17 Burst results for "Lawrence Stone"

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Muller. Muller was was born I think eight, hundred, seventy, nine, I'm not mistaking. Can I think he died in the nine thousand nine, hundred, sixty, one or sixty two I think okay. I may be wrong. For a couple of years but that's pretty much from eighteen eighty to nineteen sixties. I think motor was aiding seventy nine to sixty, one, sixty, two something like that. Okay. and It was pretty much the same era as a as of George Lawrence Stone who lived around the same time. And it also was about the same time that that very influential Swiss drummers in educators were. Were alive working like like the late great doctor fence. Bagga. Who was one of say v most influential Swiss drumming guys chur he I learned a little bit about the The world of Swiss drummers when Mark Beecher was on the show great rudimentary. Drummer. About learning about the Swiss army and all that cool stuff So that's neat. Now, obviously, you are a very close student with Jim. So why don't we kind of an in a parallel fashion? Maybe talk about molar and then his his students right which. Might be a naive thing to say but so chairman was a direct student of molar correct. Yes that's that's correct it should also be mentioned that. that Jim was a relatively late student of of Sanford Motor and I mentioning that because. There are quite some differences between the early students of or relatively early students of Sanford Molar like for instance, say Gene Krupa. WHO's method of movement is quite different from what from what? Jason Used to do. but but Moeller was always heavily into teaching and he was a seemed to be a very strict teacher and the he you must've been a tough a tough cookie. I should think. I mean, it wasn't just it wasn't just the teaching that that molar was. was absorbed with He also built drums. And the story goes he would only sell you a drum if you would play for him and if Mola with think you're no good, he would not sell you the drum no man from from today's perspective and and aspects of marketing possibly not that smart but. What it was good for now meant, he must have had a ton of students obviously, but these guys who their name lives on for you know. Like the next hundred years, you must have a you must spread your name and your lessons a lot over the years. Yeah and and I mean molar he he he must have been very strict guy. I mean you possibly heard about the the the same as March to Boston where he he marched from from Say. Around. Two hundred. Forty Miles I mean obviously not in one go but every step on the on the march, he was playing the drums in a while as he was of under the impression that drumming should be an Olympic discipline. Wanted to be drumming. Olympic, man no kidding. Yeah. No I haven't heard that that's wilder and just as a as a side note was that I think molar was also a member of the polar bear club which included the aspect of him say a swimming swimming the ice water in winter you would break the ice jump in and..

Sanford Molar Muller. Muller Jim Swiss army Mola chairman Moeller Sanford Motor George Lawrence Stone Gene Krupa Mark Beecher Boston Jason
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"I'll go to this great classical percussionist, George Lawrence stone, and I'll become classical percussionist. And it was really hurt that stone said that he told me that he was really hurt by that because he wanted to. He really had his eyes set on that being legitimate percussionist and But you know with his studies would stone. Stone, really helped him with. Developing his reflects. developing his. Sound. Natural. Body motion the level system allowing the sticks to work for you allowing this third do the work. You your body to accept the natural rebound. And that and all of that was through. You know the pillar of percussion really where we all begin our studies percussion, which is control and Joe was again a naturally curious hard working disciplined person. So he would take those exercises and stick control. And if you go through the whole book. You'll notice that you won't find a single accent in that book. It's it's it's sticking patterns. For. Control. And for if you repeat each line. Twenty Times. It's also book that will help you develop your single stroke roll your double stroke roll. And your clothes role, and then there's a section on slams. So. But really, the foundation of the book is the first three pages pages five, six and seven. Yeah and so what Jo would do is he would. He would practice diligently practice the exercises that stone gave him But then when he took them home, he practiced somebody also experimented with him and added accents different accent patterns. With the sticking that were written. Just to vary it up a little bit sure would bring those those patterns back to stone his show him. What he did with less material in stone was always very knocked out and encouraged encourage Jodi continue to do. These types of patterns and continue to experiment with these types of patterns and and stone write them down. and. These patterns eventually became stone second book which he dedicated the Joe Oh. Wow. I didn't know that accents and rebounds. Yeah so Joe would refer to stick control as. Stick control accents and rebounds and Joe's first technical method.

George Lawrence stone Joe Oh Jo Jodi
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Make my own course with a different instrument. Tosh, such a big jump. It's not like you went from violin to you know I'm not GonNa achieve that I'm going to play the cello now. It's going I'm going to just it's apples and oranges. It's such a big jump but it it obviously worked out one of his wife most famous students the original drummer in the PAT metheny group. Danny Gottlieb. Yeah. He got his start. On Cello. So he teachers e I played cello and then. Switched to drums. I think he started playing drums around nineteen sixty eight and started studying with show in nineteen, sixty nine. Well. So and again, Danny has incredible technique as well very, very fast reflexes and great finger technique too. So that could be there could be something there with with learning. You know learning a string instrument and having that technical facility with your fingers finger strength. Dexterity control. Yeah. I've heard a lot about Danny from from I'm taking lessons right now people listen to the show that I've I've been taking lessons with Barry. James who has a Student of George Lawrence Stone And he was telling me a lot about how Danny's just the you know a great, you know drummer and very, very great student. Let's on that note. Good Transition. Let's talk about maybe I'm assuming it because it predates the Brubeck days I think let's talk about. How we got into lessons with the Great George Lawrence Stone, the author of stick control and accents rebound. So let's how how did that happen? Well. He studied with Joseph Jett for a period of time and upshur my understanding with the Joseph was a real. Disciplinarian taskmaster. Interviews I've read But he took show so far and He's also sounded like a humble man in. Interviews that I read about about Joseph Chicken. He recommended that that Joe Study with with George Lawrence Stone go study with stone. And so joe would. would. By bus from Springfield Massachusetts.

Danny Gottlieb George Lawrence Stone Great George Lawrence Stone Joseph PAT metheny Joseph Jett Joe Study Joseph Chicken Tosh Springfield Brubeck Massachusetts Barry James
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"But a habit. There is a growing realization science that few people are born gifted. It takes time and persistence to be world class. Anything always remember you can be brilliant. You just must stick with whatever it is. You want to be brilliant at. Do What you love and love what you do wishing you a lifetime of happy drumming sincerely Berry James for George Lawrence stone and Joe. Morello very well said they're berry. I love that that's a great. Ending to the book, I just ruined the end of the book for everyone. Thank you what I really appreciated and. Kudos to you because what you're doing right now, the break gift to drummer that I hope more and more I was listening to your podcast going to guide. You got some fantastic interviews with some of the best burgers. Of and I'm sure you've enjoyed you know interviewing them. I ENJOY OUR MR zillions the interview. I've enjoyed Tom Glenrothes than interview with you, and by the way down, has been very kind and helpful to me in getting this book out there to the to the public to the public, and I'm thankful to him and so many other drummers. have been pushing the book as well and It's my bucket list now just to get it to as many people as I can, and we're since we can't get out to the store to everybody and the. then. I'm going to do as much as I can sure. Time I've got left to try to you know. Remind everybody about this great man, George Stone and just what he's. His, teaching and how I'll read, it would be if everybody just got into the technique played it, and they'll just play better than. What. Is Introduction said he said. Get this book by it. Play! Study it. You'll play better. Easy is that. That's awesome Berry, and before we go, we both need to give a huge. Thank you to your friend. Tony Smothers for getting US connected. He reached out and got all this set up on your behalf and got us connected and i. just think that's very cool. And and like I said we've been. We've been talking for months Tony. And I and we finally got it altogether and so a big. Thank you to Tony. Yeah Tony The great guy and A. Very fine drummer really well. Oh cool great, so everyone out. There can get in touch with Berry at Berry James, drummer at gmail.com, and then like you said I'll give out your phone number Berry. Because you. You did before, so it's it's. Erica three, two, one, two, nine, seven, three, zero, four two, and you can study with the Great Berry James. Berry, thank you for coming on the show. Thank you so much. Thank you for doing what you're doing. It's just wonderful and just I. Just keep it up and I look forward to speaking with you again and maybe go into a lesson to perfect thanks berry dot wonderful. Thank you so much. Thanks for checking out this episode with Berry, James Barry mentioned one thing to me. after the episode that I. Think is cool to add on to this. That maybe didn't get through in the actual interview this is Joe. Morello's last book that he worked on before he passed away. so I think that's pretty important, and is just something worth noting Also I have talked on the phone with Barry Multiple Times after we did this interview just for fun about his stories, and all kinds of stuff like that so I am going to be doing some lessons with Barry via skype and I'll report back to you guys how it's Goin probably on Instagram but I. Just again. I recommend trying to get some lessons with him if you can via skype. At the email address, which will be in the description as well so thanks for listening and tune in next week. If you like this podcast, find me on social media at drum history and please share rate a review and let me know topics that you would like to learn about the future. Until next time keep on learning. This is a.

Berry James Berry Great Berry James George Lawrence stone Morello Tony Smothers James Barry Joe skype Tom Glenrothes Instagram Erica
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"What stone that said to him fifty years ago. With amazing to me, they listen to him. But, you're absolutely right now. The other thing is that that's interesting, too, is and and both Danny Gottlieb in his article for the stone family, which is a great to read. If you WANNA read on website, go stone. The, Stone LLC and and read what the family is. Put up there and what Don. And Danny Godly put up there originally when when you know, stone was teaching. He used to look at the at the balanced point of this. Balance It on your fingers, and that's your thumb and finger would go. That's where we go in the in you know in the web of the left hand and right end kids. To play the the. You know the the the traditional breath and so. WH- by the time I got the study with him, and of course all the jazz, drummers, buddy, rich gene group, and so forth they would hold this lower. You know right at the balance point of the state, and that's where they would get their the technique and the speed, and in the case of both super enrich and Louis Belt, and all the guy. They would get it from the balanced point of the steak well by the time. I thought it was so. Rock and roll started happening. You know the end the R&B and then rock and roll would come about, and and then stone said well, you know yeah I? Don't know whether we can use the balance point of the fulcrum point of the sick. Now we may have because we gotta hit the drum harder now. You know than just playing jazz, which is a software music now we're going to be fighting. Electronic Instruments Electric. Amplifiers and huge speakers we've been. We've been a change the whole point, so he would find the balance point of the stick, and that's what I show in the book and we would reach back for the button by modern ish. And then we would have a lot more. In the stick, so joe and I talked about that. Many times and Joe agreed that you know instead of showing the old method in the book we show the method that stone you know. Finally came up with which was just moving this back an inch from the balance point. Is I'm on both six, and therefore you would have more strength in you know you'd be. You wouldn't be hitting the nail with a hammer by holding. The hand the handle of the hammer about halfway up, you know. You'd have you'd have more. Clout if you will sure you more room out amusing. Go. Another way that stolen evolved over the years. Absolutely you read. My mind was a lot of guys. Would would I feel like in his position? If you're seventy years old, we go rock and roll. Know what the what the Hell's rock and roll. We're not changing for that, but he sees it as I want my technique to live on forever, so let's evolve and That's just so cool. He seems like a really great guy in general, just a nice guy and also very. Careful. He was wonderful. I think back on him, and I say I should've practiced more when I was with. We all. Instead of doing the college social thing you know your. Didn't you all over the place? You know at that time that they'd hire the. They ll so many so many music students between Berkeley and Boston University and the conservatory. ME. All over the place all lying. That's funny. Let me ask you this one more question than I wanna read this conclusion, we'll read again where people can find you, and and hopefully sign up for lessons with obviously one of the the masters of the stone technique, but. So! I have played traditional grip every once in a while I do it with brushes, but when I'm actually playing with a drumstick I just feel like I can't get the right power and I'm working on it, but. Will, I do better if I practice stick control, traditional grip, versus just using matched grip or Am I okay doing it either way. I think you're find doing it either way and I think that's with Mrs Stone. Point was in not forcing you to do one. Technique over the other and he said many times. You Know I. Want you to play with what's comfortable with you. You know if you're planes. Decided when you roll, and you're trying to get a nice mood, bothers role. You're the used to call it a. you know weeping free or they'll helicopter. Where you come in from the side, and you and you buzz that way. If you want power and you WANNA, poke in dog, you play up straight up and down so same thing goes for what regardless of the genre music playing. If you're playing jazz, I would say traditional grip works best. If you playing, you know rudimentary stuff outside in drumline. Many many of the drumline in high school and college still play they. They have the federal sprite traditional grip. And Yet You know the rockers, though the guys that are playing rock, they'll play match up and it's works just as well. The guys that are playing funk music you know. Music oftentimes news matched grip, and in that was stones whole thing at particularly when when rocket. The the marketplace, he said No. You'RE GONNA need more power, and you get more power out of A. Script and you will get out of traditional or even get more finesse. Oughta on the traditional grip. and. A whole. Today. Whatever works playing all, but you know depends on the genre music playing. Yeah, no, that's that makes sense that again. He's a pretty flexible guy. so we'll. Obviously way ahead of his time I mean he's still probably ahead of time. a even even now so All right before i. read this conclusion because I think it is really neat and I think that's a great way to kind of wrap up this episode so again for everyone out there I, highly recommend this book. It's called drum lessons with George Lawrence Stone by Berry James With Joe, Morello and I think people who listen to this show that I typically don't do things run like Oh, someone's got a product and they wanna come on the show. Let's talk about it and spotlight it. It's this is a very special book from. A Very Special person who actually has a lot of experience and it's it's one of the most historical kind of peace pieces of work that. I think in drumming, that's out there as far as a book, go so. I think if people google, they can probably find it right, and then it's. It's sold through Alfred or you can find out at Alfred. Dot Com al F.. R., E., D., and if I'm not mistaken berry, right, it's it doesn't the backyard's 14.99. Is that right? Yeah? On Amazon. Dot Com as well okay boy. That's an affordable That's an affordable book so you. You're not breaking the bank by buying this and you can actually learn from. From one of the the masters himself, so let me read this conclusion here, so we can all learn why. groundwork is so important in the mobile. Close it out here Berry so. Says conclusion why all this groundwork. The question arises. Is All this groundwork necessary? Many young drummer will say I never had to go through this step by step preparation I picked up drumming as I went along. It came naturally to me and I'm pretty good at it. The answer is simple. Pretty good isn't enough. In this era of keen competition and understanding audiences, a drumbeat or solo today must be more than a spasmodic conglomeration of bumps and thumps banged down helter skelter on a set of skins and symbols it must carry a message a message inspired by the players, thoughts and clarified by their knowledge and application of rhythmic structure, and this is where the preliminary training comes in quote, careful, considered and continued practice of such combinations offered. Offered here and in my books, stick control and accents and rebounds will with interpretation aid in the development of a pair of smart hands. Quote George Lawrence Stone in the back to you? We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence therefore is not an act,.

George Lawrence Stone Berry James Stone LLC Joe Danny Gottlieb Danny Godly Don Point Louis Belt Electronic Instruments Electri Berkeley google Boston University Amazon Morello
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

07:29 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"You know, give some information. That would be helpful to them. Going there, check they yeah, this is the protect the it's above any other book is. This is the control book and. What we wanted to do is make a companion book to stick control and in. Explained Narrative, -Ly how. Stone came his ideas and what he taught us and the thing that he said. I think we've captured that pretty well. I think you have as well and it's just It's. The the very end of the book it says why all this groundwork and I just think it's it's. Like it's just so important, and it goes into detail her, but it's just very important that everything builds on the right foundation. Kazan or as people say. You should probably read that conclusion because that stone dome sort of put it all in perspective there, why don't we let's save that for the? We'll end this episode with that conclusion. I think that'll be. That'll be cool and that I think is really neat is. Is You as you go. Through I marked the other day when I was reading through this. You get little bits of information from guys like obviously you, but the cool thing is. Is You get to hear basically from people who are no longer with us like George, Lawrence Stone, and Joe Morello, little bits and facts like Joe Morello's thoughts on the use of a metronome. We kind of talked about a metre before it says Joe Morello a metronome will help you to rhythmically to be rhythmically accurate. It will not teach you to swing. The metronome can be used to gauge your development. It should not be used as a challenge. That's just that goes against what I. Sometimes think where I think. Oh, man! I need to raise the BPM today I need to. I need to beat myself and I know a lot of people. I don't think there's any wrong way to do it. You know what I mean I think you can. You can use a metronome to push you. Whatever gets you play in the drum is the most important thing, but just to get at its. Point! That's a very good point and. In my teaching I found this and Joe and I discussed this at length what we were talking about that article on the metronome. The Joe put in there for the most part, and and that's this. What happens is in and like I. as I said to you, we use a metronome for the I. Guess the first who year that I was there in the half of the next year. And then he sort of weaned. Be off it. You know because what happens is and I've found it with my own students. If I thought them on a Metronome, keep them D'Amato metronome, and then all of a sudden. I say okay. Let's play this ties with other metronome. Sometimes, not always sometimes they haven't built that clock. Yeah, and and they con- you know the the metronome becomes they a crutch and it and it stops them from feeling the music and I. think that's the point that Joe Maiden article is that it will? It will help you. Building an o'clock, but then you have to maintain that clock yourself. and. Very very important in you hit on a very good point here. Enjoying I discussed it in when he put it in the metronome. What he was saying is don't let the metronome. Bia Crutch be able to play with the metronome. be able to play without the metro and still keep good solid time. Yeah absolutely! When you look through this, it's It's very reasonable to do I I don't know it's if you go page by page, and and like I said to you that I so personally and I explain this to you on the phone, but just everyone kind of knows. I grew up playing in rock. A on drumming for my whole life basically got into audio engineering still played the drums, but I i. really didn't get that I. stopped going to drum lessons when I was in like eighth grade and But then I started teaching other friends and kids when I was like seventeen, and I really didn't have the fundamental like right now. I would have no confidence in my reading. So what my plan is is hopefully to work with you Burian and work on my reading, and and just being able to go page by page in this book but I do think stick controls pretty easy. It's rights and. And lefts and I say that I should pause. It's not easy to do because there's a ton of different stuff. It's easy to start with because it's mainly rights and laughs, and I love how there's the it's somewhere in here. There's the hourglass where it's left. Left left left left left right row, and then it just kind of tapers down the middle and gets bigger very fun exercises And I like how in your book again, which is drum lessons with George Lawrence Stone. There's photographs to kind of help you of the starting position on the way down open finger slightly. We're doing the rebound strokes there's. There's a little bit of. It explains what you would be you now what you'd be doing and it's really nice to have a little bit of that that extra some supplement to the original, which is very cool. Sure, thank you very much and that that's when you hit on again. a main major point and that is this. Stick Control Book at you say look simple to start off, but if you get into the book as an example, what you always talking about when we first met, and he said that about well, how about the lot of pages where stones teaches numbered roles? Singles doubles and buzzes. you know as as a as an exercise well in the back of the book it shows you know. In six eight time show are enforced wartime, even a cut time it'll show three notes three eight dollars and then. Fourteen six. Thirty second notes and you say well, you count back. And that's that's the the main thing that sticks to a lot of drum teachers I've had so many calls over the is not from drummers, but from teachers and okay. How do you count that? What teen against three you know and I would expect it to him. Yeah, still encountered it, and and that's where that's where the rub lie, then they control because you get to a certain. Part part of sticking, so it's just about where flam section stock, because the Flam section is very important that book. It takes you from one level to another level, and that's you know right after the triplets and the rules and so forth. However because. The whole idea of right there was so they could see in stone's own words. You remember this book is not much. You know the book is not much. Written by us, we clarify things during the lesson, but most of it is taken right from stone right from his own words in the that he did in the international musician where he would explain things. To to drummers, who would write him letters and and so we just sort of cold everything together when he was talking about Jews and You know whether it be Flam drag the rough drag clash Ross We would explain that, but not with US explaining we will go through the stone. Articles inlet stolen. Explain it just like he to to us. And if we came up with something, Willey also said that he's right didn't write the article. At that in in Joe as I, said that such a great memory, then he could remember what almost.

Lawrence Stone Joe Morello Joe George Lawrence Stone Joe Maiden US Bia Crutch Kazan Willey George
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"I'll publish a book for You I'll help you publish a book, and that's how stick control came about and Ludwig Finance. Sticking. Know, who can now stick control? After eighty years eighty, three eighty four years is still selling according to Alfred, my publisher and publish stick until or distributed control, anyway, the publishers it and the stone family and And it's still selling about twenty two thousand copies a year. Ma'am. Yeah. That's more than most of the yeah. That's more than most people can sell. Wow! I love hearing that too that he didn't set out and say I'm going to write a book. It was just like a hey. You got something. I feel like some of the best things in any area of life are. Hey, you might have something here. You should do this when they're just doing it in a in a pure kind of like. Oh, these are just my. These are just my notes for students kind of thing And yet a bottle, the lightning, so all right? Let's talk about yearbook because you sent me a copy of this and signed it. which is I gotta be honest now. One of my like you know prized possessions just to have this. It's called drum lessons with George Lawrence stone, and it's by James with Joe Morello so. You can explain this better, but you basically just did where where stick control can be. Interpreted in a lot of different ways, and it's kind of a famous book for saying that beat people say you can look at it, and then you can get go through it really quick and not really get its full potential. Unless you have a teacher who knows how to actually. You know show you how to use it, so your book is A. Example of how to use stick control right? Yeah, that's what we started out to do. Here's here's how this all happened Joe Morello came to town to apply Mont to all rather. Danny Gottlieb was living here at the time and he married a lovely. Lady percussionist fast who is with the symphony here and also taught at the University of Central, Florida and and they met I believe Akwa. The. At Epcot Center when they were doing the Christmas show there and They traveled together now and I'll tell you a little bit about that, but Danny and best brought joe in to do a clinic. And He just knocked everybody out on the clinic and and He knew that I had studied with stone, Dan. He told him that I'd be there and we got together after the clinic was over and we were walking down. We're going to go get some coffee. That's what we started out getting. We got a little something more than coffee. Something else Joel Berry said. Have you haven't done a clinic or a math class or even even you know professional you know lesson with other teachers and somebody always asked plenty play page before forty six and in sticking. And I think it happens all the time because they control of the book completely exercise is no explanation whatsoever as the play those exercise so. When I told me he said we ought to write a book on how to play the book. He was joking and I said you WANNA he said Yeah you WANNA and so we've changed telephone numbers that night, and I sort of pushed him into it and we we We had a wonderful conversation about our love for joy stone, and how much he had done for both our careers, you know Joe Joe across with an internationally recognized drums star, and I had had very great career as a teacher and teaching this. This phone then, and it was all because of George stone and so joe and I decided to write a book well. Joel, you know being blind. He couldn't do any research. That was my job so for the first three years after that, so I started researching everything I could find about stone, and when I found out that the in and I did remember after awhile that stolen written for the international musician. On a monthly basis, and the and the and it was called Technica Percussion. And was article, so I had been president of the musicians union here for a couple of years and I use my juice to get into the archives that in New, York of the and pick out all of these articles, and they assigned the lady to work with me, and she photocopy all of those articles for all of those years from about ninety I. Actually we got one from nineteen forty one. The book only shows forty six, but I found a couple of articles from nineteen, forty, one and forty two but from nineteen forty six, about I wanna say nineteen, sixty, three or four stone almost on a monthly basis. You do a few more minutes. but about the technique percussion, so we that stuff we've. Juxtaposed over the. You know the stick control book. And Joe and I had weekly conversations about will. This fit will fit because we want. And it turned out to be. We were looking at some calling stick control to the turned out. It turned out to be lessened with your stone, and we just came across things, and he would mention saying that he remembered from his life. Fifty years ago. That I couldn't remember from Mine and enjoy happy memory elephant I swear he. He couldn't remember. Things that stone had taught him. In the nineteen forties, nineteen, forty, eight, forty nine. You know wow and. I was ten years after that when I said it was so and so with between Joe's memory, and in in monitoring me, and in just helping me along all those years. We Gonna put together almost you know. Three quarters of the book at that point, unfortunately jobs hot the way while we were doing this and so. The book go for a couple of years I just put it on the show, and then I had from our friends of mine and so much family dot, pushing me a little bit so I ended up finishing the book myself. thanks to the stone family they. Helped me get the contract with Alfred publishing which. International Music, publisher and so now I'm being so with sick and troll and accents and rebounds and I'm sold on. Amazon and I'm so by Alford Nj. Pepper and and It's just wonderful the book selling very very well, my next. Issue was going to be that I wanted to take this book on the road, so to speak, and I wanted my my list about his to go on the road and teach the stone method. And the you know the introduction to stone anyway to new you know some of the younger players that are out there and go into the. Guitar, Senators, and Sam ashes and the MOM and pop type music stores well, the pandemic sort of Failed all of that of course, so now on teaching it on skype. And signing up. You know quite a few drummers I've had a gentleman from. Australia. CALL ME IN STUDYING WITH ME A. Lot of people from all over the place including the students that I had here in the local studio where occasion and Quite a few of those, if stolen, so I've got a pretty much a fulltime job. Now just teaching online and I'm hoping that others will join me and they can recreate Barry James Drummer at gmail.com. or at three, two, one, two, nine, seven, three, zero, four two. That'd be happy to speak with any of them and hopefully..

Joe Joe George Lawrence stone Joe Morello publisher Danny Gottlieb Barry James Joel Berry Ludwig Finance Alfred Epcot Center Australia Florida Alfred publishing Sam ashes Dan Amazon University of Central skype president
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Was. Going to publish the twenty fifth anniversary of the magazine. They decided to do a An article on the best books ever written, and so they contacted all of main drummers, big-name drummers in the country, but whether they were rock. Drummers jazz drummer, a country drummers from Nashville or they were studio. Drummers symphonic rumurs and they. sent him out a questionnaire and the question. There was just you know. What do you consider the best twenty five drum books of all time? and which ones do you use? Do you recommend? And when the results of that of that questionnaire came back, stick control was voted by almost every one of them, and I think there were about one hundred drummer quizzed on this and role by stone came back as the best chromebook of the era Continue you that way for some eighty three eighty four years now. so. Just taking a look at that, and realizing that it's the gold standard of drumming, and that many many many many students have particularly drumline rudimentary drummers. Have studied. Secondhand from that book. it was just I'm very proud to have said that I had that opportunity that he would miss the stone quite by accident because I didn't know who I might be studying with. Once I got into college and I spent foyer with the. Genius. Comes down to well, and you also had vic firth there. That's pretty amazing on its own as well I. mean he he's. He's no Slouch, right? For sure for sure and Were You know many drummers studying with Mr. Stone at the time and as years went by and I, continued to teach the method stones method I found out that it really worked I mean there's just something about the way that book is laid out the just takes you progressively through the steps. That will really train your hand, yeah! Fine Drummer by the name of Dan Gottlieb who was Joe Morello's protege Road, an interesting article when Joe Pass Away, and he said that Joe and I mentioned me in the article as well with teaching. The gold standard of drumming, which would allow any person at all any drummer to gain control in speed and strength in their hands and endurance by studying that method in by studying the stick control method. And, he's absolutely right. That's exactly what that does for you. As I went through it in its various forms in stone would teach it many ways and I'll I'll go into that a little bit with you The What what became apparent to me when I went out to teach, myself is by teaching that method. It's just helped everybody that I am I. Promise I get to the point where I think. Student I said I will promise you that. If you go through this book with me when you come out the other end, your hands will be super, strong and super fast, and you will have complete control of your limbs, and because we use the actually play the they control with our feed, and I think dom in his interview with you mentioned that yeah honestly. So. That, that's the, that's the book that the Classic Book was voted that way mind, drummer and I found that over the years to be just. What's every beginning student needs? And it's it's been working for me for many years. Well. I find it fascinating to that that it's. It's lived on for so long because it's not. I think it falls in the timeless category where it's not like. Let's say it's not eighty dollars, bass, drum techniques, or you could even say double Bass Drum. Texan techniques for speed metal, which would be very. It's still current, but like they're you know this is. This is very timeless, and you can use it forever and and I mean I've played the drums for most of my life, and I've been slowly going through it, and hopefully we'll be taking a few lessons online with you just again, because dom in our interview, really He. He really got in my mind. The hold the lineage of teachers going from Stone Gladstone and molar that it's a very special thing to be able to take a lesson from someone who took a lesson from the previous person, and it keeps going down and down and down, so I think that's really cool now. Can I ask you real quick so when you're doing the lessons. With George Lawrence Stone. You would get there. Did you spend most well first off? Let's just go super simple, were they? Were they half hour lessons? Were they an hour where you learn all? Yes, they were our into turned out with him. It was always more than half an hour. You know. I was around when the morning remember took the subway down was place, and he didn't have any other, maybe until two o'clock or so, and so he would give me an hour and fifteen minutes an hour an hour and a half lesson. and. Hit An interesting. Thing about that, too. When I started re. Doing Research for my book, which is called. Drum lessons with George Lawrence stone and Joe Morello when I worked on. It together I started researching some of the things. You know his articles and having Barrow mentioned this, too. He had. Written many many articles for the international musician, which is the, union? The Musicians Union magazine and I was able to go and do some research and pull all of those out of there and You've been some of them to Barbara who his stones granddaughter lived in New Mexico and She now has finished with her with her cousins and Estonian family book the down. We've mentioned called tactics percussion, which every one of the article, and so and I went through the articles I gone to New York and pick them up some years ago and showing I went through them and the cost Joe was blind, so he would have. Somebody one of his blooms. Ours wife read the Article Stuart Moore, I would read the articles to over the phone, and that's how we came about. Coming up with thirty lessons by stone in our book. And What I found is his his I'm just wondering. Give you an example of how this man evolved over. The is one of the early lessons in the nineteen forty. was, somebody who had asked him a question about. If you're left handed, should you be playing left-handed? Traditional grip or should you be playing right hand in and at that time, he said. No I believe you should continue to play right handed. using the left hand as you're now, you're strongest. Hand will help you. With the traditional grip you know motion, and and it would be the best way to go well. It's fast forward now. Ten twelve years and I show up in in his office in a studio for a lesson at the end of the lesson since he didn't come to the campus, I used to have to sign a receipt, so he could get paid by the university. And so after maybe the third or fourth last with him, and by the way, my drum teacher in high school believe in in that same theory that you play right engine, even though you left hand than then I am Los Angeles. So I. Learned to play drums right handed, and so when I showed up at stones, and then we will, of course everything in those days was a traditional grip. Cry showed up at stone. Studio I.

George Lawrence Stone Joe Morello Stone Gladstone Nashville vic firth Los Angeles Dan Gottlieb Stuart Moore Musicians Union Barrow New York New Mexico Barbara
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Look into the drum history podcast I'm your host Bart E and today I am beyond honored to be joined by Berry. James, who is the last living student of George? Lawrence Stone who is still teaching this method berry welcome to the show. Thank you bought. It's a pleasure. This is so cool We've been working on getting you on the show here for a little bit and I'm glad we finally got it going Man That is and you're eighty one years old. Correct all. While and I just love how you're still very actively teaching and we. We spoke earlier about how during the corona virus the covid nineteen stuff you're using skype, and just still chugging along, which is just amazing where we're lucky to have you teaching still. Well. Thank you, so it's. It's the only way to stay young exactly. Now what I WANNA do. Today is really just hear the stories about what it was like to learn from George Lawrence Stone. And I want to preface all of this with there's an episode. I did with Tom Formula About. the history, and basically the biography of George Lawrence Stone, and we can briefly go over that a little bit, but. If you WANNA learn more a deep dive into his entire life, and all that stuff. You can check out that episode. That was a little bit before this one, but so berry. Why don't you just tell us? What was it like to learn from him? And in what? How did it happen, right? It was at college when when it used to take it away. Yes after high school I auditioned for and got into Boston University s FAA's Hula find applied off. WHO's music on theater in the same school? And the one of the first things that I happen to be as I went into school. What was going on at that time? There were a lot of musicians of all the playing all instruments, but the drummer's I was most interested in. We're getting out of the military band after the Korean War, and at that point in time they had the you know the Gi Bill, which allowed these folks these musicians, and and all of the military to be able to go onto college in be paid for that to be paid for by the government. So you know I'm thinking. I'm pretty heavy Did very well in high school in the drum corps and and competitions, rudimentary competition and I thought I was hot stuff until I got up the Boston University and the first week and All these folks that in the military band for four years and they just blew me away well. We had a choice at that time of three Stopped, members or teacher there and one of them with the big for. Another one was boxed. Smith who, with the campus, with the Boston, Symphony Orchestra at that time and the third Drum teacher. With the school was George Lawrence Stone. And I I sat down in the practice room one day with one of the military. drummers that came out here at me play and he said you need to go study with your stone. You need to work on your techniques. And I thought well all right so I got in touch with Mr. Stone and I signed up for lessons with him at the time. He didn't come up the campus. You used to have to take a subway county his. studio, which was on Hanover Street Boston and pre old district and he was on the second floor in an old building. Ramshackle building all gone now. Now where the Quincy Marketplaces and some of your listeners might know that when market marketplace, it's a tourist attraction in Boston and stone studio was right there on the second floor, his dad used to use the first floor George Birth. Stone to actually manufactured from any of the Jordan Wolves stone from our world famous. You know and very expensive. On the back cover of my book and we'll talk more about that You see a picture of a George Bird stone from circa. I would say nineteen ten. owned by a friend of mine here near Orlando and He allowed me to take a picture of it, so I could put it in the book, and it really is an example of of really Martin. Drum making at the time, so George Lawrence Son was helped his dad in the store and then wanted to dad passed away. They sold the business to the. Drum company, who continued for some years and George continued teaching on the second floor of his building, so that's where I ended up each week picking subway down with store in going up and taking less lessons than the boss he started, everybody would stick control and that he had had published, and I believe it was nineteen thirty five. And this was nineteen fifty seven by the way time I went with him. He also had a very famous student there by the name of Joe. Morello, who at that time with with the Dave Brubeck Quartet? And and had made the you know numerous records in was considered probably, and was voted actually by Dombi magazine, and back into the best in the world at the time, and he was into a lot of the odd time signatures, and so forth very modern guy and We'll talk more about Joe as we go along, but JOE was. You know Georgia lowered stones, protege and they work together so about ten years you know not lessons only, but you know working together on various books, including accents and rebounds, which was stolen second book and much of that book was done with articles and exercises. By Joe Morello. In any event I started as an eighteen year old, going into Boston and to tell you the truth when you're eighteen years old. Realize what you're studying with. You know and I think with four years I got out and people would say to me, you know drummers would say to me well. You studied with stone, man, he the best the best in the country. How was that lie and I was just my trump teacher. You Know I. I think I know his reputation when I was studying with I, would been very intimidated. But stone with very easygoing gentleman, he wore a tie and a suit jacket to in even while he was teaching most of the time. and. I I just went in and I, thought it studying the sick control book, and even though I thought I had good technique chops when I got in there, but the time I got out, they would just superlative compared to when I went in the before years earlier so between the control, and he had just come out with accents and rebounds the time, and we did some work with that in my third and fourth year with him. He was just a wonderful gentleman. He was kind he was generous. and. There was no attitude at all. He would never give you hell if you didn't practice. He just say something like Hey Barry I. See it in putting much practices week. And that was my. Clue to get work in the next week and yet it on. You know You know bar sticking to a has become. The Classic Gold Standard of Drum technique books. some years ago when Martin's room.

George Lawrence Stone Lawrence Stone Boston Joe Morello George Boston University George Lawrence Son Martin George Bird Berry Hanover Street Boston Bart E James Drum company George Birth Dave Brubeck Tom
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"But the the next step then was George was determined to learn how to play it correctly and he asked around and was told that the best drum instructor was George. V Stone and again George be stone as opposed to George L. A. George Lawrence Stone. The Guy who ended up Ryan stick control and and so on who was about the same age as George while George be stone We won't go into his background but he was an all around musician. He could play multiple instruments and was band leader and so on in addition to building drums as main reputation now versus has a drum builder early days. So the story actually as told by George L. Stone who remained a lifelong friend? Georgia's And they have filed a correspondent had files ecorse payments rhymed net has all of that now And so according to George Elston Young George. Way PUTS ON HIS UNIFORM. He went to a military academy and he marches with his drum into the the stone facility and ask for George B Stone a the best drum teacher in Boston and if time George be stone was playing poker with his buddies which was known to do a had some free time and there was a new union office upstairs at night. That's where he was playing cards and this all of his buddies look at it like well. Are you going to be a jerk until this kid you? Don't you don't teach. Kids are GonNa be nice to what you know. They were all holding their breath. Weld George Beeston Cut Young George Way some slack and went and gave him the lesson and agreed to teaching and that became Georgia's second home in short order he became gopher a companion for George L. Stone and one of the G. H. W. Catalogs has a picture. I think I used it in the league. Way Of George L. Stone and way as young boys with a bunch of the sound effects that the George Beast company made but I can't say enough about the musicianship and the quality of drumline that George Beeston's capable of they talk about him. Doing a buzz rule that sounded like tearing a piece of paper and being able to play these intricate solos on the dime if somebody held their fingernail on the dime to hold it in place and then George B and George Elston could play a solo with one of them play in the left. Stick the other play in the right. Stick part gone Dime if you can imagine. And he Taught a lot of things other than just technique and rudiments. Those were important but he taught total musicianship. the basics of mallet instruments of the the use of a fax and Chime in how how to play with a band how how to accompany.

George L. A. George Lawrence S George B Stone George Beeston George Way George Beast company George B George Elston Georgia instructor Boston Ryan G. H. W. Catalogs
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"These guys drummers have very rare DNA that we are willing to share ideas. Absolutely no guitar players. Don't do this base buyers. Drummers will just share anything with you and that's like so Roy. Nap was a phenomenal influence on in the Chicago area of what was happening and and taught many many students that went on to play drums. Set you know Barrett Dean's a very bad teams are very very famous drum set player that was also in several movies in a very very fast player. He was a student of Roy NAP. So this Roy. Nap had his own lineage. So if you if you would put together the big lineage. You've got molar gladstone. In stone kind of teaching Roy NAP in the Roy. Nap was the next generation. That from the Chicago area created his own lineage. Okay an actual recordings on the Internet of Roy playing and just the precision and the accuracy that he played with really deepened. Really exciting. Gosh Man. That's unbelievable it's an as we wrap up. I just I feel like it's different now than you. Just you might get on. Not everyone does this but you see where like maybe you go to Sam ash and you say I wanna take lessons and you get the teacher they give you. I mean these guys are like does it. It seems like you have to already be a drummer to get in with these guys at that point. You're like I'm going to take it like Freddie Gruber something. I'm going to take it to the next level Like I'm Dave Wacko and I WANNA get better is that or did they. Did they teach guys? Who were you know? This is my first day learning the drums. I'm a you know a twelve year old. Would you go to like George Lawrence stone and learn the funny you mention that because vic firth who was a different mind of for a well over forty years was a student? George Lawrence Stone at the age of thirteen. Wow Cool yes these guys. If somebody was interested in in learning you took it. So look what happened. You know he teaches. You Know Vic Firth Young Age and and VIC firth turns into vic firth he's so he goes up from there but I mean. These guys are just absolutely phenomenal players and all this information what. I'm doing is I'm working with Francioni. The new publisher by Drummer as had said they have recently announced they want me to be worldwide education director for modern drummer. Great and part of what this is is. I want people to want this information to stop being put into modern drummer. But also it's an educational program where each magazine has educational history and information and stuff to practice from this great lineage. And and I tell him you went to go and subscribe to modern drummer and go to the website. Subscribe to because now with the David Francioni at the helm. That's going to be a whole new level of twenty first century. Modern Drummer Information. That's going to go out and pull from the past and lay the groundwork for the future of the Twentieth Century. So it's very very exciting. So subscribe and get involved. Yeah that's extremely exciting. I like many people grew up on modern drummer and love it. And just by the name. You think it's all new stuff but I just there's so many articles of just great things like I remember learning about the painted drum heads all these cool things from reading. Modern Drummer So I'm a huge fan. Congratulations to you on that. That's all and I think that's a great segue as we finish up here. Why don't you tell people what else you got going on? Where they can find you. The sessions panel all that good stuff. Oh this the sessions panel on Youtube. I S everywhere I go there and subscribe. It is a good over two hundred interviews and I've got a phenomenal not for profit organization that is investing into trying to capture the stories of all these great musicians not only drummers but bass player's guitar plays a piano place. I've had the chance of sitting down to interview. People like Steve. Gadd vinnie Dave Wacko Stewart. Copeland Steve Jordan. I mean just you know. I was able to interview some drummers. That are no longer with. Us JOBLESS STOCKS IN CLYDE STUBBLEFIELD. A to a great jumpers from James Brown. I sat with them in a room together. The interview was fantastic. It was emotional and within a few months after the interview. They both passed away. Hal Blaine I interviewed. How Blaine a great interview with how blame this is? The man that played all the soundtrack of the nineteen sixties seventies and he played on thousands of recordings. He just passed away a year ago and just to hear his interview when I sat down with him. I said this I said how I'm from. Long Island when I started listening to music of the sixties and seventies growing up. I had like my top ten favorite songs and drummers that I would listen to that I would study little that I realized that you and nine out of those young drummers. They're all him probably une credited obviously like the beach boys and all this stuff I mean. And that's a whole that's all boys Elvis Tra. I mean just incredible the carpenters all that fantastic music so these interviews are important because we're capturing their story especially before hopefully catch it had before they had chance to sit down with Roy. Burns the Lakers. Who played with Benny Goodman for many years? Had the chance to interviewing Ed Shaughnessy. We Lost Ed. Also so some of these guys that we've lost and and indigo chance to who played with Billie Jean Michael Jackson. We lost him a couple of years ago. These interviews have been very very important to capture the stories then. I've sat down with not only great drummers but base plays Leland sklar Billy Sheehan you know Darryl Jones who plays with the rolling stones. I've sat down with some phenomenal players. Nathan East Great Bass Player Guitar players. Steve Vai what a great interview. That was piano players. Chick Corea said that with chick. Corea you gotta go interview just to hear how great it was the question. I'm asking him or not what it was like. We played with so and so I'm not. I'm not that that doesn't impress me when I went to know is how did you start. What books did you learn? What teachers did you have? How'd you practice you? Know what motivates you who listening to then who he listening to now. What inspires you when you hear. These people speak about that. It is deep passion at its best. So that's going on with what it is. I'm still teaching out of my at my studio at my home. And that's going on fantastic teaching using the Internet for many many years so this is going on to global students around the world that I have so. I'm still traveling. It's I'm still at the thick of it. I feel great physically. I'm sixty six years young and I have no plans of retiring. I don't use the R. Word for retire. I use the word reinvent. They say you're not retiring. You're rewiring exits executive and I've got to publish a company called wisdom media that I that I put together with a phenomenal partner. Joe Berg Amini who plays all the Broadway shows and he's got several bands that he plays with. We've got books out Hudson. Music Dot Com has a digital books outfit has the physical books. We've got more material coming out. There's more stuff happening at my desk pumping out stuff because I want the next generation to really understand historically what is there for them and that's where I feel. My responsibility is to do as much as I can. For the next generation to be a part of this great lineage. You're no slouch. That's for sure you're you're always busy. That's well man. I am just blown away by. I just can't believe this. Just the the the like you can just follow the lineage of all these great drummers and I think it continues today and I hopefully try to think that In some way that what we're doing right now is passing on those stories to another generation into people like I didn't know any of us so absolute and what you're doing is great because this allows my voice to be heard and hopefully in in many many years when I'm long on that when someone hears my voice as I'm speaking late now they can sense the fact that the information is still alive might not be but the information is still alive seek out the knowledge and be a part of a journey of playing art and playing music I say art is about expression music happens to be my language but drumming. That's my voice. Really wet soil about beautifully. Said well dumb. I really appreciate you being on the show. I will put all of your information where people can find you in a link to that chart that you were talking about in the show notes as well so people can check that out and I keep up with you and all that stuff and and you can find dom on Instagram. At global number two DOM Lots of cool stuff there as well. In addition to the sessions panel. And everything there so dom- thank you for being on the show. This is just been an absolute pleasure talking to you bar. Thanks so much and thanks so much that you seek your responsibility to make this happen in touch base. There are so many more stories we can do. So we'll have to look for part to at some point in the future fans that awesome. Thanks thanks so much. If you like this podcast find me on social media at drum history and please share rate lever of you and let me know topics that you would like to hear about the future till next time on learning. This is a win sound..

Roy NAP vic firth Chick Corea George Lawrence stone Chicago Freddie Gruber Hal Blaine Barrett Dean Youtube Dave Wacko Steve Jordan Steve Vai Lakers Ed Shaughnessy Dave Wacko Stewart Benny Goodman James Brown Long Island Sam ash
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"What's amazing about it as you start to feel the relaxation that happens in your hands which is what stone wanted which is how. I went through the book with Morello. And how many of the students years ago and then from that from stick control then when you go into accident two rebounds and you learn about how to play accents and pull outs a control strokes and up up strokes down strokes within that motion that also not only helps you fluently on the drum set but as I did back in the mid seventy s after I went to stick with my with my teacher. Morello I said Joe had with this book worked with our feet and Joseph Watson with done that but try it out so I went through the book one page a week. One Minute each exercise with my hands and then did the exact same routine with my feet. Too great result. I'm sure I mean of course it's GonNa make you stronger and better and and translate absolutely you know. I just played a six months ago was posted. I played attract eye of the tiger. That's on drum. Youtube Channel loved on it. And what I got a kick out of it. It's only been out now for about six or seven months but already has like a almost two million views and on their here amit sixty six years young playing and all the young comments about this guy's feeder incredible double bassist guys should be playing metal when I hear us they get a kick out of it and that all came from the free stroke applied to my feet using stones book stick access rebounds so funny from Guy. Born in the late eighteen hundreds and on top of the next level. I tell you about this year so just been working with the whole family. Many years ago when I was when I was young in the late sixties. I saw some articles in the magazine. It was called the International Musician magazine. And it was. It was a magazine. It was kind of like it was a newspaper and it came out like every week and it had in there a feature of George Lawrence stone writing articles about drumming in this in this magazine and he wrote in there from nineteen forty six to nineteen sixty three. He died a few years after so I remember all of those different articles that had no idea where they were so in my contact with the family which stone family that are just such wonderful people I had met. Say so listen guys. There was some articles that stone. You know your grandfather wrote. Can you track down these articles? I think it'd be great to read so the family went into several years. We tracked down every article and they put a book together. That is just released now on Alfred publications technique of Percussion Columns by George Lawrence Stone for the International Music Musician magazine from nineteen forty six nine hundred sixty three. It's about two inches thick the book. And it's all the the articles at George Lawrence Stone wrote. This is huge. In their stone. Talks about gladstone. He talks about molar. He talks about shaping in Morello and an on all these different lessons that he told her all of its students. Gene KROUPA and buddy rich. This book is historically so important. To read I tell everyone go get technica. Percussion Alfred publications and read historical insight. Because going through this book it validates everything that I teach. What a prolific guy I mean and that actually leads me to so we talked about billy. Gladstone's background obviously radio city. Music Hall Inventor Snare Drum We talked about Sanford Molar learning from civil war drummers growing his technique from there what about George Lawrence Stone as a May on a little bit more. You said he was in Boston. What else what got him. You know going when you get the new version of stick control with which is which has the quotes in in the inside cover. I asked the family to put together a page of history and a page of history in the new version of stick control. That explains these guys like stone. Grew up in a drum manufacturing atmosphere where they were meant not only making drums but they were playing drums and teaching drums. And that's Kinda like also the influence that glassed on gladstone. Kinda was influenced by that. And when George Lawrence Stone would make marching drums gladstone wanted to make more contemporary snow jumps. So he came up with his and billing and billy gladstone only made about forty or fifty snare drums and these snowdrifts probably sell for forty to fifty thousand dollars each. I'm sure I mean it's it's gets and the George Lawrence Stone Snow jumps the same thing. They are just wonderfully hand. Constructive made so so. Georgetown larcenous father again at that time in the in the late eighteen hundred eighteen. Hundreds is when Vaudeville when the Feta district opened up so in the Fina district. It will all these acts. That were performing. They needed musicians. So George Lawrence Stone could read very well. He complained that only snail but he could play tiffany and mallets so he became the top performer in Boston. That played all the theaters and he became the top teacher and he was the top drum manufacturer of rudimentary drums. He became like he was like the stuff and he married had had children and ran his business into and and an his book came out in nineteen thirty five so he was working on these techniques back in the nineteen twenties until he perfected it. And if you look at the old copies of stick control. The fact of the book came out in Nineteen thirty five and looked as great as it looked. That book was was done by an engraver what they use a piece of metal and like a Chisel and hammer the chilled into this metal. The each page for the book. And then that's how they they ended up printing the book they put this this metal sheet and they and they ran out around and they made book copies of well after about four or five years. The metal wore down the negative. No good so the expense to do. The book again was to be difficult. So what they did. After that from the nineteen forties on they would just take a photograph of each page and print the book from the photograph. So the challenge with the book is the book started becoming blurry and imagine doing that for like fifty years. Yeah so what happened was it comes into every time. I'd get the book and I always say go to. If you have an old still go to page thirty. Two and the bottom of the page was one of the worst pages. You'll see the blurry you see like thirty second notes with US three lines. You can't tell that they would three lines. You see the rest are all blurry you can't you can kind of figure out what it is but it's Kinda hard to see so every time I look at this book I would look say. My Gosh Book. Just looks ready. It needs to be re engraved. Well the family contacts me at some point. They had heard that I was in the publishing business. They had heard that I was also a drummer and atop teacher ended up the student of Morello and I was a student of shape and with student of Shelly Manne and they knew that was to connection from their grandfather. So they contacted me and said we'd like you to help us out bringing this book into the Twenty First Century. Said they said to me. What would you change in stick control and I said boy first of all I am incredibly honoured at humbled that you would even consider me to ask my advice but I would change nothing? The only thing I would do is re engraved the book and then I said it would be nice if we can put a note of history in there a page of history about your grandfather and your great grandfather and I'd like to get quotes of famous drummers on the inside and back cover so we can have the influence of stick control with all these drummers and they said Gee we'll do that so we found a good engraver and then they said well. Gee them we don't know any drummers to ask them to ask for quotes of the book he said. Don't worry about it. Yeah you got us. That's awesome really amazing. Yeah man I mean it's so cool and like I just I can tell how honored you are to be a part of this lineage of this just again this more or less just a family tree of teachers going down the line and I don't even know why I didn't even put together the whole George B stone and Sun like the Boston drums like the snare. Drums and everything was with a family business. And those drums if anybody goes on the Internet and researchers to even some of the pictures of the drums. They are beautifully handmade drums that sounded. That's still sound good really incredible And there's something special about like drums made in Boston. I've talked about this with. I think Rob Cook about how they have different. And that was the heritage of what we have in there and also the Cooperman family which is a which was in Boston then moved to Vermont. Were making the cooperman drums. That were kind of like the next generation of the George Lawrence Stone snare drums when winstone stop making the drums cooperman. Kind of took over and Cooper was the one that made the Stair Jones for molar so Mola's drums will cooperman trumps. Any pictures of Sea of molar. You see playing the cooperman drums and and when when San died the Koopman family contacted Jim Chapman and sent him one of Mola's drums and said we want to do to have this here in honor of `continuing in this anthem older way of how they play it and It was just so beautiful and then when Jim Chapin passed away knowing that I was what it was top students the company called me up at Saddam. Since Jim has passed away. Since you are carrying the torch we want to send you a mola drum and I have a. Mola from that. They sent me. That's my studio that I had that I teach on. Wow and it really is deep to have an and it was. It was a drum that muller had designed and played and it's just really pretty valuable that the lineages not only in in just the knowledge that we learn but in the products that were able to get hold of those three guys. I feel like we have good idea them. Now let me throw a kind of a curve ball at you and I wanted to. I've always heard his name and like in the in the world of teachers but Roy C nap. I don't know much about him. Do you know how was he involved with all this? I know he was kind of known as the dean of American Percussion Teachers. Yeah Roy Roy. Nap was from Chicago and he was a drum corps drum corps player and he was a student of Sanford Also a while and he also knew a George Lawrence stone very well they would. They would pierce together. And whenever George Lawrence Stone would go to Chicago to perform with some of the some of the axioms provided with they would get together and share ideas because they were more into the rudimentary end and but Run-up also knew billy gladstone. When Glasser would travel they would get together so imagine these guys. Listen Bunny which got together with Louis. Belsen Elvin Jones and Max Roach and they'd get together hang out and Morello and they share ideas..

George Lawrence Stone billy gladstone Morello Boston George Lawrence Stone Snow George B stone Youtube Mola Sanford Molar Chicago International Musician magazin Gee Roy Roy Joseph Watson American Percussion Teachers US Gene KROUPA Sea of molar Roy C
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

13:14 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Freak is going on. As I turned to out who sit out the hell. Do you know this guy so al turns me and says we spent two years together in. World War Two. He said I was a martial arts instructor. And Buddy was a martial arts instructor US together in World War Two in the Marines and they just happened to be both from New York and both drummers so he said so we find that a friendship by being in the Marines together. That's how it started so every concert that but he would come into the east coast. He would call his friend. Al And Al because I became one of top students. I would always call me up and take me along the way so. I was backstage at a buddy concert all the time now why. This is important because backstage at a buddy concert. You meet all the best drummers and that's where I met Morello so I'm sitting down in a chair and without at a concert I'm not even sure. I think it was a club called Jupiter's Franklin Square Long Island and Buddy called us up. It was sitting backstage and there was another chair next to me and it comes walking. Joe Morello with his dog. Matthew Joe was legally blind so we had the seeing idol. He comes in with this dog. Matthew and he says to my right Al Miller my teachers to my left and buddy Sorenson leaped and waved and and it was just so great. How respectful he was to to Al End. Morella to me. I was just young eighteen year old kid. I was nothing but he was absolutely respectful to me. And he's kind of saw me as a student in the next generation so he goes on and he performed that night and he played a drum solo. That was so incredible. In the first set on his snow he played like about a fifteen minute solo on just his snare drum and two thousand people in the audience he was able to bring two thousand people to their feet in the middle of his solo. Just playing a snare drum now listening today now you have double bass in he got symbols. You're crashing even. Get a crowd riled up because we're doing all this for. This guy had a snare drum. He didn't use the other parts of Israel he just used in. The Solo brought the people to their feet brought the band back in came back with the bad and the place went absolutely crazy. He says I'll see a second set and he walks off so I now I'm holding my head in my hands at this time so he just played this incredible solo understand. I turned and I said guys to Al Miller Real. What the Hell did this guy? Just doing that snare drum so my teacher. Melissa I have no idea what this guy just did. Morello crosses his arms and turns to be. It says he played a series of strokes have strokes and full strokes using gladstone stone and molar movement playing pullouts and control strokes so. I start laughing so morillas. `same why you laughing. I said well Miss Perello. What you said just sounded so academic. It was just kind of funny. He said well that's what he did. So I said Okay. Wait a second. Tell me that again. So when he explained it again and mentioned the gladstone stone and Muller movements then I knew I was on a something so my teacher said listen. You've been with being out for several years. Maybe it's time that it takes them less than with Joe so I get Joe's number of the store. He was teaching at was a Sunday night Monday morning. I call the store Tuesday. I'm in a lesson with Morello in New Jersey and I said Mr I just WanNa learn all the stuff that you told me that buddy did. It's what I just want to understand. What the hell that is. So that began the journey of now. Joe Started me with George Lawrence Stones. Free stroke this one hundred percent rebound stroke that when you throw the stick down you allow the stick to we bend into your hands and you're not really controlling the stick your guiding stick. Gotcha and that's that's his technique right. That's that's known techn- Yours Lohan Stones Technique. The free stroke. We throw this thing. That'll let it bounce back. See many of the drums before stone will hold the stick tight the hand they would throw the stick down and they would pull it up and they were controlling the stick and there were hurting their hands. They were getting pain. They were not able to play for a long period of time. So stone kind of realized that if I find allow rebound to be a part of me the physics of movement and it goes back to again. The minds of Isaac Newton's third law for every action is equal and opposite reaction by throw it down and allow myself to relax and let the stig bounce up. I'm using the least amount of energy for the maximum amount of results. Pause for a SEC. LemMe ask you though. Real quick backing up was buddy a student of these techniques or because Joe Morello just call it out and say this is what he was doing or was buddy like we. All kind of know was from another planet and just sort of pulled all these different techniques just by his nature of being a great drummer or did he actually studied these great question. Great question and I asked but he this that I got the answer because buddy was was highly skilled with finger. His finger which gladstone this wrist rebound and molar so buddy told me when he was a young child in his early Vaudeville. He was the opening. Act of Georgia Cohen. Have you ever heard that name? George Cohen I don't think so do the research and anybody anybody hearing my voice. Do the research at who join Jim. Cohen was George. Cohen was a song and dance band back in in the early nineteen hundreds and he was the guy that that wrote many songs that he was the one that really started Broadway. The whole concept of Broadway in New York of having a theater district was Georgia Cohen. When you go to Time Square right at the beginning of the Broadway Theater district is a huge statue of joy. Jem Cohen. Would they called Mr Broadway? He wrote he wrote songs like her name was Every day rees at the data This was a huge back. Eighteen hundred also wrote during World War. One the the marching song that fired up the troops over here around the gangs all coming. That was George Cohen. He got the Congressional Medal of honor from Franklin Delano Roosevelt. This guy helped with world war one firing of the soldiers with his songs. This guy was deep and he was a song and dance man so he had several Broadway shows going on with these statistics. Buddy rich was the opening act for Joy Jem Cohen now as the opening act but he would go out. Play the drums tap dance singer song? He was opening. Act in Georgia. I'm callin toward also at the US. Doing these shows. George Cohen used. Whenever he was traveling the best musicians in his band he would carry around his first trumpet player. His first violinist his arranger piano player and his drummer. The drummer is that Georgia. I'm Cohen US. Either Billy Gladstone. George Lawrence Stone Sanford Molar. Jeez teasing the guys that were playing behind Georgia Cohen. So Buddy is sitting in the pit watching these three these three great drummers perform at different times and they travelled in a train to go from New York to Chicago Buddy was next to them. Sitting with them not formally taking lessons. Yeah sure learning the gladstone stone and motor movements but he told me he says I got them from those guys. So if you can imagine when I talked to Papa Jones and took a took a couple of Papa Jo Jones. He would tell me a certain time he goes over here. Now here's what you want to accent so use molar. This particular pattern. You'RE GONNA play from your risk so you stone now here. This is more sensitive and little quicker passage. Go to French creek position and use your fingers use gladstone terminology that they use normally what they didn't do. They didn't put stuff in books to carry it on for the next generation. Well yeah that's a good point. I mean it seems like it's it's still very popular to use these techniques but like you said it's it's it seems like back then it was like your everyday language. You're just you're this is how you explain what you're when you're talking to other drummers which. I guess doesn't happen quite as much as it did. The molar technique you about a lot but it totally totally was that everyone knew these techniques talked about it and it was never logged down in books or or to the technology that we have today so here. I am now. I'm in years gone by. It's the it's the middle eighties and I'm traveling now. I'm endorsed with companies traveling around the world doing these different drum clinics in performances around the world so I had study with Morello in shape and now I'm utilizing these techniques and I also studied with Shelly Manne after Morello. What had learned the technique to a certain point? He said. Now you're ready for Jim Chapman. So he sent me to shape into now go from the stone technique to molar so in the process was as. I was traveling around around the world. I'm talking about my clinics free stroke Molin Gladstone. And I'm traveling all these other countries people are looking at me like I got three freaking eyeballs. A WHAT THE HELL IS MOLA. What? What are you talking about? So because of where I lived on Long Island we knew about this stuff outside of the Long Island New York area. No one knew about this stuff. Nevertheless traveling to different countries. Sure so now I what I would do is when I came back from my travels in the early nineties when I came back at the success of my career travelling playing and being involved with endorsing all these companies. It's just fantastic. What I would do is what I come back. I would invite Jim Chapin and Morello to dinner and once a month when I came back I pick up Jim chip into this house. Drive over the Morello. Find a nice restaurant and we'd have dinner and I'd buy these guys dinner if over one hundred or the hundred and fifty dollars spent for dinner for all three of us. It was one of the best investments I've ever been in my life because the stories in the anecdotes and the history was incredible and one day. We're at dinner. And we're sitting down and I said to realize adjacent Joe. You wrote a two great books. Massive study's message studies to fantastic books. That are still deep. But you never mentioned the free stroke in there but yet when I worked with you for almost eight years all we did was the free stroke and I said the gym Chavez said Jim you wrote your book advanced techniques for the minor one of the top. You still the number one drum set book in the world and you said that because of leading the mullet technique that that's what helped you to write your Independence Book Jazz. Why didn't you ever talk about molar in the book? I said the Joe. Why did you ever talk about the free stroke in the book and they both turn to meet the same time and said? Oh everyone knows this stuff you know I think not. And that's exactly what I said. I said Oh I think not. I said because I'm traveling world and no one knows about it. So they both kind of set back in their seats. And kinda got a little somber. I said well. Then this stuff needs to be notation. I said Yeah Guys. You guys got to write this stuff down and put this into it and they send me wrong. We're in late seventies. We'd done writing books. It's now your turn in your generation to do this year you write the book you know the stuff so you write it. So that's when I wrote my book it's your move. This book is twenty six years old. I wrote the book. Get you move simply because it was about explaining the free stroke and molar and I say in that book. I'm not showing you techniques that don fabulous recreated. I'm just trying to be the Messenger to pass on what I learned from. Jim Chapin who got from older that I learned from Morello who got from stone so that was the beginning part of the first book that was no -tated to be able to have the information put into the into the you know the the at least the the lexicon of educational material drummers to make sure they don't disappear forever that's all it was and then from that when ended up showing this stuff to to Joe Air he then put together the DVD the secret weapons of a modern drummer which he explained the techniques in now dvd and video format. We further have this stuff now explained in done. I've done you know hundreds of different. You know stuff on Youtube and videos that to explain it so I think we have enough of this information that is out there but people have to really realize you gotta go to the sources that really have the validity of the techniques. When I studied with Chapin another figure that one of the first lessons I came in with shaping. He said I'm going to tell you a story that Toby and I want you to tell the story to every student that you show this technique to we didn't touch stick or PAT or anything. I said okay. So he sits me down and he tells me the story. He said when Mullah was young when he was like thirteen fourteen years old. This is now in eighteen eighteen ninety four waiting. You go to take lessons drum lessons in eighteen. Ninety four there are no schools. Yeah he was a witty. Go you go to the old soldiers homes. Where all the retired drummers from the civil war or are there that played all their life playing drums. And you're going to take lessons from them. So that's where Moeller went. He learned from civil war drummers he lived in Albany and Albany is where one of the first soldiers old soldiers homes was built in the capital of New.

Joe Morello Georgia Cohen Matthew Joe New York gladstone stone Billy Gladstone Jim Chapin Al Miller George Lawrence Stone Sanford Buddy rich Joy Jem Cohen instructor Franklin Square Long Island Al End Jim Cohen Marines Youtube Israel
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"Boy so I looked I said my God is that these are three teachers kind of known molar. Because Jim Cheapen I had heard as a kid lived on Long Island. He was a student of Mullah. But I really didn't understand the mullet technique joys Lawrence still because of his books stick control which is which is a classic in his book accents rebounds although I hadn't been through the book so they knew of the books in glanced on. I had heard his name in the New York area from different people that had known of him. So I kind of heard what I said. Actually WELL I said Mr. I want to study with these guys these guys. He said they taught everybody. They Taught Me Papa Jo Jones Philly Joe Jones Art Blakey Buddy rich. All these guys learned from those guys. Like I gotta learn for these guys and Maximilian says too late. They're dead boy. Books live on. That's the truth. Absolutely so so when he said that I was Kinda shocked they said. Oh Man so. My next question is what really impress. Max that developed our friendship. I said Mr Roach. If they're gone who would their best students? And that's what he said. I like you to pack up my drums and we'll talk some more so now I'm on the stage helping Max Switch. Pack of his drums in in that itself is is is a whole nother story but in that point you know it led me to shelly. Manne was the best student ability gladstone. Joe Morello was the best student of George Lawrence Stone and Jim. Chapman was the best student of Sanford. Augustus Molin too good list. That's where I went. So he said to be said. Start with Morello. Get The stone technique down first because once you had the stone technique which is this free stroke and rebound and once you understand that in that strengthen Jerus- then understand moulder. That'll help you understand molar. Better once you get the mullet technique down and understand that then study with Shelly Manne and get the glads technique down so that was the that was the direction he gave me. Stone First Moulinex than glad so so I said great even in my nights heavy I said okay so I ended up with literally in the next week meeting. Morello backstage at a buddy which concert Hansel here. I am eighteen years old and it turns out that my teacher Miller was a Was just human long a brilliant man. He's gone now for twenty years and he has some books out. That are just fantastic. Books that are still great. Great Books and he Had Pictures of Buddy which studio so one day. He said to me he goes listen. I got a buddy friend of mine coming over tomorrow. Why don't you come over for dinner and we're going to have dinner with this buddy of mine? I said wow I said Mr thanks so much so yeah come on by so as I'm getting ready to the next thing. I come by me to his house. I pass a club it was called. It was called Poor Peters. It was wonderful jazz club that was literally two blocks from our house. So when a passing I see in the marquee it says tonight the buddy rich big band so I said Oh man how cool is which big Dennis plane tonight. I'm going to go have dinner without so I go to the club and I buy three tickets front row center one for me one for my teacher. And when for his buddy friend put my tickets in my pocket I am pumped up so now I go to this dinner at outhouse so knock on the door now answer the door and I said Al Have. I got a surprise for you. He says well. That's fantastic come on. I've got a surprise for you too. I walk in the House. I turn to his living room and there is buddy rich man. Now understand that at this point nineteen seventy-one Buddy which was just always on the Johnny Carson show. Every night he was performing with his band everywhere. This guy was at the peak of his game playing with Sinatra. Sammy Davis. This guy was in Vegas. This gay was everywhere and now he's in my drunk teachers house in Suburbia Long Island. I also says Buddy. I want my student dom familiar. Don this is this is buddy rich so I lead over the shape buddies. Hannah's I'm shaking his hand. Turn to the AL. You said I was going to meet a buddy friend of yours. This is not a buddy buddy big freaking difference like I said we left Buddy. Love that and then Al cooked some steaks and we had Caesar Salad and some wine and we sat down talking and and I just you know. Remember what my mom said. You have two years at one mouth. Listen twice as much as Larry True. How was he was he? I mean he was down Earth he was funny and he was a Vaudevillian. A void. Billion is a person that as an entertainer buddy was on stage at the age of two. He was doing red winner in the family. So Buddy was already a song and dance. Manny danced sang. He played drums. He told jokes. He's a juggler. This guy this guy did everything. He grew up with that skill. So he was just the nicest guy loving and welcoming. He was nothing new up some of the stories that have been the rumors that have been passed down at who he was was he intense absolutely was he driven to be the best performing. He can be every night absolutely. Did he drive his band to be the best? They can be absolutely because he wanted to give the best performance to every audience because he figured if was my last performance. I need to make this the best. That was his personal constitution. That's heavy so now we're eating and then it's about seven o'clock seven thirty and buddy says he looked Washington goes okay guys. We gotta go to the GIG. Let's go come on. We'll we'll leave a couple minutes. We'll take my car so I'm remembering gig tonight. I forgot about the tickets that I bought three tickets front row center so we come outside and he goes. We'll take my car. And He's had a red corvette stingray deters. Many says you hop in the back seat now if you know a red corvette stingray but there is no freaking backseat. It's where you put your attache -cational so I climb in behind these seats. I get in the car. Alga dependency we buddy such driving. And he drove very quickly with driving and driving. I said I said Buddy I had no idea was beating. You bought three tickets to go here. The ban tonight turns me. He says well. How stupid is that? You're going to sit back stage without. Give me the tickets. Wow so I pass tickets up to the front of the car. Buddy grabs three tickets. We pull up into the front of poor. Peter's there's a lineup of people. Buying tickets buddy gets out of the car with my three tickets. Walks to the last. Three people in line gives an tickets and says a sea front row center and he turns back in the car that people are in. Shock. He gets back into the car. We drive around to the back of the club. We go in the back door. Buddy then grabs to folding. Chairs puts him backstage behind the curtain. Alan I sit down and buddy says I'll catch you guys after the show. I'll drive you home and walks away so I I'm in I'm in. I'm beyond shock. It's beyond surreal. I'm in like what the.

Joe Morello Shelly Manne George Lawrence Stone Jim stingray Papa Jo Jones Long Island Maximilian Joe Jones Mr Roach New York Augustus Molin Johnny Carson Sammy Davis Max Switch Al Have Suburbia Long Island Poor Peters Jerus
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

10:48 min | 2 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Drum History

"History podcast. I'm your host Bart Van Zee. And today I'm joined by Dom Family Loro drumming global ambassador and that title was given to him by Ron SPAG Nardi the founder of modern drummer which I just found out and that is beyond cool dom welcome to the show. Thanks thanks so much. It's kind of interesting when I hear that title. Remember Ron SPAG. Naughty and Beck nineteen seventy seven. When the magazine I came out I knew Ron because he was a fantastic drummer in the in the New Jersey. I live here on Long Island and in the New York area. And we get together at certain gigs together. And we talk about the idea that he had as far as putting a magazine the other and then as his career with the magazine career and my career on doing different events and performances globally as we met up several years later on he kinda dumb. You really are traveling. The World Spreading the gospel of drums. You really are like ambassador. You now have become drumming as global ambassador and I got a kick out of that one of the interviews that Kinda stuck and people started calling me that and I'm humbled by it. I really am. I mean it's it's really true and now I feel like most people They digitally get to know people via social media. And personally I feel like I've watched a lot of your videos. Your your really spreading the the love of drums not even like A. Obviously you're teaching things and all that great stuff but it's really just the just a passion oozes out of you for drums so I think that's we all you a huge. Thank you for for getting the next generation excited about drumming thanks. I think what's amazing about it? Is that when someone follows their passion. And you've got to really understand what that means I. It doesn't matter whether you're passionate knitting or fishing When you have a passion that you are so driven by and then you see people that are older than you that have that passion and that's really kind of guiding point came from. I met many senior statesman in the field. All these great great legendary names and I met them at a young age and when I saw them having great fun and living their passion. I just said that that that's what I WANNA do. That's it really was was driven so it was really all these great fantastic drummers that we stand on their shoulders that really have guided. Us along the way. That's so true and I just love how it's it's not something where it's just for kids or something like that. You know what I mean like. We're all I mean just being an adult. It's like you meet guys who were ninety years old. Who I mean. Roy Haynes turn ninety five recently and it's you never grow out of it and he's the biggest kid of all of us. Jim Chased used to say to me. The object is to act child like and not childish very true and Roy when I hear him play when I speak to him. He is still childlike with the passion of performing and playing drums. It's just really incredibly inspiring so jumping off of Roy. Haynes who is an absolute legend in the in the dreamworld we're talking about some legends today So these guys and as you put as we talked before the technique legend. So we're talking about billy gladstone. George L. Stone and Sanford Molar and I just I really love how you said. These guys taught the legends who we all love their. The reason we have the greats. They really did. What's amazing is that these gentlemen virtual all three of them Gladstone Billy Gladstone Joys Lawrence Stone in Sanford. Mola were born in the eighteen eighties so they came from knowledge of drummers before them which really will like civil war drummers and and mental drum corps kind of players so they had this incredible facility that they will learning and they were inspired to play drums and learn the techniques. And and and just the how these guys learned but gladstone played in New York City at Radio City and he. He was a avid performer. And also doing some teaching George Lawrence stone and Billy of course lived in New York City joys. Large stone from the Boston area was working at all the Vaudeville theaters and doing a lot of theta work and teaching. So he had his skilled as a performer. Educator and Sanford. Mola was a drummer that was playing with John. Phillips seuss's orchestra. Wow which was which was huge. That ban was like you know powerful and he was not only in the snail drumline. He Was D. Top snare drummer and Phillips Sousa. When he heard molar play many many years ago he said to him. I want you when my band because you know how to play loud and I need volume with my full marching locusts. Listen I want you to be in my band so you pay them a salary to be in the band. And any of the drummer's had joined my band have to go through your teaching school so he set molar up to teach aside from being in the band so these guys had opportunities in the early nineteen hundreds as they heighten their skills that this was the beginning of the drum set era. Exactly I was GONNA say it's. It's just one of those a lot of times. That happens where it's like the perfect storm of like the timing. Is there the drum set has been invented? Everything's changing absolutely an interesting to remember. All the immigrants that were coming from around the world to New York City. This is where the energy was happening in. New York's as they were all migrating here and as these immigrants around the world when jazz started this music of freedom these fantastic educators with the ones that guided this young talent for them to give us the legendary music that we guide our lives from so we have to always go back to the educator and how they're able to open doors for this young generation. That's pretty what these three guys did. Absolutely well why. Don't we take them one by one here? So Billy Gladstone is someone I've seen a lot In in various episodes he's popped up as just being a obviously a performer but he he worked with various different drum companies. Correct Emma was he with Gretch or am I mistaken on. Yes she was. It was with grateful the early days. Everybody was kind of with rich. That was really the the momentum of what it was but billy gladstone also was a brilliant engineer and he began to manufacture his own snare drums. Yes so he wanted. He came up with an idea a patent that is still under the name of a snare drum with the lugs on the snare drum. Were manipulated where you can tune the bottom head from the top lug so the top like had like head like a little a little drum key and then a bolt so you had a drum key that when it went to the top part of the actual drum lug when you turned it it tightened the bottom head when you turn the key around. It's slipped past that first. Top part and went to the bolt and tighten the top head. When you turn the key around the key had three parts of it it wet and it can get to both of them and you can tighten both heads at the same time. This was a patent in the Early Nineteen Twenty S. This guy was way ahead of the curve. Yeah he kinda reminds me of George. Way A little bit. Obviously he was before that time but it was It's just these inventive guys. So that's way was highly inspired by billy gladstone. These guys were all from that era of real creative thinking at that early part of the nineteen hundreds remember in the nineteen hundreds you had Einstein. You had all these FANTASTIC TESLA. You had all these. You had Edison all these great minds. Coming out creatively joining in the world. And they were all kind of based on the East Coast in America and it was pretty intense to see all these ideas that came out of his pretty magical. Yeah really now so. He was a performer. As you said that. Didn't he play at radio? City Music Hall is that right. He did it was musical and civil of the field is that were there Carnegie Hall those early days and there was another percussionist that was that was performing who played mallets gladstone plates named him and the Mallet player with Shelly Man's father. Wow so shelly. Manne the Great Drummer. Literally as a kid was hanging out with billy gladstone and learned gladstone's techniques to such a high level which was mostly finger technique okay and a high level of sensitivity and I came to hear about these names. It was kind of funny. I'll tell you this story. I was eighteen years old and because of where I live on. Long Island I was close enough to New York City where it was just a quick fifteen minute train ride or a car drive to go into city. So in the late sixties early seventies. I went into New York all the time and heard all the greatest drummers of the world everybody was here with New York with buddy buddy which Louis Belsen Art Blakey Max Roach Philly Joe Jones Papa Jo Jones. It just everybody was. Elvin everybody was here performance. Every night was a different man. I went to a concert at a club where Max Roach was playing. They had his own band that he put together. That was like a Tuesday night and I kind of walk in their nineteen seventy-one. I'm eighteen years old and I walk into here Max play and he played four sets? That just absolutely blew me away. The intensity the passion and here was a man that already had some gray and on his face on his hair. And you know when you're eighteen years old and you see somebody little gray on their hair you think. The guys got like one foot in the grave. This guy's not gonna even make it through the evening. I looked at Max Roach. And he blew me away with his ease of facility. His relaxed approach is creativity. At every set that he played four sets. Every solo was completely different so at the end of the performance everyone had left the club and I sat there little bit stunned and in shock. I said well here. I am working on the system studying with a great teacher. Al Miller on Long Island. I'm trying to get this together. This guy blew me away so I walk up to the stage in a shoot Mr Roach. Can I shake your hand in a couple of questions and Louisiana goes absolutely shakes my hand he says? Are you a drummer I said yesterday because you take lessons I said yesterday with Al Miller and maximum or I know milk from Long Island? You tell him I said hello. I have his books that that I look through already. I felt like this guy immediately just welcomed me immediately because I said can I ask you a question. How how do you have that kind of freedom that you can just sit down play what you feel and just express yourself like any language it just you feel you your brain takes it in and you express it with no challenges or barriers at all? How the heck do you get to that stage and it looks at me and says come up on the stage with me so I hung up on the stage and he leans over to me and he puts out three fingers on his left hand and I remember having that. He showed his pinky his ring finger and his middle finger and he puts it in front of me and says three names and he points to his pinky and says billy gladstone coastal the next fingers as George Lawrence Stone and goes to nested says Sanford mullet. Those movements are going.

billy gladstone New York City Long Island George Lawrence stone Max Roach global ambassador Roy Haynes Beck Ron SPAG New Jersey Bart Van Zee New York Ron Ron SPAG Nardi Dom Family Loro Haynes Sanford Sanford Molar Mola George L. Stone
"lawrence stone" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Lisa g reports. Thompson is being charged with two of the incidents. Cops say he could be responsible for dozens more. Investigators say Thompson would ride on the back of trains, and then use the stolen master key to enter the unoccupied, rear car and activate the emergency brake. Cops say once they released the clear photo of Thomson tips came flooding in leading to his arrest at his home in Manhattan. Thompsons also been charged with lewdness for allegedly exposing himself, while subway surfing, Lisa, g NBC News Radio, New York. There is no section of the nine eleven memorial in lower Manhattan dedicated to those who have donated are sick from being exposed to toxins following the terrorist attacks first responders who spend time working at ground zero were on hand for a dedication ceremony. At the Morial glade. It includes a pathway with six Lawrence stones that have World Trade Center steel imbedded inside than it sits, roughly where the main ramp was used in the rescue and recovery effort, many of those second that have done it from diseases are first responders and volunteers, who worked at ground zero for months following. The attacks. In sports, the Red Sox Yankees, postponed by rain, gangqi stadium. They'll make it up as part of a day nine double header on Saturday, August fifth. Meanwhile the dodgers leave. That's one nothing on the fifth in game, one of the NBA. Finals fourth corner Toronto leading Golden State one thirteen one of three checking the traffic outbound upper deck of the George Washington three right lanes closed for construction. The inbound lower level is closed. The inbound south to of the Lincoln shutdown. No problem at the Holland FDR north seventy nine through Ninety-six. Right. And center lane construction flooding on the east bound by the Grand Central and on the Degan. Southbound your van Cortlandt park you now know how to go whether tonight, showers and storms taper off, partial clearing, low sixty five and then partly to mostly sunny Friday, high of eighty degrees, banning.

Thompson Lisa g Manhattan Red Sox Yankees Morial glade World Trade Center van Cortlandt dodgers NBA Thomson Degan gangqi stadium Grand Central NBC News Toronto New York Holland George Washington eighty degrees
"lawrence stone" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

12:47 min | 3 years ago

"lawrence stone" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"And believe me, it, you know, it would be very awkward for someone to do this on their own. But if you have the courage to stand up, and do it there's going to be somebody who here's you who's going to back you up, and if everyone would simply speak out against, hey when they hear it. You would stop these bullies, and you would push them back say underneath the rocks that they have lived on for many years. Because we have had hate from the moment, we settle this country in basically started pushing out native Americans in killing them to today. There's always been hate against the quote other. But the thing is most of the time that hey was not allowed to surface in a way that seemed acceptable in right now, many groups think it's acceptable to publicly eight other people and for some people to go to the extreme of killing Heather whether that other is a Jew, a Muslim LGBTQ as we saw in Orlando. You know, it doesn't matter because once you start preaching hate publicly and believe you can get away with it. It just leads to that kind of expansion of a, and it isn't that we need Morley on Lewis's, we need more informants. I think that if we compare the environment of the thirty s to the present moment, we don't need spies to tell us what is happening in the circles of hatred today in many ways, people are acting out in the open. How many times have we seen a shooting? Right. A mass shooting or a school shooting or something? Or after the fact somebody says, oh, look, you know, he posted something on Facebook. People are broadcasting their hatred in a way that it was perhaps more marginal or secretive eighty ninety years ago. And so was interesting in a way. And also, very scary is the way in which some of these things which were in certain ways on the margins a say in the thirties or in the forties, and you know, Louis and his people and all sorts of folks who were fighting fascism were really trying to stop the transition of fascist or anti semitic ideas from the margins to the mainstream. But this has happened that we don't actually need. Spy ring, so to speak or something to figure out what's going on among those who are preaching and promulgating hatred because it's so much more open and outspoken. Yes. But I think the question is still the same. What do we do? How did we respond to these things, and I'm still not sure uninstalled trying to work that through for myself? You know on this podcast. I talked to off oaks about monographs and books that are not written for a popular audience. And I try to push people to make the case for why their work matters. They're focusing on a particular topic particular figure point in time and not always, you know, looking at it from the broad historical perspective. Right. So I often push people to to make the case for why their work is relevant in a very broad sense. In terms of social political cultural context, and in a certain way, you don't have to make that case because the story of what you're engaging with of. Fortunately is so relevant at the same time in when we talk about sort of writing for a popular audience. There's always this question of what gets lost in. Translation, do we risk kind of flattening the story or the historical developments in order to tell? The story that will grab the public's attention or that will present something in a way that will really highlight that relevance it because I think that when when we look at at this particular story as you say, it does have a great deal of potential for challenging popular memory or perceptions about the past whether that has to do with the question of the nature of fascism and hatred in the US in the thirties and also just in general throughout you know, American history. But in terms of our understanding of anti semitism in America of Jewish identity in the thirties of American Jewish history or the history of L A or just America at large. So I'm kind of curious what you see are kind of the challenges and the opportunities of writing popular history as opposed to something which is more of a standard. Or more academic book will something like you said like your first your first book based on your dissertation. You know, what are the challenges and the opportunities? And in what ways do you think that we have kind of arrest that we take when trying to reach a popular audience whether in terms of writing the book itself or in terms of making the case for why what we do matters. Well, what I would say is I think historians can operate two very different levels one. Which is they sort of more academic book, which is I've written earlier on which is trying to take important arguments within history in offer a very detailed explanation of whatever the phenomenon should be. So of my first book was a study of working class life in Cincinnati during the first hundred years of the city is story of how a working class literally built a city and then lost control of it by the end of the nineteenth century, and it's not a book, a general audience is gonna read, but it was a very important contribution to understanding. Eva Lucien of industrial capitalism and working class life in Cincinnati. And I think that historians can do that. And I remember when I was a graduate student. I started Princeton in nineteen seventy three in Lawrence. Stone was the you know, the man who ruled over the department of British historian. In Lawrence stone than was arguing that historians lead to not simply do this new social science analytic work. But that we had to also go back to telling stories and at the time. I poop pod it thinking. When you tell stories you leave out too much. Well, you know, forty some odd years later, I think stone was right? But not that all historians have to tell stories would I realize in this book is if you want to reach a mass audience when people wanted to story most academics or went to their words went to their arguments. But if you're talking to a larger public, they wanna know, what's the story, you wanna tell if you wanna write for a large audience. What's lost is some of the detail? But what needs to be highlighted as what's the essence of the story. Why should trees dive or anything we have to say? So what why does this matter in you'll have to put it in a story that is engaging to a large public, and it isn't a nine the roar because my health is that my book will inspire a generation of younger historians to do research into what was happening in American cities throughout the country in the thirties in the forties. Some of it may be told in a trade book. But my guess is a lot of it's gonna be academic studies that really enhance our knowledge if the period, my own sense is that it took me five bucks to like though, comfortable enough. I mean, I in each one of us things we could write for a general audience, but some of it is chance to so I wrote a book in a more accessible than I ever had before. But part of the reason it's taken off is because it happened to come out at exactly the right moment in time. When people are starved for this kind of story. So again, what I would say is proposed historians who wanna go to a large audience think about what's the story. You wanna tell for others storms who are looking more academically? What are the arguments you wanna make in? How does your work expand our historical knowledge in important ways? Not simply filling in holes, you can be a tailored though in halls. You're trying to open up new ways of looking at the world. And sometimes we need a very intense academic base that allow other people to expand. Even though I uncovered this yellow story. I was reading all these secondary books about Nazism and fascism in LA excuse me in America that helped me understand the larger context that was happening in LA. So to me academics are always working in cooperation with one another. Trying to uncover new knowledge. Discover why matters, and then communicated probably I two enacted amick world in then second to a larger world, and we're all doing important things. One is it more important than the other. In a when you are talking about this particular history to an academic audience versus a public audience. Do you find that people respond to it differently? I guess now to tell you the response wherever I've been as the Brits say people are gobsmacked by the story. They just can't believe it. Whether it's been giving it to history departments in scholars or you know, the ninety seconds streak, Ryan, New York or going out to Tennessee or Jerusalem. People are just blown away by the story. 'cause it's it's an unbelievable story. I think there are clear reasons, you know, why that is the case. But it's also kind of surprising its surprising that it's still surprising. I guess is one way to put it in as much as there have been other books that have been Britain about the rise of in. These various groups like the silver shirts friends of new Germany, various attempts to fight fascism in LA and other places around the country. Well, yes, they the other thing I think that made my book different is I made a decision to also right in the way of never written before which is to write with a sense of historical contingency. And what I mean by that is a lot of the books that I've read that have been written about the silver shorts about the German American bund. They're kind of dispassionate kind of knowing how things are going to turn out. I tried to write a book from the point of view of the spies in the spymaster in the Nazis and the finishes as they saw things on Raveling in real time at any moment. They didn't know what was going to happen next. I researched this in a way, I've never researched book before the first thing, I do is try to get the skeleton of the story that is what is your entire story. What's the beginning? Middle in the end. So that you know, where you're going. But then what you wanna do is flesh it out. And to me what that meant is. Once I knew the basic thrust of the story. I wrote each chapter as I was reading the spy reports. In other words, I had read enough of the spy reports to get a general sense. But then as I was writing each chapter I read those reports in depth to see what were they scared about. What were they worried about and trying to convey that for example, they didn't know World War Two was going to happen. Many people were saying, well, you know, maybe Hitler will change one season power either. He will moderate is policies or other politicians will throw them out of the government because he's just too radical. Well, we know neither those things happen. But they didn't know they didn't know World War Two was going to happen. They didn't know there was going to be a holocaust. I was. Trying to write with a sense of drama and the Connor drama that they felt because too often is historians we want eliminate the drama and make it more dispassionate. Well, that's good. But it's a different kind of a raid in I wanted to produce a story of courage under fire. So to say of people risking their lives to do what they believed in in. What's really important to know is every one of the spies except for one with Christians only one of Leon Louis despise was Joe none of them felt they were spying for the Jews. They knew the spymaster was a Jew, but

LA America Leon Louis Cincinnati Stone Facebook Orlando Heather Morley Lawrence stone graduate student Eva Lucien Hitler Connor Germany Lewis Princeton