36 Burst results for "Law School"

Fresh update on "law school" discussed on John McGinness

John McGinness

00:49 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "law school" discussed on John McGinness

"Radio. I'm gonna get your calls in just a moment I promised, but I want to share one more thought with you and it has to do with Documentary film that was made and available on Amazon. And it is a documentary film about Justice Clarence Thomas. And it is is entitled actually created equal, Clarence Thomas in his own words, And this is This is cold for more than 30 hours of interviews. With its subject, Clarence Thomas the justice and it talks about his his rise from poverty and segregated Georgia. We live in a house with dirt floors, outdoor plumbing and then wound up Yale Law school and eventually on the Supreme Court. Jason Riley, one of my favorite columnist, has written about it this weekend. It publication and it tells the story, but was very, very interesting. This was a it was a big success in terms of the Amazon. I guess it's a movie platform. I guess that's the best way to describe it. It was doing very well. They pulled it off for reasons that that lacked explanation with no explanation whatsoever. The company took it down. And Oh, yeah, By the way, it zah about a very prominent black jurist. That was taken down in February, which is black History month, so the lack of sense the lack of logic displayed their escapes. Mayor I think it is profound, actually. And then I wonder, why are we silencing people? Why don't want to. We want to hear that I have had the occasion to read. I've not seen the movie. I get a chance. I will if it's available. Um, but I have read Justice Thomas's autobiography, and I found it to be riveting, very, very interesting and is very candid. And it's not a It's not a Hey, look how wonderful I am. On the contrary, he he shares some of his, uh Some of his regrets some of his indiscretions his words, if you will, but it's an honest, candid piece, and I think it's incredibly impressive in terms of looking at somebody who grew up In poverty stricken Georgia and in the time frame in which he grew up and the likelihood that he would wind up living a life of poverty and desperation. Desperation given this statistical data available But where is he? Now? What a compelling story. Why are we not having a chance to review that documentary piece? And why would we want to silence of Dr Seuss? For that matter? Let's get your calls. 808 34 15 30. It is Glenn the barrister in Roseville. Glenn. Good afternoon, sir. Welcome to the conversation. Great to hear from you. Yeah. Hey, thanks for taking my call. Hey, listen, This is ridiculous. I I almost could take it as a comedy, but it's not funny. I've got two little granddaughters, 13 and the other is five. And they live in Los Angeles, and they're actually want an Islamic and they're actually racially mixed. No less than five different races. White, Black African American Hispanic in Japanese. And the maternal grand parents are Hispanic and have been teaching the Children Spanish and then uh, my step daughter in law. Has had the kids Japanese school, but they can't attend anymore because old school has been shut down. So one of the things we've done is sent books. And as a grandpa, I learned how to write to read in part. I learned how to read. In part by reading Dr Seuss books or having them read to me. And it cost me no West on $100 the other day, uh, probably get the last set that was available on Amazon to sound down there. Now prayer, too, that I was able to get them Curious George, which is next on the chopping block. Because originally because it involves the exploitation of a monkey that being George from Africa from a white man, Babbar, the elephants is next on the chopping block. And Babbar, originally conceived in written in French is now being condemned as a example of French colonization in North Africa. And then finally, little house on the prairie is going to be banned because it involves our it involves the migration of Western movement. And then what was Indian land. And when does.

Jason Riley Los Angeles North Africa George Africa February Roseville Five Glenn $100 808 34 15 30 13 Babbar Georgia Amazon Justice Thomas More Than 30 Hours Two Little Granddaughters Yale Law School Spanish
Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 3 d ago

Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

"Activists in Washington Power broker Vernon Jordan has died. He worked in civil rights law after Graduating from Howard Law School, then became head of the National Urban League in the seventies. He never held public office but did form relationships with lawmakers and corporate leaders to create economic and political opportunities for African Americans. His friendship with a young bill Clinton paid off later when he became one of President Clinton's closest advisors, D

Howard Law School Vernon Jordan National Urban League Washington Bill Clinton
Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 3 d ago

Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

"In Washington power broker Vernon Jordan is dead. Jordan grew up in segregated Atlanta, worked in civil rights law after graduating from Howard Law School and became head of the National Urban League in the seventies. He's been a long time Washington D. C. The resident. He used that position to become one of the city's most imposing figures. He never held public office, but formed relationships with lawmakers and corporate leaders to create economic and political opportunities for African Americans. His friendship with a young bill Clinton paid off later when he became one of the president's closest advisors, D. C delegate Eleanor Holmes. Norton spoke with us earlier about Jordan. In a real sense. He's a real inspiration to young people and especially the African Americans to what they Can't achieve. He's in American life. He will certainly be unforgettable. I'm on Lee, hoping he will not be your irreplaceable. In a statement tonight, President Biden says Jordan knew the soul of America in all of its goodness, and all of its unfulfilled promise. The president says in order to honor Jordan the work of fighting racism has to continue. Vernon Jordan was 85 6

Howard Law School Vernon Jordan Jordan National Urban League Washington D. C Delegate Eleanor Holmes Atlanta Bill Clinton Norton President Biden LEE America
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 4 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 4 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

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Supreme Court rejects Trump attempt to shield taxes from New York City District Attorney's Office

John Landecker

00:38 sec | Last week

Supreme Court rejects Trump attempt to shield taxes from New York City District Attorney's Office

"Today rejected former President Donald Trump's effort to keep his private financial records out of the Manhattan district attorney's office, Michael Grant says professor of tax Law at Columbia Law School I don't think these air unnecessarily limited to tax crimes. They're also maybe insurance fraud issues or bank fraud issues or wire fraud issues that have to do our mail fraud issues that have to do with over evaluations of property. Speaking in an ape INTERVIEW. The D A's office says the documents are necessary for a grand jury investigation into whether the former president's Cos violated state law. The script's

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Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | Last week

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Former President Trump's legal problems continue after acquittal

KYW 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Former President Trump's legal problems continue after acquittal

"Beat impeachment once again, but he is still facing other legal troubles. Loyola Law School professor Jessica Levinson, former president Trump faces legal exposure on a whole host of fronts. On the federal level. President Trump could face legal exposure, not just because Of the January 6th insurrection, which frankly, seems unlikely, But President Trump could face federal legal exposure based on obstruction of justice. Campaign finance. Potentially financial crimes. There is

President Trump Jessica Levinson Loyola Law School Donald Trump
Recent ‘Jeopardy’ Champion Dies Following Surgery Complications

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Recent ‘Jeopardy’ Champion Dies Following Surgery Complications

"Are emerging about the recent death of a young jeopardy. Contestant. Here's more from CBS is Matt Piper Jeopardy. Contestant Brayden Smith was just 24. He died this past week, according to a tweet by his mom. He had been a champion competitors during Alex Trebek's final episodes as host The Las Vegas review journals as Smith died after suffering health complications following an operation Smith was planning to attend law school with aspirations of becoming an attorney for the U. S government. His obituary said he was looking forward to competing in the show's tournament of champions. He won nearly $116,000 during his record five day winning streak. That

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The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

90.3 KAZU Programming

05:28 min | 3 weeks ago

The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

"Kenny and Keith Lucas are stand up comedians and identical twins. People don't have to react when I see twins. No. Okay, they go crazy like we were in the supermarket looking for some Jell O. Yeah. And we're just about to pick it out. And then some dude came out of nowhere. It was like, you know, you guys have a stick of Doublemint gum. That's from their 2017. Netflix special Lucas brothers were having a moment right now they're writing and starring in a remake of Revenge of the Nerds, But they also wrote the story for the new movie Judas and the Black Messiah. The film premieres today in theaters and on HBO. Max NPR's Elizabeth Blair has this profile. The Lucas brothers are best known for a kind of stoner humor. And here's a rule of thumb You should never do. Shrooms wouldn't do Who looks like you, man. I'm telling you. But underneath the jokes, there's a serious side that draws heavily on their childhood in the housing projects of Newark, New Jersey, called the Garden spires is you always, you know, broken elevators infested with rats and rotten Drug dealing violence everywhere, But you know, there's a community that is people that there's families is my family When they were six years old there, Dad went to prison. My father actually is out of prison. He's not in prison anymore, and it sucks that he's out. I wish he was still there. Oh, yeah. I wanted to go back because all he wants to do is father's sight. Don't like do we pay rent? Now it's over. The Lucas Brothers connection to Newark got the attention of New Jersey Senator Cory Booker in 1999, then a Newark City councilman, Booker went on a hunger strike in front of the Garden spires. He also served as the city's mayor. Here's Booker talking to the Lucas brothers on his instagram. I love your insightful, hard hitting humor and the sort of the Eddie Murphy and S O. My great heroes Coming up, you know, were uncompromising how they used humor to shake folks woke like book arm. Keith and Kenny Lucas went to law school and why you and Duke, But unlike Booker, they dropped out. It was weird Tonto Study law and and kind of be poor and black because it's like, Oh, I see what The consequences of policy and law are like on a daily basis, and especially when it in relation to African Americans and the notion of criminality and how it's projected onto blacks and I see that process. I found myself sort of disengaged very early. I always said, you know what I want to do something that has a direct impact on people. From an emotional standpoint, Judas and the Black Messiah is very emotional. Lucas brothers were in college when they first learned about Fred Hampton, the charismatic leader of the Illinois Black Panther Party in the 19 sixties in the movie he's played by Daniel Cholula, Mother Liberating You can't Murder Liberation is another revolutionary, but you can't murder a revolution for murder Freedom fighter, but you get amount of freedom. He's the Black Messiah. Judas is William O'Neal, an African American who was arrested for interstate car theft and Impersonating a federal officer in the movie. We see how the FBI recruited O'Neill to avoid jail time and earn some money. He was instructed to infiltrate the Black Panther Party. And provide the FBI with information about Hampton O'Neill is played by like Keith Stanfield Target You Like some good information, some nobody else No. Is it some kind of bonuses? I'm I'm counting on it. Bill O'Neill became so much of a Panther insider. He was put in charge of security. He provided the FBI with a floor plan of Hampton's apartment in 1969. The Chicago police raided the apartment and killed two Black Panther leaders, including Hampton for the Lucas Brothers. It was essential to tell the story of how the FBI recruited informants in the black community. I think it's important to see just how insidious The system has been in turning young African Americans against one another. Now they Essentially used poor black people against poor black people to execute their goals of minimizing the threat of black messiah is like we just felt it was important to see both sides of the coin. Whether it's a historical drama or its stand up comedy for the Lucas Brothers. It all comes from the same source in a big thing about our act is that we we always try to ground it and stuff that we've gone through, and it's always been Important for us to talk about these systemic issues and a variety of ways. Now they're writing and will star in Seth McFarland reimagining of 1980 four's Revenge of the Nerds Practice a bunch after school. They called US nerds. So one cool. The Lucas brothers promise that their movie will be almost nothing like the original because times have changed. It's like the juxtaposition of being a bully and a nerd is so different from what it was like in the eighties, where you had this one, a stark dichotomy between what it was bullying what it was to be a nerd. Now that's been fused together, and I think That's why the time is right to make a story about that. The Lucas brothers say it's hard to watch the original revenge of the nerds. Even though the movie was a childhood staple. They're excited to give it an update and to make it personal. Elizabeth Blair. NPR news

Lucas Lucas Brothers Keith Lucas Booker Elizabeth Blair Max Npr Senator Cory Booker Newark City Newark Kenny Lucas Revenge Of The Nerds FBI New Jersey Illinois Black Panther Party Daniel Cholula Judas William O'neal Kenny Netflix HBO
Egypt and the Arab Winter

Between The Lines

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Egypt and the Arab Winter

"Arab spring. Well who doesn't love a democratic revolution. Who's not moved by. Brave protests is calling for the downfall of a brutal regime well a decade ago. That's precisely what happened in the streets of cairo and alexandria a wall of sound as egypt's vice president. I'm sulaiman announces that president hosni mubarak will step down the merciful. The compassionate seasons mahamat house entrusting mubarak has decided a month as president of the republic might have seconds after the announcement. Cairo erupted in celebrations. We are extremely happy. We are all aspiring future for egypt. We are not depending on the government anymore. This is the egyptian people. And this is the base of the new constitution now. The worldwide far the greater the egyptian uprising that culminated in the downfall of mubarak. This is ten years ago so february. Twenty eleven all. That was entirely understandable. Wasn't it after all all revolutions at least in the first few days they blissful and remember every tarn across the water arab world trembled. We already had president ali. Fleeing tunisia albany mubarak of course was toppled. Gaddafi was killed by fellow libyans. Assad of course. Vice the syrian sunni rebellion however. The egyptian uprising did not deliver a democratic outcome. Nor did the cycled arab spring really amount to a more liberal future for the region. Why noah feldman is professor of law at harvard law school. He's author of the arab winter. Tragedy noah welcome to. Abc's radio national. Thank you for having me take us back a decade ago so to the wave of popular protests that swept the middle east. There was something profoundly moving for anybody who cares about freedom in watching large numbers of people say enough is enough. We want to have a say in how things are done in our country and we want dignity and we want social justice and we want freedom. And that i think was the reason that all over the world people responded so positively to the arab spring. It's also the reason that the impulse to have these kinds of protests and change spread across the arabic speaking world to so many countries and so there was a sense of optimism but also a sense of gee what will come next and i think in some countries more than others a worry that what might come next might not be as positive as the protesters hoped what comes next. I mean for generations. It was widely believed that arabs. As opposed to site asians europeans africans latin americans. The widespread view was that arabs. Were uniquely allergic to democracy and of course the arab spring challenged narrative yet use site new book quote. It brought little good. The arab spring ultimately made many people's lives worse than they were before house are. That's a painful realization to reach especially for someone like me who believes very fundamentally that there is no country no culture no group of people organized by region or religion or language who have less in the way of aspiration to self government and freedom than any other but ultimately the reason i can conclude that it brought more harm than good. Is that in egypt. The process that began with democratization and experiment ended in a new dictatorship is bad and in many ways worse than the one that came before in syria the process of arab spring ultimate gave way to a vicious improve civil war. The gun to be sure by the syrian regime in its own defense that left almost half the population displaced either internally or externally and killed hundreds of thousands of people and pretty much the place in the arab world where things are measurably better as a result of the arab. Spring is the tiny country of tunisia. Which has actually the odds to build a functioning constitutional democracy. They still a lot of other problems. But that's just a tiny tiny piece of the much bigger picture in which things are either no better or in some cases much worse

Mubarak President Hosni Mubarak Mahamat House Egypt President Ali Noah Feldman Sulaiman Cairo Alexandria Tunisia Assad Gaddafi Harvard Law School Albany ABC Middle East Syria
Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | Last month

Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

Nepal Bassett Village Foundation University Of Chicago Indiana Sarah Safari Himalayas Jeff Gauchan Mount Everest Base Camp Trail
Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

Marketplace

03:42 min | Last month

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

"Facebook has created its own sort of Supreme Court. It's an oversight board that has the final say on some of its hardest decisions over what users can and cannot post. Today. That board issued its first rulings it ordered the social network to restore several posts that it had removed for breaking Facebook rules. NPR TECH correspondent Shannon Bond joins us now to explain Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So we should first note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon tell us a little more about some of the cases this board considered. Yeah, there were five and total announced today. And in each of these, the board was reviewing post that Facebook had taken down for violating policies against things like hate speech, nudity and harmful misinformation about covert 19. And when you dig into the details of these rulings, you know, enforcing these rules is really complicated. And ultimately, the board overturned. Facebook's decision to remove in four of these first five cases, huh? Okay, so give us a quick example. Right. So in one case, Facebook had removed a post from a user in Myanmar, who had suggested there was something wrong with Muslims and Facebook says this broke its rules against hate speech. This is an especially fraught issue because, of course, Facebook has been criticized for its role in the genocide of the country's Muslim minority. The board looked at this and said, You know, if you take into consideration the full context this post was pejorative. But the board didn't think it crossed the line into hate speech. And so it said, Facebook needs more justification. If it's going to take down post like this. And the board told Facebook to reinstate it Now Facebook has agreed to abide by these rulings and the post is already back up. Wait. So who is on this board? Exactly? Admit up of 20 international experts. They're mainly and things like law and human rights. But there's also a Nobel peace Laureates and journalists and even the former prime minister of Denmark. It was created by Facebook last year, and it's funded by Facebook through an independent trust. And do you think these decisions give us any clues as to how the board sees its overall role? I spoke to Evelyn Do ek Harvard Law School lecture has been following the board very closely. These five cases even though it's only five cases out of the thousands or millions of decisions that Facebook makes in awake are a true shot across the bow from the oversight board to Facebook. She says. It's a shot across the bop bow because the board is taking aim directly at some of Facebook's policies and enforcement, you know, warned about the extent to which the company relies on artificial intelligence that says those systems need more human oversight. It emphasized taking context into account, and it wants Facebook to just be much more clear about its rules on policies like health, misinformation or Dangerous groups. You know, Elsa, we know Facebook has this immense power over what it's billions of users composed. Now it's created this board and from what we've seen today, the board has ambitions to be a real check on that power. You know, it's kind of flexing its muscles so interesting. Well, what I did notice is we did not here today about Facebook's decision to suspend former President Trump after The whole insurrection at the Capitol in January. 6th. What do we know about the board's review of that case? Right. Facebook reviewed the Trump suspension to the board last week. This is the case everyone has their eyes on. Of course, right. It's a huge deal. The board is opening up for public comment tomorrow, and it has about three months to make a ruling, And ultimately it's going to be up to the board to settle this very fraught debate over whether Trump should get his account back, so we'll stay tuned. That is NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks, Elsa.

Facebook Shannon Bond Shannon Elsa MPR Ek Harvard Law School NPR Supreme Court Myanmar Evelyn Denmark President Trump Donald Trump
interview With Sana Saeed

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:36 min | Last month

interview With Sana Saeed

"Welcome to abuse congruence. The american muslim experience episode one. Oh wait. I'm sorry you're codes and as usual. I enjoin by. Hey welcome back listeners. Welcome back We this is our first episode of twenty twenty one but it feels like a lots already happened in this very short year or short lived year. So far we've got a lot but here we are on good to be back and get you back with. You are things i guess. All things being equal These k- Have some family members were affected by cove. Unfortunately so bring them Just distracted long. I mean china. Try not to get distracted by polit political stuff and keeping on it super interesting but other than that just getting back in the swing of things in life and that of course keeping the family members who who were in their situation some. Yeah i mean interesting about the political stuff being kind of The least of all adjectives as you describe it but anyway we're super excited to have our guest on the show today and omer if you wanna honored as long as marquess. Absolute son is the is the host in senior producer who has been with. Aj plus since two thousand fourteen hoping. Watch the channel. She's a canadian so most of her life in the us and is interested in politics. Religion culture end She works to stay out arguments on twitter as she has a background in media critique and analysis in has had worked in appear in the new york times the la times courts the guardian salon. And of course aj so. Hey thanks so much for having me happy to be here. Yeah it's great and so you. Avoid twitter fights that that that defeats the whole purpose of revenue on this show. I mean usually told us that when we were booking. I'm i'm jay. Try to successful at avoiding twitter fights. That's right. I'm relatively new to twitter and I've unfortunately gone up on the deep end and But which is some of the stuff. I'd love to talk to you about as someone who obviously studies media is involved in media and I i i'm sure as social media being a part of that so But yeah i guess before. We get into that meteors stuff on not to say that Will be what i do want to start off with is not me but i'd love to kind of talk about your background in as we like to call it the origin story. So tell us about says aids origin story and We we'd love to hear that. I know that you did spend some time in the bay area. So i'm i know that's where our paths crossed on. However i know there's so much more to the story we love to hear that and you could start way back as a as you'd like sure yeah So i was actually born in pakistan. I was born in lahore and My family background is kashmiri And we're lake whereas a lot of kashmir's inbox on her infant job as well. We're like the pajama fight. Kashmiri's but like my family is extreme has actually retained a lot of kashmiri customs and identity. It's been that's always been really interesting. The way we kind of have balanced those two identities very strongly And like my family also emigrated from kashmir basically at like a little bit before and during the the petition. Yeah during the partition. So yeah i was born in exxon. And when i was about like four or five months old. My parents My dad had already moved at that point. He had moved to the united states. Kind of like take the family business there And my mom. And i filed suit and in nineteen eighty eighty seventy eight. We were in In new york. So when i was in new yorker basically up until the end of ninety nine early two thousand so grew up in initially flushing queens and then eventually to Moved onto a long island. Washington long island which is where i grew up And your basic so. We have citizenship. The only person in my family who has us citizenship is actually my brother. Since he was born there so we then applied for canadian citizenship and ended up in canada and moved to vancouver. I was there for up until i had to go to college then. I moved to montreal. I went to mcgill where i did. I from my undergrad. I studied political science in italy studies. And then i continued on ethicon decided. I'm like don't wanna do law school. Do i want do grad school. I ended up applying to only one loss one one grad school and because my french fluency at that point was not that great. I ended up not getting into the mcgill law school because they do require french fluency so I went to grad school. And i did islamic studies and that was To be honest it was the greatest blessing and it was the greatest blessing. Not because oh you know. You're studying islam except it was a blessing because Doing that masters program really kind of set the stage for i would say my approach to

Twitter Kashmir La Times New York Times China JAY Lahore United States Bay Area Exxon Pakistan Ethicon Mcgill Law School Mcgill New York Washington Vancouver Montreal Canada Italy
Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

UN News

01:30 min | Last month

Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

"New data on the economic impact of covid. Nineteen has confirmed what many have been thinking. Workers haven't been hit like this in generations. According to the international labor organization ilo people trying to earn a living suffered massively in two thousand and twenty after the corona virus started spreading globally. Early last year. Ilo director-general guy. Ryder told journalists on monday that the impact has been four times worse than the last major financial crisis over a decade ago. This has been the most severe crisis for the world of work since the great depression of the nineteen thirty its impact is fault greater than that of the global financial crisis of two thousand nine when comparing with the law school Twenty nine teen. We now see that eight point. Eight percent of global working hours will lost in the course of the year. And that is the equivalent of two hundred and fifty five million full-time jobs. These lost working hours came from reduce time at work or what is called unprecedented levels of unemployment that affected one hundred and fourteen million people. The said that pandemic restrictions may have accounted for the bulk of these people leaving the labor market either because they were unable to work or because they stop looking the un body said that these massive losses resulted in an eight point. Three percent drop in global income from work equivalent to three point seven trillion dollars or four point four percent of the world's economy not taking into account cash subsidies for workers.

ILO Ryder Depression UN
State investigates Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department

All Things Considered

05:07 min | Last month

State investigates Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department

"Sherif al to be in a wave, and his department is facing yet another investigation this time from Sacramento. Today. California Attorney General Have Yerba Sarah announced he's starting a civil rights investigation into the sheriff's department. It's not completely unexpected Vienna Wave has had a contentious relationship with county leaders and his department has been plagued with deputy misconduct allegations and questionable fatal shootings. Watchdog groups like the County Civilian Oversight Commission claimed the department is shrouded in secrecy. Commissioners even called for being away his resignation last fall. One of those commission members is Sean Kennedy. He is the Kaplan and Feldman, executive director for Loyola Law School's Center for Juvenile Law and Policy, and he's here to talk more about all of this. I Sean. Hi, Larry. I got to start here. The attorney general will be looking into whether the policies and practices of the largest sheriff's department in the country has routinely violated people's constitutional rights. What's your take on that? And how unusual is this? I think it's long overdue. There have been allegations for decades about deputy gangs or cliques. Within the Los Angeles Los Angeles Sheriff's Department and Ah lot of county actors have really turned a blind eye to it. So the fact that the state is now investigating it, I think is a real step in the right direction. So you said. You said it's taken a long time. But is this unusual? It's fairly. It's fairly unusual, but when you have had such longstanding allegations about like internal gangs violating people's civil rights Using excessive force filing false reports. It's definitely in order and you know we're really gratified to see that the attorney general is looking into it. Speaking of the attorney general, what kind of power does he have over the department Because Sheriff Ian away the likes to say when other county officials challenge him that he only has to answer to the voters and to the state A G. Well, the Eiji is the top law enforcement officer in the state of California. And while sheriff being a waiver is an elected official, he and his deputies Obviously cannot violate the rights of others or obstruct justice. We know that because one of his predecessors Sheriff Lee Baca is serving time in federal prison for obstructing justice. Bezerra says the action has come in response to the absence of sustained and comprehensive oversight of the department operations. The board that you're on the civilian oversight Commission is supposed to keep an eye on the L. A sheriff's Department. Why has it escalated all the way to the state? Well, you know, we on the civilian oversight commission have the power of persuasion, but it's very difficult to get access to all the information that we need. The sheriff's department is a very close department very inward looking. It resists collaboration and oversight. And so it makes sense that the Department of Justice With all its law enforcement capabilities. Would step in and look into the matter. You mentioned gangs there has been reporting about gangs inside the department. Even from being away was younger deputies. You recently released a report on the impact of these sheriffs, gangs and what you find. Sheriff. Gangs have been in operation since the early seventies. And for 50 years, sheriff after sheriff has downplayed or ignored the problems that these internal Gangs and clicks pose. To constitutional policing in our community and how they really threaten the integrity of our justice system. And so it's just really important this investigation to get to the bottom of what is going on with the sheriff gangs in the department because they create a culture of violence. It increases the number of deputy shootings. And it really calls into question all of the convictions in which secret Deputy gang members have testified as prosecution witnesses. In criminal trials. You know, this is not a criminal investigation, but could what is unearthed in in this investigation become criminal, depending upon upon what Agent Sarah fines I'm sure as the investigation unfolds, will learn that but certainly in the past, I spoke of our prior sheriff Lee Bok. It evolved into a criminal investigation, and so many Allegations about the internal gangs. The executioners of the Bandidos described they gang like activity that results in criminal prosecutions every day. So it wouldn't be a surprise if it did evolve into that. But do you think the subject of these deputy gangs will be part of this investigation? Yes.

Sherif Al Yerba Sarah County Civilian Oversight Comm Sean Kennedy Loyola Law School's Center For Los Angeles Los Angeles Sherif Sheriff Ian Sheriff Lee Baca Bezerra Civilian Oversight Commission California Sheriff's Department Feldman Kaplan Vienna Sacramento Eiji Sean Larry
NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

The Takeaway

01:02 min | Last month

NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

"Of peril but also a time of tremendous possibilities. The head of the end of the Legal Defense and educational Fund says the organization wants a new generation of civil rights lawyers in the South. Now it has a $40 million gift from an anonymous donor to put them through law school. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. LDF president, Caroline Eiffel says the scholarships will focus on the place where most of the LDS cases originate. The South is a critical region in this country for civil rights activism. It is still the region where a majority of black people live. The program is named after two LDF alumni late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker Motley, the first black woman to be a federal Judge. The scholarships will cover tuition, room and board and other training. In return, applicants agree to spend at least eight years working on civil rights cases in the South. Eiffel says they're likely to handle voting rights disparities and housing and education and other cases. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington This

LDF Carrie Johnson Caroline Eiffel Justice Thurgood Marshall Constance Baker Motley NPR Supreme Court Eiffel Washington
Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

"An anonymous donor gives forty million dollars to the N. double ACP legal defense and educational fund to use for scholarships for racial justice law students the LDF says with that money it plans to send fifty students to law school in return they must commit to eight years of racial justice work in the south starting with a two year postgraduate fellowship in the civil rights organization the LDF chose Martin Luther king day to announce the Marshall Molly scholars program named after former Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker motley as lawyers both played a pivotal role that led to the courts brown V. board of ed ruling outlawing racial segregation in public schools I'm Julie Walker

Acp Legal Defense And Educatio LDF Civil Rights Organization Marshall Molly Constance Baker Motley Martin Luther King Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Courts Brown V. Board Of Ed Ru Julie Walker
Charles Yu Talks About Interior Chinatown

The Book Review

04:21 min | 2 months ago

Charles Yu Talks About Interior Chinatown

"Charles. You joins us now from irvine california. His latest novel is interior. Chinatown at just won the national book award for fiction. Charles thanks for being here. Thank you kremlin. I'm excited to be here and let's start with that. Winning the national book award. Your speech was so great. I just loved it because you used seemed genuinely surprised. Don't what was that moment like for you. I was genuinely surprised. I was screaming. As they're reading the citation my family. And i wear all sort of looking at each other and just yelling and we didn't know what to do and my son after while that i think you need to give a speech and so i sort of pulled myself together but i didn't really because then i proceeded to forget to thank my wife my kids and my parents so a half of whom were in the room with me. It was just awful. You know there's a fine tradition. Though i think of of leaving like the most important people out in acceptance speeches hoax out. I don't know. Do you think it would have been different. If it had been in real life. I guess it may must have been nice to even if you forgot to thank them at least have all those people. Those class close family members in the room with you. One of the weird unexpected. I guess benefits of having a virtual ceremony was that we got to hug each other immediately after and then change back into shorts. And why didn't you think you'd win. The chances are pretty good. When they're you know only a certain number of finalists. that's true. I suppose maybe underestimated the chances a little bit but i i don't know it just seems like something that happens to other people. Well it happened to you. I think deservedly. So this is your fourth book affection and they all have really amazing. Titles which i'm gonna read aloud. And then i love you to start. Walk us through them before we talk about this latest novel interior chinatown so the titles are third class superhero. How to live safely in a science fictional universe. And sorry please thank you which is a collection of stories. I mean just those titles thanks. I do enjoy titles. I wish there were a job where you could just title things. Maybe i'm trying to make up that job. I don't know what that would be exactly but yeah it's fun it helps me both. I think sometimes have a handle on what i'm trying to do and also i just imagined when somebody encounters that title. I'm hoping that they get that feeling of. Oh i want to flip to that page and see. What is that you know. It's funny when you say like you wish you could have a job coming up with. Titles i just feel like i have to bring up the fact that writing fiction is not your first job. It's not your only job that you started off as a corporate lawyer. How did you get from that life to this one. Well it took a while. I graduated from law school in two thousand one and as i was supposed to be studying for the bar I found myself in the bookstore instead. Reading george saunders and lorrimore and and people like that and and just kind of diving into the world of i guess contemporary fiction at that time and just getting really excited about it and i think also procrastinating from studying and so then i I started to write these sort of weird. The first thing i wrote was A love story. That is a set of physics problems like that you would find an undergraduate physics textbook Thought i don't know what this is but it's something to do you know on nights and weekends when i'm waiting for waiting for the senior associate to tell me all things did wrong in my merger agreement so severe that it. It'd be it was just this sort of thing. I was doing on the side for many years. And somehow i was creeping towards this. Tv land without even realizing it. Because a few years ago. I i was at work at the time working in house for a tech company as a lawyer and i got a call to come meet for potential spot on the writing staff of this show westworld and i thought well this is. This is not going to happen. And but somehow they hired me so so that was few years ago. And that's what i've been doing since as my day job

National Book Award Irvine Charles California George Saunders
"law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"I. Love The name of Your Book We have today on habits and Hustle we have Alexandra Carter the book ask for more. The title is amazing. I mean I live by this motto my entire life though I was it caught my eye right away. And you're also a college professor. You're you're a negotiator for a lot. Was it for for Fortune Five, hundred companies and for Why don't you take it from here, give us a little bit of the background story on you, and then we can kind of dive into the questions I have for you. Yes sure. So I'm a fulltime law professor I'm a Professor at Columbia Law School where I teach negotiation and mediation. I. Also train diplomats at the United Nations I talked to Fortune five hundred companies. Basically, I've spent the last decade helping thousands of people around the world learn to negotiate better and feel more confident doing it. and. What I loved about my I started the book I mean a lot of people who listen to this podcast. No negotiation is right because that's more or less my audience. However I love the way that you define negotiation because that's not what let's not typically how we say it. So would you say your steering the conversation? So kind of tell us what, what, how you what's your definition of what a negotiation is? Yeah. Well, this goes back to my honeymoon in Hawaii actually in two thousand six ages ago and my husband, and I got in a Kayak on the why Lou River beautiful scenery. And the guy looked back at us and says, please negotiate your kayaks to the left. So we can wind up on that each and that Jen was the moment I realized that there's more than one way to think about negotiation it's not just the back and forth over money right before you sign a contract with the client or that once a year conversation you have with your manager negotiation is actually steering. It's any conversation in which you are steering a relationship and. That includes the relationship you have with yourself. You know I think it's so interesting. I. Love the title of Your podcast Right Habits and Hustle, and I think when I think about habits, you know we talk about fueling ourselves with.

professor Alexandra Carter Jen United Nations Columbia Law School Professor Lou River Hawaii
"law school" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"law school" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"One Sunday night fifty five years ago tens of millions of Americans gathered to watch television broadcast of judgment at Nuremberg dramatic depiction of the post World War Two trials of German judges for their behavior during the Holocaust. . With star studded cast it promised ratings gold. . Once underway news alerts interrupted the broadcast that showed civil rights activists including the late John Lewis being beaten on the Edmund Pettus. . Bridge. . Since judgment at Nuremberg addressed the culpability of ordinary Germans for Nazi atrocities. . The juxtaposition of the images was striking and helped galvanize public support for what would become the voting. . Rights Act. . But the leaders of the civil rights movement were not the first to utilize the most modern means of communication available to them to bring about social. . Change. . Since the dawning of the American experiment, , social movements have long captivated our attention to advances in communications technology. . The sons of liberty utilize the printing press, , the women's movement of the Mid Nineteenth Century the telegraph. . But the technology itself has not brought about change no in addition to utilizing advances and communications technologies these and other successful social movements have also operated through grassroots networks built on face to face encounters and embraced positive unifying messages that stress shared interests over difference. . Today we facing unprecedented public health crisis that keeps us out of physical distance must also confront dramatic racial and economic inequalities. . As, , advocates have done in the past though we can leverage technology to create community across distance to see that we are deeply connected and must work together to bring about lasting change that was very brush of Albany, , law? ? School. .

communications technology Albany Lynn Pascarella Nuremberg Association of American colleg Rabe Russia Edmund Pettus professor of law John Lewis President
"law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Strauss of the university of Chicago law school there the office of the new book democracy and equality the end during constitutional vision of the Warren court David explained the significance of the court in law and in history I think it is significant in two ways one is that it tackled a real problems that's been at the heart of American life from the beginning that's the problem of race discrimination racial subordination of African Americans in the Warren court tackled that problem when the other branches of government were not willing to spend however much progress it made it made progress and that is a permanent part of the pharmacy and no other court in our history tackled that problem we can make progress on the way to work with it that's one thing I'd say the other is really just a more general version of that which is the Warren court saw as its mission to look out for the people who are not getting a fair shake in society and it started with African Americans in the Jim crow south with the Warren court's view was a more universal one and extended to for example criminal defendants political dissidents religious minorities and eventually near the end of its time a little bit four people and it's thought that's what the Supreme Court should be doing it should be sticking up to the people who are not getting a fair shake elsewhere just do you want to add to that my guess I would add that the war court also gave over time a sense of why we need to do for review why we need courts to enforce the constitution and that was something the framers themselves understood it was basically because we love democracy but we know democracy flawed and we know sometimes it can be flawed in serious ways two of the ways in which is most obvious that democracy will not work the way in which one might hope it does is first in its treatment of people who are seen as the other whether they be African Americans or women or gays or or any group at any moment time is seen as the outsider that majorities will tend not to give him a fair shake and you need courts with life tenure the step in those circumstances and ensure that the government in fact acts properly and the other has to do with democracy part of it in the sense that one of the other temptations that majorities will have is to manipulate the political process in order to retain their power and they will pass laws about poll taxes and literacy tests and gerrymandering and so on that are designed to undermine the basic principles of democracy in order to ensure that they remain in power and their two one needs courts with judges with life tenure to be able to step in and say no we have a deeper commitment to that and there's sometimes a majority's can't do what they want those two factors the protection of those who are vulnerable and the protection of democracy in the political sense were to the central features of the Warren court and I think they were completely right and those decisions have stood the test of time we now have the Chief Justice who thinks the court should remain above the political fray who says justices should just call balls and strikes Jeff how does that contrast with Chief Justice Earl Warren's view well I I think it doesn't mean anything to be perfectly honest it's utterly hypocritical the reality is that the major cases the Supreme Court has the ones that are most important most controversial aren't about balls and strikes they were about complex difficult challenging issues this is the notion of calling balls and strikes really has very little meaning we were talking about a case like brown V. board of education or a case like citizens United there is no balls and strikes those are very hard questions that require serious judgment and beyond that courts and justices do need a principled approach to the exercise of their very large power that you're given under the constitution and pretend that all you're doing is calling balls and strikes is simply to port to hide the reality of the judgments that you make David the Warren court has been criticized as being too activists and changing the law rather than following it imposing its own vision on society how do you answer those criticisms read it to them in two ways first of all the Warren court was in its bones deeply democratic and here's what I mean by that some of the most important decisions of the Warren court decisions that actually expanded democracy and needed help like the one person one vote decisions and we quote in the book from an interview or a warrant gave way to his career where he said you know if we have been able to decide the one person one vote decisions earlier brown against board of education would have been unnecessary because the democratic process would have solved the problem no I think that's a little bit naive but it reflected the attitude that pervaded the Warren court which is our primary commitment is the democracy and we're only going to step in and where we think there is some malfunction democracy and then we'll just try to fix the malfunction coming up on Bloomberg law more on the Warren court's landmark decisions I'm June Grasso and.

Strauss university of Chicago law scho
"law school" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"law school" Discussed on KTOK

"In Georgetown law school and again his latest is treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail David Brody welcome back to coast to coast AM how are you I'm doing great thank you for having me tonight so let's start off with a rather important definition of the knights Templar who were day they were basically the army of the medieval church from the early parts of the eleven hundreds to the early parts of the thirteen hundreds and they became probably the most powerful force in all of Europe during that time period they acquire the amazing amounts of welfare as I said the army of the church they fought in the crusades they were gifted a lot of land by nobility something that they discovered in Jerusalem when they're over the Middle East made an incredibly powerful we're not quite sure what that was some kind of treasure or secret and then just as quickly they were outlawed by the church and that's a whole nother story will get to that I'm sure as we go along right so these the theory is that perhaps allegedly they discovered vast fortunes gold and other treasures beneath the remnants of Solomon's temple is at the idea a critical yes that city they discovered something that would nine nights went over there and then almost instantly they came back to Europe and became incredibly powerful so I mean that's one of the questions that no one really knows the answer to what did they find when they were excavating under king Solomon's temple was it gold and silver and treasure possibly was the ancient secrets of Christianity that they at the church didn't want to be revealed and so that the Templar knights use that to leverage themselves into a position of power did they find religious artifacts such as the holy grail of the ark of the covenant did they find.

Georgetown law school Europe Jerusalem Middle East Solomon David Brody
"law school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"law school" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"I am providing peace of mind yeah. That's that's the first thing you're providing yeah that's true because they try okay. I got it. I go my gosh. We gotta get beautiful flowers. Where we're GONNA you go okay? I've heard about Samantha and her husband going to and you they walk in and you make them feel really good and they see all your stuff. They done the past and they immediately go like this okay. Am I right yeah yeah. That's true okay thing about so the first thing he provided US peace of mind but the second thing you second thing you provide and I love that you said feeling but what really is is you're providing the frame of the memory The the flowers frame up the entire event when people walk in they go oh father's beautiful the bride's excited the mother of the bride's excited excited. Everybody else walks in and says how beautiful it is and so you get this really important day but it's really it's twofold. It's about the pride died in the moment at my wedding is beautiful. My flowers are beautiful. Therefore my wedding is beautiful. The dress has got the same ocean attached to it slightly higher flowers but the same idea mhm so when you look at it that way and again if it's okay if you say Kenneth but I just wonder if you needed a change of perspective that when you look at it that way I think there's a lot of depth to what you do. You're in the memory. Making business is what I think yeah. I guess I mean that's true. I don't know why I wonder if that matters. Though I guess I hold my gun I know let me ask skew this. What have you ever talked to a bride before the wedding or after a wedding when they actually have been flowers got delivered? Have you ever heard Korea from them. Oh yeah example give me an example of a sample conversation. That's happened. Oh I just last week. I got a huge hug hug from the bribe when I came to pick everything up after the reception and she said everything was perfect goes beautiful everyone was complimenting on it and oh my gosh just got a big hug and how did that feel. It feels great. I didn't have to do that then you need to receive that. I think your heart is extremely fulfilled. I think your brains playing games with you. That's what I think because you just said after I did all of that walked you you throw that you go oh. I don't know if it matters. Are you kidding me. You know how important word of that bride in that moment you were super for important so give me a break Samantha of course you map of course you matter you matter bigtime this. This is the biggest day in the life of these brides it really is and and you're the one making beautiful her words were it was beautiful full. Everybody talked about it. They love my wedding. That's huge. Come on Samantha. You matter big time what you do. We'll be shown for decades in picture books online. Are you kidding me. Your work gets displayed all over social media. You're a hero for that day because you gave him peace of mind and some beauty come come on folks Alah Samantha's out there really break down what you do for people run. That exercise was the last time he had a really satisfied customer what they say how they feel. How did you feel that will give you clarity coming up next my conversation with Andy Brink? This is the Ken Coleman Show Hey folks kids have started it back to school and if you've got more time on your hands and you're ready to complete that degree is time to check out my friends at liberty. University Liberty has over four hundred unique league online degree programs so whatever your interest or passion Dave Guy which you need earned the degree or certificate you want and you don't have to wait till the spring. There are eight start dates per year. Most classes are in eight week formats now. Here's some better news. They frozen their tuition for the next two years so if you get in now now rates won't change through June twenty twenty one and what's even better than that. They're gonNA be giving away more money..

Alah Samantha US Kenneth Ken Coleman University Liberty Korea Andy Brink Dave Guy eight week two years
"law school" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"law school" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"During the day went to georgetown law school at night had two kids at the same time then got a job with venable the largest law firm at the time probably still is the largest law firm in baltimore he went to work there he eventually led the tax department he represented some of the largest corporations in baltimore and he was the most low key individual you've ever met he never bragged about his clients is business while he also didn't talk about anything when he was with me or my brothers sister or my mom it was only about us and nothing to do with his business wasn't thinking about business he wasn't taking calls he it was just about us he had that ability to focus on us i mean as a kid growing up i remember he used to come home have dinner with us them most nights then he would hang out with us play ball outback whatever and then we'd had upstairs take showers and dad would head back downtown to work and you know what i have no idea what time he came home but he was always there for breakfast the next morning so he ran a the the tax department at the largest law firm in baltimore he had three kids he really was had lots of student loans and he had time for everybody he also helped many members of our family.

baltimore georgetown law school
"law school" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Thank you for being in law school with us we'll be right back stay with us father patrick conroy has served as chaplain of the house of representatives for the last seven years until last month when the most unexpected headline on tax day was that house speaker paul ryan fired the priest and he wasn't saying why the speaker demanded father conway's resignation father conway said okay but there was no explanation as to why he was being forced out speculation immediately focused on a prayer the chaplain had read about the republican tax bill quote may their efforts these days guarantee that there are not winners and losers under new tax laws but benefits balanced and shared by all americans blessed are the poor the first shall be last father conroy was cast out well today he came back he unquiet he wrote a letter to house speaker paul ryan today saying quote at this time and upon advice of counsel i hereby retracting rescinded my resignation and then he lists of a few reasons quote on friday april thirteenth year chief of staff came to me and informed me that you were asking for my letter of resignation i inquired as to whether or not it was four caused your staffer mentioned dismissively something like maybe it's time we had a chaplain that wasn't catholic paul ryan's chiefofstaff tonight denies that allegation but the chaplain has levied that charge that maybe he was canned with a snide remark about it being time for somebody not catholic but the chaplain unquote today and thereupon speaker ryan thinking better the matter decided to unfair him as well so as of tonight father patrick conroy now returns to service as chaplain in the house as it was in the beginning shall it be more at least until someone else praise for equality.

patrick conroy paul ryan father conway of counsel chief of staff seven years
"law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The third when i think um at the this project when when when the law school we sort of study the so the highest rate of recidivism in the hague where it's like recidivism because it's so much buried in what does it mean of a set of eight france there's an and connecticut the right immune support the highest rate is growing violations but a parole violation can literally mean like i watched my hearing i was sitting in on these hearings unaided noted i've been forming concentrated they decimated of the year law student in one guy was living with his girlfriend who just had a child a he will be staying overnight he had an ankle bracelet he was stayed overnight because he was the care given when she was at work they valley the probation for not being at home so darn a hearing they stepped them back for eight months at the end of the here he say can i changed my address right had just the baby about move to another country anna he gave the address of his girlfriend in a row for say that's fine so he got violated full to his girlfriend's house and then upon his release he was given permission to gortat so this is completely a waste of eight months and so the question is what can we do besides being a form that this is happening and we study for a few months and consistently technical violation tech guellec's technical violation none of it was serious enough to warrant another criminal offence all latest somebody dome what time in prison between three months in a year more in prison one of the things that we could do is find ways the be on the parole board like d this is like a a ministry of agency wait with with broad discretion and zero oversight and nobody i know has ever say i would like to be on a parole board like we haven't really thought about how to make up a people who are in those positions drought i actually think administrative law is the way to we have to really think about changing and decrease in the prison population because as people who are already in prison in not getting back in court in that gonna be recent rescinds so we really have to thoughtfully figure out how to me clemency where unomig parole.

law school france connecticut gortat eight months three months
"law school" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And and my family so uh thank you thank you thank you for that brought the story to i went to law school at in michigan and my aunt listen detroit's on visiting my aunt i'm a second year law student in my aunt is very popular in the neighborhood and people would sometimes dropped by and say a lower end so as i was talking to my aunt this man comes by an says load of my annan and pair of their friends and they're sitting there and he's drinking and were talking about law school and i'm telling them of course as i'm telling her the courses i'm taking she asked me about this asking me about that and i look up henry and this man is crying and i thought i thought we were going to finish the mice excuse me are you okay he said i'm just crying because i always wanted to go to law school and did he said this but i caught up in a bunch of jack assery and i'm mad at myself end of quote bring now you proper that last night now you better praying dot com often all right i got involved with a lot of things that i shouldn't have gotten involved and passed up a lot if i could have done it differently i probably would have uh it didn't know set for my kids do you know not to have my kids out a much he'll but i'd i did the same thing i got involved in a lot of stuff and did that no and kinda messed up a few opportunities but i'm at a point now i'm at the point now where i to change live i wanna i wanna help these beat the young man this very big killing each other after right no they are humane which in what you don't and what you've done henry as you said and what you said henry is you take responsibility for the mistakes that you've made and you're not blaming the white man you're not blaming republicans do not blaming donald trump this is a message your sent into these kid and it's a powerful positive message henry you're already changing this country you already are going to revive apple forty seven thousand power and i know half that off you out through the number would grow people if you if you if.

law school detroit henry jack assery donald trump michigan apple
"law school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And my family so uh thank you thank you thank you for that it's a story to i went to law school in michigan and my aunt in detroit's on building my aunt i'm a second year law student in my aunt is very popular in the neighborhood and people with sometimes dropped by and say hello to her and so as i was talking to my aunt this man comes by and says load of my annan and pair of their friends and they're sitting there and he's drinking and we're talking about law school and i'm telling them the courses i'm telling her the courses i'm taking he's asked me about this asking me about that and i look up henry and this man is crying and i thought it going to finish the mice excuse me are you okay he said i'm just crying because i always wanted to go to law school and lilley he said this but i caught up in a bunch of jack assery and i'm mad at myself in the quote bring now you proper lat now you better praying that's what i'm talking about right there i've got involved with a lot of seeing then i shouldn't have gotten involved with and passed a lot if i could have done it differently i probably would have uh it there's no set for my kids you know not to have my kids i love my children but i'd be at the same thing i got involved in a lot of stuff and did that none of and kinda messed up a few opportunities but i'm at a point now where i'm at the point now where i wanted change live i want to i want to help these beat the young folk main every day killing each other and right no they are humane which in what you don't and what you've done henry you said and what you said henry is you take responsibility for the mistakes that you've made and you're not blaming the white man you're not blaming republicans do not blaming donald trump this is a message you're sending to these kids and it's a powerful positive message henry you're already changing this country you already are active wherever apple forty seven thousand power and i know after i talk to you without clear number would grow but people if you if.

law school detroit henry jack assery donald trump michigan
"law school" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"About also the opposition to this obviously there is some from the law school admission council which administers the l sat this would obviously mean a drop in revenue for them but the council also argues that b l set is an essential test to prepare law school students for what they'll expect once they start their courses that's right people who are big supporters of the all sat say it's not just about making people take a certain tests us to take it but that the actual act of preparing and taking the test gives a little bit of a sense of what you might find a law school and therefore may be some people take it and decide oh i didn't like with grant they don't wanna go to law school where jerry applicants wouldn't have that measure and so yeah l second particular the group that makes the attritional test is very concerned about this trend and both because of their own revenue and because they just very strongly fully than of quality of their test as a marker for who kept succeed unlawful and what about the american bar association what do they have to say about the change yes so they've been anna interests think position where under accreditation rules up till now schools needed provide a valid and reliable emissions tests and they don't specify in the accreditation requirements that it must be the lcd but up until now that's been the only test use in so schools are now arguing that the jury is just as valid and reliable on their pudding or studies that show that and so the aba is kind of grappling with that and then there are also just considering doing away with the requirement that you need in admissions test which would then just cleared away for schools either have a test or not and do whatever they want okay i've been speaking with wall street journal reporter sara renzo sara thanks so much for joining me thanks from us and finally could you live in an amazon only world wall street journal reporter catherine been went on the amazon diet for a week to find out just how many of her life's needs could be met solely by the online retail giant and from electronics to food amazon recently acquired whole foods the company certainly has a lot covered so do you think you can live on.

law school american bar association amazon catherine retail giant jerry wall street journal reporter sara renzo
"law school" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"Work i've managed to save up enough money i don't have to do anything i'm just waiting to leave for law school so i could all my jobs that was the glue and free including the aerobics job that however i continued the same eating habits where i wouldn't eat all day long and then inhale whatever i could find in my fridge and then pass out on my face was a kind of like a restrict binge psycho gsee jack it wasn't a deliberate restrict binge cycle as in something that like i was trying to restrict all day because i was trying to achieve a we or do anything like that which which i have done in the past as well it is or of a this is just how i eat now because i run run run all day long and then i worry about getting nutrients into my body but i wasn't choosing nutrients in hourly new body in their right mind their body doesn't create jelly beans after running all day like that don't get me wrong i have days when i eat jelly beans but that's not all i need it and i wasn't wasn't aware enough for a tune enough to know that i needed other things to keep going it was like this is energy and this will do you now widow as starburst in the couch whatever okay gr you ineligible know that that big spent of my paying attention in my nutrition at the time and my body responded as anybody that's been abused for over a year this point in time by fluctuating and changing and for me that fluctuation looked like rapid weight gain at other points in my life for instance right now i have a chronic illness ever richard arthritis now so fibromyalgia my.

law school
"law school" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Harvard law school in teacher professors a thing or two a few few months later i happened to bump into him at another event and he made only remembered million he asked well how did it how did that work when i brought it all back to las cool i said well joe fiscally i have bad news i brought it back to my school and the professors overruled you unanimously quickly a laugh because he understood all too well the situation of law school uh and how his approaches shooters constitutional approach this methodology is basic premise these were so at odds then and now with the dominant theories of constitutional law practice the most law school i learned from you that when justice scalia spoke at law schools or spoke before law students he was looking to disrupt them in some fashion any haven et declares that he wrote his descends for law students what is it that he was seeking to achieve by disrupting those of us who just memorize well justice scalia had in mind disruption of the best and not disruption will away the campus loser disrupted now unfortunately but what he meant was he was there it intellectually shake the students up a little bit especially the one who but exposed in a serious way too textual is emerge or ridge it'll is almost ideal uh interpreting the constitution in accordance with how it's words were understood by the generation that made those words with the law school year would come to campus he would give talks in an effort to spread that message but you mentioned the also wrote defending opinions and so many supreme court cases and those content by john who is owned admission uh were aimed at the next generation of lawyer so he'd already in any one case where he was defending use all the wrong end of the case and that is his side had lost his view it lost justice scalia was left to explain in detail for a generation of law students what a better wade to.

Harvard law school constitutional law law school justice scalia john wade joe
"law school" Discussed on AM-1230 WJOB

AM-1230 WJOB

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on AM-1230 WJOB

"Have a hard time working for the state of indiana because we start with an average salary of fifty thousand dollars coming out of law school so so you get a lot of training you get a lot of experience so your value rose up very quickly because you're now practicing as a fulltime lawyering you're not working up as a junior partner associate uh so people often leave but i do think that the the cost of um law school and the debt burden as really kind of making it difficult to get people into the public sector and i think it does kind of affect the practice of the private sector 1982 and new graduated law school gap and now the perception of lawyers well i don't know that it's increased with all the advertising but i do think that uh you know there's a little bit of a self uh uh made a professional standards that have gone down because i think these civility among lawyers the way you treat one another is a profession has decreased uh and i think that really reflects poorly on the profession so when i see you know lawyers in my office we really train people that if somebody needs in iowa fabre other a professional service may get a paper from the state uh we we try to be uh let's say show our respect for the other professional even though i don't know that it's always returned inkind gladys you in that also the lack of collegiality i believe you put it in that i can say never really noticed sad i think like today i'm going to the hispanic our party and so forth seems like everybody of gets along or one of the organisations i belong to the gia the be actually do so many trials to be admitted into an and you get rankings based upon me clauses the boda rekkem protocol advocates and.

indiana law school partner iowa fifty thousand dollars
"law school" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

WGSO 990AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"law school" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

"The ad council or fees accenture that she had this passion for romance and i think it's very cool that we have romance novelist lawrence smith with us and she is written on of books but what's really really cool about her to she is a secret she's a lawyer by day and a fantasy novelist by night lauren thanks so much for joining us on the show thank you for having me so when i say lawyer by day and then you're this fantasy novelists by night tell us about that that's intriguing well you know it county which like you're talking about with your mother and romancenovel i had never read romance novel and kill i wish in law school law school is such a gruelling structural process and i just remember thinking i needed a way to escape and i would aid reader had been writing at third grade and one of my friend thank you know you great blustery have you ever heard of romance oh my gosh now i don't read that now i we i read that right look i'm good for that and then i started reading them cry with flown away fight the writing it quality of the stories that research at the writers cut in and i i know what i really love towards that march to ready to art cheese can they aren't cliche air about characters overcoming obstacles to be together and solving problems and i put darren did that i thought fit garner had such a bad rap and the stories our show captivating and wonderful i thought i want to write that and so i survived to wash core by reading romantic and writing romances and then it just kind of took off and it became this kind of way to survive the stress of being a lawyer because during the day i would be stuck in court all day and i would kind of just you know in between my case it on the rockets i would go out my notebook and just kind of right here there and it okay calmed me down and kind of help me find my again were you ever in writing in those stolen moments during your date.

accenture lawrence smith law school darren lauren
"law school" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"law school" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"A generation of kids the gun fired up motivated dedicated to become an lawyers sure the accept not many women know there were in my in my class justice the loyola law school uh there were three women out of the ninety six of us and i gave a talk through dave dino at loyola a couple of months ago and loyola has more women than men as for school really i law school in ever had more women than men than school i think the reason i i didn't want to be a lawyer in the sixth grade is is not only that i didn't know any but i didn't see any women lawyers there were no real month i didn't even consider the possibility of being a lawyer i thought about being a businesswoman because my grandmother had been a business one but i didn't think about that and tell someone said yes you can do it you know at one time there was i think there was a massive bias against women lawyers especially in the courtroom without a doubt jews expect you to all due to be trying the case not a woman and i truly think that is a thing of the past not only thing of the past minutes become necessary that women on the court relive he go before a jury in any urban county not just woman she needed diverse badge and not just for the sake of symbolism but really participating because the jurors you're not made up today of old white men.

loyola law school dave dino loyola law school
"law school" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"law school" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"All right so you know i have this legal background where i went to law school right so i am no legal scholar i was there and i was i was more focused on like learning political shape the unlike the law per se i was like quickly realized this is a debt in but one of the things that i did learn and held to really and i continue to hold it really closely is our how anti discrimination law actually functions so for example we're like what what is legally possible to deal with issues of racism today is so narrow like like anti discrimination law is pretty much it was invented for black people it was invented to cover racism and it's edits limits it's just a question of enforcement at this point but there's not a whole lot more that people are going to be able to get whereas for like i'm transgender rights they're not covered by into employment discrimination law for example and so there's a lot more room for there to be legal reforms in that domain than for race right so in a sense like because we've reached the limit of lake liberal technocratic topdown reforms you have to add it in a certain way acknowledge the question the materialism question this issue of marxism this issue of life what are the actual relations that are producing these things which coats does on the one in but up on the other him like they're still this this unshakeable attachment to technocratic liberalism in the sense of like okay if we have rigorous empty discrimination laws if we have an authority system that recognizes certain injuries this is still carrying over the kind of legal dr him remind said around there is an injury so there's remedy specific acknowledgement of the injury is attached the remedy whatever.

law school