridge Group Mitch Michigan Bryan Curtis Donald Trump
 Flea-Market App Mercari Jumps More Than 70% in Tokyo Debut

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Flea-Market App Mercari Jumps More Than 70% in Tokyo Debut

"A m tuesday morning right here in hong kong members shot celebrity and i'm bryan curtis we've got an hour and a half to go before we get trading started in tokyo sydney and seoul and then three hours before hong kong and shanghai opened up futures flat australian futures up but for the china markets and hong kong and taiwan could get a little ugly today i ate really trade on these trade tensions boiling over so we'll see with doug krizner he'll step in just a moment but for now the top stories we're gonna warnings from former us treasury secretary lawrence summers says developed countries are not prepared for the next economic downturn and he says central banks should be wary of raising interest rates just because inflation is slightly halt and speaking of hot the war of words between the united states and china over trade is heating up secretary of state mike pompeo pay mike pompeo weighed in today he called china's appeals for more trade openness a joke pompeo was commenting in michigan where businesses would likely be hard hit by a trade war with china in the meantime x commerce secretary carlos gutierrez says that investors ignore trade developments at their peril people are talking about whether we're going to be the trade war whether a trade war is coming make no doubt the trade wars here we are in a trade war and i'm surprised that it's taken the market so long to recognize that gutierrez is currently co chair at albright stonebridge group google investing five hundred fifty million dollars in cash into china's jd dot com that says the us giant pushes deeper into online commerce do companies plan to explore joint development of retail solutions in south east asia the united states and europe while big japanese tech ipo debuts today we're talking here about macari which you might describe as sort of combination of ebay and oetzi startup is already valued at a billion dollars bloomberg's david and glass in tokyo says there's a lot of excitement about it today incites basically says you have about two hundred forty unicorns in the world one hundred fifteen of those in the us seventy in china nine india two in japan this is the other one of the two and i'm sure you haven't even heard if the other one preferred network so it is a big deal here is the biggest tech ipo since line listed about two years ago all right well what we have also is essentially a mixed and for us stocks probably more down than anything else got more from bloomberg's charlie pellett in this wall street wrap it was a mixed day on wall street with the dow and snp lower nasdaq advanced amid the escalating protectionist standoff between china and the united states greg valliere is chief global strategist at horizon investments at some point i think somebody is going to have to cry uncle and i think these terrorists hurt china germany much of the eu more than they heard us so at some point they may relent they may agree to some compromises but sadly we're not there i think this story gets worse before it gets better the s and p five hundred index down five a drop of two tenths of one percent the dow down one hundred three down four tenths of one percent nasdaq off by half a point in new york charlie pellett all right we've got some breaking action and also look at the markets here thirty three minutes past the hour let's get right over to doug krizner in a rebuke ryan to president trump the us senate has voted to pass the defense authorization bill that restores penalties on the chinese telecommunications giant z t e we'll have more on that as we continue here on daybreak asia and energy stocks we were talking about overall weakness in the us equity market energy proved to be the bright spot that we had crude oil trading higher by one point two percent in new york recovering from a big selloff in the friday session we were down about two point eight percent we've got this key opec meeting coming up and producer said to be discussing a smaller than expected boost to oil production wti right now sixty five seventy six so you wanna know what we're likely to face australia in about an hour and twenty five minutes from now i know the.

Bryan Curtis Hong Kong One Percent Five Hundred Fifty Million Dol Thirty Three Minutes Twenty Five Minutes Billion Dollars Eight Percent Three Hours Two Percent Two Years