20 Episode results for "Laurin"

Preakness Stakes special: Interview with Kate Tweedy

Can Do with Bill Duncliffe

33:20 min | 3 months ago

Preakness Stakes special: Interview with Kate Tweedy

"This do podcast is brought to you by Blake. Lbj Thoroughbred Services Blake. Delvina is a full service. Bloodstock agency and consignment company representing clients at every major wholesale in the country. For MORE INFORMATION CALL RUN. Blake at eight five nine three nine six four eight three six or Hensley Albena at eight five nine six to one zero eight zero zero whether an experienced owner or newcomer to the Game Blake. Albina has the knowledge and experience to help you achieve your goals in the third grade industry. The horse right hit the name is Paul Revere. And here's a guy that says foam is clear. This is built on cliff. I want to welcome you back to this special. What should have been preakness week edition of the Candu horseracing? Podcast the podcast about all things horse racing some history some handicapping and some humor the genesis of our two interviews. This week goes back to a visit. I made to claiborne farm. In April of two thousand sixteen we were waiting outside the farm office for the tour to begin located nearby the office where the graves of some of the famous horses. Who made their marks on the track in the breeding shed at claiborne? Pick your area. You'll find a favorite Gallon Fox as Rula Roundtable Mr prospector and many others. But it was too side-by-side grapes that caught my attention more than any others on the right secretariat on the left Riva Ridge. I remember thinking that were it. Not for sloppy track in the preakness. These guys would have held remains a back to back triple crown winners for the breeder owner trainer jockey the entire team remarkable and. I remember thinking how sad it was that but for that rainy track and Baltimore That Day River Ridge might be the most celebrated horse of his generation instead perhaps due to unfortunate weather almost certainly do a secretary at smashing performances in the triple crown series. The following Year River Ridge has been somewhat dare. I say forgotten overshadowed at the very least and that's a shame what I find so enjoyable when I do. These history focused podcast is how many fascinating threats come out as I begin to pull on them K. Tweedy pennies daughter was gracious enough to spend time with me talking about Rear Ridge. We talked about the horse. Of course. Pardon the rhyming there but we also ended up talking about a hellacious forgotten battle of World War Two the birth of the recreational skiing industry in the United States. How some biographical movies out of Hollywood can get some very essential things wrong about people. How patients true teamwork can provide the correct answer to the question. Do you want a champ are claimer and sometimes horse? We try to teach teach us some things too. I really enjoyed this discussion with Kate. Tweedy and I'm so grateful for her willingness to bring river her mom Lucien Laurin Elizabeth Ham and those times back to such vivid life. Thank you kate. I really appreciate you making time for me. I don't know I know I mentioned to Leon. I don't know if I mentioned to you but you know I was visiting claiborne farm a few years ago and waiting waiting outside waiting for the tour to start and this you know you're more with it. I'm sure there's little graveyard offices. And looking at these headstones I see River Ridge and secretariat side by side. And it hit me that you know. We're not for sloppy track in the preakness. We're looking back to back. Triple Crown winners for your mother. Able Lucien Laurin right. Yeah and you know it. It was and still am and always will be a huge secretary of fan but you know re was remarkable horse really two three and four but you know understandably. I guess but sadly been overshadowed by the horse whose name. Maybe we won't mention again. Yeah it's it's interesting. How just that you know that? One year following his and all of a sudden he's Kinda backstage or offstage a little bit right. Take well interesting. I don't know In your reading you The Mama was felt bad about Nathan because he was so talented and one secretary came along the Senate took their you know sort of give him support team needed the good. You know I mean. They made some bad choices about him I did. She felt that there was He works with Cirque well and it was because there was so preoccupied you know with with other recent. Certainly I mean no one. You know. It's like yeah place. It sure but she felt like he he had they not taking him to California and had they not You know shouldn't have been pushing. They should've let him rest and he would have had a much better four-year-old well three year old year You know and and would have had a better reputation as a whole you know. I mean I love the comment. Look to read it but Bill Mack. Said you know. He's talking about the Well cut and how it's said from the you know that's what century wanted but the you know something about how we came in second and how was to know and it's like it's it's really great to have you said the best source of his here or. I should look that up. It's in. It's in the documentary read but Just to keep up the great horse and then he's not as well Remember you mentioned the cup. And really kind of like Sham and and secretary Easterby Riva broke the track record as well in the Marlboro Cup. I mean don't check a track record. Also which is pretty pretty remarkable Pretty remarkable things. I love about doing this. I think I mentioned you. I'm a I'm a history buff and I love to dig into the history of the sport and when I do. I often find a lot of things that I hadn't even expected to encounter and Riva was one of the first horses. I remember as a young man really kind. Get my attention and you know it's a it's an alliterative name. It kind of rolls off the tongue river. But you know when you start digging into the name you know this the ski run unveil that. Your Dad helped develop. It's a huge story behind the name. Riva Ridge right true. It's true and it's a wonderful story and and I people know it but You know it's funny. We we used to sit around. The family and mom failed cable. We have this new full here just the mother and the side. Damn now we need the man and we'd all sit around and kind of talk that names and sometimes you know and when we were teenagers. Right now You know sometimes it was like no. We're not do that. And then and then other times it was like. Oh that's great and so I. I just remember sitting around looking at the table kitchen table and somebody said and she went. Oh that's a great name and of course you know. We have had a lot of cleaning truck family. Not just because that was our favorite rented but also that he actually now he did not serve in the battle of leverage but he trained with the Tenth Mountain Division Corrected Division trained to them in Colorado and was there they were unfortunately it was looked like they weren't gonna Sir because they they were trailing so long and he just got frustrated and said okay. I'm GonNa you know I'm GonNa join some other 'cause we're never going to see action. And so the came true. And we're we're recruiting and he went and I guess probably a friend of his was also when okay so just about the time Committed and then the sensitive issue was called up and then we go to Italy and there's something very brutal action though in some ways. Yeah we're really glad and and Taught me so fascinating is that all guys came back to Colorado after the war. And they were buddy and they all together and they all together and of course. They're the ones who who really founded with three. There had been some historic You know African had been a mining town in certain other places have been around for a long time but the scheme the streets we know. Now that's really developed by the division in the you know in the sixties that yeah yeah really responsible for the growth of Ski Recreational Sport in this in this country that you know They had a great scares buddies and they had this vision. You know this sort of oxygen vision about the future and so very cool story of that. Derby winner. And you know of course that really I don't know I just remember when when when we win the Derby with mom article in Rocky not move which said then housewife wins and and and of course look this like Denver housewife and got an MBA Columbia University. Right whose father has been breeding great horses well headline away characters in the night. Yes right so there you go and of course that made destroy that. She was just a Denver housewife. Now that's what I thought was great. That of course. Well you mentioned it was interesting you mentioned. I hadn't even thought of this but I had done a little bit of research and and you know thank God. Dad wasn't involved in the in the battle that tenth amount was at Riva Ridge because Encourage anyone who's listening to this. Who's a history buff to go? Take a look at some pictures of Riva Ridge and you're looking at fifteen hundred two thousand feet sheer cliffs that these guys climbed and the reason why they were successful in that battle is because the Germans never expected that they would come from that direction. And and really like twenty five percent of them were killed or wounded in that in that battle horrifying thing and they were so brave and they were. Yeah I I don't know how it was that they they must have just said okay. We're going to do this at whatever. Cost Yeah Yeah if. They came out alive a lot of antenna without legs or various other. Let's talk a little bit. You know secretary and now we're GONNA mentioned the secretary of big red. The Beautiful Chestnut Horse Riva was really kind of the opposite of the striking horse as a youngster. Particularly I guess right you know he was he was also a little bit but like Trick and he won in Kentucky Unlike Secretariat Ship Tom Pretty quickly with his mom. And you know the scholars You know which meant that he he he wasn't he wasn't eating well a fever. And you know some trouble but he furniture Howard Gentry Fattened up and you know took the cabin took especially under his wing and pretty soon he was he was doing much better and But he grew up tall and skinny little gangly. He wasn't the big beautiful horse. That of course his stablemate was flop eared by any uncle but just an impasse and he was no great shakes to be as fatal investigate. I guess always right to be compared to Secretariat. Unfortunately backhoe follow active but But yeah he he and he he was he was fast. I don't know probably Ron talk about how he was fast timid and how it is an interesting story because it you don't scores. How intuitive run was and also An -lution And by listening to run and The whole team really working together. Jim Gaffney and and Charlie crist because you know Noticed that ran away from other horses. He he likes to be fun but it wasn't because because we WANNA win which is more like secretary it was it was like he wanted to get away from the other courses and so run thought well. This country really talented. He's got a lot of speed but he needs to be a little more comfortable running the side horses and through them and so he he asked me should for mark to take him out of training and work with him and so he he worked them. He worked with In by having courses come up alongside having questions behind questions ahead and that requires the cooperation of you. Know a Jimmy Gaffney and the whole program and it's sort of been down it got more comfortable and then from then on he was you know he can speed through which is really great. Well Eh. This is jumping ahead a little bit but I was struck when I read. Dance Story 'cause I had watched just a little bit earlier His his Belmont which was actually in many ways kind of remarkably similar to in some ways remarkably similar to secretariats in that they went very fast. He was being was pressed by two other horses to his outside. And you think about this was a horse who is timid and afraid of the horses to be pressed right on the rail like that and you haven't pulled away and won by open links. Didn't win by thirty one but one by convinced seven. That's pretty remarkable piece of insight by Ronnie to say he needs this because I think what Romney said. Yeah you can have a camper. Claimer was when he said Lucien Right. That's great place. Yeah exactly and and because he he clearly had the speed and the end with desire. I mean you know it takes more than just ability for picks you know sort of a desire to women so I think. That's you know wanting runny very experienced a lot of great horses. You know. Really he's had. This is the best choice I've ever ridden in that fan lot. At that time I think even the day the Derby wanted to make a change right. That Lucien was a little bit hesitant about but he trusted Ronnie to breakers. Yeah that what you mean. Yeah yeah well you know in both cases for well together runny and Lucien You know they they. Both were very intuitive about their versus. They knew their horses. And the way we communicate in such a way as say oh you know. I think we can do better. I think this is going to help and the team. I really great game and that that really that was great for the press so you mentioned a couple of times and I have to ask and I know I asked you about this note over by email. Last night I watched. The many people have watched the movie and quite frankly. Lucian comes across play by John. Malkovich almost cartoonish kind of character. Right yeah so I have to ask you what was what was the real was. He really liked that if he was he was okay so absolutely not and that was the thing about the movie. I regretted the most. And I think we're on to. It's not fair to portray mission like that and he definitely wasn't like that he was He was he comedian. He's firing you know strong opinions about things but he was Not was goofy. This was like when it came to horses and I don't think he you know the other thing that really drove me crazy about the movie. It's where they have him. You know news you know. Just before the burnings bad press notices that he'd came around with him in a in a barn importance and hey and lots away from the plane that you know anybody knows what choices to put cringe horribly but But anyway no with not like that never would have done it. I don't know what golf with like He's did where you didn't have some sort of funny looking close but so that everyone. Everybody had terrible. I mean those fashions were awful in the seventy That wasn't unique to him. The other person who wasn't at all like choose fraternise Elizabeth hands. She's yeah she was far more dignified and refer. She was not holyoke graduate and very great writer. New Courses Loved loved the business but she's pretty formal. I don't think she ever walked into a kmart and their entire life. Aren't done Kate Right. Well you know who knows? I don't really know she she was. She was married professional informal. She wasn't down home fun character that we talked about. Lucien team and in your mother you know two and obviously Eddie Sweat. And all the People Elizabeth him around the horse and around the stable So he you know he. They make these adjustments. The horse training and the blinker is all these different things. He wins the Derby. Now we come up to the preakness and unfortunately the wet track. Which had been his undoing before at highly. I I Comes UP THAT DAY. Right and he just he he was one of those horses never liked a wet surface. I think correct. Well Ron explains it to me. One and I thought very interesting. Yeah Well I mean we've had smaller homes. He had he had sort of little delicately deep chest and waist You know it's not a small horse by any means but Somebody got so much wrong. Who said he he looks like a deer ran like he shortage delicate I and he just couldn't get purchase. A good solid purchase and when secretary had big powerful lakes and big airports and he could just pound through anything. But you know it slide around the nervous so he wouldn't give all but he was so I think that and I don't know how many other horses have that problem. But that was particularly things. Oh No that they're they're out there you can look at past performances over on the West and then you'll see went four four wins three seconds. You know some handle it and I think a lot of it has to do with their frame and how much they can power three or not or skip over it in some cases I guess you know. Get over it. Yeah and I think it was interesting. said that and You know just just the way the body was built in. Yeah wouldn't that have been amazing? You know to triple Christmas You know Of course leading into the Belmont which we already talked about. I'm jumping around a little bit here. But then to know me I mean that could lead to a little bit of doubt about him coming into the Belmont but he quite all the doubters I think with that performance and completely yeah into take much for people to go he. He's for Real Yeah he's real deal and You know but but the other thing was after You know after the Belmont and then he went to California anyone's but then never really want again for the rest of that year a three hundred year or he it was like mom says he lost all respect. Everybody Kinda went okay. Then let's talk about this other big beautiful horse and and really bad for him because she knew what a great host he was and and how much he deserved you know to be respected fired And yet you know you know. Strapping younger comes along and steals the gun. Then and of course then when he loses that the course of the year honors after winning thirty and the bell. Yeah so he was not three year. Old of the key to them ended up being three year old champion. His younger stablemate go ahead. Of course all of that is like what I'm GonNa Happen. I wouldn't you know I wouldn't argue with the decisions but it it was just a shame and of course reader with also knocked ham. That secretary was secretary when people kinder- stable to visit him. You Know Secretariat with you. Know would get all the attention. And and of course. All persons like attention You know he's been sort of you know pose and you know he wasn't the glamour boy and And I think mom sat about that too because you know. If you haven't had secretaries he would have been started stable. He saved the farm to. Let's face it right absolutely. Yeah you know one of the things in you. Do you want me to talk about that. And do you think yeah? No no no please no please go. Well you know mom had She ran stable but she went on behalf of the board of Directors of metal on Metal Stud and that was basically Elizabeth him her brother and sister and and a few other folks and the they really. My aunt and uncle just really thought you know Granddad. Seen is not aware of course The haven't been making many for a while. The farmers should have been declined to Granddad. Let's you know took it been neglecting And so they're saying we'll sell it and put the money in the stock market and you know mom and sister that they keep it going you know and she said no you know this was his dream. He's still alive. We don't actually have the right to sell it out from under and then and so they should have said okay. But you know we're not going to allow this to go on forever. You want to try for a while. You know to keep this thing going go ahead. You're there has sort of had on the show and she'd had a few months of successes. But you know it was seventy and She'd been at for Several years and we were saying okay. We're done and she's going more just one more year. I had this this good. You know good feeling about religion so they finally said okay We'll let you hang on a little bit longer. Then so then starts winning and seventy one and that changed everything all of a sudden they go all right You could try it for a little bit long. So you know if that hadn't happened if we hadn't come along and and made the levers of the rest of the board members you would've told US secretary would probably still have been born because well was born by seventy but But you know without that team that I was talking about nutrition and run and and Eddie and Shimmy and and mom you know the whole them they were the no secretary would have been. Dorsey was I mean. I think you know We're Kalat that goes into a champion and even as much power. The secretariat had. You just don't know So who knows what he would have been. But we certainly wouldn't have had him so that would have been mad. You certainly first of all. That's a big bet that your mother had to make their which. I'm sure it was not done without a lot. As you cited a lot of a lot of pressure from family and the board and so you begin to understand why she felt such a special bond with Riva and one of the things that I read. It was really interesting to me. Was that you know. Secretary of course was that was a ham and over time. I think he had so many visitors. He just put on the same act probably for everybody but I want to confirm this Riva always knew when your mother was visiting would always come over to see her right. That's always yeah absolutely and and so on so many visitors and it's like you can always tell he was responding to you but we but yeah absolutely and a couple of things about we've been She she allowed her. The SORTA cut our teeth and make mistakes and learn. And and so that when Secretary Kim along she was ready. Because there's so much pressure for example that the Derby And but she didn't throw at so she knew how to do it and then she also had earned respect among her fellow owners. So you know. She had a lot more courage in making those decisions but she had to and And so she always should love because it's almost like they grew up together and he he. He convinced her sister that you know that she was. She knew what she was doing. They should keep trying so you know they're they're still palace in that way on the way that she didn't really feel the Yeah so so fine with him. Great identity with thought about the fact that he took her through that learning curve that prepared her for the next year right which was. Yeah wow well talk about the about I Dunno member the allegations that getting drugs. You go ahead with that. Yeah Yeah Yeah I did know this by the way. I was not aware that so this is an interesting story. Go ahead interesting story Partly because with another element of MOM getting You know cutting hertie learning how to You know because she she felt like he had been at then drugs and she She took him Well she commit allegations in the press and and remove him from the track. And I'm I'm sorry to Monmouth. Remember the name of the four name of the race but so So she she took him back to them on and they just and got roundly criticized by the leadership of Jockey doing let because she didn't quite understand it but she's done break the chain of evidence that they couldn't actually Test him on site and and so she said undermined her l. but fail said took her or the leadership. Said you know you. Own intrigued by coming up to half Have prepared you know doing making allegations but not being able to back them up with evidence. And so that was a than she was. Okay all right And so you know it's better to have that happen early on then later when you're in the national spotlight and feel that have been drugs and I don't think that was that unusual in this case. But they couldn't prove it Improvement because of the blocks of time between You know when when the Kurt and since and But it also made her really appreciate it you know. He he yeah. He achieved against a lot of Oz out. You know he get a lot of heart you know as I said When I was that claiborne that day and I was looking at the headstone. Day really struck me. How he's been relegated to second place you know Just kind of off the stage they are and it really made me sad just looking down at them because I remembered what a remarkable Orsi was watching that The Derby and the Belmont and those beautiful silks by the way just Just classic check. I think that going back in the day and and it's really nice to like I said I love the history of the sport and I like to bring back some of these names that we tend to forget about sometimes and I appreciate it because most people don't want to talk about I mean they they like me you know they really wanted to talk about the of course. That's not. Yeah that's right. Let's let's Riva. Did have a remarkable for your old year. We won the up here in Massachusetts when the Brooklyn when I mean he he. He showed his stuff that he was he was made of. He came made a comeback after drugging incident which was great. Well he did and also I think Given more was like having seen mistakes sued within the call of the three they were much more careful and selective and also I think we should pay more attention and training. So that he was reading the relations they put him in and and you know just came back stronger than ever and often four year olds have more More ability mortality. Understand what they're doing. And if we could have seen what secretary that would have been really special and and I'm really glad we would get the chance to redeem himself as a on because she'd say means great tomorrow we'll have an interview with Leeann Laden. Who until recently was the secretary of Tourism Manager? What is now called Middle Event? Park almost literally. Just a stone's throw off of interesting. Ninety five Leeann has authored with Cape tweedy books about Secretariat and the famous Metal Stud. You'll learn as I did that. What by all appearances was a blue blooded operation that have been handed down from generation to generation was anything. But and how the grit and determination of boy who grew up in dire poverty. Be at a man who left his mark on horse racing. Many many ways. Thanks for listening. We'll look forward to you joining us again tomorrow. In the meantime of course may the worst be with you.

secretary Derby Riva Ridge Secretariat Lucien Right Lucien You Easterby Riva Lucien Laurin Elizabeth Ham Paul Revere Lucien Laurin Year River Ridge Blake claiborne farm California Ron claiborne Baltimore United States Delvina Albina
Battle of Cajamarca - Nov. 16, 1532

This Day in History Class

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Battle of Cajamarca - Nov. 16, 1532

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson. And it's November sixteenth, but battle of Kabul Markelle took place on this day in fifteen thirty two and it's also described as a massacre. This was committed by Francisco Pizarro and his men against the Inca people of what's now, Peru when this happened the Inca empire had just been through an enormous epidemic and a civil war and the epidemic could actually sparked the civil war emperor. Wanna Capac both of his governors and multiple other important leaders had died in this epidemic. And then why not Capac named one of his sons as his successor? But that's son died in epidemic himself before you could even be notified of the decision. And then his father died also before news got back to him about the death of his son. This interrupted the imperial line of succession, and nineteen year old husker went to war against his half-brother out a wealth of both of them being sons of the previous emperor, the resulting civil war went on for four years without a wellpoint ultimately winning this war had just ended. When Francisco Pizarro arrived on the coast of what's now, Peru. He was following the example of her non Cortez's conquest of the Aztec empire. He was planning to take a small force inland and capture outta Wolpe. Hugh Inc of you'd as a divine ruler. That was actually what Cortez had done with the Aztec emperor Moctezuma the second Moctezuma was killed when this happened. Although it's not clear exactly how or by whom Perot and his force of just one hundred sixty eight men took a treacherous mountain road from the coast inland to Markelle, which is where auto Alpa was in camped. The city itself was almost empty with Ottawa's force of between forty thousand and eighty thousand men not far away. Once they got into the city Perot concealed his men in buildings that were arranged around Marcus central square, and then they invited out while but to have a meeting with them the night before this meeting Ottawa Alpa had held a ceremonial dinner. To celebrate his victory over his half. Brother, and this dinner went on late into the night in involved, lots of intoxicating beverages. So when he entered marker the next day he was carried on a litter with about seven thousand retainers, and they weren't necessarily at their best. Most of them were also unarmed because they were not coming there with a fighting force or with any idea of having any kind of battle at Wolpe was a divine emperor. He expected to be treated that way. By this visitor to his empire inside the city out of wealth. But was greeted. By a fryer. You talked to him about Christianity and also delivered a Spanish document that was called the requirement. The requirement was meant to inform indigenous peoples that Spain had given its representatives the moral religious and legal rights conquest. Of course, the requirement was often delivered in Spanish, and that was often the language that the people they were talking to did not speak. There was though an interpreter in Markelle that day. During this exchange with the friar the friar had a bible and sources really differ about what happened, but they all end up with the bible on the ground either having been knocked down or thrown or dropped. And when that happened Pizarro's men burst out from hiding, and they massacred nearly all Abbas retinue and they took him prisoner because ours foresaw almost no casualties in this. Well, Ottawa Alba's force being mostly unarmed were just massacred outta Wolpe was designed as prisoner until July twenty six fifteen fifty three when he was put on trial after there were allegations that he was mounting an attack force. He was executed. Pizarro attempted to use the emperor's that followed a Welte as Pepe DHS, although one of them named Manco Inca ultimately rebelled against Spain and established a completely separate Inca capital two. Buck Amari is considered to be the last Inca emperor. And he was executed on September twenty four th fifteen seventy two less than twenty years after out of wealth is executing. You can learn more about this in the April fourth twenty eighteen episode of Steffi missed in history class called hallmark and the end of the Inca empire. Thanks to Casey, Peter. I'm in Chandler maze. For their audio work on his show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts. And wherever else you get your podcast, and you can tune in tomorrow for a murderous castle. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb chauffeur babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you podcast.

Francisco Pizarro Wolpe apple Cortez Peru Markelle Spain Perot Asheville Wanna Capac North Carolina Kabul Markelle Anna REEs Dilling Fagin Capac Laurin Vogel Ottawa Alpa producer
Sherman's March to the Sea - Nov. 15, 1864

This Day in History Class

07:13 min | 1 year ago

Sherman's March to the Sea - Nov. 15, 1864

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson. And it's November fifteenth Major General William to come sherman's March to the sea began on the stay in eighteen sixty four this happened during the US civil war, and it's more formerly known as the Georgia and Carolinas campaign the union army had captured Atlanta in September and had removed at civilian population. With the intent of keeping Atlanta is a strictly military base. It had also destroyed factories and railroads and buildings basically anything that might be useful to the confederacy many homes in Atlanta were also burned. Although it wasn't the wholesale destruction of the entire city as it's often popularly imagined the March from Atlanta started on November fifteenth and sermons force was divided into two approximately equal wing. Things they continued southeast toward Savannah Georgia where they would arrive on December twenty second. This was not a straight unbroken line. The two wings progressed in four columns with the right wing shifting south toward make in Georgia and the left wing shifting north toward Augusta Georgia. This was to make it seem as though maybe those cities were the real objective, but both columns shifted once again and bypassed both cities this March was incredibly destructive. The intent was to rob the confederacy of anything that could possibly make use of and to terrify the civilian population and try to encourage a faster southern surrender. So the union army took anything that was edible or valuable from plantations and from farms that they passed Sherman had promised to make Georgia howl. So they burned out buildings and farms and sometimes homes. They kept destroying railroads and cutting telegraph lines and birding stores and supplies. They were as they went also emancipating people who were enslaved on these properties. So in theory, this destruction. And it was definitely destructive was supposed to have some limits. Sherman gave orders not to enter people's homes and win seizing livestock. They were supposed to focus on things that were owned by rich people rather than what was owned by the poor people who weren't resisting supposed to be left alone as much as possible. The intent after all was to deprive the confederacy of anything that could be useful and terrify people into surrendering. It wasn't to punish the poorest civilians and the freed people who really had nothing else. But in practice, these orders that were supposed to sort of temper this whole process were often not followed at all soldiers carried away as much as they could and destroyed what they couldn't. And a lot of people who were left in the path of all of this destruction were women and children because a lot of the men were away fighting this also meant that the people they were liberating from enslavement were liberated now, but they were left with nothing to support themselves. No way even necessarily to have shelter or food and Sherman and his army. We're taking no responsibility for them or for making sure that they were going to be able to survive once they had moved on the two wings of sherman's March reconnected in December. They took fort McAllister. For bombarding city of savannah. And then after capturing savannah Sherman sent this telegram, his excellency, president Lincoln. I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of savannah with a hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition. And also about twenty five thousand bales of cotton w t Sherman Major General. The destruction in all of this was massive the union. Army lost fewer than two thousand of the sixty thousand men that it left Atlanta with over this more than a month of the campaign. And it was also disastrous for southern morale as it was intended to be especially for the civilians who had thought that the confederate army would protect them. And instead had no protection Sherman estimated that the March through Georgia caused about one hundred million dollars worth of destruction. And then the following year they turned north toward the Carolinas. And that March probably also did an equal amount of damage through the Carolinas after the war sherman's March became part of the lost cause propaganda that reframed the confederacies role in the war as a noble and heroic, but doomed struggle to preserve it genteel way of life and even appeared in the nineteen fifteen birth of a nation, and then was later part of Nazi propaganda. Thanks to Chris. Ross yoda's for his research work on today's podcast and thanks to Casey pink room in Taylor Mays for their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to this day in history class at apple podcast, Google podcast and railroad to get your podcasts, and you can tune in tomorrow for a battle that led to the end of an empire. Hello. I'm Anna, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these signs history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on her first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

savannah Sherman Atlanta Georgia union army apple Laurin Vogel Asheville Dilling Fagin Army Savannah Georgia North Carolina Anna REEs Carolinas savannah producer confederate army fort McAllister Augusta Georgia Tracy b Wilson
Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

BrainStuff

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. I'm more in vocal bomb, and you've likely heard of Palio diet, the trendy regimens name is short for paleolithic and supposedly mimics the nutrition of ancient humans who lived about ten thousand years ago, cave, people eight meats, seafoods nuts and a few fruits and vegetables. Oh, and one other food source that doesn't show up on today's protein focused food, blogs other people archaeologists in western Europe have evidence that the precursors to modern humans eight their neighbors during the paleo ethic era. Most experts though have debated whether cannibalism was essential for the survival of these hominids, or whether it was part of ritualistic ceremonies to be classified as nutritional cannibalism, the people that paleolithic clans eight needed to be well nutritious. So just how many calories are in thi- or an ear. Archaeologist James Cole of the university of Brighton in England decided to find out Bing of the diagrams of cattle and pigs that illustrate. Different cuts of meat Cole mapped out the human body, then determined caloric count within each segment showing how much energy they would transfer. If consumed the results were published in the journal scientific reports a thi-, for instance, contains a hefty thirteen thousand three hundred fifty calories while the spleen is a modest one hundred and thirty overall the average human body has anywhere from one hundred twenty five thousand to one hundred and forty four thousand consumable calories. Some parts may take longer to digest you'll rack up ten thousand two hundred eighty calories from humans going alone. While others are snack size like the kidneys and contain about three hundred and eighty calories. The brain spinal cord and nerves were thinking Stu would be the most appropriate cooking method. Here will provide you with two thousand seven hundred calories and the bones contain about twenty five thousand bone. Broth is so untrendy right now after all despite all this talk of ancient eating habits coal concluded that other humans were probably not a nutritive meal of choice compared to competing. Available food sources one single willy mammoth, for example, containing a whopping three point six million calories would have given an entire tribe food for about eight weeks a human on the other hand would have provided enough calories for tribe to subside for only half a day, leaving everyone to wonder what's for dinner after just a few hours. Cole concludes that because of the relatively meagre calorie counts of the human body people. Eight other people for social or cultural reasons not for their health. So modern paleo dieters can breathe a sigh of relief there. Recipe. Books should continue to skip this particular ingredient. Stays episode was written by Lori L dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other food for thought topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these signs history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we liked and how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

James Cole Laurin Vogel Dilling Fagin Anna Faris Asheville North Carolina apple producer Europe Stu university of Brighton England Lori L Tyler clang seventy year thirteen thousand three hundre ten thousand two hundred eight two thousand seven hundred cal
Taking Emo Seriously

Friendshipping!

39:24 min | 10 months ago

Taking Emo Seriously

"Friendship is proud to be part of the Chicago podcast cooperative this episode of friendship a six bucks a month back documents music photos videos drawings podcast get yourself a free fully featured trial at back blaze dot com slash. I did it I did it I really really had to concentrate on the but you may I'm trend is friendship ing and the theme this week is there is drama and you want to call it quits don't write as Diese Punch the Whoa new Jimmy World let's talk about it's really they come in a mosh pit all of a sudden I love it I have so many feelings about this this is what so here's what's interesting has been at the forefront of my mind since it was released I am so glad to hear says yes you do yes jen can we talk about. I would love to okay so first of all it's band longer than many people that we are friends with have been alive yeah and I really really interesting about it is that like they have a lot of if you listen to static prevails you'll notice a bunch of of Jimmy world albums in terms of are they clarity or are they bleed American a big part of that is just like everybody else I love all music that came out when I was like sixteen you know y'all but they've always had more rock roots some times so bleed American but that's okay if futures is more like power pop also being album it's like my God that's such a great description very like big American underwater music and I like to say that it was good music for divorces absolutely this new album surviving has all that is like you gotta he liked him. Atkins became a dad like gallic he grew up a little so in New Orleans he still that Weirdo he's such a weird set don't think they've sworn in any single there's no curse words than any of their songs which is always very fucking guys the future is going to be better and then this album is like actually it didn't turn out we already but it's like a you know I was twenty two really excited about life I'm like I still am really Nice Jimmy can sounds the same as he did when he was twenty five it's kind of it's kind of lovely about Mo and it's an excellent book because it was the first time anybody actually and how they were on like this I bleed American tour this journalist from Spin wrote this book anything they're they're literally very much like we are we are job is music we make music flu like they've been friends longer than you've been alive. Oh my God I in the year that their friendships older than you to him I know fucked up we should have if there's one person on the planet who deserves to interview Jim Adkins it's it's fucking is extremely good at interviews with anybody let alone with a subject like Jim Atkins the re recorded version of your house love it as like headphones hold on her show so speaking you finishing our book yeah we have it has to be done I definitely credit to our mutual anxiety Oh yeah definitely than stressed yes and that is oddly not happen yeah weird so I think it's because everyday dockery and then on a weekend I'll go is this book on time to finish his book without you either and it makes me wonder some day because I would like to write a book I know that there's a book in your head and there's a book in my head and I almost feel like I wanNA do like an extended book tour for the books that we wrote on our own but also together can you imagine we should just follow Jimmy and this is one of the best days of my life I love that you're having a good day 'cause you know what I am too he for this honor I will honor is all mine that we'll do you proud social point in the process submitting final proposal each of us had a huge part contribute Wednesday before this person sounds like us yeah we ended up choosing this day because we will call Kim was flying out of the country on vacation that following Thursday on the whole weekend either not responding to any of my messages or sending me messages promising time we get to Sunday morning the date is due and have heard nothing back from Kim a changed we changed it to Tim and then we realized that rhymed with Kim Anyway it's it's too late too the citing a concussion and food poisoning holy crap I also could use or hurt by Kim she didn't message me at all that Sunday or has she contacted the past I'd gotten all the stuff she needed in time but she basically ignored me even do I kick her from the group I know I'll end up having to confront her and after all this -pointment in hurt what should I do oh man what a bummer this feeling kind of hurt and disappointed I to me you sound very hurt and justifiably so pointed in my friend Kim Yeah I'm heard disappointed my friend Kim and right now I can't think of anything that I feel your head he's not as I do that it's like you don't need to procrastinate on your feelings you can just feel them right now it what do we do about him right because it looks like she so I is involved at gentiles a better idea than I do of what the future looks like okay one of them is Hawkeye one of them is he they know we got a lot of hints even the question here because they said like I promise I'll get it done I promise way of putting that like I think that the bad feelings piled up it became a pile of sadness because it's started to stand for all the shitty feelings that you feel surrounding this is my failure this is the thing I forgot to do when I was sixteen years old this is my failure it hurts so much absolutely and this is something that happens I think like everybody every now and again so which does not mean you have to forgive her and it doesn't mean you have to move on and work with her again yeah yeah same big name so let's talk about what you Kim is GonNa show up to the next meeting again I think that we need a better idea of what the future looks like and there are the end of the question says do I kick her from the group I assume that the group will be I would assume the key that if you have not yet heard from Kim Kim is really just hoping right now like this is just like she wants to let the ducks fly into it and die and not deal with it that's what this is oh God I know and you know you you that's where I stand what do you think or do you just say your decision to the group like hey since my name think no matter what the asker needs to not involve Kim in the future I don't think that there's the big name clients but I feel like working with your friends and working with big name clients is so enormously so many times fucked up and she could not on fuck I mean Trinh you and I do that this project was even paid it wasn't said it didn't say yeah yeah which does not cannot be relied upon for something that is volunteer so you've learned something very important about Kim you you go forward like anytime you work with somebody new it's an experiment no matter how well you group like a year or so ago I put pull on twitter that EST- I wanted to ask people I was or I don't know but a lot of people are like absolutely not and I was like damn that's a strict policy to of jobs we turn their hobbies into jobs like it's just it's just how it works but this this is a reason why people don't you for you to branch out to somebody that you've never ever worked with before and don't know because they think like the only advantage of working with somebody you know is that like you vibe which like I think it would actually benefit you to go completely outside if your Rolodex for the next person's really philosophies in context and how to handle like social issues and stuff but if I wanted someone to go correct but we do think that this is a new opportunity for you okay so how do we talk to him the next meetings she has shown where what her priorities are and see for you is just leaving her off the next email thread Agri like you don't need to like is Sean I don't think so either without that would be so bold and weird yeah especially since she was so bad to want I think that this is one of those times where you write a few emails that it anything do you want her to apologize do you want to have an explanation do this is not an insult unless you're kind of a pushover and they will say oh. I'm so sorry I forgot I had this going sure I very much agree with that so if you want an apology you can get one you can an man maybe Kim she said Tim thank you president seriously saying something what you feel you short concise senses it's usually what we re advocate for because the details don't you feel better and also presenting it in such a way that Kim has the opportunity to say I could really use an explanation for this it would make things so much easier on our friendship on this if you told me what happened and if she ignores that too that that it I think that you deserve something from her whether it's an explanation or apology and it's again I want to talk to the Kim's of the world also don't want to be like yeah but sometimes there's just no preventing it I mean it sounds like the Oscar did as much in there I don't all the moving parts of this project and you accommodated them already and it's still they still let you down so turn and I work well together and we'll tell me a migraine and I'm not GonNa meet this deadline and I'll be like yeah of course it does not based on making money but it's also like so you know I mentioned the Adhd thing and you know as a kid I you know I did well in school but I would like not finish a project because you know I have ways of of figuring it out and again like when we talk about Kim's viewpoint been Kim we've all been Kim yeah one of the things that I say about Adhd a lot is that like a an and it is it affects your life impacts your life negativity a lot so should I talk of my job and one of the things that I do is I produce our podcast games podcast and the show and he sent me in like a sample and I found myself just fucking confront myself I had to sit and think and like just meditate the way like to describe this is so you know that scene in X. Men thirty with Tim Skeleton and stuff but he's got super healing power so he's just like I'm fucking going so I put on my headphones and I blast white noise or pink noise I eat something delicious I make hours to just send Matt Attacks Message saying the the truth song or something like that it's just gonNa take a little while longer and passed me as a teen would have after figuring that out that's so good and it's like you name your demons yeah no what they are in I mean it's just it's a skill that you learn over time and it seems like Kim has not been able to for people with ADHD it can be physically painful to work on like crazy and and I feel like fucking wolverine like walking through it and my body's you've with mental illness in the modern world is you are the fucking strongest people in yes John Yes and the first step is recognizing that the bowling ball's are there bridge of a project you have to accept that people will have these difficulties and they will have difficulties just the fact that you got this done somehow got it done so you you in the next project is like ask for pictures for like a picture of like and it's it in I don't know if this is right for every situation may not be right for years but you could have said like if I don't hear back from Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean you got Tim involved somehow that was so good so we talk about one of the ways you can help me make up for this is to figure out something for this because they oh this can Kim introduce tim to some to some people maybe she's got other piles of sadness that she could use you can't just invite you to say thank you so much for help for saving this project for jumping owner I would like to send a pizza to your house you don't have to do anything that involves money either say mm -serily Oh you a favor and the next time you need help you need to come to me because Walsh show the fucker yes and then do it yeah don't let the spiral the things we asked you in the future is like there's no reason to trust your friends more than other people that you with e for Kim I don't WanNa see this at the top of the show 'cause I don't want to ask her but I really do because I've been of course but I just like saying that because my degree was very expensive and I'm still paying love you but anyway due at nine am and the library isn't open and I have to print I'm unable to study for our final because so many other things are piling up now would just be like well failed using I had so many piles of sadness for awhile and I realized that it was I had so many ball so you had so many balls in the air like juggling like crazy and just drop them and sometimes alien balls got thrown at me and I was like he's my friend and he's not GonNa care I'm just going to let that ball drop Yup Yup and that should be we Kim's apology is the most reasonable apology is I'll human brain is really just a spongy wet fleshing mass we'll fuck up for the people you love the most because it just it just popped out of your brain there's a good quote from card says sometimes you will try your best and do everything right and still fail yeah and sometimes true and it's not all my God that's exactly right I'm combing through the book now looking for things like that Kinda others always tell the truth is not correct yep like always have a bunch of friends you can under the circumstances do the best you can with the tools you have that's it and that Ryan's and there's these characters cares there's these creatures called Nogues Doug's knocks it's GonNa make sense so are in the game and you kill them constantly because doug skin is really good like why the hell did you do that that nogues are so cute their pets that was just cruel that was and you were not set up to make a decision there because you based on the information you had based on the information everybody but it's true sometimes you kill a few nuggets to get I like to follow us on twitter. You may do friendship if you would like to follow us individually rallied and then I'm trying to end tonic like gin and tonic but within hawks are daddy I wanted to like I actually pause inappropriate thank you Laurin gallagher for your design work thank you to Monica Yeah let me get the frigging frigging ads.

Kim Chicago jen Jimmy Laurin gallagher Atkins Jim Adkins president Tim New Orleans Spin sixteen years
Listener Questions About The Impact Of Stay-At-Home Orders On The Environment

Environment: NPR

08:15 min | 4 months ago

Listener Questions About The Impact Of Stay-At-Home Orders On The Environment

"This is the national conversation with all things considered I'm Ari Shapiro. The global pandemic has halted daily life as we know it. No flying no commuting know bar hopping in this part of the program will answer your questions about how these changes are affecting the environment. Npr's climate change correspondent Lauren. Summer is here good. Have you with us? Hi We have a pile of questions. So let's just dive right in starting with Kathleen in Randallstown Maryland. Since so much the entire human population is sheltering in place what has been the impact on greenhouse gas emissions have the global reductions been enough to affect global warming climate. Change thank you Laurin. It seems intuitive that if you've got millions of people no longer driving hours to and from work each day it's gotTa have some kind of impact on emissions right. What do we know about what that impact might be? Yeah that's right and you know the first place we really saw was in China right because they were the first ones to really lock things down now. A lot of cars and factories and industrial activity was slowing down. So that meant the country was burning less coal and so over the month of February you know people are estimating there was about a twenty five percent drop in emissions now. Maybe that doesn't sound like a sound like a lot. Actually yeah I mean add to that that China is the largest emitter of carbon in the world. So they're small drop is actually equal to what a St Leg Ohio Illinois admits an entire year The rest of the world right now is the question because things are slowing down elsewhere Us energy officials put out an estimate this week that they expect to see a drop of around seven percents emissions That's kind of about the same as we saw during the last recession. But it's still very early to tell what the world's going to see and certainly we are adding plenty of carbon to the atmosphere. In the meantime this was supposed to be a big year for International. Climate negotiations is that on hold wall. Countries are trying to deal with the pandemic. Yes the answer's yes because there had been a very big meeting planned for this fall. Countries were expected to get together and discuss new commitments to cut greenhouse gases because you know the backdrop to all of this scientists are warning. There's very little time left to limit emissions in a way that's going to avoid the worst effects of climate change so the meeting was playing for. Glasgow Scotland in November but the UN has decided to delay it until twenty twenty one A lot of the groups. I've talked to are are supportive of that because you know one governments are rightfully occupied with other things right now this global crisis and to you know the timing was actually kind of challenging before because that meeting was planned for literally days after November election. Here so the idea of which administration was gonNA come into power has been making it very awkward for negotiators to figure out what's happening with the US because president trump has said he is pulling the US out of the Paris accord. Oh that's really interesting. All right our next listener question comes from somebody in the state that's been very affected by climate change. This is Chrissie and tell Keaton Alaska trying to find positives. This current time. My question is what positive effects has the virus head on the climate. So you were saying. The world is running out of time. To mitigate the worst impacts of climate change is this slowdown buying us more time yes and I think we don't really know it's pretty small at this point these emissions reductions that we're seeing and the really big question is what kind of rebound are we going to see because many of these changes like not driving and not flying. The probably won't stick right. We're going to go back to normal at some point hopefully But maybe you know. People are speculating. That maybe some things will like. A lot of people are using video conferencing now for business so maybe someday in the future conferences will be virtual instead of in person and that would mean less emissions but I think the really big question is what kind of economic stimulus packages countries are going to do right. If they're funding things like oil and gas industry right boosting construction. That could actually to a lot more emissions so that could be a rebound and then some after we get back to normal right if you have questions for Lauren to NPR dot org slash national conversation on twitter use the HASHTAG NPR CONVERSATION. And OUR NEXT QUESTION COMES FROM. Nancy in Los. Altos California. Here where I live in Silicon Valley we are almost done with our fourth week of quarantine my family and friends and I have all noticed that the air is amazingly fresh. Probably because exhaust fumes are so low is anyone tracking the effect that this quarantine is having on the environment and also how it informs the subject of Global Climate Change. Thank you is it people's imagination that the air looks clearer and Bluer I mean. Is this actually measurable at this point? Yeah actually it is and and a lot of people are reporting this You know like I said the first place we saw this was China and air pollution. There dropped by about a third in February. It's gotten a worse than San because activity has started increasing. But we're seeing this this and the US to You know local air pollution very dependent on the weather so you can't really pick a single day and look window and say hey this is the pandemic But you know air quality monitors in Los Angeles have been showing very good air over the last week. Nasa is releasing data that in the northeastern U. S. nitrogen dioxide which is this pollutant from burning. Fossil fuels is down by about thirty percent. So there's a real effect being measured. It feels almost paradoxical that this disease that has having a such a horrible impact on people's lungs might be leading to air pollution which would have a good impact on people's lungs right and you know some people have said are we saving lives while so many lives are being lost and it's actually a really hard question to answer but You know one way that people have looked at it is actually through the Olympics You know in two thousand eight. In Beijing officials were shutting down factories and limiting cars to improve the air and so scientists were studying. Can we see health improvements from these small temporary dips in air pollution? And they did. They saw improved cardiovascular health and some people mothers who had their third trimester of pregnancy during the Olympics actually had babies with heavier birth weights. But you know at the same time. There's a huge toll on public health happening right both people that have cove nineteen but people may also be avoiding hospitals and doctors right and not getting the routine care they really need. So it's really hard to say with the overall effect. Is You know early on. In this pandemic there were a lot of hoaxes about wildlife returning to cities and our next question is about wildlife. This comes from Laura also in Alaska. My question is what effect is this virus having on wildlife. I'm thinking about the fact that in many places like cities there are less people out and about and that means there's more room for wildlife. Are people seeing a change in the animals that they live near? I am wondering about animals that depend on people for food for handouts like pigeons and other small birds and rats in a city. We've only got about a minute left Lawrence so we may not have time for birds rats but what can you tell us about other wildlife? E-eh there's a lot of anecdotal stories out there. People were seeing coyotes walking down streets in San Francisco but I can say that scientists really are starting to study this right. You know if it's quieter there's less activity out. There may be burns or singing differently if there's less ships and cruise ships in the ocean. Maybe Wales are singing a little bit differently because there's less noise for them to compete with so people are starting to really look at it. I did see rather horrific article saying that in Washington. Rats might be trying to find their way into people's homes now that they don't have restaurant dumpsters to raid so. Let's just hope that that doesn't happen for everyone's sake. Let's hope that his NPR's climate correspondent Lawrence Summer. Thank you so much barry and if you have questions about Cova nineteen and way we live. Now we're here to help go to. Npr Dot Org Slash National Conversation on social media use the HASHTAG NPR conversation.

Npr Us China Lauren San Francisco Ari Shapiro Olympics Lawrence Summer Kathleen Randallstown Maryland Laurin Washington UN California
China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

Environment: NPR

03:07 min | 5 months ago

China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

"China's efforts to control the corona virus have meant many residents stayed at home in factories. Just shut down. That had an unintended effect. Less air pollution cleaner air can improve public health. Maybe even save lives joining me to explain why that isn't so simple. In China right now is NPR climate correspondent Lawrence Summer. Hi Laurin I Rachel. All right first off just explain. How big the drop was in air pollution. In China it was significant. It was down a quarter two third in some places compared to the same time period last year. And that's because people have been driving less but the big thing is coal consumption because power plants and industry has ramped down. We're starting to see an uptick. As China's activity is increasing. And that hasn't been true everywhere. Beijing actually saw an air pollution spike outdoors and February. Because there was a weather pattern trapping the pollution there okay so if power plants factories were running less that also means carbon emissions dropped. That's right about a quarter now. That's a tiny fraction of China's yearly emissions but it still substantial because China is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world so even that Short period of time in China equals would a state like Illinois or Ohio emits an entire year. Wow so even though. It's only a little bit over a month that we're talking about for these improvements. It's substantial enough to make a difference in people's lives. Yeah even a short term drop in something like air. Pollution can actually have benefits and a good example of that is the two thousand eight summer Olympics in Beijing to improve air quality during the Games government officials limited car traffic and they shut down factories and researchers actually tracked people during that time period and they saw improvements in cardiovascular health and lung health. They found that babies whose mothers spent their third trimester during the Olympic Games. Were born with heavier verse weights. Okay so that was years ago our people in China right now. Seeing those benefits yeah. It's a good question because the potential is really big here. You know. It's estimated that air pollution is linked to more than a million deaths per year in China. So I put that question to Jill. Baumgartner she's an environmental epidemiologist at McGill University. It would be a mischaracterization to say that the crow virus was beneficial to health because of these air pollution reductions in addition to tens of thousands of people who were impacted by the virus in China place stress on people's lives and on the healthcare system and lots of other sectors. She says that people with health conditions other than cove in nineteen may have not been getting the healthcare. They really needed during this time. Period and people may have spent more time indoors so they would have been exposed to more secondhand smoke potentially or indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves which are used in some parts of rural China. Presumably though as the corona virus is contained in China. This drop we've seen in emissions is going to be a race by the fact that the factories the power plants. They're going to go back online and return to normal right. Yea and of course. There's an incredible human toll here associated with this reduction in emissions and there's also a high likelihood that it's going to be canceled out as China tries to make up for its economic losses and really starts ramping up power plants and factories in the near term. Npr climate correspondent. Lauren summer. Thank you thanks.

China China Beijing NPR Lauren summer Laurin Lawrence Summer Olympics Jill McGill University Baumgartner Games government Illinois Ohio
Gruyre, You Make Us Melt

FoodStuff

29:04 min | 1 year ago

Gruyre, You Make Us Melt

"Today's episode is brought to you by parts dot com. Have you ever thought about the fact that where you choose to live directly impacts the you, you become well, apartments dot com is here to help you find that future perfect place. They're the number one rental search site, and with good reason they have the most listings, which means you have the most apartments townhomes condos and houses to choose from and apartments dot com has custom search tools too, so you can find exactly what you're looking for to become the best version of yourself. Visit apartments dot com to find your perfect place apartments dot com. Change your apartment, change the world. Hello, and welcome to save her production of iheartradio and stuff media. I'm and I'm Laurin vocal bomb. And today, we're talking about Greer. Yeah. The cheese cheese and the region kinda short. But this is one of my favorite cheeses. Yeah. And I always bring it to cheese giving just understood. Sure. Okay. But I actually remember, the first time that I knowingly had Greer probably had it before then, but my brother's ex girlfriend, so I was in high school. This time she was a vegetarian, and she made these homemade French fries with shaved Greer and mushrooms on them who and that was the first time I was like, oh, so, I wouldn't necessarily be scared. I'd be eating these fries all the time vegetarianism is not a weight loss plan. No, nope. No. We can be a healthy lifestyle choice. Absolutely. I mean, I'm happy that I tried them. And I still clearly I still remember. Yeah. Oh, I don't remember that moment. But, but it's it's a topnotch cheese. It's great and grilled cheese. Oh, it's really good at melting, there's a whole section on that later on there is. But before we get to that we should get to question. Yeah. Greer? It. Well, I'm gonna give you a definition that involves a lot about the process of making it because with cheese, the making is the message. So the original Swiss Greer is a type of cheese made from raw whole cow's milk. That's curdled with Rene and with way, from the previous batch of Greer in open copper vats, it's pressed into large wheels usually aged, or ripened that is for about six to twelve months, but anywhere from five to eighteen or so can happen or longer during that time friendly bacteria, eat lactose. That's the sugars from the milk that it's made with, and they poop flavors and acids that help solidify the cheese. Other friendly bacteria, and you grow on the cheeses surface, helping create a natural rind and further affecting the flavor like creating some tasty molecules and breaking down some not so tasty molecules, and some water of app rates out until it's down to about thirty five percent moisture content and a few chemical and enzymatic processes, breakdowns on the protein chains from that original milk, and all of this results in a cheese, that's a solid. But still pretty soft to the bite, and a smooth not crumbly. It's a ivory to yellowish in color, and may range in flavor. But usually tastes a little like nutty, tiny bit, fruity, and spicy and salty. And of course creamy. If I lost you on any of that CR cheddar episode for more about cheese-making. Yes. Also very old school. Original foodstuff video series video on cheese has some bad graphics, designed by yours truly don't check that out. Yeah. And there are also Greer style cheeses, which may differ in production methods and an ultimate product. France, does also make a Greer that is similar in the broad strokes, but has a has different rules altogether. For what it's supposed to look and taste like and so much more on that later. The whole thing it is an entire thing. It's great for fondues. Grier is for French onion soup. A- Riera is one of the two classic fondue cheeses, along with tall. And it's also traditional in the French Kokomo and sewer, which is a grilled cheese sandwich with a Dijon mustard sliced ham so good. They're so good. And yes, more about the science of multiplicity later, and it is named for the Swiss town gruyere in the area where the cheese was originally made and is still made their the name comes from either grew year. Meaning forestry officer or tax collectors or grew meaning crane, and that is the bird on the crest of the counts of logorrhoea. So. Mysteries history. Now's it didn't know Swiss cheese. And this is the cheese with holes in. It is sometimes called rat cheese, because it's the cheese rats are we've seen with Khartoum didn't know that we still need to watch ready to. I haven't forgotten about. All right. But yeah. Now, let me think about it Swiss cheeses, bur confusing name, it is because there's more than one cheese in Switzerland. Yes. Yeah. Agree air from Switzerland doesn't not have holes in it. Yeah. I'm the French Greer is required to have some holes. But yes, Swiss Greer has few to no holes right? So confusing nutrition wise. It's cheese. I mean. A serving sizes an ounce. Yes. That's a small amount of cheese. Keep them keep that in mind, or give yourself a nice cheese, treat have achieved giving have a cheese giving go crazy with the cheese whiz. Numbers. Yes. As of twenty ten Switzerland produced twenty nine thousand metric tons of Greer per year. France produced about three thousand metric tons, by the way, our little smaller than US tons. So it's more like thirty two thousand US tons. I anything more than like a pound. And I don't really understand it. That's an unimaginable amount of cheese to me. That's a lot of trees. It's a bunch of cheese. I also spent about three minutes trying to figure out why there's a difference between metric and US tons specifically. Why, but yeah. In those three minutes, nothing became apparent rabbit hole for different tastes. Greer used to be an umbrella term for family of cheeses and the Rhone alpine region made in a similar manner. But distinct in taste, including kommt, Bo fort abundance, French career and Swiss career but not anymore. No, no, no, no, no, no who gets to claim Greer. Oh, we'll find out but first, we're going to take quick break for a word from our sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by away travel luggage return. A lot here on saver and always approach is simple. They create luggage pieces, designed to be resilient resourceful, and essential to the way you travel today. They asked thousands of people how they pack why they travel and what bugs the most about their luggage. Then they designed to bag that solved a few old problems like sticky wheels, and few new ones too, like dead cell phones, and they can offer lower price compared to other brands by cutting out the middleman and selling directly to you. 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Visit away travel dot com slash saver and use promo code saver during checkout. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. And we're back with more food controversy. Oh, yeah. Greer's history goes back to medieval times. Sometime around eleven twenty five CE and a town called career now career the place is in Switzerland, but it's on the border between Switzerland and France. And because of this ownership of Greer is disputed, like we mentioned before several similar cheeses by a different name do fall under this umbrella of Greer that originate in France and one in the Austrian Alps, and I would like to throw in this probably not true in here. The story goes that in one, sixty one CE emperor and Taunton. The pious met his death via indigestion caused by overindulgence in green. Probably not probably not. No. They don't think that anyone really created what we know is Greer until. Yeah. Like, the eleven hundreds right, anyway, fun story while it's much price. Now it I started as a means of survival. Grier did and necessity. And this region of Switzerland was and is very Mounteney and partly because of this, it was plagued with food scarcity, but they did have cows for milking since the region was mountainous, and the cows, grazed pastures that were often up hill from where the peasants lived and peasants, didn't have time to go marching up the mountains to milk cows every day. So they need to figure out a way to make the milk lasts longer. So they picked a group of peasants to be in charge of all of the villages cattle and to make cheese from that milk. And they had a couple of requirements for this cheese. I it had to last in the mountains for the summer. Okay. Second it had to be pretty sturdy a. Cheese, and large to make the rough journey back down the mountain and to meet these requirements. They need a low moisture cheese, but problem, yes, they could only carry up so much salt to dry out the cheese. Oh, okay. So they came up with a system, a system it involved, cutting the cheese. Oh here, you produce a very tiny Kurd particle to reduce the moisture. They then cooked the cheese at a high temperature while constantly stirring it. And this process was draining for the makers, like it was hot. It's physically demanding the work paid off, though resulting in a full fat hard cheese, that people quickly fell in love with so much. So that words spread and the Swiss makers were able to sell it throughout the country and in France. And Italy pretty soon after they discovered it. Yeah. In the thirteenth century, they were able to build a castle in the town that still stands today. And as I understand it, you can take a tour listeners, and it's lovely please done it. Done it. Let us know let us know by the fifteenth century cheeses, like Greer, recalled Veselin, and it wasn't until the seventeenth century that Greer officially replaced to that name possibly because this is when the region started to export Greer, the first time as more and more people tried it the demand grew in the word entered the dictionary, academy. Full says in seventeen sixty two and along with all of this, we get the origins of cheese controversy as concerns over its origin grew. During the eighteenth and nineteenth century, lots of folks from free Switzerland, moved to the Greer region making it bigger and expanding it out into France. And at the time with no form of cheese, copyright or trademark a lot of imitators started to enter the scene in Greer cheesemakers wanted to change that by defining, what Greer was in protecting the name, but as we've said, French, and Swiss career were and are different shore. Yes. The French and Swiss, both argued that they should have claim to the Greer name. The French argued that their version of Greer was more well known, and that they should get it because of that, while the Swiss argued that they'd been making it longer and Greer's from Greer. So it's really several meetings took place, several meetings flees to debate the issue of Greer eighteen ninety one in Madrid. Nineteen twenty six in Paris, and nineteen thirty in Enron. Oh my goodness in nineteen fifty one. One, the international strays a convention on cheeses. That sounds me. Decreed that both France and Switzerland had the right to use Greer despite the confusion around the fact that they are two distinct. She's is going by the same name, but this did not in the tension between the two countries around the cheese. No, Nope, no, no in nineteen fifty eight comped career was awarded in ASC Appalachian Josiah in control. A are controlled Appalachian of origin, within France. An AO see is meant to recognize regional products made using traditional methods that have these traditional flavors and other characteristics that are, you know, good rights. Yeah. The Swiss were awarded the control designation of origin in Switzerland in two thousand and one which similarly, defines production processes and locations and product, but France was not done. They applied for a any could you help me out, Appalachia enjoy. Gene, protege AO p yes. With the European Union and the AARP. He is an internationally recognized status that means that no product from anywhere else can properly can properly use the name. It's why sparkling wines from outside of champagne can't be called champagne. Exactly the EU looked into it, and eventually put out a report on the matter saying the French case was weak because they're cheese was aged outside of the area in which it's produce I know the French career union dropped the case had holes in the story. That's what the guardian said about it. No great minds, great minds think alike. In two thousand ten the whole of Europe, recognize the Swiss as the official makers of Greer with U, P, meaning comped Greer became just caught, and before that back in two thousand and four the Swiss helped that process along by developing a blueprint of the acidifying bacteria, the give Greer, most of its texture and flavor. The country has a center for agriculture research, affiliated with the government called Agra scope and yeah, Greer's bacterial culture was the first one that they mapped, it's now part of their A O P process. So, like if you're making Greer in this approved way, you can buy a bottle of the approved culture set or like largely create your own the old fashioned way, during the process. But I love that. They, they have this, this is a product. Yeah. Oh, they're also working on bacterial tracers to verify the origin of any given piece of cheese to make sure that you're not like like flipping imitators there won't have it. Learn no. The one for Greer was still in trials as of two thousand seventeen which is the last information I could find about it. Oh my goodness. Oh, I love it. Yeah. There has been a so much scientific research into the micro biology and chemistry involved in Greer over the past three decades. Probably because of all of this kerfuffle. Oh, people. They wanna claim their Jesus. They do cheeses important, and I respect that they are taking it seriously, as we are. I do too. Speaking of seriousness, I have some very serious melting science to share with you. But I got one more quick break for word from our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by ZipRecruiter. Hiring is challenging, but there's one place you can go were. Hiring is simple fast and smarts, a place where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates that place, ZipRecruiter dot com slash saver. Ziprecruiter sends your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't stop there with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience invites them to apply to your job as I book Asians. Come in ZipRecruiter analyzes each one and spotlights the top candidates, so you never miss a great match. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five of employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. And right now, our listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ZipRecruiter dot com slash saver that ZipRecruiter dot com slash SAVE. O R, ZipRecruiter dot com slash saver. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. So melting science. A few science things influence how a cheese melts art first. You've got your moisture content because the higher the moisture content of cheese, the more easily. They'll melt, because of those water molecules sort of keeps them like elbow room in among the proteins preventing them from clumping up. Yeah. Greer is what's called a low moisture cheese as we talked about before that is around thirty five percent moisture it's drier than a fresh cheese, like mozzarella, which could have up to sixty percent moisture content, but more moist than a hard cheese like parmesan, which is usually around like thirty percent. That's why mozzarella will like us when you heat it, but parmesan will tend to like crisp before it really has a chance to pool. Yeah. Greer has just enough water content to, to facilitate melting. Yeah. Part of moisture content is due to whether it's cheese has been aged or not. But aging has another effect on how cheese melts how it's proteins are connected. Okay. So, so the. Primary. Proteins in milk are called caissons. And what do you make cheese? These, these protein, molecules link-up tight in these long chains in a fresh spring cheese. Again, like mozzarella, those chains are stretchy entangling, which is why mozzarella strings out in that, like, classic like pizza commercial kind of way like the teenage mutant ninja turtle thing. Yeah. Yeah. Or heck, like in a in a stick of string cheese. Yeah. Exactly string. Yeah. But as cheese ages, enzymes in the cheese, slowly break apart, those long chains into smaller and smaller bits. And that's why an aged cheese like cheddar agreer melts into smooth puddles that stretch a little, but, like mostly use, and it's why they crumble into like those large pebble chunks, when they're cool as opposed to something like parmesan, which will crumble into like we little dusty bits? The third thing that influences how a cheese melts is its chemical makeup and okay, here's where it would be good to do a rundown of what is happening to cheese when it melts. Okay. So you apply heat to cheese. Yes. Yes, you do. Uh-huh. Frequently all the time. When the cheese reaches about ninety degrees Fahrenheit. That's about thirty two celsius or a little under human body temperature. These solid fats in the cheese will start to melt into liquid oil, you might see beads of oil on the surface of the cheese. Yeah. But it has to get a little bit hotter, than that, for those cases, that are really holding the cheese together to give up the ghost is he in cheeses that are curdled using the milk coagulating animal protein, Rene, which is most cheeses, the sort of glue of calcium atoms will help hold the case in proteins together in their chains. But as the cheese heats, that glue dissolves, and the cheese, just kind of collapses, like, like my friend has his old lady cat, Mary and her joints are pretty good. But when she's done moving around she doesn't like circle and likes it and kinda like subtle in. She just flips right over. Oh, yeah. It's real cute, every time and for Mary, I've noticed that, that happens after a certain number pets, but. Cheese happens at different temperatures in high moisture mozzarella. It's kinda low it's around like one hundred and thirty Fahrenheit, that's fifty four celsius, it can be all the way up to one hundred and eighty Fahrenheit or eighty two celsius in hard, parmesan and for air it's in the middle like a hundred and fifty Fahrenheit or sixty five celsius. But remember, that's an cheeses using net. You can also curdle cheese using various acids, like vinegar, or lemon juice. And that's how a lot of fresh cheeses are made like Ricardo or Panesar, or caso, Blanco, as those cheeses, form, their case in proteins will bind up with each other. But there's too much acid for the calcium atoms to glue up among them. So when they heat there's no protective barrier to those proteins. The heat makes the proteins bunch up forcing out molecules of water, which means that you've suddenly got a dry cheese, which instead of melting, we'll just continue firming up and may even Browner crisp. That's why you can simmer chunks of penny. And like a Currier a creamy spinach sauce, and the hold their shape or why you can straight up pan fry a slice of Keizo Blanco, and it'll Brown instead of melting, and why Ricarda in lasagna arrive. Yolly is pillowy instead of UC and part of why most vegetarian vegan cheeses are so totally crap melting, because although. Most rent is lab created these days. Most vegetarian friendly cheeses are more likely to be acid curdled and the proteins involved may behave differently than the milk proteins. But sure, sure. Sure, anyway, back to your air and actually has a little bit more acid than some other cheeses of its moisture in age which dissolves some of the calcium bonds and winds up making it a little bit string year than say, cheddar, and, yeah, it's right in that happy, medium of just enough moisture and just enough aging all of which means it melts too. We go. We perfection. Hat tip to David yo him and Andre Schloss over at fine cooking dot com for their excellent explanation of all this, by the way in their article the science of melting cheese. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And we'll have to do a whole episode on fondue. Yes. That was kept like avoiding. Yeah. Like there's too many. There's too many it was too much to talk about. Yeah, got to focus do my mom used to do fondue, every New Year's and it just. I don't know why New Year's thing. Yeah. Yeah, I don't understand why why like fun do and drinking are always it's always like, oh, man. Let's have a celebration with sparkling wine and undo because boiling pots of oil, he's great idea. Glasses. Always nothing could go wrong here Lauren. I don't know where you're talking about this is giving me a wonderful will pause to remember. I was a huge. My little pony fan to do. You remember the us. Who's that who's who's was like this big pollution villain? And it was destroying the my little pony home or I do vary. Vaguely remember that it was like an Uzi of gray hair. Oh, no more shirts. More shirt ideas, hang. Yeah. Okay. All right. Mark, and Mark, and that one down. Burs essentially just making shirts that only appeal to, and I'm not to upset about it. If I can get on my little pony, Greer shirt. That's it. That's yeah. Yeah. Best day, I don't know what else I can do. I don't know. Well, this just about brings us to the end of our air episode, but it brings us to Liz. Liz. Ready to you ask, I guess? Oh, one day, I guess I that's why I was so confused. Really this is just a back door this whole show is a setup this just me already long. It's a long game. I like that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I have not succeeded at all. But that's great because it means I get to keep making up asides. Odes Valerie wrote. I recently enjoyed listening to your podcast about vehicles shaped like giant food. And so, I'd like to share with you, this picture of a vehicle that my family ran across when we were visiting NYC and twenty fourteen. This was the l L Bean boot mobile that we've found central park, I had never heard of this. But there it was in the park who knew I live about forty five minutes from the Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, Michigan, which was mentioned in your podcast. So I visited it's vintage Oscar Mayer wiener mobile, many times. Right. Next to it is a human sized hot dog bun that kids can climb into an ad giant fabric, hotdog toppings fun. If you ever get a chance to visit that museum it is an interesting place, and very different from any other museum I have ever seen Henry Ford went collecting famous buildings such as the one where Thomas Edison invented the lightbulb and the one where the Wright brothers. Vented flight. Plus, there's a building about the Heinz fifty two varieties of pickles. And he can walk through these famous buildings and greenfield village there in the picture. Well, it's a giant giant boot with tires at the bottom in the the license plate. The vanity played on front says Bigfoot. Yeah. I, I recommend looking up the picture. Yeah. It's a giant mud boot. I I love it. I do too. I'd be very thrilled to see that out in the wild. Yeah. It's a little bit creepy as extremely large boots tend to be who. Yeah. What if? What if you were like a sleep, and your, your bed is like you were on the same levels of window and the blue just went by and I. Yeah. That might nightmares stuff the stuff nightmares. Jenny wrote. I heard Lauren mentioned her love of a good sandwich. The contains fries and had to give you a heads up on one. That would make a great episode the horseshoe. The horseshoe sandwich is the full size and a smaller portion is often called a pony shoe. It's an open face sandwich made on Texas toast topped with two burger patties for the full size one for the pony size then a layer French fries, and finally, a Welsh rare bit cheese sauce. It's a regional dish in and around Springfield, Illinois, and can be found in a radius of about fifty to one hundred miles around that town. Oh, wow. That sounds that sounds really great. I wanna I wanna eat that food. I do okay. Road trip road trip Richard time. But in the meantime, thanks to both of them for writing too, is you too. Can write to is our Email, is Hello at saver pod dot com or you can find us on social media. We are on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at saver pod. We do hope to hear from you savor is production of I heart radio and stuff media for. More podcasts podcast. Iheartradio, you can visit the I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Thank you, as always tore, super producers, Andrew Howard and Dylan Fagin. Thank you to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good. Things are coming your way. Today's episode is sponsored by thrive market. I've market is a revolutionary online, marketplace on a mission to make healthy living, easy, and affordable for everyone, you can shop for thousands of the best selling products. Always at twenty five to fifty percent below traditional retail prices and more than seventy percent of the thrive market catalog cannot be found on Amazon. You can get everything you need eco-friendly food snacks, vitamin supplements, personal care products, cleaning supplies. Beauty products kitchen. Staples, homegoods baby food kids products and much much more. And it's all shipped straight to your door. You can filter the catalog by your values and dietary preferences, whether you're paleo gluten free vegan, kosher, ketogenic, also, including sustainably, farmed, fair trade, certified, BPA, free, and more in just one click of a button when you shot by your values, and you support companies that are trying to change the world you can help be part of that change. And for you our listeners. They're giving you twenty five percent off your first order and a thirty day free trial. Keeping my into their prices are already. To fifty percent off and they're giving you an extra twenty five percent off your first order. And that free trial, go to thrive market dot com slash saver. That's S. A. V O R. No code is necessary. Shop around and the discount will be applied at checkout. That's thrive market dot com slash saver.

Greer Swiss Greer Switzerland France Greer Rene Grier Lauren Laurin US Packers ZipRecruiter Italy Ziprecruiter Texas Amazon Springfield Paris
The Cool Mint Episode

FoodStuff

34:56 min | 1 year ago

The Cool Mint Episode

"Today's episode of saver is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle design to adding electrolytes for taste to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like you owe. Unlike you any I do of water one of my favorite things is getting some nice cold water after after I run in the morning and smart water because I love the taste. And I love the bottle today. Convenient bottles, sit is and today. Smart water is reimagining water again with new smart water alkaline with nine plus ph and smart water antioxidant with added selenium both with the same great taste as the original smart water is vapor distilled with added electrolytes to taste, great and great tasting water helps you meet your goals. Whether you've got some new ones in two thousand nineteen or are just aiming to look and feel your best every day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Hello. And welcome to savor a production of iheartradio and stuff media. I'm injuries, and I'm Laurin vocal bomb and today we're talking about mint mint. Yes. Finally, an anti can't eat stuff. Oh, there's there's been at least. Well, there's been a couple that you don't like, right. I can't t- to use another one. Sure. And I do love mitt, and I'm determined to do we discussed off air that potentially. I can have certain types of like mint candies share that that are just made with like a mental oil rather than an actual like peppermint oil. Like, we need to we need to figure out which chemical in meant. Yes is the one that disagrees with you. There is a York. Peppermint Patty at my desk, and I'm going to do it at the end of the workday. So okay. Yeah. That's why that's a good plan. Thank you. And it's not severe like, I just get like John mouth and tingling. And nausea cramps stomach. I mean, it's not fun. No. It's not no, but toothpaste like it took me years. I feel so sick brush. Yeah. It was the meant. It was the meant. Well, I can eat it. And it's delicious. I'm sorry. No, I'm so happy. I'm so happy. This is finally happening. I hope you enjoy it Lauren. It's refreshing just like mitt. There you go which brings us to a question meant. What is it? Well, meant is a genus of herbs sometimes called Mentha and also like even higher up in the tax system. It's a family of herbs called lemme NCA, which includes everything from basil to time to Rosemary and lemon balm. But today we're talking about the genus Mentha. Yeah. Mints tend to be perennial meaning that although they will die back during freezing winters once he plant them. The roots will take hold grasp hold grab violently hold. And we'll come back year after year in some cases, like peppermint. They are so vigorous partially because their root systems are the only way that they can reproduce. Like peppermint is a wild hybrid of spearmint and Waterman that sterile. It does not produce seeds. Yeah. Yeah. Which means that genetically every peppermint plant is nearly identical to the very first peppermint plant ever identified. That's cool like bananas. They're clones. Exactly. Exactly. Mint stems are square in cross section which just always delights me. No. I don't know. Why? I just really like it anyway. Yeah. And the leaves and stems can be anywhere from green to grayish to purplish the flowers anywhere from white to purple. And there are a lot of types of meant. Yeah. Yeah. I think when we chose this topic. I was I knew it was going to be a big one. But it's kinda eve about like, it'll be simple. No. There's a lotta types of meant favorite spearmint. So they're thirteen to eighteen species in the mid family are that's the general consensus because I've found different thing. Oh, yeah. I thought that would be like no no there never really is like a single number. It's like, well, you know, squidgy. Squeegee because I at some places it was it seemed very definite was twenty five. Oh, no other places like no thirteen. Anyway, I think I think it's I I saw the numbers thirteen to eighteen in multiple places. Okay. Multiple places said thirteen eighteen so that's what we're saying. And they grow all over. And yet anyone who has tried to grow meant are not tried to grow meant. It grows it grows. Whether you want it to or not, basically. Yep. Different types of meant are native to Eurasia, Australia, North, America and Africa. And nowadays, you can find different types of mint growing all over in temperate climates, even though there are probably thirteen to eighteen species in the mint genus. There are over two thousand varietals within those species they amrried really easily penny. Royal, by the way is one of those species. And I was today old when I learned that I always I'd seen the word penny Royal all over the place. And I was like, oh that must be some quaint British thing that I will never understand the British version of pennywise the clown. Oh, no. Why would you say that? It's I mean it had to be said Lord. It's not like a Royal. This isn't this isn't Pulp Fiction. Okay. Like, we didn't need a British version of pennywise. I think we do. Now, I'm going to eat your face like what? That's I mean, we got Britain down to Pat because that's what it is picture. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, goodness. I'm sorry. I apologize for that. Yeah. Some some things that are called meant though, just to Merck up the waters a little bit more are from totally different genus. Like for example, Brazilian Bush meant it's a close cousin. But yeah, at tech sodomy is hilarious is what it comes down to. Yep. Very very serious. And another thing that makes us interesting is that meant itself is kind of a category. And when people say meant, they usually mean spearmint because it's like the flavor in most toothpaste is spearmint. I think I think it could be I I feel like most people think of peppermint when they think of meant because spearmint doesn't actually contain menthol which is one of race. I mean contains a couple related compounds. But yeah, I think it's in the research realm of mints. That's what I read is that. Yeah. Generally, we mean spearmint, and I think it's the meant flavoring in a lot of. Okay. This like added in its strange because there's menthol and then mint flavoring share, and well, anyway, it's confusing. It's a category of flavors yet is and it tastes cold. Because because some of the compounds admit, perhaps primarily menthol interact with the same nerve endings in your mouth that detect physical cold. It's triggering the exact same sensation in your brain. Pretty cool sort of like cups as in triggers heat. Oh, okay. And there are a lot of all title oils in meant a different ones in different concentrations in different types of meant these these are oils that we tend to experience as flavors because they interact with some of the nerve endings in our mouth and nose. Another common. One is limiting which is citrusy. Most of these oils are produced by Zocalo, these these we glands that are all over midst skin on the leaves and stems and flowers, and they're basically a defense system against bugs, both insects and microbe bugs. Yeah. Sort of like. Big chemical warfare, water balloons, just all over the plant at a microscopic level. You know, something tiny enough disturbs these glands they'll burst with all of these oils all over the unfortunate creature and some of these oils are even toxic to humans in large enough amounts. But yeah, as with other plant defense systems like suckers humans decided we liked that. Yeah. We don't care though there. And these these glands are protected from just blowing off of the skin of meant by ton a little spikes, which is why mitt leaves feel a little bit fuzzy man listeners, you are missing a lot of excellent hand. I gotta say I'm extra gesture I like it. Okay. So so so those glands being all over the surface of meant is why you can just gently brush against him plant and come away with that sent on your hand. It's also why you should be gentle with meant when you're using it in cocktails or cooking most of that desirable flavors right there on the surface, the actual juice of the mint leaf and stem is a little bit bitter and kind of unpleasant. So for example, like if you're making them, oh hito. You don't want to muddle the meant hard enough to juice it. You just want to bruise the skin and flatten those little spikes leading those balloons released their oils. Found good. I experienced the sadness. I was like, oh, maybe I'll try. No, no, no, don't do that. No. But what about the nutrition of mint mint is another one of those herbs that can bring a lot of flavor to dishes without adding calories rates, and it has so many fascinating medicinal, potentially medicinal properties. And throughout history. It has been believed to process medicinal qualities. Oh, yeah. By essentially, everyone who has ever interacted with it because of because of cooling properties that I mentioned, you know, it features in Arabic and traditional Chinese and western teamwork. Medicines people want thought it could induce perspiration. And ministration one of the reasons why meant got this rep of healthy on a level that made it stand out from other fragrant herbs is because of that cooling sensation of menthol. And I just I hadn't considered it until I really considered it. But like the phrase breath mints could for someone like me. I can't I don't get. Meant flavor, but I still call it a breath mint. It's solidified its position, cinnamon breath meant that contains no. Oh intimate. I tried that for a while still. Men can also act as a pain killer and a pest repellent it can reduce itching from insect bites and it's used in some decongestions as well as medications that treat sunburn. Yeah. Those those title oils that I bet did minute ago can have other effects on our bodies as well as producing flavor some products that he's been oils arguing it in like a folk medicine kind of application and some do use it for that flavor. For example, neither meant nor menthol who've been confirmed to actually work as decongestions in your sinus tract, but they do clinically make people feel like they're breathing easier, and they might be relieving a little bit of the pain associated with sinus inflammation, because there is definitely research confirming some of mints uses topically on the skin for itching, not just insect bites all kinds of itchy problems for treatment of gastrointestinal issues, like irritable bowel syndrome, taken in these specially prepared pills to that. That pass through the stomach digested. Peppermint oil does seem to have a relaxing effect on smooth muscle tissue. Which is the kind that Europe that your guts are made of. And as a pain reliever. Oh, this one is cool. Okay. So we we already talked about how compounds in mint can can interact with those same nerve endings detect cold. Well, you have a variety of nerve endings throughout your body that can do that too. One such receptor found a small number of nerve cells in your skin. Does this interesting thing when it Tex cold it inhibits pain signals from being sent from that area to the brain. And this is RAD because it might be able to be used topically safely to treat neuropathy pain that that's pain caused by damage to your nerves themselves or by something going wrong in your in your pain, signalling system, these types of pain tend to be chronic. And it's what opioids are prescribed for think like dramatic diseases tension headaches stuff like that. So yeah. More clinical research does need to be done. But the preliminary research is pretty solid. That's awesome. Yeah. I should say here that as with any. Potential remedy consulted. Doctor before you go putting medicinal doses of anything in or on your body. Yes. Especially take care if you're pregnant or nursing don't don't rub men oil on a baby. No, we are do not get your medical advice from a food podcast. Almighty, you do that. Never take our advice about anything to do with babies, especially probably that's fair. Yeah. That's fair. When I was looking at meant sensitivities and allergies to get to the bottom of whatever is the deal with me in meant, I found several studies that suggest an allergic reaction to meant can lead to asthma. Also, the culprit behind my allergy or whatever it is could be the same thing that it can relate to aspirin in which I also I'll really I don't know if it's allergic, but I got a problem with both those things. Yeah. Well, more research to be done more research. And speaking of more research, we have some mint numbers, redo, peppermint and spearmint are the most commercially grown varieties of meant according to something. I read the global demand for menthol is twenty thousand metric tonnes who. But only thirteen thousand metric tonnes is sourced from plants. Yeah. The USDA classifies spearmint as an invasive species in Tennessee and other parts of the south grow your Minton. Pots, y'all. That's very serious look on her face. I'm very serious about it. I've heard tell of mint I think from you. I'm a little more little nervous about the whole thing to be honest, and you can find meant in everything all kinds of things. Gum tooth face. Fragrances for candles liquors ice cream. Teas hot chocolates cocktails candies. Jellies medicine cough, drops chapstick in state redes-, particularly with lamb of area English or Irish then. Yeah. Yeah. There's a world of mental out there. There is there is it's really popular around Christmas time here in the US, and I would wager probably other other places. Well, particularly peppermint, candy canes or the number one non chocolate selling candy the month of December in the US. And yes, I want to do an episode on candy canes so badly now because they have just a plethora of fund miss around them. I I took time out of should been spending research other things looking at candy canes that episode is coming later, but not today. Yeah. Yeah. Rap rabbit holes are real y'all. They are we should. Do remember when we did gingerbread in the middle of summer? Yeah. An annual like middle of summer Christmas food episodes of that. I like it. I like that tradition. -solutely we've got some history for you. But first we've got a quick break for from our sponsor. this episode of saver is brought to you by smart water. I drink a lot of water. I have witnessed you do it. Yes. There are a few things. I love more in life than some cool water after a workout and I love smart water, not only for the taste, but for the uniquely designed bottle because it's so great to grab when you're on the go twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from the inside out today. They're continuing to find smart ways forward in everything they do from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people where changing our world refresh thinking like you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you meet your goals. Whether you've got some new ones in two thousand nineteen or just aiming to look and feel your best every day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Emmer back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. So the Mentha genus most likely I originated in the Mediterranean in Europe, and or Asian Africa, depending on the type all the way back to at least three hundred BC meant was seen as a symbol of hospitality. Folks, would drew them at banquets to welcome guest and also in general to keep mice away either in the home or where grain resort and also they would wear them as crowns like oh. You know that? I like that. According to Greek mythology Haiti's loved a nymph named Mentha soa jealous process, any his wife transformed Mentha into a plant, but he's hoping to make things a little more bearable for her life as a plan gave her a sweet fragrance hooping folks would have would appreciate your sweetness. In another version, I found seventy stomped on Mitha until she was dust and Haiti's brought her back to life as the fragrant mint plant, and I went on a whole green with envy rabbit hole after reading that. But I it it turns out it's old pal. Shakespeare, probably oh that guy that guy there. Multiple multiple versions of that myth share those are the two key the basics. Yes. And this is where the word meant probably derives from that name, which itself probably came from a dead, pre Greek language. Yeah. Which in which it was the name for the plant like the Mentha myth is an origin story for this plant. That was already familiar to everybody time is a flat circle. Speak. Speaking of flat circles, interestingly the word meant, meaning like, a place that prince or stamps money is from a different Latin root, monitor meaning money makes sense. I I guess I guess it's also if you if you type in minutes the first couple of results, I found were for the US mint other types of money meant place. Absolutely. Anyway, the ancient Greeks were fund of minutes, and they used it in their funerals in their homes as a freshener, and as a remedy for indigestion meant did get an association with death as well. And that's one of the reasons it was used at funerals perhaps because of this myth L with processing eighties. Yeah. And it was used to cover the smell of the dead. Egyptians might have used meant as a currency because it was so prized for its perceived cleansing abilities mints were described as a tithing herb in the bible. Yeah. Yeah. The Pharisee is we're like a give us money or meant whichever is fine money are meant. Yeah. And then money minutes. I know it's all there. Plenty of the elder wrote about meant in first century, see advising students to wrap meant around their heads to delight the soul for the good of the mind and more efficient learning, basically, clear your mind and you'll concentrate better. Okay. Yeah. Aristotle also wrote about mitt, but he warned soldiers should avoid it before battle because it might diminish their willingness to fight like the concept was like they might chill out so much or they might just be so happy that they're smelling this lovely meant that they're just like, well, what's this all for anyway? Why can't we just be friends? Okay. Yeah. The I. In Chinese literature. Maybe from four seventy see in. Oh, anybody help me with this one then going pow lung, which is sometimes translated as master lays muster lays, a treatise on the preparation of medicines or some variant thereof. Yep. So they certainly back towards that time in probably for a long time before they already had the digital uses in there. Yes. Going on. Peppermint has been distilled into oil and Japan for centuries as well. Some of the first mouthwashes out of medieval Europe, where a mixture of mentally use and vinegar. Oh, or or Moore's them flee, folks. But just you on the mental eve meant infused steam vapor was used in sick rooms to add frequences to Beth as sort of a nerve stimulants to give relief to dry hands to treat dog bites all kinds of things herbalist. John Gerard wrote that spearmint rejoice as the heart of men. Oh, I mean, I mean, not your heart. Maybe. Not your stomach. Yeah. My heart is briefly haffey. There's like a two minute window where I'm like oh. Commercial production got underway in Britain in the seventeen. Fifties. Mint made its way across the Atlantic with the first pilgrims and okay. So when you think of mints are at least when I think of mints, one of the first things, I think of is dental hygiene shore. Yeah. So if we kind of go down that path Alto. It's got their start in the eighteen seventies. A product of London confectionary Smith and company marketed as a stomach SU there rather than eight breath freshener, the high dose of peppermint extract, made them far more concentrated than the leaves themselves. By this point. We see the earliest analyses of menthol like scientific what's going on here. Yeah. Yeah. But yeah, no. I mean like other lozenges of the time. This was definitely like an entrance into being actual candy like there's layers there's layers. Simultaneously, dentist? Washington Sheffield invented toothpaste mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide meant along with other flavors were added into that to mask the flight records as you can imagine baking soda and hydrogen peroxide, not the most delicious on their own. No, definitely not. And then we get listerine listerine comes onto the scene in eighteen seventy nine a combo of eucalypt tall, which is a hall infused with eucalyptus time all add menthol dentists began using it on their patients and in nineteen fourteen listerine convinced the public large that they had bad breath. And they needed listener you to solve it. It was probably true the first part anyway, the second part. Yeah. That's fair. That's fair. The association of the cooling of the menthol and breath freshening was really starting to solidify at this point as meant was becoming more popular in the US, more and more state started to grow it. But the two front runners were New York and Michigan huge fields of peppermint and spearmint turned into oils and extracts after being distilled into that. And to read airy these operations were huge and in the early twentieth century Michigan accounted for ninety percent of the global mint flavoring market. Wow. Ninety percent. But then in the nineteen twenties a blade of fungus wiped out a lot of the meant crop production shifted over to the northwest with growers attempting to breed a blade resistant crop up until the nineteen nineties. Washington state in Oregon turned out the bulk of the world's mint flavoring. But with the advent of cheaper synthetic flavoring and cheaper extracts and oil. From places like China. And India a lot of the major companies have moved away from US mint producers. And speaking of China and India, they both began cultivating meant in the nineteen sixties commercially. And if we step back a bit further to post World War Two Brazil got in on the game with others American countries following soon after Brazil and speaking of synthetic menthol, the company Harman and Rymer GmBH the same company that was the first to commercialize synthetic vanilla figured out synthetic menthol and nineteen Seventy-six or the first iteration of it, the Takasogo international corporation of Japan. Perfected the process of synthetic menthol in two thousand one I do think recently there have been even more perfection of it. You can't perfect perfection. You can project a process creative. You know what I mean? And I wanted to mention this as well because in classic and classic saver style. We missed this whole thing. But I was interested the McDonald's shamrock shake. Okay. Yes. All right is is that mitt flavored. Oh, exactly. Exactly. Okay. Look it debuted in nineteen seventy. And after it went off the menu firm, and it in the nineties it came back in two thousand due to customer demand, and in two thousand twelve it became nationally available in the US, but outside of that is kind of rare a few places in Canada and Ireland have them. So I guess yeah. Shamrock shake. What is it? Well, it is a super neon green milkshake. But yeah, no one's entirely. Sure. What the flavor is. I from my childhood like I to be fair. I have not had these in one of these in a very long time. But I thought it was just a vanilla milkshake. That was just green that makes sense and possibly true. Okay. So some sources say it began as a lemon lime sherbert type thing. Oh, yeah. And then evolved into plain vanilla died green in nineteen seventy three and then in nineteen Eighty-three evolved. Again, two minutes, if you look up the nutritional info, you'll find that it's vanilla flavored with Shimron, sir. That's lever comes from natural flavored parentheses plant source, which we would assume is meant I mean plant source can be anything. I mean, it could be vanilla as well. I mean, it could I mean, it could be a lot of stuff. It could be liquorice of my goodness. We need somebody to get to the bottom of this. It seems the general consensus seems to be that there is meant involved somehow now. Okay. But it is mostly vanilla like, it's a light. It's a light mint -ment flav. And nowadays there's multiple flavors like chocolate shamrock shake, and especially designed straw. Oh. This shake, okay? And the shame rock she is credited with helping impart to create the Ronald McDonald house charities. You can see are. We don't really talk about specifically this, but you can see her McDonald's episode for more about that whole thing. Absolutely, whatever the flavor sixty million shamrock shakes have been sold since their inception. And it's an excellent study in artificial scarcity. Also, there is a shamrock tracker for finding one in the off season track him down to different states. Hey, yeah. Yeah. Because right because the offseason being like not around Saint Patrick's Day because right because we in America have a very specific concept of what Saint Patrick's Day is about and it's green, and it's green and there's shamrocks involved Yip Hintze SanMar shake. Yeah. There's a whole story about how New York actually didn't have shamrock shakes until twenty twelve. And then when they got them, I think it's twenty twelve but recently issue, and when the got them Jimmy Fallon went to McDonald's and bought like a hundred of them for his for the audience. Yes. And people were mad because they sold out of the shamrock sheets because of Jimmy Fallon. It was a kerfluffle. It was kerfuffle. And to end this whole shave rocks. Jake. That we've gone. Weird mascot of the episode. We present McDonald lands uncle ogrim Assi Ono, the green Irish uncle of grimace, a really the nineteen seventies and eighties. He had merch and an Irish accent. Oh, I'm sure that that was strictly authentic accent? Oh, yes. Yes. Now, I know what I'm googling after we finish this show. Yes. It's worth it is weird. It's so weird is it as horrifying as the grimaces. But like just slightly more racist. Yeah. Cool. Well, that's great. There's like a weird origin story to jinx the shamrock sake. I think it was before they solidified grimacing ogrim ac-. She grimaced drinks, the shamrock shake, and he turned he like slowly Spacek turned his green. And it's really creepy. Oh, all right. But I highly recommend looking at. Yes. We'll we'll do. Yeah. And I guess that wraps up our episode on meant I think that there's a lot of little pathways. I I definitely want to do a whole other episode. Yeah. On candy canes. And so these these other mint candies which whole there's a lot there. But yeah in the meanwhile, we've got a little bit more from you. But first we've got one more quick break for word from our sponsor. Instead of an ad today. We wanted to tell you about a new podcast from our friends, Robert lamb, and Joe McCormack hosts of these signs podcast stuff to blow your mind might have heard of it. Their new show is called invention and every Monday on the show. Robert and Joe explore the inventions, and inventors that made the modern world each episode examines, a different technological turning point in the minds cultures and susidies that provoked. The change topics include things like the KEA teen the vending machine that was near and dear to our hearts, the chopstick the x Ray machine. Sunglasses. Braille and more on invention. Robert and Joe considered the origins and impact of inventions, both recent and inch int- for good and for evil. Join them to explore questions. Like, how does the machine for removing human heads changed the way people feel about capital punishment? And what was it like for the first people to see inside their own bodies with an x Ray in venture. Publishes every Monday. Listen and subscribe to invention an apple podcast the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcast. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. And we're back with listen. Feel like men's commercials that like. There's a lot of mouth noises. I apologize for that everybody. But I had to get my point across. So that you understand. Very important. Very yes. Dan wrote we have a family tradition on birthdays where we always get a big pretzel for the family gatherings. There's a local shop that makes all sorts of pretzels ranging from pretzel, burgers and hotdogs to your normal. Little twist. They also make specialized shapes we usually order pretzel in the shape of whatever. The theme is for our kids. Birthdays, we've done Elmo Pepe pig. Darth Vader in a whole bunch more this year. My son is having a dinosaur. Pretzel and included a pick just to show you how cool they are. And yes, it is cool. It is so cool where we're going to follow up with Dan. And see if we can post this unsocial because it is it like y'all like I thought that Jurassic Park did a pretty good job of illustrating dinosaurs. But I was wrong. This is the this is what dinosaurs looked like. Yes, they need to include this in textbooks. It's beautiful. It's glorious oh arena wrote. The region I'm from and west Germany, close to the Luxembourg and Belgium border has its own pretzel related custom. I wanted to share with you. Each November eleventh St. Martins day is celebrated throughout Germany children will make colorful paper lanterns and walk in procession across town singing songs at the end of the procession. Each kid will get a little reward in the form of a big soft sugar pretzel called a Martin's Brett growing up. I love these pretzels so much. I would trade my cousins, my toys for bite out of their pretzels. Unlike a normal soft pretzel, the dough is enriched with butter milk, and or quirk baked until just golden Brown without the lie bath, and then glazed with a butter milk mix and covered in sugar the pretzels of my childhood were easily as big as my head and the fluffy est thing I've ever eaten. Now, I live in the UK and every year round of ember the craving for Martin's spread soul returns with no way of getting a quick fix. Luckily, for me, my grandma has recently discovered an old recipe and her books, so come November. I will give it a try that sounds so good. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Let us let us know. How it turns out send us send us pictures? Yes. Yes. She did send some from past years, and they look amazing. Yeah. Look delicious and soft and fluffy that one. Yeah. And I want one the size of my head. Now. I thought I was done with my pretzel cravings, but continue to do forever. Anyway, if you would like to Email us like these wonderful listeners, dude, thank you for emailing. You can Email is Hello at saver. Pod dot com were also unsocial media. You can find us on Instagram Facebook and Twitter at saver pud. We do hope to hear from you. Savor is a production of iheartmedia and stuff media for more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Thank you as always tour super producers, Andrew Howard until Fagin. Thank you to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good things are coming your way. Episode of saver is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to adding electrolytes for taste to supporting smart people who are changing our world. Refresh thinking like you today. Smart water is reimagining wander again with new smart water alkaline with nine plus P, H and smart water antioxidant with added selenium both with the same great taste as the original. Refresh yourself with smart water.

US mitt Europe iheartradio John Gerard Mentha Peppermint Patty nausea York apple Britain New York McDonald Lauren Rosemary pain Laurin
The Croissant: Who You Calling Flakey?

FoodStuff

34:52 min | 1 year ago

The Croissant: Who You Calling Flakey?

"Today's episode of saver is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle design to adding electrolytes for taste to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like you owe. Unlike you any I do of water one of my favorite things is getting some nice cold water after after I run in the morning and smart water because I love the taste. And I love the bottle today. Convenient bottles, sit is and today. Smart water is reimagining water again with new smart water alkaline with nine plus ph and smart water antioxidant with added selenium both with the same great taste as the original smart water is vapor distilled with added electrolytes to taste, great and great tasting water helps you meet your goals. Whether you've got some new ones in two thousand nineteen or are just aiming to look and feel your best every day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Hello. And welcome to save a production of I heart radio and stuff media. I'm and I'm Laurin vocal bomb. And today we're talking about croissants assaults as I was thinking about this. I was like coming up with all my favorite Crisanto memories. And I realize most of the things that are my favorite memories. I'm not sure count as thoughts. Oh, which we will get into. Oh, yeah. Yes. There is a precise. Definition of what a Crisan is. And. Yeah, things that are croissant shaped. I mean, the word means crescent spoiler alert. So I guess I guess many things can be crescent shaped. But it's true. And so yeah. One of the things that I used to love is that kid and people are good. They're gonna grown allowed. But I loved those pills Pillsbury. Super buttery useful for like if you wanna stuff things in their tastes to you make those pinwheel thing. Yeah. And and it's you know, the the they come in those canisters that are so completely. Terrified are terrifying. Glad you agree. Yeah. Yeah. It's a little thrill of danger. Every time you have to get this food, and like, well, it's all processed. I used to love my I think I've mentioned before. But my grandfather used to make panel Shaq allow which is crescent a croissant with chocolate in it. But not really but in my team, Joe. Yeah. In my mind, I always thought it was a croissant. Doing this episode. I've learned to the air of my ways, it's really funny too. Because I I know it means like chocolate bread, essentially, it's even in the name. That's right there. It's pretty much right there. But. That's okay. Oh, yeah. Oh, yes. That is just about that is like one of my favorite foods on this planet. It was my go-to you, and I was living in Belgium, probably every day cheap. And then another thing I mentioned is the I can't remember the kick up said the kit, Kat, croissants, fantastic. Oh, man, if people in Japan. You gave me great joy. Great jerk that invention. I should use one of these and make my own, but they're hard to make. They are hard to make. That's that is why they are so delicious. Yes. And we'll get into all that. But this brings us first to our question. Yes. Croissants. What are they? Well, a croissant is eight type of meanwhile, Wasser made with laminated dough totally clear, right, laminate. Yeah. Let's let's let's unpack that a little bit this time. The literal translation of the French word in west Serie is a thing from Vienna. And you can probably tell just by that one sentence that our history section is going to be really interesting. But yes, literally think from Vienna inn west series are a category of French baked goods, and or pastries that use yeast risen dough that's rich ind with butter, and sometimes eggs or milk. They are rich and on the Savery side unless you add fillings that are sugary brioche also falls into this category. Laminated dough meanwhile is a category of does that have been rolled out. And then sandwiched with a thick layer of butter. Then folded and rewrote and refloated and re rolled creating a Finnish pastry that's made up of lots of thin layers of dough separated by thin layers of butter their flaky and tender puff pastry. Also falls into this category. So a croissant is a rich pastry. Made up of lots of thin flaky buttery layers of yeast dough. Traditionally they are cut into triangles and then rolled and baked into that crescent shape. And yeah, you can use the same dough to make other shapes, and you can add feelings, but I would not call the resulting pastries Khorasan's Norwood. A lot of people have discovered. I very glad to know this now as I move forward in my future of croissants. I understand. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's it's okay. It's okay. We are all only human. It's true. Yeah. True. Remember, I think when we first started doing this show, and I let you borrow that book make the bread by the butter, something, maybe it's other. No, no, it definitely make better. Yeah. That I should probably give it back to, you know, raise this wasn't kind of like some weird shades things that you'd give it back. I just remember in there that the recipe for croissant. She was like just just. Yeah. Very complicated. It's a lot. But we got a got a section on that later on. There's couple like like tricks that will kind of help. Andrew. But it's still a lot of work. Yes. Yes. And nutrition wise, there's a lot going on. Yeah. That layer of butter that you sandwich into the dough can be anywhere from like twenty five to sixty percent of the amount of dough that you use. Oh, so so you can be dealing with really quite a lot of butter and all that butter means that Khorasan's pack Clark punch and about a third of your daily recommended intake of saturated fat in a single pastry. Ooh. Yeah. I'm that said, I mean, you know, like that fills you up and there's some protein in there from the butter, and we and milk solo. It is in the treat category. Overall. You know, it's more sustaining pastry than something more sugary. Next time. You someone's giving you a side. I about you croissant and us be like it's more sustaining than other pastries. This is basically a protein bar. That's nonsense. I would try to full. So numbers the first results. I got when I Gould croissant numbers were this this croissant formula or formulas every multiples for determining how many layers are in a croissant. And I even have a little picture here. Because I was so intrigued by it. Yeah. Yeah. Depending on how tightly you roll it or many roles you do. I mean, but, but that's you know, there's layers within those layers. Here's what family. Layers all the way down in the song. I am God Konya west raps about croissants quote. I am God. So hurry up with my damn massage in a French asks restaurant. Hurry up with my damn croissants. I am God. And then. In response, some bakers. I think tweeted primarily at him with recipes and cooking times for croissants, which is so good. Let's beautiful. That's that's I'm going to say the at A plus use of Twitter. Yes. The chocolate croissants, are you know, that technically with on? But that pastry is the selling pastry at Starbucks at this not surprise me. No, not at all fifty percent of the croissants in France. Are what are called industrial croissants. So that means they're bought frozen and baked in house, which I think we've discussed before fringe people kind of get mad about that sort of thing. Oh, yeah. There's a whole discussion surrounding authenticity. And in all of that. So yeah, it's I just found a thirty two page paper about the food ways of the Crisan. And that is discussed in depth who in it. I believe it. Yeah. There are all kinds of riffs on croissants nowadays. You've got the pretzel croissants the infamous crow nut which is the croissant. Doughnut the bagel croissant. I read about one made with Bri lower sounds, so good. Oh got really excited about that. And then I found I found in argument about the the British croissant apparently straight listeners right in. Oh. And it's it's a source of controversy. Another controversy course. And also I read that the British use jam which is highly frowned down. You do not do that like inside. Or or like is it? I think they cut it off and put it in. Okay. I don't know. I just was kind of startled at the length of this article about the British doing croissants. You know? However, you wanna eat it. I don't I don't judge. And yeah, yeah. That's the whole chocolate open thing because it's not that shape that crescent shape, which it does make sense with the name the it's not gonna croissant. Anyway, there are lots of country-specific versions like Suisse's, a Gipp fillet, the polish Martin's, glazed and topped with sprinkles for the feast day of or San Martino. Yeah. Yeah. That sounds lovely does. And the croissant has an interesting history, and we'll get into that. But first we're going to pause for a quick break for word from our sponsor. This episode of saver is brought to you by smart water. I drink a lot of water. I have witnessed you do it. Yes. There are a few things. I love more in life than some cool water after a workout and I love smart water, not only for the taste, but for the uniquely designed to bottle because it's so great to grab when you're on the go twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from the inside out today. They're continuing to find smart ways forward in everything they do from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world. Refresh thinking like you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you meet your goals. Whether you've got some new ones in two thousand nineteen or just aiming to look and feel your best every day. Refresh yourself with smart water. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. And we are back with another controversy. Yes. Because although the croissant is French. I mean, how French is it how fringe is. I'm actually I'm not sure how excited people get about croissants, but I feel like pretty excited. So I feel like it's controversial. But maybe. Maybe some. Well. Okay. Let's let's present the facts. Yes. Yes. Because as you might have guessed from the name the translation that Lorne gave the at the top the croissants, most likely was a fancy import to France from Austria. So not from France. Really? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Let's let's move on you, you you could say you could say that it was imported from Austria and finalized in. Oh, yes. That's we'll say that. But let's good into some of this the the nitty gritty of this croissant history. The spiritual predecessor of the croissant. The Kip fell originated in sixteen eighty three. And the kid fell is a baked good in the shape of a crescent featuring a lot of butter and lard and sometimes sugar sometimes almonds Bill and goes at the Kip fell arose as part of a celebration after the Austrian victory at the siege of Yeta, and you can see our pretzel up for more about that. Oh, I loved it. Just keeps coming up. I know like thank you bakers of Austria, you're like doing everything you're up early. And. Yeah. Heard some tunneling under your city, and you let people know and pretzels and croissants were involved somehow. Maybe maybe. Yeah. It's pretty it's like a legend. But so the story goes that. Yeah. After they these bakers who heard this tunneling alerted the authorities. There is this big celebration that the crescent shape there was this baked good. They made specifically for the celebration in the shape of a crescent that was meant to resemble the Ottoman flag because they hit a yeah. A fought back the the invasion of the Ottoman empire. Writes this is supposed to symbolize eating your enemy. Oh, he bad ass. That's great sponsor way more metal than I thought. Right. Yeah. So next time. Yeah. You're eating protein. Heavy monitorable. That's a croissant. That's the true spirit of the beautiful. Yeah. Just miss side, Kip furlough is the German word for crescent and some Islam. Ick. Fundamentalist refused to eat the croissant because it resembles their religious symbol. However. Ever the kid fell existed before this legendary events Apoel from twelve twenty seven CE mentions a crescent shaped bread product, given as a Christmas gift from baker's Vienna to Duke Leopold and moon-shaped breads, go back centuries before that I feel like we talked about that in our cake episode talked about it and it cert- episode. Yeah. I think of cake, maybe maybe waffles. Maybe man, that's a throwback. Yeah. I was a old timey hot minute ago. I lo- awful. I don't need to be thinking about that right now. Okay. All right, okay. In another aside to throw in here. These days if you order a kit fell in Germany or Austria, you're more likely to get a crescent shaped cookie as house to this kind of pastry croissant type thing. But okay, let's give France some credit where credit is due. There's a popular legend at Marie onto a net. Introduced the Kip fell to France when she was feeling homesick for via fun story. But there is no real evidence for it El, no. Yeah. Whatever the case the cafe did make its way to France. And if we go back a bit to eighteen thirty eight and Austrian August Zang, he moved to Paris, France and opened the first Viennese bakery in the city called LA Boulogne. Shreve in was it was well liked and well advertised, and it had these spectacular window displays that people adored. And of course, he sold Kip fell possibly given a lift sheen thinks to esteem oven. Okay. I find I just like thinking about old time you how you found ways around things we just take for granted. And despite having what sounds like a very successful bakery. He shut it down after a couple of years and relocated back to Austria where he founded that country's first daily newspaper, and he made Bank. Also, he worked in the banking industry and the mining industry. He was a man of many interests. All right and there's an elaborate tomb in Vienna. Central cemetery to him and no mention of the the croissant. Would love if people who've been there had taken pictures. Yeah. The Mirwais sounds like it's pretty. Do you expect? That's awesome. Okay. All right. But so he had set up the sort of a trend for Viennese style. Pastry in Paris. Yes. It kind of reminds me of like, which is so funny. But the cronut like it sounds like it was kind of this trendy bakery to go to you. And that. Yeah. Yeah. After even after he left the love of Kip full had bins by eighteen forty as you could find a dozen or so bakers making Viennese breads, and pastries it didn't take long for the croissant to be adopted as a breakfast food. Charles Dickens, even mentioned, quote, the dainty croissant on the boudoir table after visiting Paris in eighteen seventy two ish while simultaneously calling out the dismal monotony of English breakfast foods. Oh, yeah. Dane. The first written mention of the croissant. Infringe could be found. An awesome pans eighteen fifty three days substance, automated tear, the first recipe for croissant is because it wasn't quite what we would. Call a croissant today appeared about fifty years later and Joseph vas to Chanel universal to cuisine at the eighteen eighty nine world's fair, which is the one the Eiffel tower was built. Croissants made their debut. I mean had already debuted. But this was like a big deal the grand debut. A lot of the attributes today. That's good. It's good. I like it. Thank you. Because you're about the only one. Hey, it helps the production. Even if it doesn't make it into the to the final product, the the emotion is there. We're both gesturing about the emotion. Yes. I imagine you listeners know that gesture, you know, the emotion just. And then in nineteen sixty three a little company called Pillsbury launched their refrigerated crescent rolls and debuted poppin fresh, aka the Pillsbury dough. Boy, I don't know if I knew his name was poppin fresh. I. I feel like they should bring that back because that's great. It is it sounds like you how you would lamely. If it was me describe like a song you heard. Yeah. Poppin fresh are like shoes. Maybe. Yeah. I'm I'm picturing that like he he's dressed much more like the fresh prince of Bel-Air. Version anyway, somebody makes that. And then with the help of industrialization and the introduction of premade frozen dough a century later. This is a century from I've really messed up the timeline a century from the world's fair. So yeah. Like around the same time that Pillsbury thing was happening. We which had kind of been this fancier luxuriance thing became more readily available and they were croissant. Teddies? These takeaway croissant places that started showing up across France yet in this really kicked in around the late nineteen seventies. Some historians see this as a way for France to to sort of take back their culinary scene. Because around that time American fast food joints had started popping up and Crisanto raised countered that by offering sandwiches made with this. You know, very French base of Crisan, although this demand also led to further industrialization and innovation and wider popularity which would serve to further. Distance croissants from their origins. So much stuff so much layers upon layers like you said here's upon layers in nineteen Eighty-one Sara Lee came out with their frozen croissants, and they quickly became a best seller. And then seeing this fast food chains like Burger King and arby's. Started offering croissant breakfast sandwiches in by nineteen Eighty-four. The New York Times ran with the headline claiming that the Americanization of the quest. Sants had begun. And then further proof the krona I feel like that's a pretty Americanization of. Yes. Yeah. I mean, it's it's related is not I would say, it's probably not a croissant is definitely not a class on anymore, but came out in two thousand thirteen. Oh, wow. Yeah. Right. So so soon and yet so far. I know I know it is interesting. I hadn't I I guess I just like internalize this, but I'd never really considered it. But how the croissant is just this kind of symbol of France. I think if you just ask somebody to come up with stereotypical. This represents France, it would be a beret. Uh-huh. A bag at stripes. Yeah. On a croissant? It's up there, certainly. I could be wrong. Maybe this is just me. But I I think that's the that's the American persists for sure American perception. But yeah, the croissants like this become this cultural icon in France. So that's that's about our history. We've been teasing some science here. Yeah. And we will get into that. As soon as we get back from a quick break for word from our sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by save the food dot com. Each year up to forty percent of food in the United States never gets eaten. This translates to two hundred and eighteen billion dollars lost in wasted water energy fertilizers cropland in production costs. The average American throws away over twenty pounds of food per month for the average family of four that's nearly one thousand pounds of food every year gone to waste resulting in one thousand five hundred dollars lost and sad vegetables. In the bottom of your fridge. Save the food has awesome resources for helping you prevent that a guide for how to store hundreds of common ingredients to keep them. Fresher longer a tool for planning a whole week of meals, incorporating leftovers, and leftover ingredients and another tool for taking the guesswork out of how much food to make for guests, whatever their dietary preferences and hangar level cook. It store it share it. Just don't waste it. Learn more at save the food dot com. Brought to you by the natural Resources Defense Council and the Ad Council. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. So all right. There are a few Saudis reasons why croissants are so tasty of fluffy and flaky at the same time. And so reaching satisfying. It comes from croissants being a vian Waziri. Though. That's also limited as I was talking about at the top. This is really combining everything read that was happening with French baking and pastry around the time that they were invented. And yes, there is a difference there between baking and pastry classically French bakers were working with the heat of ovens to do their science slash magic. Whereas pastry chefs working with the chill of ice with jellies and things and fruit fillings stuff like that. The trick of making a good croissant is to work with very cold dough and butter and then to let the heat of the oven perfect them. And to talk about that. We I have to talk about east poop what food. Yeah. The in Weiser redo its yeast risen, which means that you've let a colony of yeast grow in the dough, you feed them a little bit of sugar, and they'll poop carbon dioxide and flavor. The flavor part in croissants is usually pretty minimal you have to let a a colony grow for at least several hours to really make enough flavor. Compounds to be super noticeable at which point argument would us friends lactic acid bacteria are also probably involved, and I have read recipes that will have you do this let let it proof for several hours to overnight. But it's optional. However, the carbon dioxide part is critical these tiny air bubbles are what make baked goods fluffy. But hey, another thing that can make baked goods fluffy is butter and water and follow with me here because into and of themselves. Neither better nor water are things that one would really describe. It's fluffy. Both are almost entirely unlike say marshmallows. Yes. But the moisture in each will evaporate when exposed to heat, meaning it will expand into steam in baked goods this can provide lift in a DOE as long as the structure of the dope can support it an increase aunts. You've created Hella structure because you have laminated. The dough you've made all those layers of the butter melts and the moisture from it and from the DOE itself will boil and evaporate out the remaining fats and proteins from the butter coat each expanded layer of dough. And as the DOE continues to heat each of those layers cooks like a like a Panini in oppress except the press is made out of butter and hot air. Yeah. And then as the as the pastry continues to heat the starches and amino acids in the ingredients will react producing the yard reaction of Browning. On. I didn't really mention milk is one of the ingredients in the DOE. It helps with all of this. And so yes, that's how you get fluffy. Flaky flavorful layers that first bite crunches in crumbs everywhere. Oh zone messy. It's service is so good. And there are there are lots of good guides to making croissants online. The important part really is keeping everything cold like chilling. You're rolling surface, chilling, the dough chilling the butter and also making clean cuts when you create your triangles and being real delicate when you shape them, so that you don't Smoot layers. Yeah. You don't want us move. You don't wanna smooshed you've never not not not in Crisan in croissants, other things smooth. But yeah knows no small share not share. And and I wanted to to give you guys a couple references that I found super interesting, and helpful as I was pulling together these notes one is that thirty two page article about croissant food ways, it's called the way of the Crisan traditional perspectives on a traditional pastry. It's by one Rachel Hopkin and was published in the journal digest, though, which is a journal of food waste and culture. And yeah, that was great. And then there was a baking guide and fine cooking by one Robert Joran. Oh, it's got an awful lot. I'm not sure if I'm saying that right? I'm sorry. I've looked up so many French words today, and I'm butchering everything. Anyway, it's called baking light and flaky croissants, and it it's it's it seems good. I haven't used as methodology, but he's very thorough and laying everything out, and yeah, also, just I apologize for right? French pronunciation throughout this. I'm sure that some nice French speaker out there is. Cringing? Yeah. It's been a roller coaster pronunciation for sure. Our we've been living in fear. Every other words, but I think you know, we need to brace. We tried. We tried our best. Yeah. Yeah. I all all mistakes are mine. No offense intended. Yeah. Well that that's that's about the end of the croissant. It would you ever tried making one? Now, I kind of want to this is precisely the type of like really nit-picky pastry making that I enjoy doing. I also really enjoy making buck, lavar, which is which is different. But similar like it's got similar physics that go on while you're baking it, but but, but it wouldn't be considered this Viennese style pastry because you're not you're not rolling, Mike. You are with Crisanto. But yeah, just just the idea just the sheer mental image of rolling out dough. And then putting a slab of butter half the size of that dough down and folding just making that butter that initial butter sandwich. Yeah. Is just so sexy. Yeah. Have you have you tried? Oh, no. I remember reading that the entry in the book that we mentioned. And she was pretty flat out unless this is something you're like super excited about. 'cause I mean, the whole the premise of the book is like calculating the cost of ingredients. And then the cost of the time you like the labor. Yeah. Whether or not it's more cost effective. So we're not like telling you don't do if you want to do it. Yeah. Yeah. Take pictures and send us. Yes. It was more. Like, if you're just thinking, I'll try croissants, and you're not super excited about it. Maybe don't do that. Yeah. I think there was like two recipes in there that she I don't wanna say failed. But like. She couldn't get to work. Oh, Qassam might have been one of them. Oh, yeah. Anyway, I I would I after my disaster making buttermilk, biscuits and marshmallows that. I will gladly help you if you ever decide to do oh still need to have. We still need to have a cause. I can totally help you out with that. Anyway. Okay. Yeah. That's what we have to say about croissants. Next time. You're biting to Kasane. Just remember how medal it is. Be like. Like it. Like, he's the most weights hero. This brings us to listen. Buyers. So many layers. Jane wrote, I'm from Dunedin New Zealand, and while I could care less about whether Bob Lova is originally an Australian or New Zealand thing apart from to say that all can have Russell Crowe. And we'll keep the of. I can't couldn't for one thing. It's still issues as it is summer here at Christmas time is my family's go to for our Christmas dinner dessert my birthday happens to be a week after Christmas, and I have been known to request my mom oops up one for that celebration two. She only got a standard mixer couple of years ago, and before that whipped with an electric ham beater, so it has always been a labor of love and not to be trifled with. We see what you did there. And we like it Christmas just ain't Christmas without it. My mom's version tends to be a crisper flatter Pov than those marshmallow. We one sold in stores like Cowles, but it is much preferred by my family for sure the eggs are laid by her hands in the poverty is always topped and fresh whipped cream and fruit usually locally picked raspberries, and blueberries and is a perfect finisher to a summary Christmas lunch. Oh, that's nice. That's so delightful. I'll say hi to your mum's hens for. Sim-? Big couldn't pet pictures of been they've been coming in your love it the best Matteo wrote. I just listened to your food TV episode and your mention of dinner and a movie on TBS. Brought back font. Childhood memories. You see for some bizarre reason TBS was broadcast in southern Ontario for many years. I think every person in that region can fondly remember the channel and how it used to play amazingly rewatch -able movies, like Shawshank, Redemption, and Forrest Gump and Braves games today. I know considerably more about Georgia than I ever thought I would TBS several years ago was replaced by Peachtree TV a vestige of its former self no more saved by the bell in the mornings or dinner and a movie sad face. Any? I have a perfect Ed boiling recipe for your mother place exit. A pot cover them with water put the pot on the stove and place a lid on top bring the water to a rolling boil and as soon as it comes to enrolling boil turn off the heat and. This is important. Do not take the eggs off the stove for ten minutes after ten minutes. Take the eggs off cool immediately and peel perfect eggs. Every time. I have so many experiments at try. Out my onion goggles. Oh, it doesn't make any sense. I'm going to use them take some notes trial these weight, and then and then I'll go present by findings my mother, and maybe she won't hate willing. The gift that keeps on giving results in more deviled eggs than that's great. Or in a happier mother. Both are good both deviled eggs first mother's happiness. Are you about my priorities there? That's I'm gonna bad personnel. Okay. And I just want to say I too saw a Shawshank Redemption for the first time on TBS. Oh, I'm positive that that yes. Yes. So. Oh, yeah. Yeah. That and I'm breakfast club. So many movies that like when I saw them again, not in their edited for TBS format. Yes. I was like this is a different film. Why? Make more sense. Yeah. Oh, but yeah, thank you so much to both of them for writing in. Yes. And if you like to write too as you can our Email is Hello at sabre pod dot com. You can also find us on social media. We are on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at saver pod. We do hope to hear from you. Savor is a production of iheartradio and stuff media. For more podcasts from iheart radio. You can visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Thank you as always tour super producers Dylan Fagin and Andrew Howard. Thank you to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good things are coming your way. Today's episode of saver is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to adding electrolytes for taste to supporting smart people who are changing our world. Refresh thinking like you today. Smart water is reimagining wander again with new smart water alkaline with nine plus P, H and smart water antioxidant with added selenium both with the same great taste as the original. Refresh yourself with smart water.

France Crisan Austria Vienna Pillsbury Kip Paris Twitter TBS Japan Andrew Howard DOE Laurin Shaq Joe Kat Belgium Starbucks Khorasan
19 Unthinkable Ways to Save Money on Clothes

Success Unscrambled | Blog Traffic Tips | Business Success Stories

22:37 min | 7 months ago

19 Unthinkable Ways to Save Money on Clothes

"Hello and welcome. Assess but asses offer and my focus. This is to help Finance to become more visible using conic marketing strategies so that they can scale their business quickly on gained time Freedom Day need with with their loved ones. Right in today's episode. We'd be looking at nineteen on syncopal ways to save money on clothes and just in case you're wondering what does that have to do which gonig marketing strategies I have women find Funds budgets sort of. It can actually afford those kinds of recall it projects for the business online business on forty locks. Because many times you Wanna you hugh outsource projects and you need to find ways to find funds Budget of eatable Sue Sousse Fund it. So I'm helping women saved when the other parts of their lives so that she can actually a full. Those projects going forward so again topic of today's associates. Nineteen on thinking to save money on clothes. So if you're trying to save one includes or if you need to find creative ways to save hundreds on clothing every month then this might be heavy so not looking for clothing. Habits is one of those controversial topics that can betray orbits. Ricky as I can easily step on other people's toes there are several schools. told me it comes to finding the best clothes and taking care of upped. Many people continue to struggle with what they should wear while working from home. The reason for this is because what you will has a profound effect on your ability to be productive by working from home so I feel looking for sort of pragmatic dunked youths Approach to includes than you've come to the right place in this episode you looney number of practical reasons in one year goes on still look good even on the Donostia esteem of the week. So why focus including well. There are things that we do everything they were night of our lives and putting includes is just happens to be one of them. Can you imagine life without clothes. What life would even look like? I knew I knew it would be cold on on entrusting also we would all end up on the show cold out to look good naked. which would be a bit of a a hassle? I mean sit down for a few minutes and think about it. We need chose to wear for nearly everything in one sense can be annoying because it means To wash as well as finding something to every single d two times three times a day is a friend of mine who keep who sleeps in the nude so he said I can tell you that I cannot sleep close out Sus Not going to happen since this is our our lots than we have no choice but to conquer this challenge head on and don't allow it to win House budget. If you're going to save money on clothes then do it in style on on Stacey so say when he includes seventeen weeks. Let's spend some time looking at the seventeen or eighteen. Nineteen weeks to save money on Sadat becoming coming up attractive three hundred and sixty five days of the year even if we are in our jumps onesies. All sports spots these tips tips and tricks Difficult but they will lead you to be a little more creative on how you buy wash uninstall clothing faithfulness. His nice try on clothes. Everyone's I like to spend some time coming up with new outfits from my existing stash of close. It is so easy to Tro. Tro Your hands up in the air declare. Ah that you have nothing to wear. Another deadly assumption is that you have wanted to see more of it several times already considered we mix and and much existing Thompson flattens. I concentrate surprise myself with results giveaway before buying Wilko's is number two a great habit to adopt before buying anymore. Clothes is to give away with things that just don't fit well or don't company make your buddy the some some items colluding Just doesn't fit your property then what to how you try to make it fetched either. Two sizes not writes. The cut is not just not suitable for you simply simply give it away as it might someone else better by. Polity Bras is enough number three. I cannot emphasize this enough every few years or so I would head of what the department still get for Bras. There's nothing worse at least in. My opinion on seeing woman would bras. That don't complement their buddy sheep year are here. We are twenty for entry and finding a perfect brise tenant is for some people yes it is is a subject that isn't easily already address in schools. So maybe we need to have women's clubs that at addresses this kind of issue. Nobody wants to talk about this anyway. In a number four. We've got an end of fixing existing clouds. If you're like me you probably have a fever atop CADA gun dress. John's jumper that might that might have a tea or rip somewhere. Trust me it makes war wall sense to fix it at home. Compared to trying it out it is still difficult to find a replacement item. You may be thinking that you don't even have a swing machine on you don't know how to so well. He is a great tip. I'm a true effects. Your Clothes Party. which if you will cancel so that you can get those those fix SHEFA? Conflict is inevitable five. Have you ever worn itchy item of clothing. I knew I have one of the most annoying experiences experiences for me is very uncomfortable. Close it could be an itchy labor lazy SIP. A pair of pants twisty Walker. Eugene straps on address trouble every every time you move unless you are friend agreed at altering Fifty property politically than you better. Just giving it away. Life is too short to be stressed cruise. Just doesn't sit right on your buddy the number six. We've got try before you buy why I know. Several people who guilty of this just like trying goes in the shops before the by what they don't realize is the coast of acquiring that item of clothing goes up when they need to go back and change. This is will ask for a front refund. Yes is going to be stressful. Asfaw trying on clothes and shops on you may not get to see if it matches existing clues on shoes at home however considered a cost of not. Try on before you buy it if you're buying it online on the delivery is free on return on Is Free then that will help lower the cost of acquisition so wash whites to get us. This might be commonsense. You're going to laugh at this one but it would make sense in the long run. I don't wear why I choose every week. So here's what I do the moment any side way anything whiten given the I tweak the rest of my the my wardrobe for the rest of the week include white-tie title so at the weekend at the end of the week I can wash do a white only wash in case if you're wondering what white rods. If I wear white practice week I would also WANNA falling because well as otherwise items like in wash wash a white only wash choose wash Attempts like knits in by eight. When buying Youtube I tend to think wasn't items that easy to wash dry and we we don't rely not I don't have an electric triumph will i-it's an air dryer saving the environment again to try and save the environment neither? Do I have time to spend every week ironing a bunch of clues. Life is too short to be earning every week. Yes I do have friends. Would I in boxer shorts that linen Osama's kitchen towels on anything. You can get hands on into homes iming signing bitten is not something that I prioritize on nights of things to do to be honest number nine. We've got thank drift or charity Depending on where you live you'll be familiar with each thrift charity shops where you could pick up secondhand items floating in a world of fast. Flash ended his. Think of buying Oracle's Brown you however you may find better quality items shift shops which is good news. The win win for everyone to really could Quality Jeans over the years. I balloon that a pair of jeans can work so well at Sony so many events actually at one point in my life I disliked jeans. That's to be honest because they will use Megan so stiff however they know they now have jeans us. Soft and supple. I can win for much longer periods of time and I don't feel like jeans and I don't feed restricted so at at least one black Appear in your we'll give you several options too much of a top Leases jackets and Kardashians etc at number eleven avoid dry-cleaned. Only you know that I am full of stories so I have to tell you this one. Many years ago there was a scene on a countrywide country might still and it was cooling rocks and a phone scorgeous jacket it more like a a sort of a seventeenth century kind jacket Twenty dollars marching corset. only five dollars and the liberal Red Dry. I stop which is visit. I really tried hard not wade into often so I'm not have to dry keenum frequently. Yes if you've guessed that I probably ended up being hundred us us to have them striking over time. You're right. What was the point? Stay well away. From those items detri- clean who need leaves grab eludes basics classics. The are some clues have never ever ever go out of fashion. Some people call them Basic classics. If you're still not sure what I mean. Think of them as timeless pieces the anomaly in regular collins like black white h made these agreed to have new wardrobe all the time because he never go out of style on the fit perfectly examples of these. He's anxious straight fit chow trousers which enes tank tops Cada guns leggings and shirts thirteen. We've got choose quality not who quantity. This may be obvious to a lot of people but it make perfect sense to buy one good quality item compared to four cheaper once. Let me give you a practical example. You may be tempted to buy four t shirts for tornadoes. That's a great deed isn't a bucket compared to buy one really good quality. Top twenty dollars. That will go with a lot of things. You Wash. Nevada twenty days always try. Try stuff onto Right of course once you get a good quality time you will get more way out of that quality tough for many years to come. Those oceans tornadoes may be riddled with holes after only a few washes take great care of closing number fourteen. I have seen people mistreat So much I wonder why did do it over the years I have. I've been to many trips council Lots of places so I think people on how they treat their toes if you take care of your clothes across the city making a good many as wet lose more than once is enough fifteen. It has been Full washing it really prolonged life of close especially when you're on holiday or at your holiday but even you know just ordinary life but only the obviously that's that's very important as well but if you don't be in holiday in a tropical country be sweating a lot. That probably isn't as practical depending on the occasion it be make makes sense Twice before shing them. I'm observed that it is not a good idea for some people due to the High Buddy Buddha However the trick is you have a problem with difficulty buddy buddy anew in a cooler climate drake is the way one basic short sleeves talknet Schultz neat tongue up on the fee for top way to shoot for example. These rough Gordon shoots that. We're no noise said Roger Laurin but those rough northern things Like at the only ten years old so much shit. It's at eighteen years on. They're still going strong. Bring him directly on my skin. I would wear a tank up like a White v neck. Tanked up under his under the shirt and on sort of when I when I get home in the evening get home after going out. I think moving. Don't smell. You will smell now Britian on them. Idle on second could just hang Hanging at one one one once clothing and a tank company to wash an effort on different tanked. Can't Cleveland on unregistered again to these NATO whatever it is Be Next equals. I'd like them hang on too long before Washington and this is especially very usefully Cooler climates way. Hey it you not that sweaty especially you know in you know. The sheets have the color Andrew. The cost that can get duty. But if you if you just wear short-sleeved tank thank upon the debt you gotta wait. A second time genes can easily be won twice as well depending on how long you wore them. The Flex Time Rob Wash using good quality service in sixteen to help prolong life of your clothes washing with good quality to shoot and the reason for this is lacking. You want to remove orders undoing scenes as well as you want to smell clean all the time like especially if you are a person who enjoys physical touching hogging people hug you back. You WanNa make sure that you're smelling cleaning house. My sweaty a good quality to not destroy the fibers of equalling prolonged them. And I know some of somebody who can use them on the clues camotes with a ten S. slowed syndrome. It's not do dude runs on arms. So we can't when a sloped Just use me good quantities vision that washes even the cooler temperatures. This habit will really help you to save money in twos in long story. 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13. An Ordinary No with Bim Adewunmi

The Secret Lives of Black Women

1:00:37 hr | 9 months ago

13. An Ordinary No with Bim Adewunmi

"I had like maybe forty thousand buses syndrome. One time in my twenties and then I burned it to the ground because I was looking around and I was like come and great people equally grit. We're all great. Ask for it uh for it and get it written down but ask the thing thing if you want it Oskar again because the worst thing they'll say is ordinary and then if it's a yes you get to do the thing you want so I was very confident I did think that my quote unquote natural intellect would save me and it's like no. It won't something I think about but now all the time is I look at every opportunity on. Earth is fifty fifty regardless of the probability and my fifty-fifty breaks down to either. It will work or wounds. It's in your or an interest. I think yourself as much as you can. Hello I'm SHARLA and I'm Laurin and and this is the secret lives of black women. It's the first episode of season to Ya. My God so good to be back in the studio in this space ace it feels it feels. It feels good to be alive. It feels good to be back. It feels so good to see your face Shiloh. Cue Thank you and I anti Korean routine. I mean skin chefs kissed to your skin. It's so gorgeous chefs get. How have you missed this? I've missed it so much. Of course. Yes yes this is my favorite thing that I do. I've missed it so much. I feel like I've grown so much. I've missed the open and honesty of the space in these conversations that give me so much life you give me life you give me life. I guys we're just. I wish that you could see my heart rate. Aiding how excited I am to be back an an HAL throwed. Im to introduce our first theme for season two today talking confidence and you know what this is a subject subject that I feel like you and I talk about a lot personally but also not really deep down confidence I mean. I don't know I feel like I actually don't think hourly present as a confident person so that was a lie. Yeah the totally sure because I talk about it all the time. It was like totally delighted myself and be like present. Ain't a person that's really confident capable in control and I was like no I tell and also I don't talk about it for sure 'cause we talk about it nonstop and I'm the the exact opposite. I've present apparently people have told me as a very confident person and I'm just like for for Real Kaz I don't feel it inside. This is the struggle I think. Perfect family have had like a good deal Success in it may seem like I have it together but it just truly at Gel and even hosting this podcast member. Someone sent me a message on the Graham. Are they like commoner on one of my photos news just like it's so great listening. You guys have it all together and I literally read this while I was wrapped in a blanket in my closet crying. Why are you in your closet? Because I didn't want to be around the sun I see I had to ask. I needed content. I was like I just wanted to be like in a dark room and like Jake Depression APP because I was just feeling you know just a complete lack of confidence in like myself and you know my accomplishments like sometimes when I am really hard on myself and and when I get get in that state it's just like I accomplish nothing I have like who. Who am I in the world? Why lies anyone my friend and it just it really inhibits me so it's something that I'm actively working to? You're feel secure in like you know myself and everything about me. I do wonder if confidence is possible. Sometimes for us without out an intense amount of work you know like really working at it. It's and I'm also an immigrant and I feel like coming from Haiti and coming from a poor our country and having this learned helplessness and self hatred. When you come here to America also makes it really hard it inhibits the confidence you know so I do wonder how much of it can we help you know? Sometimes I wonder so. I've been doing like a lot of work. You're just about like healing. My inner child and just figuring out who I was before people told mean who I was a little you know and being comfortable and that person 'cause I think when we're like a kid you are like oh I'm like wild and free free or unlike bookish anyway you feel at least I remember feeling secure and who I was until I didn't even the things like you said even even the things that I'm good at I doubt like am I and I tell you constantly I told you constantly that you're good at a particular thing and you will bring it up a new as if I've never said that you are great at that thing because you never internalize it because I don't believe it so yeah and this is something that I am. I'm actively working on. Is that you know when people give me. And maybe it's because I saw films like never been kissed a lot where it's always like the Bayton switch of someone being really nice and then they like you know poor pigs but on your the dance that's Carey that's not never been kissed spoiler. Alert guys I think so. I always operate within that level of expectation. Because I don't see it about myself and when people are like you're really good at this ask you know of course special. I'm like how are you trying to trick me. Not only do we both not see it because we both operate the same way. But we both don't respond to literal validation out in the world. You know like this friend who I spent the one of the girls I spent the weekend with. WHO said I'm good at everything I do? She was like second in India like as far as test scores for some architecture tests S.. She took like before she went to biomedical engineering. And she's like yeah. I'm good. I was second across all of India. But if I have you no literal things out in the world like being nominated for an award or you know getting a beating out a bunch of people to get a job or like like any kind of validation out in the world I question it I don't I don't look at it and be like yeah. That means I'm good. Got That thing I look at it and I have all kinds of imposter syndrome. We both do. We both question these outward validations of our work and it doesn't give us confidence. We don't believe it. You know you don't bananas. We don't believe it and where it's something but I will say that we are actively working to overcome for combat and I am really excited about today's gas. Been Outta me. An she is a Nigerian born writer and journalists you know her as one of the host of first aid kit. She's also producer for this American life. She's a playwright. Her Bio is amazing. Because is it says funny but can't stress this enough also extremely hot Which says a lot about her level of confidence? I wished that I had even the confidence to put that in my bio. I feel like when I listened to her podcast or read her twitter or see her interviews. There's just such such a sense of shirty about like who she is that I want to learn more about her but also I want to learn how to get. How did she get there So I'm really excited to talk to them today. How about you Charlotte? Yeah yeah so it's going to be our first black British guest. Yes which I think is important. I think it's important to hear from other her EXP- black experiences me too and I also think you know I grew up with such a deep deep love for like British comedy and British movies so I always thought that British predation especially British black people were just inherently cool light to be a British blacks. Like what do you mean that you've ever you know. Struggle struggled with a lack of confidence. You're just born cool. Look at that accent. Anything you say. British sarcasm is the funniest. It's the funniest thing in the world. I'm just like I don't know if anything and be funnier than like British person being sarcastic nope math. I don't I think well I can't wait to talk to her. I feel like I'm just like a little nervous. You're so beautiful. The the the Nigerian in me except that obviously but every other part of us like let's no it's a face but thank. You should not be nervous at all. It's all of a sudden all of the Nigerian. You that makes you so confident. Yes yes shadow over that was more specifically specifically. It's my mother. I yeah that's just even when I'm not feeling confident I am confident. Because she's in me all the time so my my urge to shrink is overpowered by the urge to kind of standard and superheroes. So it's fine. Wow what's what's your mother like. She is an incredibly intelligent. And perhaps the funniest person I know she is. She's a fantastic mimic because of the reason reason why she's so good at mimicry. Is that she. She puts in a little bit of cruelty. which makes it fantastic? I think she kind of she's zeroes in on the thing that makes a person a person cussin' and then she pirates shove and it's fantastic so she's the first funny person I knew and she still is one of the funniest people I know. She is hilarious and awesome. She's yeah she's funny she's great she's Incredibly bold she does things and Explains later if that's the thing that is required but she's not necessarily looking to explain a lot of the time she's incredible. She's very warm. She's very kind Until you until you cross her children and then she'll run needs to the ends of the earth she's she's she's wonderful. I love her. Should you think Because one of the things that we want to talk to you about is we felt that you. Are you exude such confidence in the world. So it's you know it's a really interesting thing when we think of our perceptions of other people because you just shake your head now on Lake I listen to your pockets and I've sceneries with you and I'm just like how can I get to that level of just like trusting myself and you said it's the Nigerian and you that can accept it. Can you like AAC elaborate on that show before I do that though. I think it's important also knew I don't know how old people think I am but I'm very close is two forty so a good amount of this. Thank you for saying that a good amount of this is just plain old time. The longer you live live in your body on this earth I think the more you get to a place of just like I guess this is it so make amends. Delake fix it like you know. I think that's a big part of. It is really just a case of like. Oh I've been doing this for so long. So sometimes people say oh. You're so confident and I think think of the back of my mind I'm like do you think I'm twenty three and therefore it's all because I'm not and that's no shade at all to twenty three year olds. There are many confident twenty three year olds and God bless them but I wasn't always someone who kind of stood onto feats like firmly planted. I was sometimes shaky recall many years ago crying in a toilet work because because I was terrified that I was going to be exposed for something that was the first and anytime I've ever had imposter syndrome because thereafter you realize that the bulk of people are idiots. And so it's like it's fine so that's another huge thing but the most important thing I do think and I always want to reiterate this is that I am. I am thirty seven years old this year and and so a lot of the stuff that used to kind of linger. It's gone I who has the time like there are so many of the things I wanNA do. WHO has the time? Time to be fretting. Like I'm so much more aware of death like Jesse real as real like this his flesh like. It's it's it's degrading with every minute. I'm here so it's like fix up. I haven't got time. Unbe what is everyone they ask your. I'm like away. I'm in almost the exact same space. I'm getting to the point where I literally don't have time for my lack of confidence consonance anymore. It's not serving me anymore and I'm also very aware of the fact that I'm I have a finite amount of time here and is this how I I wanna spend it reading over whether or not I'm good enough at something inconsequential by the way. Like something in a few months probably won't even matter that much anymore not title and I do think I think one of the things I all my life. I've been a Quite keen diary keeper so I had very extensive. Diaries is that sometimes. I wrote in Code. When I was a teenager I was terrified? Someone's going to discover my deep dossier. I mean honestly. I had no secrets I was in. When you're a teenager? You really think that that everything is the most important thing you've ever done ever thought never felt something I decided to do. A few years ago was to write down not even every day but you know every few weeks just kind of like rake over the events of the previous weeks right write that down and then come back to it and one of the things I have that I still do is go back to their diary diary and find appoints maybe a year in the past and I read the stuff I'd written and it's always a catalog of worries or concerns uh-huh or triumphs or sadnesses and a year later. I think to myself I remember about nine point seven percents of anything. I'm reading which at the time felt strong enough that I had to write it down. If fell burning enough. It felt like a big enough issue that I was like right this shit down. It's going to matter and then a year later you like it. It's not a matter I do not remember any of the particulars. This was a nothing. Oh my God and you don't even remember how it felt on the time. The feeling Ling was overwhelming. There is and then you go back and you think ok on the one hand. This is just a function of memory. And you know whatever on the other though do it kind of places your experiences in a much bigger canvas and then you think. Oh I see generally speaking I'm nothing like in the grand scheme of absolutely do yourself down oversee your something you someone great but ultimately we are missed and I think that's an important thing in a sense of proportion and I think that's it basically it's one thing after the other and it's like everything leads to the next thing to the next thing to the next thing until you know they put you in the ground and so you really have to kind of figure out where you're going to expend so much of your energy a- and then pull back from the places where you realize. The return here is small as to be s to be. Yeah nothing so yet eh. Choose wisely but that only comes. I do think with a good amount of time. And you know some navel-gazing introspection where you think I need to sort this. How will you know if I don't it might happen to me? So it's in your own interest. I think to yourself out as much as you can. Yeah Oh that was like A. I just took notes. I'm not and just had to step back I'm like Oh yeah. That was a word because I'm in the point of like I'm thirty three so I'm in the like I've got sort myself out. This shit cannot persist like you said we're just you know each each moment that we breathe. We're dying we're going to die. Yeah so yeah. It's just really. It's good to hear that introspection. I am also like an avid journal. Or but I find sometimes I go back back to my journals like whenever I started new journal. I read the first page of the last one that I finished new an like. Damn why am I still dealing with the same shit. I've gotTA GOTTA figure out a way out of this But I see I I do think that sometimes you're not looking necessarily to to fix so if you're dealing with something that you were dealing with a year ago that's still okay. I I do think that especially in terms of diary keeping. I am not doing it to fix wchs myself. I'm doing it really kind of look at myself. There are some things that I think. We're going to just end up having to live with so it's fine to still be going through something incredibly incredibly similar this time last year. Five years the key is I think really learning kind of make room for that thing and kind of below. Well maybe I'll never quite shake this off and that's okay okay. It can live with me if it's not actively harming me if I'm not if I'm seeking to change it and it's not changing and I'm doing all that I can you know. Then maybe it's fine. Oh at least maybe it's livable. Maybe find is an overstatement. Maybe maybe I can coexist with this thing. Maybe it's a part of me that I can just roll is at the very least he's it's you can learn from it right. I'm so sometimes you don't learn and I think that's also a k. You have to give yourself the room to kind of like I. Guess I'm you you know just not getting this but I'm getting all these other things I think that's the important thing. I'm trying to find a place of balance where I am not needlessly beating myself up and I am mostly cloudy myself on the back of doing the most basic stuff. It's kind of like wow. That was amazing. The way you chew that food that's not like but it sounds like what you're doing is just being present and in the moment trying to be and I think that's a difficult thing because the nature of life as we live it is to be thinking talking about the next thing on the next thing and whether that's like in the grand scheme of your career or just a relationship or your life or whatever your relationship with your mom how you think about your father and you know all these other things you all condition all of us are conditioned to think about Oba. What next which I think is a good thing because you know the human states I think to be striving for some ineffable something which is whatever survival Brian Right exactly? You've got to look out for yourself on the people around you. You and your tribe I get that but I also think that you know in the meantime stuff is happening in the now and it's fine. It's good it's great to look back and kind of be like wow. I really learned something. But in the meantime you're in it now you're you're you're doing. You're dancing all the steps so to try and figure out a way where possible so kind of at least if not enjoy. Don't actively hate the steps. Ben This all sounds super profound and like it's something you've come to after a long Reflection was there a point in your life where everything was very opposite of this viewpoint that you have right now that you were You're making more of moments comments than just accepting them and just being present for them like. was there really bad. Time that like forced you to kind of get to this place of quiet and observation survey Shen and acceptance. I know what the narrative requires. The answer is no I- incredibly incredibly incredibly fortunate. My parents superb people. I have a really wonderful relationship with both of them most of the time because you know you have to leave room for the other bits but I think something that was kind of hammered into me in a way that was also very casual and I don't think my parents were where they were doing it but I think that I have always kind of thought of myself as you know good. I'm fine. I'm crates even like without being too. You know to Nigerian. But I'm yeah I think I I grew up with a very constant sense sense of self i. I was aware that I was you know that I had value And in a kind of like Pollyanna kind of like. I'm amazing amazing. I thought I was just like another human being that had as much right to do be anything as every other human being. That's it with the full knowledge that the world is not fair with wooded that look like from your parents because you talk about them so much instilling this view. They they let us be. I was a very Over there was a period of my life where I was an overly sensitive child. Everything irritated me and I was my dad's in a very classic Nigerian away rather than an kind of let me be would would give me a terrible nickname. He called me the egg and he'd be like don't touch the egg she might very now. I look back and I'm like well terrible terrible father but you know he was right I was I went to this really prickly. Nothing was correct. Nothing was ever done right. If someone looks at me the wrong way at you know flash and just kind of like almost hit them like I was is very weird thing so I think about that period period a very specific point of my parents kind of going. Well that's just him and I think that's fundamental to how they kind of let us be. Let us just be. I think I was Fellow precocious child. I was good at school was But my being good at school was an accident. I wasn't a very good student. I think every every report card was like bins very intelligent. The one I remember a lot was intelligent. But she's very overconfidence And that's a problem because she thinks she knows everything but she doesn't and that was very true I was I thought he devices. A big enough word and said it within the authority which by the way. That's a trick for life you can just use but I would kind of just like say stuff and I'd say it would like real kind of and that's that and everyone was like notes. No when I was like isn't it and then you can see the Dow is it no. I'm just like this stupidly confident child. It's not real. It's not correct so I was very overconfident. I did think that my quote unquote you know natural. Intellects would save me and it's like no it won't like you have to apply yourself so so. That was the point of that but like in general I guess I was talking about. This is my sister actually recently. We were saying how we will always very aware that our parents loved us Because they did love us and it was very clear in their actions and their words But then the thing that we said was like well l'amour important thing I think was that our parents liked us and that feels very difference to like this all ankle passing. You know you came from me you on. Oh my child I love you you know. We had long conversations. We spent time together. We'd go on drives we you know. They want to know what we were thinking. They care about our opinions. I mean apply our opinions but they can. They wanted to hear what we saw. And I think that was just like it's really wonderful grounding thing of just like understanding everything I was saying wasn't even if not everything. A lot of what I was saying was being heard we. We mattered to my parents of course but also so to the outside world if if they think we have something in us then maybe the world will think tha- I look back and I think Oh. Yeah that must have something to do with it. You know. We're zero born with the thing that makes us. It's fine half of each of our parents but we are also one hundred percent ourselves so perhaps I was born with like a you know this really unshakeable unshakeable sense of solving which case thank God but also I do think there's a big part of that is just kind of like no. I think I had a very fundamental unarticulated understanding. Even as a child that that I that I mattered in some way but not not more expensive anyone else. That was what my understanding was modelled on because my parents told us uh and showed us that and so I just I just fell into it. Do you see a lack of that in America because this is something that I think about Observe and talk about all the time with my non-american friends just seeing their level of confidence and sense of self and sense of self love and I think Not What every non American culture a lot of non American cultures for example. My husband is Indian and him and his friends seem to have a self love. That was instilled in them by their parents. Like you said liking them spending time with them acknowledging them you know making them feel like their thoughts in were important important. You know like these little actions every day to make you feel accepted and loved and I've and I think the comparison when I look at my myself and my American friends and those of us who were brought up here. We don't seem to all have it. We don't seem to all have that shared experience. Our experiences experiences seemed to be a little bit We tend to have a little bit more trauma a little bit more disconnection from our parents a feeling that we weren't particularly like or at at least that's what I tend to feel sometime. I think it's a problem. All around the other thing I wanted to point out is that of course when I speak about a lot of what I'm thinking about is when we were living in Nigeria Julia so we were born in the UK moved to Nigeria for a few years while more than a decade. But I moved into a middle class comfortable experience in Nigeria. Uh where my parents had office jobs and they had good hours and so they could spend time with less than they could encourage us in our endeavours at center. So what what I'm talking about here is a good amount of privilege alongside the love that parents feel for their children. But like it's easier to show love with money. Let's be very clear so I think what I'm speaking about here is very much me. I know lots of people who grew up similar to me between the UK and Nigeria but like in terms of trauma that exists everywhere. Like when we lived in Nigeria we arrived in Nigeria under the you know the head of state when we moved to Nigeria was Ibrahim Babangida Benja. He was a military military man. who was you know bad for Nigeria? And then after him there was like you know our attempt to democracy in the June twelve elections and then that went to port and then we had a military dictate so we had Sanni Abacha General Sanni Abacha heated and die until maybe the year the year before I moved back to London so again like trauma was every way we we did not have direct kind of hand of white supremacy pressing down on us in our everyday not all the time I mean it was there because Nigeria ex-colony obviously of Great Britain. So there is. There is trauma in the every day. But my WanNa WanNa hear more about your time between the UK and Nigeria but also your transition to America but we're GONNA take a quick break and we'll come right back. Just make good holiday give. What super comfortable Bomba socks? You know what I'm GonNa have to say I agree with you. I have on box right now. 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So I'm definitely going to check this out and lucky for me and listeners of the show dipsy is offering a thirty day free trial when you go to dipsy stories dot com slash secret lives. That's a thirty day free trial when you go to Dipsy D. P. S. E. A. STORIES DOT com slash. Secret is and we're we're back. I'm just like I just want to listen because I'm always when I meet people who had good childhood. I always so curious. It's amazing movie and be like wow. That was that lake lags that I just don't even want to be. What was that experience? Like to grow up in feel loved and light and how that carries U And just even your your recognition of like you know. My family family had good jobs and not be stressed about. Money is like a freedom to be able to like eggs more interactive kids in a different way. So whenever I don't know I'm always always in awe and a little bit not jealous the wrong verb word wondering what if what would I be like this exact act. Same Way fantasizing. Yeah it was fantasizing about what that would look like a and trying to do what you talked about earlier which is not holding onto that. I mean Right and I do think I've kind of painted this picture of my parents like these. You know fucking amazing. And they are but you know the human beings and they are I say as Florida's any of their children and I do have certain resentments like my life in my life that I had in the UK for example like life was Oughta we were working class in Niger in the UK. Middle Class in Nigeria but immigration changes your status every time when we when I came back to London we we will not middle class. We do not have to cause did not have the made You know and also he didn't have the support of the whole family system my mother my father siblings and our extended family. They're Nigeria and yeah we were not rich opposite of rich. We were very we actually. Yeah we won't walking Clawson Pool in London and that was an adjustment in itself off. It means that right now. I am an inadvertent Holder of money. A don't like spending money. I'm incredibly cheap. Everything is kind of like. Could I walk because I go get a taxi and I'm like no it's okay. The exercises get like you know like the constant fear. The first time I went on holiday and paid for by myself I was excuse my language. I was shitting bricks because I was like how am I gonNA replace. Oh my God what are you doing. And so yeah how we how we came up definitely affects how we kind of face the world day in day out so yeah it means that I might my urge. Every time I get any bit of money as well pull the in. Put that in a tax free savings account. I've taken a of everything. The government has offered me in my growing where they kind of go. Put this as as you should. But also it's coming from a place of slapped with allergy legit where I'm just GonNa like never going to be poor again doing that again and I because we were poor growing up. Are you know this is this is this is the truth and so I just want to say that when I mean you I love that you've made such a point of you know saying that your parents aren't perfect but also saying that they are great people in that you. I love them but I point out parents not to blame them. For whatever the result of our confidence our lives are but because because for me knowing and understanding that a lot of my current worldview and behavior and lack or lack of stuff like self love and confidence finance was things that were learned from childhood. But it's not to blame them. It's the point out that they're not set in stone is just like the knowing and understanding that there's an their origins to things means that I can undo some of the things and it makes me feel like I'm in a place of more power which feels better right right like not. We're not born. Yeah you know feeling away you know you do this on our podcast Thursday and we talk about the a very basic very different things but kind of similar what we talk about this idea of who we fancy is not some divine law. A lot of that is influenced by any number of variable starting with popular culture. I think about the people that I thought to myself. Oh I thought I fancy them. He's just tall. Oh and I do think about that when when we talk about how we how we came up because again it's not a place of blame. It is what it is life is. Life is life like we're here. That's fine but I do think. Think in terms of like my approach to things my mother like I said she's the boldest person I knew my mom goes in chest. I like she is. I was getting like superheroes stunts she goes in. And then you pull her aside and you know what you're doing she was like no but no one does come on. I was like why are you so confident. I thought you knew everything kind of person who we're just going to say so so kind of see what the other person has like. She's very much. Let me poke this bear. And I'm like let's leave the bear. She yeah sometimes I see myself of being you know relatively timid next to her and I think Oh and then when I whenever I do in fact do a very bold thing I think all. That's mum and it's not just mom. It's it's her mother. My Grandmother Who I knew briefly before she passed away when I was a kid and she was also been pressured like this tiny woman like a bird like she was very is very small. Risk was so delicate. One of the strongest grip. Jesus she was like this incredible businesswoman. She was she. That's the other thing as well. She was wealthy like she did she. She was. She was a businesswoman. She traded with the grains people up in the north of Nigeria. And she would go on like month long long trips. You know all the way to the northeast kind of security of her business and in a way my mother and her siblings was sort of semi raised by their grandmother. My Great Grandmother Mother who I never knew and she was a woman as well but I do think about how my mom for. Example is such a presence for a lot of the time such a present mother and I think Oh you're responding to the fact that your mom wasn't there all the time and so again just to point out what you said. There are patterns that emerged from how we were parented and you. Don't you see he them years later and he's like oh mom. Is this way because you know. Oh Okay I get it and I think that's like an important thing to remember. That appearance are also working on the various pressures. That are being exerted. Sit on them from their own histories. were all going through generational legacies and it's just like having the ability to uncover of like. Oh this happened to my childhood because this happened just like just even that sense of awareness but when you talk about your mom in her superhero stands. uh-huh how have you carried that with you Throughout you know your own life and your career career I think one of the things that I really admire about you as you've touched on so many things like your playwright and you're a writer and a producer and do you think part of your ability to sort of be fearless and doing all of these various different things. Things comes from like your mom's presence of like I can do anything I mean. Good amount of that does well. But then I also think I have quite wide wide interests and I always have done in a way it. One of our I take on a new creative endeavor. It feels like it sort of belongs to me because why wouldn't it but I was interested in everything and I think my parents were like. Yeah why no but even then and this is very important even then there was still an an outside pressure on me that when my parents were like what do you want to do. I was like I was thinking something in pharmacology and they were like Oh okay and then my second year of the UK recall a-levels levels I decided that way hang on. I had a conversation with my sister. Who is my best friend? And maybe the best person I know and she was just kind of like. Do you want to be a pharmacologist. You're like I don't I really do. Not What we farm cultures. What the Hell am I doing? Like if the D. and chemistry hadn't hadn't already told me my sister's going to like what the Hell I was like. Wow that's thanks for being there to just kind of slap me upside the head. I don't want to do this so yeah the next year. Ah At six four my basically when I took on media studies and I took on General Studies and whatever just in an attempt to move away slightly from that then I took a year off like You know I knew my results were going to be terrible because I was doing the wrong subjects. Who Me I came to America? I have this wonderful long summer and then I went to university and university see. I studied journalism. I didn't get a job straight away. I did get. I got a short term engagement at the BBC in my second year at Uni and I assumed very foolishly naively but that's how jobs are going to come to me that someone would present me Jill. I'm okay thanks. BBC The BBC. That's a huge job. In England. It was a huge let me. It was a huge huge Jenny. And I was just kind of like this on the one on. That's my view. Pretty good then sign kind of always going to be this easy. I'm going to find them like that. And then and I let university into a recession and then we got out and there was that Oh print is literally dying grace superb. What now we know we did? Some Brentwood radio did TV. So at least I you know. My degree was in multimedia journalism anyway. All this to say finally I applied to do a masters because I thought well one way or another. I'M GONNA get a job in journalism so I'll go do journalism masters and I went and I go in and at the end of you. The person was kind of like. Why are you doing this? It was like the only way to get a job and she was like you show man. I noticed there was an application for a positive action scheme which is sort of a diversity scheme at the The Guardian did God newspaper in the UK. So I applied and I wasn't very sorry I found out about it two days before it closed. I kind of submitted his super ladies I got the interview I went in. I got the internship. And eventually they commissioned with a couple of short pieces. I'm so excited. My sister running into Safeway to buy a copy of the Guardian with her best friend. Lila and bring it home. It was gonNA like. She's in God. We had the whole thing and all of that just kind of like. That's what we did. We just got like all day. It was great but yeah basically I just kind of the from their job on the Guardian as kind of like a freelancer and then eventually I became an editor the I was just. Yeah anyone who was commissioned in May anyone who would pay me I'd be like yeah I'll do that and I just did it and you know those. Those are the years where I had no brakes and I was just constantly on the edge of kind of like will I make rents. Let's find out next week dragons. Jose like I didn't know anything you know like I was working all the hours than the money wasn't great but it was also kind of like this. Oh yeah this is definitely what I wanted to. I WanNa be a right writes. I want to keep doing this and what I am trying to pay it forward as best I can. I'm also just again super aware that the world I came up in is very different. What younger is is facing now so results and I get an mm-hmm Oklahoma kinda going? Hey how do you do and I'm like don't do like I did one of the things that I think you're really touching on which is conversation that Charlotte. I personally have a lot in terms of building saying you know I feel like. There's two confidence buckets that I deal with. Just like my personal confidence and professional confidence and it's like professionally. I can be like I did this. This is is great one of the things that you hit on is just like how much hard work plays into professional confidence. And it's just like through all that you're fucking working high like taking king every job and being like I'm not GonNa like say no to. This is hard work and it's really inspiring to hear like you know how when you're young. You're like Oh yes of course is great opportunities handed to me. This is what is going to be like and then you're like no. It's actually a lot of. I need to apply myself of constantly. And what made you decide to make the shift from working at the Guardian to sort sort of coming to coming to the states May And now really forging your own path and doing your own thing thing like I feel like a lot of your projects right now over your of your creation of your mind you So how did you sort of bridge that gap from going to but early crossing the pond and like right So I know the Guardian for a few years but in the middle of that I got an email from somebody media buzzfeed and speaking about fair and confidence. This was a very good example of that because I was comfortable at the Guardian I really understood fundamentally advised status. 'cause the the end result seemed known to me in some capacity. A you know a good vision of what the the future held I could. I could hold it in my hand. Something I think about now. All the time is I look at every opportunity on earth is fifty fifty regardless of the probability and my fifty fifty fifty breaks down to either it will work or won't and that's my mom's thing I remember that very specific I remember being scared in fact I I remember being scared to apply for the positive action scheme thing in the in the two days before the deadline and I said some you know but what if I do it and Blah Blah Blah. I may say no my mom very wonderfully and I'm GonNa do Nigerian accent Here Komo news accent. Anyway and she was I saw him. I said Yeah. She said so if if if they don't if they don't accept you like yeah and she goes is just no I said yeah she was going to come and beat you and I said no like an early as no. No one's going to beat me mom as as low as just no no big thing I said No. She was ordinary no analysis. I guess and that was a very important thing. My mom just looking looking at me looking like fake confused. Okay just explain it to me like I'm six them. When you say is just is no mama shows okay? Ordinary we know too is just like she just batted away like it was like a musket ordinary. No no she kept saying no and as I get ed thanks. She's very heavy handed with her lessons. I was like all right. Thanks got it chairs but but I do think that's an important thing to remember. So yeah so I was thinking to myself okay. Okay it'll be okay and I kept reassuring myself over and it'll be fine and then the thing that happened a buzzy to schools. I knew that they had their international outfit. And so I immediately really all my life. I've I've been kind of fascinated with America so it was written into my contract that I would spend a year as culture both of UK Working on our a section then was called the idea sections. We had a lot of essay writing there and it was risen in Charlotte to my sister. Who insisted I put it into the contract? And I'm very glad she did. She's very small. My sister and year later I moved to New York and taken care of again to come here for a year. I was GONNA come in the election year. I was going to cover the election and then when I was going to return home I was GonNa kind of act. Sorta a translator as it were of American Election Culture for the UK audience back home and then written tune into that but without being written was the idea that Oh of course hillary will win and then the wall to keep on spinning and then she didn't win and I remember saying to my editorial so I'm not coming home like I have to see at least the first term because it might be two terms so I stayed. I stayed and will nothing's happened. You know the presidency has been smooth sailing. Nothing bad or nothing to report on there. It's been the most boring couple years of my life but Yes so so. That's how I got to America on this but but I think the fundamental thing here again is even the the action of writing into the contract. Hey I want to come to America. That was something something that my sister kind of a sister Aka my mother's daughter of just kind of like ask for ask for it and get it written down but OSC for the thing if you WanNa Senate ask for again because the worst thing they'll say is ordinary new and then if it's a yes you get to do the thing you want. What do you think that your path looks looks? Like now I think the forefront is still that question of was the worst thing that could happen you know is someone going to be you or is is just gonNa be a no. There is an element in my whole. My whole career has been an element of just like try. And that's from the mini. I spotted the the positive of action scheme staying at the Guardian. Just kind of seeing that opportunity two days before it closed and then getting it. I think that also kind of gave me like this extra Philip and my step where I was like. Wait wait sometimes. Things work out and I do think that's like the greatest thing that my parents did for us was that they they help us get a little bit further than they did. So I mean I feel like this is this just conversation is coming from me at like a perfect time in my life. And I'm just absorbing all the energy that You shared and given today. And we always in this podcast by asking our guest. What's your secret? Wow what's my secret. I think his okay his a very basic thing. You got to walk in like you own everything and that's not an arrogance and it's not being unpleasant it's just a fundamental understanding understanding the inasmuch as your qualifications and your experience allows you have every right to be in most of the rooms that you were called in to. That's just the simple fact of life like a sunny sky is blue. I I have the right to be here. And that feels like it's not necessarily even a radical act. I didn't think it is but like like I had like maybe forty thousand imposter syndrome. One time in my twenties and then I burned it to the ground because I was looking around and I was like come on. I'm great always people equally grit. We're all greats like I understand getting jitters and being like slightly worried about you know I don't WanNa underperformance Cetera but generally speaking. I don't have imposter syndrome something. No I deserve to be a did. The work I have the qualifications is much my rights as it is anybody else's and then I move forward and sometimes I fall on my face but most of the time I ended up gliding by because yeah. I'm not in the room by accident. I didn't I didn't get there by accident. And that's like the thing that carries go through is like once I feel comfortable in my ability and in my own kind of skill sets. I don't I I can't contemplate anyone making me feel like I don't belong there. I'm just like no this is my birthright screw. You I live here. Yeah you know like it feels very yeah. That's like a fun once. I have my foot in the door. I don't tip too. I just kind of think all right well implant yourself you live here now. You're a tree. You're an oak. It's yours and that helps me and sometimes it's a Li- like get her. When I'm a roof I was getting my my teeth but other times? It's kind of like. Oh yes you are right yes I you were lying but then it became the truth. That's great that's really good. Hold onto that. So that's what I do it. Just get get a toehold in then I plant myself belongs to me. That's amazing. Well thank you. Thank you for coming and talking to us. We kinda sat at the foot of a wiser more contrary to my head. It's not good for me but thank you for saying that I just I honestly think it really is a simple case of just like you know. I am old like a really anything. That's it like my mom euro saying and it's essentially the translates into English as What an elder CONC- sitting sitting down a child could not see even if they crane the neck and these usually the way my mom says it's a shut down any kind of argument? Where Am I? Don't think I should let him what a child is current guy. That's an but I do think it's a useful It's a useful thing to think about of a page of notes and I went to the back of my page quotes that you said that have been really inspiring to me at this time reflective side. Don't think that it's just I think yes. You can say your age but I think that's just as credit to the wisdom innate wisdom that you have this looking at. It's going I and she doesn't have any with you. Do you do when I wanNA thank you for sharing it with US listeners. And I just am you know definitely GonNa leave with all of these notes and just like sit and think about the things. Are you crying Oren. No I like sounded like I was crying when I was like what. You're Su You did you did. Yeah well I mean I just feel like I'm getting Really emotional tell me about it. I don't know just because it's like I feel like I'm really moved by everything that she said. And it's stuff that I really need to hear right now this moment moment in my life like you know how sometimes things happen and you're just like wow. This is like called to happen right now because until like a lot and it's just you know competence and like recognizing my place is something bad is hard for me and I'm Mike finally finely coming. I'm sorry I'm going to cry like I'm like finally coming to terms to like just deal with Lake. You know things like recognize like good things in my life hyphen. Just even be able to be like Oh step in a room and just have that lake. Since of shirty of Lake I belong here is just like you know I feel like some even step in here and I'm like Oh my good- Am I good enough. Am I like supposed to be here. I am yeah now I feel silly because I'm totally. You're take me cry crying but I just an her voices voices so soothing it so soothing The felt like she was reading us a bedtime story the entire time. Yeah just so relaxing. Hits like one of my favorite things about bums podcast Which is notice me? Changing the subject The first aid kit is back but they do fan fiction wars into each episode and I just love to listen to her read her stories at the end so I think I'm going to process everything she said here and then I'm just going to go. Listen listen to that and change gears in my head. I feel like I'm going to bring it back because I'm not done with this sense of belonging long game that she kinda pointed to because I am. It's just making me. I'm in the same place in my life. I feel like as you you and I feel like I'm coming at it from a different point of view of coming up at it with more rage because I'm just like who took that sense of belonging away from me you know like like where did it happen in my life that I got to a point where I could walk into a room and feel like I didn't belong that I didn't deserve it that I wasn't good enough to be there and it's the feeling that has not served me. It has not made me better. It's not made me happier. It's not like you can't put your hand out and ask for validation and wait for people to tell you that you belong. It's very much something that you have to give to yourself off and I just feel like I'm just in a place of my life where I'm like owning it. I'm just like I'm not waiting for anybody to tell me. Yeah I belong. It's it it really does feel like confidence is a sense of belonging it's a sense of belonging but it's also a sense of for me. It's like I've had this really a big realization and shifted my head about how I value myself or don't right so it's just like I feel like it's been really rage ful and heartbreaking to be like. Wow I've operated all of these years with such like with a lack lack of value and how the lack of self lack of fat and it's just like I feel like I've I've grown into like loving myself more. You're but just recognizing when you don't value yourself the things that Joel except and lag ways in which you will you will walk in space and not feel comfortable because it's like you're not even valuing like all that you have to give your input and I feel like that has been a big wakeup call for me every day. It's like I'm doing a meditation about how to get over like self animosity and just thinking being logically like how to value myself and but putting onus on that it's like making me shift a lot of things in my life eighth that are like hard because when you operated a certain way for so long it's like that's what you know that's what you're comfortable with. Yeah it's just what I'm going through and interest. It's just really all of this is coming at. You're totally right when you said the heartbreak that you feel when you first realise how little you love yourself because you know you wouldn't treat another person that way. Most likely and it is heartbreaking to be so unconscious of this daily daily self harm and when you're finally aware of you do feel like who like wolf you know like I remember the first time I realized this is how much I you know. Frankly hated myself and I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe it but I feel like although that moment comment was heartbreaking. It was the beginning of a really long Journey to put in work. Yeah I know and you see how much work it takes. What do you think the word of the week is right before you asked me that? I was thinking about what she was to. You know what she was saying about parents because that's been a hard thing for me to reconcile a little bit like not fully blaming but then not completely -pletely taking away my own agency you know because I don't think blame is a good way to go because everyone goes through their own things and you don't know what people are going through But I do think that a sense of self confidence it comes from support I think I. I think being supported other people acknowledging your existence and acknowledging your innate humanity is very supportive it makes you it builds you into a person who has a right to be in a place you know and I think that's important so I think the word of the week is support and I'm just making that up I go. I'm going to agree with you. But also she also said something sort of like step into this unknown inbounder if like what it means to. I'm sorry I cannot stop crying to what it means to value myself am she. She was when she was talking about her her mom and how she was going to go on a new path and her mom was like no one will beat you. It's just what's the worse that can happen in ordinary. No no and like not being afraid of that as you as you step into into yourself. It's like you will get nose and people won't like accept that and I think sometimes I have a fear of like if if I changed the way that I've been to put onus on myself like who and what will I lose so for me. I'm going to go with ordinary. No I know it's not don't work and it's a phrase but it really It really stuck with me. I love it. What a great guess? What a great guest? I thank you guys. So much for listening Hand truly just feel like I was just in a therapy session We will see you next week. See next week by a we're your hosts Charlotte Larsen and Lauren Domino. The secret of black woman is a production of stitcher our producer Stephan Kariuki our editor. John Palmer special. Thanks to our chief content officer Chris Bain sound designer. Brendon Burns and recording. Engineers Jared O'CONNELL Jordan Duffy and Andy Kristen's make sure to follow us on instagram and twitter Abbott S._O._B.. W see you later.

Nigeria UK America Guardian Charlotte England London Lake I Haiti writer India Oskar Laurin Shiloh producer Graham Ai Carey twitter
Savor Drinks Your Milkshake

FoodStuff

56:45 min | 4 months ago

Savor Drinks Your Milkshake

"Insulin affordability is a priority. The LILLY DIABETES. Solution Center can help the uninsured and those in high deductible health plans more at Lily Dot com working remotely can be a challenge especially for teams. That are new to it. How do you deal with your work? Environment being the same as home while staying productive at a time when teams must come together more than ever to solve big challenges. Trello is here to help trello part of Atlassian collaborative sweet as empowering remote teams globally for almost a decade trello keeps everyone on the same page helping teams communicate focus and connect try. Trello for free and learn more at TRELLO DOT com. That's T. R. E. L. L. ALL DOT com though in favor production of iheartradio. Any and. I'm Laurin FOLCO bomb and today. We're talking about milkshakes. Yes yes and this is mostly because we were discussing what are comfort. Foods are and for me. Milkshakes specifically chocolate milkshakes or like number one who all right yeah and I mean. It's probably pretty obvious why we're talking about comfort foods as we once again. Come to you from our Home Studios Aka our closets. Es skype we got a cat involved today. Yet it'd be real interesting gonNA live fast and loose grey cat sitting on the session. He is judging us all actively so I love. The cat judgment it. It just makes my work all the better because I feel like I've really got a guy to bring it home. Well good good. Because that's what we're getting great so yes chocolate. Milk shakes are one of my ultimate comfort foods and I rarely rarely resort to them. Th- There's sort of my nuclear option if I had a hierarchy. They're like Oh God. She's got a shock milkshake and I have one tiny thing of chocolate ice cream. That one of my friends at my apartment forever go that I'm waiting until things get more dire for goes on okay. It's there it's there need it but you don't WanNa pull that trigger yet. I see no also. I have no milk is she. I'm sure I would find a way but it probably the result would not be good but one of the reasons. It's one of my favorite comfort foods. I think I talked about it. Artist aljic foods episode Is that when I was little? If I was sad or sick my mom would get just two or three scoops of briars chocolate ice cream. And she'd put them in a cup she'd fill it almost the top with two percent milk hand. Mix It with a spoon and that was a it wasn't super amazing As far as milkshakes go usually it was a bit chunky with like those ice crystals you know but it was always special and it always made me feel better oh relevant to Self quarantining. I think I've said before I've been quarantined. A more than one although I think the technical term is I'm not sure anyway. Yeah well I can't tell you about previous iterations but go ahead. Yeah Yes oh. I have swine flu when I was in college and I was so sick. If food was the last thing on my mind but when I finally started feeling better I remember. It was Halloween. Day from my teeny tiny room in our six person dorm with my medical gloves and mask on all made a box of Kraft. Mac and cheese and chocolate milkshake. Those are my to go to I you know as we were talking about this. I was trying to come up with my list of comfort foods and I was like. This is weird like this is like. It's like grilled cheese and then like Vindaloo and I'm like I'm not sure where where and how this occurred. But yet milkshakes are not on there for me I did go through a pretty intense milkshake phase in college Like pardon my weekly routine involved after going to like an eighties. Dance Night Coming coming back and getting like a vanilla milkshake from water burger and sipping on it while we played halo at my friend's house so that is college. I've ever heard story. That is the one Yup Yup but yet now these these days I like I I do love a bill shake but man. They don't love me. They do not love me. I should not have that much dairy all the same time Honestly the idea of drinking one kind of makes me a little queasy Because they're so sweet and I can't handle that much sugar really and I don't know I I can have like a tiny one. But he'll whole. Yeah Oh yeah I mean I certainly. That's one of the reasons. They're so rare that I worked to them. But I have had so many amazing milkshakes in my life. I've also had my fair share freak shakes which we're going to talk about a little bit later freak. Greek shake freak shaef Greek freak shake. Yeah Okay Yeah. You're looking for an instagram whole. That is my recommendation for today. Flip Burger from Richard Blaze. Has some really good creative milkshakes crispy cream. New Tele has like a toasted marshmallow. Believe on top and a flog raw milk. Shake and are they do there. Is I believe that with liquid nitrogen instead of. Yeah so it's it's an interesting process. Indeed Oh and speaking of Richard Plays Yeah. Food Court debuted the new podcast that I think we mentioned previously. It's called Food Court with Richard Blaze and he is the judge in such important decisions as a fries crispy versus soggy or pimple on Pizza. Yes versus no or a blue cheese versus ranch. Those are those are the have waited reading on that one absolutely. Yeah you can see our episode on ranch about that or wings. I think both I think we talked about it in both. I mean I'm very strong. If it well I am very strong opinion and Lauren. Kind lets me voice it. I'm the first thing I had when I got back from living in China actually done I was there for almost a year. The first thing I went to the first place I went to steak and shake and I had a dark chocolate milkshake in those lake. Crispy thin steak fries. Oh yeah it was like four in the morning and one of the only things open so I don't really regret it. I'm not ashamed of it. Is it the best place I could have gone from my first meal but I liked it? Oh Hey as long. As long as you're having a nice time and I mean furthermore I don't think there's anything truly more American than go with very American I four in the morning. Getting fries and a milkshake. Yeah there's a national milkshake day. It is August I but national chocolate milkshake day is September twelfth and National Vanilla. Milkshakes is June twentieth and National Coffee Milk. Shake Day is July twenty sixth so a lot of opportunities to celebrate. Yeah Yeah and those are only the four that I found. I you know other others could be out there. I definitely believe there's at least a strawberry milkshake day. You know I would hope so I would. I would certainly hope so maybe listener can right in and let us know are maybe we can started. Like I don't know what are the parameters to say? Hey I go I think that for it to be official we have to like write our senator or something like that and I feel like they're trying to do more important things right now or yeah shit trying to do more important things anyway. That's a separate conversation friends that is but feeding of if you're looking for a separate conversation related to what we're talking about today. You can see our Sunday episode for our very silly law and order take on who invented the Sunday and also relevant is our soda episode. All that stuff comes up here. Yes absolutely and I guess we should point out that. We're not really talking about ice cream today. Just about milkshakes. 'cause ICE CREAM HOOF. That's a that's a large separate topic it is and it's a fascinating one and I can't wait to return to it but today but today this brings us to question. Milkshakes what are they well. Milkshake is a dessert. Drink treats its Vaguely drinkable ice cream. It's slightly liquified ice cream or largely frozen milk plus flavourings that you can sift through a straw though exactly like liquefied and or frozen. It's meant to be upon serving as a matter of some debate. Like should you be able to drink it? Should you need to use a spoon? Should it be able to stay in? Its Cup if you turn the Whole Cup upside down. I don't know I. I don't have an opinion about this one I do but I I don't really care too much voice. It curious which. Which one do you prefer? Oh I feel like if you need a spoon. That's not a milkshake. That's like kind of a soft serve ice cream situation. Yeah do like I think I could be convinced what I'm saying But in my mind. It's milkshake is more of a drinking sort of thing. Yeah Yeah I would agree with you but I I suppose that even like I mean if you need a spoon to start with but then you can move to your right yeah. I don't know at any rings. Blenders are used to achieve this range of textures. You've traditionally start with a ice cream and milk. And whatever other flavourings you WANNA add in and use an electric blender to to to break down the structure of the Ice Cream and to whip in a bit of extra air Some fast food places will conversely start with like a flavored thickened mix of of milk and stuff and simultaneously blended Schilit until a similar consistency is reached than going the other way Some recipes for either. We'll add ice for texture nor to like fill out the shape of it and those flavorings can be anything. Yes but no matter what they are made with Milkshakes often topped with whipped cream. Sometimes other stuff as well frequently like Ice Cream toppings like Sarah crushed candy and the result is a thick cold creamy. Hypothetically drinkable confection and the flavor possibilities are endless. Cookout the fast food chain has at least forty flavors on the menu and this is a southern fast food chain. If you haven't heard of it Like you can see one from our office. We're pretty spoiled on to tasty local ISH. Fast Food of they are famous for their milk shakes. And however the the Guinness record for the most milkshakes on a menu is two hundred seven. And that's from this restaurant in Cape Town South Africa Gibson's gourmet burgers and ribs. Oh why did I not go there when maybe they were closed? It was new year's. Oh that's true everything from him and this brings back the malts versus non malt debate. Right yeah I I don't like I said I don't think I've ever had a malted milkshake or malt as they're sometimes called and this is why we need Kyle with the motorcycle. Where are you staying in and staying safe but if you can weigh in on this debate you had so much knowledge around yeah. We've we've got a little bit more on malted milk later but I will say that. That Malta's one of my favorite milkshake. Flavors I guess it probably wasn't a plain vanilla. It was probably a malted vanilla milkshake that I was having it. That Water Burger weekly experience. That weekly WanNa Burger experience Jeez Oh college. Let's speaking of. Let's talk about the nutrition. Oh my friend's dad used to always say back. When I was in high school he would always say to. You have to run ten miles to cancer. One chick-fil-a milkshake that really depends. That is a that is a subjective statement because according to fillets nutrition information there shakes run between five hundred and seven hundred and fifty calories per shake And the average human person will burn at not according to Chick-fil-a this is according to other I mean they might have said it to. I don't know anyway I. They'll burn between eighty and one hundred and forty calories per mile run so if you get chick-fil-a as most clerk shake and are on the low end of that burn rate like you are looking at like a nine point four mile run in order to work off chick limb shake but you know results may vary yes yes yes. Yeah because because we'll milkshakes. Milkshakes ARE NOT A health food. Dairy components tend to be high in fat. All dairy contains natural sugars and then on top of that. There's usually a lot of added sugars. You're going to get a little bit of Protein Punch of micronutrients but I you know like a milkshake will indeed help fill you up. But it won't really keep you going. It's a it's a treat surprise surprise I know right but because of milkshakes reputation as a treat will a shake style beverages are like a whole dieting thing in the world of dieting but be milkshakes of varying kinds have been used in like a lot of physiological and psychological research for example in twenty eighteen researchers looking at like the immediate dietary effects on blood cells and blood vessels had a small sample of men. Drink a high fat milkshakes. Think like thousand calories eighty grams of fat. That's over your recommended daily intake fat. I in a day so they had him drink the shake and then observed that four hours later. Their blood vessels were less able to dilate. And some of their red blood cells became like SORTA spiky instead of smooth. Both of which can can raise your blood pressure. Although don't don't worry don't worry too much. It don't put down the milkshake. It's as long as you don't do this like for every meal. Your body even itself out over time I mean like yes there can be cumulative effects but don't don't panic few and then in two thousand eight other. Researchers in Oregon used chocolate milkshakes to help test dopamine response to food intake partially because milkshakes are like easy to slip when your patient is when your subject is lying in an MRI machine. Yeah but But but they found essentially that That some people who overeat may do so because their brain chemistry doesn't reward food intake with very much dopamine release like meaning that those folks have to eat more to get the same positive feeling from food as other folks and then in two thousand sixteen A study played with the viscosity of milkshakes as it relates to say shitty and digestive time so they made thick and thin versions of both one hundred calorie and five hundred calorie shakes and the Dick Shakes made. The subjects feel more full. No matter how many calories the shakes actually contained interesting yeah I know right The recommendation that came out of that one was basically like if you're doing a meal replacement shake or a smoothie or something you can add thickening agents to make you feel full for longer like a banana or os or avocado stuff like that. And there's more more more in two thousand eleven a group of researchers out of Yale. Did this small experiment where they gave milkshakes to two groups of volunteers and I for one group. They described this shake as an indulgent. Six hundred twenty calorie shake and to the other group described it as a sensible one hundred and forty calories shake off shakes. Were the same three hundred and eighty calories but they tested the subjects levels of the gut hormone called Ghrelin Before and after drinking the shake and in growing levels in our systems spike when we're hungry and and slower metabolism down. Like just in case we don't find food and and then Ghrelin levels drop when we're sated allowing our metabolism to kick in and help us digest so after drinking these totally the same shakes the subjects. Who thought they had gotten an indulgent one had lower levels of Ghrelin than the subjects. Who thought that they had gotten a sensible one so in other words when people thought they had eaten more calories they were more sated which is really interesting because it means like psychology has something to do with our actual physiological response to eating is fascinating milkshakes science. Though much of it I know right there. Even Milkshakes are even used as rewards in some mouse studies for example I found the so darling. Okay so for the past few years. Researchers have been super into using touchscreens. As part of Mao Studies. Because if 'cause you can totally teach a mouse to poke a particular area of or it's like like a button on a touchscreen with their little mouse knows in order to get a reward and that's a much more directly applicable thing to human use and studies then then buttons and Levers and stuff like that so so yeah just little strawberry. Mouse milkshake rewards in research. And touchscreens. And I don't know oh I liked I liked. I liked that I liked reading that story. Anyway that's lovely well there. There's a lot of studies clearly but we also do have some numbers for you. We we do end up. Okay so I've come to understand. That milkshakes are a very American thing. but you can't find them all over the world and people seem to like them. Milkshakes are so popular like part of why? Mcdonald's is a thing level of popular on that later. We've also done McDonald's episode. You can check out. We talked about it in that one Multiple chains have said. Milkshakes are one of their most profitable items if not the most profitable according to Christopher Muller Director of the Center for Multi Unit Restaurant Management at Orlando's University of Central Florida Milkshakes are about seventy five percent profit hoof. Sonic the drive in restaurants They say the marketing manager. There's once said shakes or their highest volume revenue producing areas. And yes freak shakes. Okay okay all right so so. This isn't like a Halloween thing. What what is but it can be. The world is your oyster when it comes to freak shakes so these are milkshakes but extreme like garnished with a slice of pie maybe on top of that is a slice of cake like donuts pretzels Yeah everything you can imagine has been added to it. They are the ultimate instagram. -Able Food. I think for the first time I saw one. That was a moment of clarity. Or It's like Oh my God. Instagram is really shaping a lot of reading these days but I had to have one was in High are attributed largely attributed to Anna poor treatise at her patio cafes in Canberra Australia. So I actually was going to go there I was GonNa go to New Zealand and go out of my way to make a stop in Cambria to Goto one of these cafes but it got cancelled unfortunately lack ovid related. This was years ago so I I didn't get to have the quote original freak shake but I did have one at black tap in New York City and it was uh topped with multiple chocolate chip cookies and like an ice cream sandwich and all that stuff to dig up the picture. I definitely took a parent. I shared it with somebody so it was doable. But if I could not finish that thing by myself Solomon I. I don't know for some reason I I like. I'm anti this entire idea partially because all a lot of the photographs of these things are very messy. Like they involve like Syrup and stuff and drips of ice cream being like down the sides of the glass and for some reason that grosses me the heck out. And I'm like no no that's wrong and I don't like it and I don't want it and I don't want other people to like it so there I don't know why I have such a firm emotion about drips down the size of glasses attractive. That's legitimate. You know what you're fingers get sticky and they would get so sticky Gosh Roy. I don't recall that happening in mind. The one I had but Maybe I'll look back I mean because on the flips these are also reminding me of a of our bloody Mary episode and all of the leg Suri Bloody Marys that That people make and consume. And I'm fine with that piece dairy aspect. I feel like you've got a thing theory. Yeah maybe that's it. I'm just like Oh so much so much ice cream a little bit. Little tiny bits is great anyway. Anyway speech speaking of little tiny bits of ICE CREAM. The record for the largest milkshake is from the year. Two thousand it was a six thousand gallon. Milk shake ooh What's called a black and white which is vanilla with chocolate syrup and that is over. Twenty two thousand seven hundred leaders. It's the equivalent of about fifty thousand normal milkshakes and it was put together By a devilish collaboration between the Comfort Diners Parmalat milk the American Dairy Association and the Dairy Council and assembled and a milk tanker that was decorated to look like a milkshake and it was driven and distributed through Manhattan. Wow that's a lot of milk shake that that is quite. It's not a small amount of milkshake. Know quite a bit There's also a record for the most expensive milkshake but it was only worth one hundred bucks. I feel like they're not even trying. Oh yeah we I mean we can beat that record if we're looking for a record to be. Fcc Oh that's I mean come on right right like being invest who just put like more gold leaf in there. I mean like what are you doing caviar? Coupla milkshakes are incredibly popular intermediate especially here in the United States. I found a whole essay. About how milkshakes are a shorthand for sweetness like human sweet sweetness and innocence and virginity often. But then there's also master shake you from Aqua Teen Hunger Force then of course. There's the drink. Your milkshake scene from there will be blood. Which involve a milkshake? By the way I was I was reading and and some of this has gone international. There is a dance music festival in Amsterdam called the milkshake festival. And it a I couldn't really track down like like the origin of the name immediately but But it celebrates the queer community and tolerance and like being yourself in whatever glorious foreign you choose so. I really liked that. I thought that that was a good like milkshake being a good metaphor for those things. Yeah that's great And then of course there like on the opposite end of the Innocent virginal spectrum matters also the You want fries to go with that shake and Milkshake brings all the boys to the yard. So you know the milk shakes out representing as what we're saying is it is. It's doing double duty. Yeah and it has been for awhile. Yeah and we will get into the history of that right after we get back from a quick break for word from our sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by Grove collaborative. We talk about sustainability a lot here on favorite because what we do to. The environment affects our food supply and with all the convenience products and packaging out there in the world we humans create and consume a lot of plastic and although recycling plastic is great reducing. Our plastic use is better grove dot. 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And that's a win for everyone mainly for me because of the money but also because I love to hear myself talk and so do you and if you're thinking it's time for a change in your insurance plan B. Automobile or home insurance. Think no further than state farm. You know the one with the catchy jingle like a good neighbor state firm state farm has been in the insurance game for more years than anyone on earth can remember. They aren't some fly by night. Operation Offering suspect savings. They offer real service for classy people who want to be confident in what they are buying. I call it the state farm difference. I don't know what they call it. I don't even know who runs the company. Maybe I should run the company. I would keep the jingle like a good neighbor state. Farm is there but I would change the tune like a good neighbor state farm as there. That was better right and we're back. Thank you sponsor yes. Thank you and as we said at the top. This is not the ice cream episode. That will happen one day but it is not today no no. Because that's that is a lot of very very briefly. Rich folks have been eating flavored ICES for at least a couple thousand years and the like dairy based creamed ICES or ice creams that we know today started developing around the sixteenth century. Yeah in around that time. We were seeing milk-based concoctions. Like posits and Eggnog and you could see her episodes on Eggnog and butter beer for more on that Yeah ice cream wasn't widely available until ice and refrigeration technology developed in the mid eighteen hundreds so so before then any kind of creamy treats would have been less frozen. Yeah often hot. Because milk was a dangerous dicey gain back then absolutely. Yes the term milkshakes. I came onto the scene in eighteen. Eighty five These milkshakes were for adults only and that's because they were usually applied with at least one shot of Whiskey But not just It was a mixture of eggs. Maybe a malt maybe sugar. Milk crushed ice. Maybe some flavorings ice cream almost definitely not involved These early milkshakes had similar thickness to Eggnog and were served. Both as a treat and a tonic and we have this early description of them. Sturdy healthful eggnog type drink with eggs Whiskey etc served as a tonic as well as a treat. The popular story goes that the drink got its name from the practice of tipping and shaking the hand of the person who made the drink probably apocryphal. But a lot of people say that in eighteen eighty six and Atlanta constitution article called. Milkshake had this quote. The newest Atlanta drink is milk. Shake you get it at the soda. Fountains the mixer of cooling beverages pours out a glass of sweet milk puts in a big spoonful of crushed. Ice Puts. An mixture of unknown ingredients draws a bit of any desired syrup shakes the milk in a tin can like a barkeeper mixed lemonade sprinkles a little nutmeg on the foaming milk into it. Looks something like a Tom and Jerry. Sit Out for you. And you pay five cents. Milkshake isn't Atlantic. Atlanta is nothing if not original I I guess. I can't argue with that sentiment true. I was not in my head in agreeance article if you curious. I didn't know this but Tom. And Jerry is a Christmas cocktail. Similar to eggnog. I did not know that and now I. I have more research to do about Tom. And Jerry that's great exactly. I WanNa know the name or does it come from but first day. Milkshakes didn't stay relegated to an adult beverage for long by the nineteen hundreds. The whiskey and eggs were out and these drinks became an all ages treat chocolate. Strawberry Vanilla Syrup is usually added in the mix and these shakes were frequently served in a tall glass. But what about the ice cream? What about the Ice Cream? Well let me tell you. Walgreens walgreens takes credit for inventing the milkshake when it comes to that edition of Ice Cream specifically walgreens employees. I've are pop colson out of Chicago from their website quote until malted milk drinks were made by mixing milk chocolate syrup and a spoonful of malt powder in a metal container in pouring the mixture into a glass on one especially. Hot SUMMER DAY IN ONE THOUSAND NINE. Twenty two pop. Colson said off his revolution to the basic mixture. He added a generous scoop of Vanilla ice cream. Then another you gotTa have to scoops you do you do it. So one scoop does not a milkshake make exactly exactly also found another article from the Atlantic Constitution. I published in eighteen eighty five. That was an interview with a local soda. Jerk About Soda Fountains It kind of touches on this. But it surprisingly gendered and sexist and will you allow me to to quote it? I yes sure it is. Surprisingly the right word from eighteen eighty five. I mean well it's like it wasn't even brought up. He just said this of his own volition. So what are you? What are you sell a lot of like well? Let me tell you about the news. Anyway so please please regale us all right. Ice Cream. Soda is a favourite with the ladies and the little ones it is really one of the most pleasant mixtures we serve the rarely asked for by men the ladies like it for two reasons first because it is good because it can be eaten with a spoon a glass of Soda with Colored Foam on top does not commend itself especially to a woman when she is with a gentleman for whom she has. Some liking is awkward to get away with it without caring upon her lip a mustache. By the way have you ever noticed Ladies Drinking Soda Water? The invariably hold the glass in one hand and they're handkerchief in the other between every sip they wipe off their lip. A man never begins using his handkerchief until after he settled his score halfway out of the place not so with the ladies therefore anything that requires a spoon is more popular with them than beverages. That require to be drunk. Consequently we sell a great deal of Ice Cream Soda. Okay Dude are like all right share. He also had this delightful not get which isn't really related. But I'm sorry we have to include. Yeah Yeah Okay. Well in the first place the most curious wants to be he was talking about flavors according to my way of thinking and one that has most frequently called for is pineapple. Soda with cream. Pineapple milkshakes and limited nectar if there is anything on earth that is calculated to make man stomach rebel pineapple ice cream. There ought to be a log manufacturer and indeed think has milk or cream and it should not under any circumstances be flavored with pineapple the countryman in the city. Taking in the town and patronizing for the First Time the Soda Water Fountain Will Invariably Choose Pineapple and something else to him. Pineapple is the embodiment of all that is desirable and pleasant and when he gets home and get sick as he invariably does actor indulging in his pineapple and milk politicians. It never once occurs to him. The pineapple is call by itself. It is an excellent and pleasant drink and as far as I know harmless with a moment it becomes associated with milk in an unlimited partnership that moment it becomes an enemy of the state and Nobody tell the student nobody go back in time and tell the story about the Dole whip. I thank you all right skin. Yeah ooh that is a strong opinion about pineapple. Milkshakes all right fair enough fair enough. Pivoting away from that Malted milk powder. Yeah malted milk powder was invented in the eighteen seventies issues. A bunch of dates that float around As a nutritional supplement for infants okay so malt green. We talked about it briefly before. But it is something has dried quickly after it sprouts resulting in a suite mash and you grind that up an ad that wheat flour and powdered milk and possibly other things like sugar malted milk powder and again remember. This is a time when milk borne illnesses were fairly common so people were interested in coming up with this thing so for a short history London. Pharmacist James Horlick's began working on a supplement for babies and sick people in eighteen. Sixty nine problem though. He couldn't secure any funding so packed up shop and moved to Wisconsin where his brother was located. The two came together to form J&W Horlick's outside of Chicago and started producing the formula They received a patent for Dia'a story which was quote a granulated food for infants in eighteen. Eighty three a couple of years later they changed the name to malted milk. Which real shame if you ask me. They've got a lot of flack for calling it. A lot of the marketing around it promoted as a health food all kinds of things from a sleep aid to digestive aid to flu recovery. It was a popular option among explorers. Too I imagine. It was comparable to our modern protein drinks or energy bars or at least. That's how people thought about them. Because of this Admiral Richard e Byrd named a mountain range after William Horlick in the Antarctic Mountains. So high okay. Warlick's later engaged in several legal battles to retain ownership of the phrase malted milk but ultimately they lost from what I understand again with the motorcycle. Right in when it came to malted shakes or malt the malt powder made them fattier more of a meal and gave them a more robust rounded flavor. Yeah I would say that in. These are modern times if you're adding malt something like that. Yeah just gives it a little bit of a depth of Flavour. Just something kind of that quite savory but it kinda rusty toasty yeah rusty tooks. Do you love it These early milkshakes were typically mixed by hand because there were no electric blenders yet but that changed in nineteen eleven when Hamilton Beach introduced the First Electric Mixer Soda. Fountains adopted them pretty quickly and then in nineteen twenty two. The invention of the electric blender catapulted the availability and the the popularity of the milkshake and also helping out the milkshake. The Non Alcoholic for any was prohibition during the United States. I have a confession. One of the reasons I wanted to live alone is because I have extreme guilt about using my blender I I was super into smoothies. So why do you? Why do you have guilt about us? A good blender I'm there loud and I didn't want to wake anybody or bother anybody who would like go out and do all kinds of things to try to use it and not body will so now. I live these anymore. I don't know any way. Another innovation. Important. To The milkshakes evolution was the invention of the. Freon refrigerator in the nineteen thirties in nineteen thirty six url prince debuted the Multi Mixer for the automated mixing and dispensing of five milkshakes at a time. And then we get it. We see a rise in milkshakes during the fifties starting with dairy queen when they added milkshakes to their menu in nineteen forty nine. And then yeah that you could see them at Diners Burger Joints Soda Fountain. All over people even started calling. Soda Fountains Malt Shops. That's how popular they were but they were called all kinds of different things. Frappes velvets cabinets frosted shakes and this typically used for non malted milkshakes and concretes which were a specific type that you could flip over and it went plop out her drip from the glass. An floats described scoop of ice cream. Suspended and milk and a lot of these terms are still used especially when you get you zero in regionally. Yeah yeah definitely and I do feel like in my head. They are very nineteen fifties thing people going on dates and sharing a milkshake and I was thinking a lot of our burger joints in the. Us are like steak 'n shake but there's also stakes show shake shack. Five guys has a lot of our burger. Places have milkshakes as a popular option and speaking of the whole thing Joseph Friedman patented the Straw in Nineteen thirty seven specifically after watching his daughter struggling with a milkshake call. Yes okay well thanks shakes future episode the Straw. 'cause I almo absolutely massive rabbit holes and going back to that multi mixer okay. Also in the fifties multi mixer salesman Ray KROC. He was the sole distributor of this thing and it was the Super Fast like Newfangled milkshake dispenser machine and to settle these. He came up with the idea of franchising. A little chain called. Mcdonald's and I will say successful I'd fair- fairly so yeah Yup Largely attributed to our love of milkshakes milkshake adjacent when the first Wendy's opened in nineteen sixty nine. It had five items on the menu including the frosty which a lot of people argue about whether that's a milkshake but thought we tossed that in there and now attempted murder okay. That was a hard turn. That was a hard term frosties to attempted murder. But go ahead. Come with me okay. So so apparently. Fidel Castro loved milkshakes and the CIA would have loved to kill him so the story goes that the CIA poisoned his favorite chocolate milkshake at his favorite restaurant. The CIA bribe to the mafia to do this. You bribed a waiter at the restaurant to do this. So he put a poisoned pill The plan was he was GONNA put a poison pill and cashiers milkshake but he put it in the freezer and alas less when he went to get it out and put it in. Cashiers shake had frozen to the bottom of the freezer when he tried to kind of maneuver it off. It ripped open. Oh the pill. Yeah Oh yeah yeah. So plot foiled they and they did not try death by milkshake again. Well Gosh I mean to me please please please please. No one poison anti yeah. Please don't do it but you know I'll be frank that for me. Yup Yup that would work one hundred percent. That's not the only political thing. Milkshakes have been involved and twenty nineteen throwing milkshakes. That politicians are milk. Shaking became a popular form of protesting particularly in the United Kingdom to the point that the U K police officially requested that McDonald's Stop. Selling milkshakes may twenty nineteen. That's wild to be so burger. King responded with a tweet. Worst Alley milkshakes. All weekend have fun but the tweet was later banned by the Advertising Standards Authority in the war so much. Oh my God that's spectacular. I hadn't heard about this Milk shaking that's going to be my rabbit hole of the of the afternoon I'm excited. Meanwhile the aforementioned song milkshake about bringing all the boys to your yard Came out in two thousand and three and apparently the artist Kelly Kelly's Later studied at liquid on blue and put out a cookbook called late. Yeah but also. Apparently she had never made a milkshake until two thousand seventeen when she did like a sponsorship thing with Bailey's involving their their Irish cream liqueur Chocolate ice cream ginger beer candy ginger and Cayenne pepper sounds good. It does sound good. And that milkshakes are having kind of a renaissance when it comes to fancier type milkshakes and things like adding alcohol back in there. So boozy milkshakes. Making a comeback full circle. Exactly exactly it's a whole wide world of milkshake experimentation and it's very exciting it is you know. I'm I'm always glad when people get to experiment so yes yes so. That's about what we have to say for. Milkshakes I gotTa admit I thought this one was going to be short and then they were talking about like attempted murder and protesting. Oh my gosh. Yeah yeah no this. This is a this was a fun one. I didn't think that would have this much fun. And I didn't think that I would have a craving but I totally had a craving. So there you go I do too but no milk no but you but you have that dairy and ice cream. If you did have milk you can make attorney. You're right you're right. Maybe he'll next time I venture out to the grocery store there is milk. Maybe I'll get some but in the meantime that is about as to the end of what we have to say for now about the hawks. We s sweet. We do we do have a little bit more for you. I'm but first we've got one more quick break for word from our sponsor Today's episode is brought to you in part by Amazon photos. 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This is GonNa be a whole we're GONNA have to learn. We are barely doing it before in the studio together but now Guy Bergamo after on top of. Yeah with this with this delay. I'm going to say it's like an extra challenge level so sorry about it. The and or you're welcome. I don't know what you like. We're at the beginning of leveling up so right now it's hard but we'll eventually will learn more skills and we'll pick pick up more listener mail queues. It'll be good Victoria wrote in Makia Sane. Perhaps macchia S- Is a restaurant called? Helen's back in two thousand fourteen. They suffered from a fire. The building destroyed. Despite firefighters efforts. Afterwards while officials were looking through photos. Taken the night of Restaurants Burning. They noticed one photo showed the silhouette of a figure standing in a window. Owner said it was the window next to where all the pies restored investigating the area led to nobody but a pie did make it out. Unburned of Blueberry Pie with the single slice missing did the Ghost Chili or protect that which is eight from. This is in response to our call for Paranormal supernatural thank. You so much Victoria. Oh that's amazing. Oh my gosh. Wow good ghost no blueberry pies great especially looking good like fresh blueberry pie man Delia. Jane wrote I thought you might want to hear about my sour dough culture and how I became colloquially known on my college campus as the bread girl this past summer I was going through a pretty tough time and began looking for some new hobbies and interests. I found his show and you never failed to cheer me up needing project. I settled on baking homemade bread from scratch. Originally I thought this would be something. I do every now and again. But it's become part of my nearly every day dietary recreational and mental health routine. I've not purchased a single loaf of bread and almost eight months naturally when I moved back to campus this fall. The hobby carried over much to the delight of my roommate's friends. Dnd's slush settlers of Catan group and upstairs neighbors who wants knocked asking why it smells like a bakery all the time only to be gifted with warm fresh slices of Rye bread in response once. My roommate jokingly wrote alike homemade bread yuan some all lows less than ten dollars followed by a number on a whiteboard in a study lounge. Well people actually begin texting me and I actually began. Selling a large amount of bread to fellow broke college kids and turned a profit on campus. You can see people happily walk around with their loaves wrapped in foil and one of the personalized sticky notes. I like to attach eagerly telling their friends pretty much. Everyone I knew began telling their friends and classmates even mentioning it to professors. My Best Friend tells me I give flower purpose. I have a running list on my phone with bread puns. I want to one day. Turn into bakery names. Some of my favorites include live and let Ri- In bread we crest Terai for and yeast meets West potential bakery slogan we give all purposes to flower. Oh yes the thing is. I'm an incredibly shy and introverted person. I tend to be very reserved around New People but now have this lovely bread reputation preceding me when my roommates threw a party. I'll always pull out a loafer. Make one before we go to a bar Oh walk into parties and instead of blending into the background like I used to a roar of cheers and praise will erupt for the bread girl followed by complimentary drinks. I'm twenty one. I promise. I make all types of bread and I'm working my way through American test. Kitchens Cookbook bread illustrated which is enshrined on the window sill of my apartment for all to see and to mark the home of the bread girl. I'm a biology major and m taking an elective. This semester called East genetics and genomics and learned so much about fermentation beer and bread. When studying. I often think of my favorite used poop or bacteria. Pu Soundbites are first homework. Assignment was to bring in a craft beer from which we isolated and grew up yeast cells. Our final project was going to be brewing beer with wildy samples we collected from trees and professor was even going to see if I could make a loaf of bread with it. Sadly my classes are cancelled the rest of the semester due to the corona virus outbreak. Being home for a while I decided to set up a sour dough starter completely from scratch using only flour and water until now. I've been using a cheater sour dough recipe that utilizes Greek yogurt and a single use overnight. Sponge still delicious. My Dad actually makes home brewed beer and being home as well started his latest batch at the same time we're both excited to see how our respective yeast collections will influence the other. But my guess is he'll end up making a sour beer. And May I say the smell of a sourdough culture in its first few days of existences indescribable? I have never experienced such a confusing old factory. Combination of Comforting Holiness and downright dirty gym sock. My culture isn't mature enough to bake a loaf of naturally levin sour dough with yet. But I've been saving the discard every day and used it today. Cinnamon Raisin sourdot. I know that was a lot but I love talking about bread and yeast and baking and I figured this was a good audience for it. Yes absolutely all so delightful key roll up into the barn. You've got bread and say here's here I am. Here's The bread that is ready to party so cool. I mean anybody that shows up at a party I throw with a loaf of bread is yeah their own. Gosh yes A dear friend of Mine Elodie who happens to be the executive chef at a restaurant in Atlanta called full commission Which is mostly shutdown due to cove it but is is running some takeaways specials and I think just to keep herself saying she's also been making a lot of bread and I got a big old loaf of fresh sour dough like fresh out of the oven like still warm still too hot to to slice sourdot and it was. It was really. It was really important to my life at that moment. Oh yeah and I know. Probably a lot of places are doing this but in Atlanta I was curious. Some bakeries are doing like weekly delivery. Things I yeah so definitely check that out and I know multiple of you have written in and told us about your Saturday. Starters what you're naming them as you're at home and looking for these activities to do so keep that up like fire to like try it. I just wanted to get right. I know there's some exciting fund science project VIBE around it so keep those emails coming. Thanks to both of them for emailing already. If you would like to email as you are email is hello at saver. Pod Dot Com. You can also get in touch with US via social media. We are on facebook twitter and Instagram at saver pod. And we do hope to hear from you. Savor is production of iheartradio four more podcasts. My heart radio. You can visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows that's also where you can find that new. Show a food court with Richard blaze. Fun Times yes Thanks as always tour Super Producers Dylan Fagin and Andrew Howard Biggs t for listening and we hope that let's work. Things are coming your way one night in nineteen sixty one on the side of a dark highway betty and Barney Hill caught lights in the sky. I don't believe it. Their story became internationally known. Some took it as fact others thought it was a fantasy but what really happened. That September night in rural New Hampshire. Join me. 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The Scorn of Candy Corn

FoodStuff

34:28 min | 1 year ago

The Scorn of Candy Corn

"Today's episode is brought to you by splendid table this thanksgiving. Make sure that the splendid table podcast and radio show is your kitchen companion throughout November Francis lamb and the splendid table team will be covering all the bases from life-changing gravy techniques to drinking more and better. Champagne, we always approve of that to a soul food thanksgiving celebration with chef Carla hall and on Thanksgiving Day. Don't miss their annual Turkey, confidential. It's alive Colin show for a full two hours Francis. And it's liberty guests Dorie Greenspan summing Nosrat and Patty hitch will answer whatever questions you may have on the busiest cooking day of the year. You can listen and call in from splendid table dot org or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hello and welcome to savor. I'm and I'm Laurin Boko bomb. And today we're talking about candy corn. We are. We really missed an opportunity to scary like pun name. Oh, well, yes, we're talking about. Which I guess if you're listening to this day, it comes out, perhaps you're near post Halloween Hayes. Maybe you still have some little packets of candy corn sitting around. Yes. And maybe you're really excited about that. Or maybe you are very not excited about that. Because people tend to fall into one of those two camps. Yes. The polarizing candy. It is extremely polarizing I would say one of the most divisive of the candies. I I think the circus. Peanut is the worst. Oh, heck, okay. All right. That's a whole other episodes tastes, like styrofoam banana flavored styrofoam. Does it happen? NF waiver. Yeah. Usually well time called candy corn the most polarizing candy of them all net basis. Brand passion index found them to be the most traditional candy of Halloween. These two loved by consumers one that generated quote, the most negative feelings in the words of Lewis. Black candy corn is the only candy in the history of America. That's never been advertised. And there's a reason all of the candy corn that was ever made was made in nineteen eleven. Or you have this from Chow hound quote. I think only serial killers eat candy corn. And why a person would choose candy corn over literally any other Gandhi that's on sale. At Walgreens is beyond me. Okay. Or how about this headline from atlas obscure, quote, a cloying kernel of evil the history of candy corn or this nickname statements earwax or this claim the leftover crumbs guy fear. He's go t would taste better than candy corn. Oh snap. Yeah. That's an image. That took me to a place. Does it really paints a picture? Apparently. There was a cartoon character named moose a moose on a past Nick junior show, moose Z that was known for among other things his Halloween song called. I don't like candy corn. But me, personally, I'm actually kind of ambivalent about it. Yeah. Okay. That's very measured of you. It's fun. When I was a kid. It was definitely low to your candy. But you know, candy it, right? It's still made of sugar. How about you? I like candy corn. I sort of like the texture in just the sort of like nice mellow flavor to it. And I mean, but I only ever want to eat like six pieces of it a year and indefinitely does not come in bags of six pieces. Right. And so I don't know like once every couple of years, I like let myself by some and then I have about six pieces, but I'm like, okay. Done here, and then just slowly goes stale. That sounds like a fad short story. That's metaphor for something else. You know? I'm not sure what I'm gonna ponder on that later. What's your least favorite candy? Oh, goodness. I guess smarties. Like, I don't really understand why they exist. Yeah. I did rebuilt a lot of people who like candy corn likes smarties. Really? Yeah. I think it's the texture is similar. It's not similar at all. I'll some people think it is. It's definitely. Very share about this. If candy corn I'm talking about like, the powdery the Chaki smarties, not the like chewy candies smarter candies are just fine with the chalky ones. You're like why did you press sugar into this format? Like, why would you do this? Explain to me. Yeah. I demand answers. Well, you know, where to reach us. So if you need to get the most angry mail said we've ever done Lauren likes candy corn side note the day before Halloween October thirtieth is candy corn day. National candy coin day here in the United States. That's right. But this brings us to our question candy corn. What is it? Well, candy corn is what's called a Mallow cream mellow Creamer. Malik cream candy. It's made from different kinds of sugar and his flavored with a little bit of vanilla to taste sorta like marshmallows, but the texture is smooth and creamy like a less chewy caramel or or like room temperature chewy ice cream, a like, solid frosting like smoother marzipan. I feel like you're trying to fit an idea. My face is like. It is increase frantic. And he's not buying this plan. They usually have a shiny glaze. And they are super sweet like I would say that the main flavor profile is sweet and candy corn in particular is shaped like kernels of corn. And is typically try colored white orange and yellow one of the sugars used to make it is corn syrup. So yes, there is some Cornyn candy corn, technically. We should call is in defensive candy corn. Man. I can't stop what video game is it. That has the character named Mallow. Oh, goodness. I'm not sure. Well listeners right in because now I'm consumed with this one thought. What K was that? A knee looked like a big marshmallow now that I look back on it. Anyway, you have a whole Google a whole Google just for me. Well, another thing for me to do later. But for now, let's talk about. How candy corn is made. Yeah, it's pretty cool, actually. Okay. The process can go a couple of ways, but basically start by heating up a blend of table sugar and corn syrup, and then whisking in some more sugar and some gelatin and whipping that to create like a sort of stiff fluff like meringue almost fondants is then added to increase the density of the fluff. And then you separate it out into different batches for coloring. It is a molded candy and the molds can be made either by packing cornstarch into frames. And then stamping the Colonel shape into the cornstarch or you can get a plastic mould and coat it with a fine layer of cornstarch. But either way you've got these molds and the the colonel's in the Molder tip down. Yeah. And so then pumps inject the batter into the moulds layer by layer starting with the white tip. And then the orange center and then the yellow top or. The bottom as the I mean, however, you want to look at it. Yeah. That's your worldview. Oh, are you bought up? This got real deep it did. But yes. So once they are in the malls, the candies are left to cure in those molds for a day or two and when they are hardened. They are kind of shaken out of the molds, and then coated with us, shiny wax, and packaged the whole process takes three or four days and funded. I mentioned is one of the ingredients. It's this pliable sculptural sort of Sugardo if you've never heard of it. It's made from powdered sugar corn syrup and water and maybe other stuff like gelatin or melted marshmallows. And if you've ever seen one of those fancy smooth sided cakes on TV or like at a catered event, it's probably decorated with funding. So yeah. One of the ingredients. In candy corn is more other candy. Different. Other candy share? I thought funding for a while was pronounced fund you, and then it was just a, you know, beard, spelling. Yeah. And I thought it was melted. Chocolate like fondue. Oh, yeah. That's not what it is. I know you can make a chocolate funding. But it's one of those things I'm not sure why ever thought that. But my brain was trying to make here you go. That's what that is. No. And all those different types of sugar are used because sucrose aka table sugar really likes to be in crystal form like big chunky crystal form, it's molecules just like stacking up together. Like that to convince it to have a fine smooth texture. Like you want for confections like candy corn? You have to kind of trick sucrose into not chunking up and corn syrup is a good stabiliser f for this. Because it contains available glucose and glucose molecules are a little bit smaller, and they started like bust up in between the sucrose molecules and like interfere with crystallization process. So yeah. And he disapproves of all of this. And I would argue that this texture is the primary part of candy corn that people who like it or dislike it are thinking about because the flavor is really mild. It's just like a little bit of vanilla maybe a tiny bit of like Honey kind of flavor in there. Little bit of like burnt sugar kind of flavor. But I Representative from jelly belly told realist that the flavor is quote, a blend of creamy fund rich marshmallow and warm vanilla notes those form vanilla notes L. Yeah. Wonderful. Jess. Symphony show that is an interesting point though. Because a lot of the complaints. I read about candy corn word texture based and for most of my friends a lot of them. They don't like a food. It is texture related. Yes. Kind of an interesting thing. I don't think I have a food for the textures the main thing that turns me off her onto it. I don't know. I love the texture of some foods lets by like, I guess like bread and pasta and Comey's so much. But yeah, the same batter. For candy corn is used to make other shapes. Sometimes like we do pumpkins and some people love them in two thousand sixteen bona petite ran a article with the headline the best candy is mellow cream pumpkins because this isn't even a contest. Didn't vote if the once it was the worst kid, you know. Oh, phone a Petit. So how does one eat candy corn? There are actually instructions about how to do this area's eightfold. Forty three percent of us. Go top down nibbling at the narrow end. I like how most people not me. Eat a piece of pizza about forty seven percent. Eat them whole and the risk. Oh from the bottom of the triangle up, which is how I eat my pizza. For the record. There's no difference flavor. Wise between the three sections. I mean, I guess you're getting the highest concentration of glaze when you eat the white tip and the the highest concentration of Mallow cream when you eat the wide yellow end. But yeah, they're not different flavors. Yeah. And another searing essay, I wrote on candy corn wrote or read read. Yes, I have. I have not written a searing us and candy corn. One of the writers complaints was as a kid. He expected. Different flavors saw the three colors. Yeah. And he felt lied to. Oh, I see. Yeah. If you wanna be upset about something. I recommend googling candy corn on the cob because there are photographs of this out there. And it's I was upset personally you can create a decorative corncob. Using candy corn kernels stuck into the base of like stiff modeling fund enter like cookie dough something like that. I was mad at it. I don't know why I got so angry. But I was like this is natural. And I disapprove I putting by foot down. That's it humanity. But what about that, but pumpkin keg? I showed you where the it was a pumpkin cooler and the people had just oh, that's great stuck the the next beard. I mean, it's also upsetting a certain point. But like, it's one of my favorite images. I've just randomly stumbled upon for some reason, I was picturing when you mentioned you said candy corn on the cob the colonel's pointing out like pinhead almo oh, that's also a little bit upsetting. But exciting, but it doesn't make sense. I mean, the whole thing doesn't make sense. But you know, it also doesn't make sense is that apparently people deep fried candy corn yet, no humanity. You can go right to your room. We're done here. If we're talking about nutrition. I mean, they're mostly sugar herpes. They're only about seven calories. I mean there candy. Yeah. They're fat free, but sugar isn't a health food. Nope. Nope. That's probably not news to you. If we look at numbers as of twenty thirteen nine billion pieces of candy corn are produced a year. That's thirty five million pounds jelly belly. Which is one of the premier national makers of candy corn says that they make most of it during July and preparation for the Halloween season. And according to Brock's, they make which is one of the other leading manufacturers they make over two million pieces per day when their line is like really up and running. Wow, you can get other varieties rather than the classic the Halloween fall colors. You can get red white and green for Christmas. That's reindeer corn pink red and white for Valentine's Day cupid corn and for a while candy corn was a popular addition to the garden of Easter baskets. Bunny corn? Yeah. There's also freedom corn for the fourth of July freedom corden corn. Oh my goodness. But most everyone if they're eating candy corn. They're eating the Halloween slash fall variety. One study from the national confectioners association survey found that candy corn was the preferred Halloween candy of only twelve percent of respondents, which seemed to me, honestly. But it was number two after chocolate. Yeah. Which was like seventy percent. So it's not really a contest. But I mean, yeah, I don't know by sales data from two thousand seven to two thousand seventeen candy corn was the favourite Halloween candy in seven states, Alabama, Idaho, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico and Rhode Island. I don't want to keep hammering this point home. But I read so many essays about why people hate candy corn like passionate essays. And I think it was somebody from Michigan wrote, essentially, I'm not mad. I'm just disappointed. Did when they heard. Candy cardinals their favorite candy. Oh, favorite Halloween. Candy specific. Yes. Yes. Still. But yes worth noting. Not only this you can get candy corn flavored bagels. So that fall into your realm of acceptable bagels. No, no, I cussed really loud in my head. When I read that actually, I suspected you might. Yeah. You can get candy corn flavored Oreos, candy corn, coffee, panic Cada and all of the Drake's candy corn. Cocktail Cain corn. Beer candy corn jello shots. Starburst? Flavored candy corn pumpkin spice flavored candy corn. Apparently opened candy corn can last sixteen months. If you start properly an airtight container or in the fridge. There you go. Make your candy corn last almost all year. Well, that's our overview of this most divisive of candies. But how did candy corn get here? We'll look into that. After a quick break for word from her sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by Hello fresh, which is a meal kit delivery service that shops plans and delivers step by step recipes and premeasured ingredients. So that you can just cook eat and enjoy there's something for everyone with hellofresh selection. There are three plans to choose from classic veggie and family, and the thing I love about it is that it convenient. I don't have to go to the grocery store. I don't have to plan out a meal, it shows up and everything is there and pre-measured and ready for me to start working. And it's fun. 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Unlike most candies candy corn pretty specifically American, according to the trade association. Candy corn was invented in the way, back the way back in this case being the eighteen eighty courtesy of an employee of the Wunderle candy company named George richer out of Philadelphia. This is sort of the trend at the time so called Buttercream candies molded into different shapes. But what really made candy corn stand out from the pack was those three colors are a real pain in the butt to make at the time. The end product though was eye catching and new they sold the recipe to another candy maker one by the name of Google. That's candy company. You may know it by another name, let jelly belly candy company. They came out with their own tri-colored candy corn in eighteen ninety eight. The glitz family had been in the candy business for a few decades. But candy corn and other mellow cream can. Indies then called butter creams were there runaway success at the time. This candy was made manually in decent sized kettle. Candy makers would mix a semi liquid sugar court surp- funded marshmallow and water the resulting slurry was poured into buckets called stringers. And then these dues called runners would walk in rivers pouring, the mixture into Colonel shaped molds each layer was Horton by hand from these stringer buckets on an individual run down the line of malls. So, you know, one free color and the buckets were called stringers because they didn't have like a single spout. They had this whole row of spouts or sort of like funnel heads kind of. And so by reaching the stringer out over a row of molds and tipping it. Just so you could fill the whole row in a single poor cool and the molds were made of cornstarch as they are today. Sometimes this was an innovation in candy making from around that time, and yeah instead of using a metal or wooden mold which you might need to Greece somehow to prevent the candy from sticky. You could press shapes into firm packed cornstarch. And you know, your candy batters sticks to that a little bit too. But that's actually a good thing. Because it imparts like a fine layer of cornstarch on the candy that helps it set. Another thing about the time that's important to this is that about half, the American workforce were farmers that meant that a lot of companies targeted them and their families directly with these farm, adjacent shapes. Yeah. Other shapes for mala creams included. Yes. Pumpkins, but also turnips chestnuts and clovers, although it was only made for a few months out of the year due to the labor intensive creation process. It was marketed as a year round treat, the Gould's is would eventually develop a machine that made hand pouring the candies. Obsolete supposedly after one of the owners woke up in the middle of the night was shooting back pain from having poured candy out of these stringer buckets all day fix. I've got to put an end to this. Yes. No mall in the nineteen twenties. Folks, gave candy corn the. Possibly affectionate named chicken feed. The manufacturers sold it in a box with the chicken on the front. The motto of the Gullit's candy companies version was quote king of the candy corn field something worth crowing for and I will say it was sort of a a gimmicky candy for children at like county fairs. Yeah. Hey kids, it's like chicken chicken feed malls. Yeah. Yeah. Prior to World War. One corn was a food Americans generally a skewed. It was seen as a poor person's food, and the teast wasn't really that great animal feed not human food, but thanks to wartime shortages of wheat Americans came around to corn candy corn, though that caught on pretty quick also that the sweeter hybrids of corn that we eat fresh today hadn't been developed yet. But yeah at the time even like grits and corn flour and stuff like that. We're looked down upon by some segments of the population. We wouldn't get more dependable hybrids of speak corn. You know, like the fresh stuff that we eat like. Vegetable until like, the nineteen thirty s and onward from there. And this just about brings us to Halloween, but I it brings us to one last quick break for word from our sponsor. Killer murders, gripped the small town of hollow falls a decade ago by the end of the killing spree six people, including my amp Beth were dead. The police discovered a handwritten note next to her body and decided it was her confession. But my aunt was no killer. The mission of this podcast is simple to uncover the truth to clear, my aunt's name to put the real killer behind bars or die trying. I'm Tig Taurus. And this is lethal. Lethal lit a Tig Torres mystery a six part scripted podcast series coming to your favorite podcast app. Mondays starting October twenty ninth. Subscribe now to never miss an episode. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. So when did candy corn become associated with Halloween? You ask we hope you ask because we're going to answer and the answer is sometime in the nineteen fifties. Interestingly though, and add that came out in the very same decade. Declared candy corn eight year. Long candy a nineteen fifty one grocery store at read quote. The candy all children loved nimble on all year long. And there's a nineteen fifty seven Brock's ad that includes candy corn in his spread of summertime. Candies. Summertime. Gandhi's up until this point candy corn was sold as a penny candy candy targeted towards children that were sold in bulk also up until this point lots of candy makers were in on the game. A lot of people were making types of candy corn. But nowadays, we have jelly belly and Brock's. And that's about it on a nationwide scale. That's just about it. Ads for candy corn in the fifties. Other than that, though, largely went all in on them being a Halloween, candy way more. So than other candies to the point that people started to think it was weird to eat it outside of Halloween times, they succeeded in associating it with Halloween, but then it became all just Halloween. Exactly, basically. Yeah. And this was also the aero when Halloween became associated with candy in general prior to this trick or treating might have not used some homemade baked goods or homemade candies but post World War Two and post the sugar rations that came with World War. Two candy companies started marketing, they're packaged candies is this like cool inconvenient handout for trick. Or treaters and simultaneously trick. Or treating was really cemented itself. As like a family tradition in America yet. A nother candy corn related thing that happened in the fifties candy related illness after one particular Halloween a lot of trick or treaters experienced gastrointestinal. Stress or even rashes and welts the cause was orange die in a member one and only enlarge amounts was it causing these issues. It makes me wonder just how much these large amounts. We're talking. It wasn't. Just candy corn that used orange-dyed number one all kinds of things did from hot dogs to candy pumpkins, though, it had been approved all the way back in nineteen zero six it was actually poisonous. Yeah. Yeah. It was made a coal tar. Well, it was derived from coal tar, which isn't aspartame again, like we are all made of chemicals things can be derived from a number of petroleum products. And if you have a problem with the use of petroleum products in general than that's a bad thing, maybe environmentally or or something like that. But the chemical itself, you know, isn't maintaining some kind of property of coal or Trillium its chemical. We are all made of chemicals every time you say that it makes me think of the Moby song you're all made of stars. I like my version better. So yeah, it was a really big thing through the fifties and the sixties, and then we started to get the more modern eras of candy making with all the, you know, sour flavors in different weird chocolate treats, and all that kind of stuff and the dominance of it through that specific era has led some candy experts to speculate that it's an established thing for the baby boomer generation who grew up with it being this specific Halloween treat, and that it just confuses the heck out of gen Xers and millennials who, you know, had more options when we were kids that makes sense. Yeah. Nostalgia is a powerful thing. It reminds me of this experience. I had when I was taking a lift couple months ago. It was really late. And I lift driver was an older African American woman. I was clearly like out of it. She says would you like some candy? And I said, oh, and she's like take some candy. And I was like, okay. So no, no, no, no, no, take some candy. I take it. And it's a candy. I've never seen before. Lord. I I don't know. What it is. I can't tell you what it was. But it looks like a lifesaver believe it was called apple. Oh, oh, yeah. Yeah. I put it in my mouth, and it becomes clear that this is a candy. That's never going to go away. Oh, and she sort of Snickers, and she says back in my day candy was going to last you for months. Okay. Andy these days, that's not the real thing. That's not. How candy supposed to be? Then she wouldn't all these stories about how she would take this candy and put it in like a Kleenex Ellen like stay home back for later. And she teach her grandkids a lesson because they would come and try to steal her candy, and she'd be like well jokes on you kid because that was. It was quite the memorable lift that's great though. It was it was I thought I appreciated the whole thing as we record this Halloween has not happened yet. And as I mentioned in another episode, I have five candies. I have to get for free. And I have all but one. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And our office manager saw me like dive for an almond joy the other day, they're very rare. So I gotta find a butterfinger. All right. Cross your fingers formula news. I think your finger thoughts. To be free. I can't buy it. This is the rule. I don't know. What will happen? I think the university. It'll be like the end of cabinet in the woods. Oh, yeah. Get. In everybody's best interest at this happens. Yeah. All keep an eye out. I will. But I think if you buy it won't count either it has to just appear somehow. Okay. You have to forge it in the wild. Exactly exactly growing nixes some Sean drills. Well, that's my next couple of days just searching for a butterfinger. If you see me wandering around. Well, good luck. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. And meanwhile, that concludes our candy corn episode and brings us to Liz. Our first letter is from Kevin Kevin wrote when I was in college I worked at fast food restaurant having been raised by frugal. Parents. We are brought up not to waste food or anything really so working at Hardee's making sandwiches for the potential customer throwing them out if they weren't purchased within fifteen to twenty minutes was quite a pickle to be in. I remember asking the manager about all this waste and being told that company policy and Furthermore, the health department didn't allow it to be given to the hungry. I recall a particular breakfast shift working with a co worker who put the biscuit making into high gear and sued the oven stuffed with pans of soon to be biscuits. However when the breakfast menu was closed at ten thirty. We still add biscuits baking being the clever college student I seized upon this opportunity, I did mostly as company policies policy required. But I I needed a fresh trash bag from the stockroom. I counted the trays of biscuits as I dumped them very unceremoniously into the bag. I reported the count to the manager who surely rolled her eyes that the excessive loss, and then proceeded to take out the trash which was one of my normal duties, However, I did not head to the dumpster. I walked straight to my car folding bag of biscuits and put it in my trunk some were bit smashed and miss shaped from rough treatment, but they were so much better than Pillsbury biscuits. From Ken mom, put the bulk of them in reuse schwann's ice cream buckets and stored them in the deep freeze. Sadly, the ice cream is not consumed by us as shrines brand was a bit pricey for our family. I've never heard of schwann's browned. However, we did have delicious biscuits for months, which were even better eating in our kitchen with mom's. Homemade probably strawberry preserves. Oh. Yeah. Save those biscuits, save them. So it's so funny to me, I just always assumed that food fast food restaurants just sat there forever. So this is really only a couple of hours. Well, I I'm happy that these biscuits found a home right in your stomach, absolutely. Especially. Yeah. Especially something that freezes that. Well, and like, you know, doesn't involve meter veg that we'd go off. Yeah. Sharing that would torment me too. Absolutely Laura wrote one of my friends posted a pick of something she found at the WalMart made me think of one of our previous episodes and of some funny, childhood memories of weird foods, and she attached a photograph and the photograph is of a squeeze bottle of green stuff, and it's labeled. Great value. Nickelodeon slime sauce. Yes. It's that vibrant on green color of slime. And Furthermore, the label says that you can add some fun to your plate all caps on the phone all caps on the fun. And it specifies that it has made with great value, ketchup and. Yeah, so. Yeah. That exists. Yeah. Nickelodeon. Good job. You know when I was a kid. I think that that would have been branded as ectoplasms like. Yes busters. Slimy ectoplasms or something. But I I appreciate that. Other brands are carrying on the proud tradition of unnecessarily coloring things green and marketing them as goop to children. I think that's beautiful. I think I saw Burger King us at Halloween. Burger right now in the bun is purple catch up. Yeah. All right. I'm in the market for Halloween recipes right now. So maybe I bet I'll never find this anywhere. But it's an idea. It's an idea. Absolutely. Yeah. Though, I suppose catch-up is. Already. Already. How? But it's not as novel. Anyway, thanks to both of them for writing in. If you would like to write to us if you want to tell us your opinions on candy corn, we would love to hear them. Our Email is Hello at saver, pot dot com or also on social media. You can find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at saver pod. We do hope to hear from you. Thanks as always wore super producer Dylan Fagin who says that candy corn is his fourth. Most hated food. Thanks to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good things are coming your way. My father is Keith hunter just percent. He's known as the happy face serial killer. On one side of the coin is a loving family, man. And then on the other side of the coin he is everything that could hurt he goes from protected a predator. Happy face a new series from house to forks, new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get outcast.

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The Inexhaustible Energy Drink Episode

FoodStuff

34:24 min | 1 year ago

The Inexhaustible Energy Drink Episode

"This episode is brought to you by foil Cruyff-ian chances are you're tuning in right now because your the curious type Royal Caribbean is all about exploring new territory to is in literally their vacations bring you along to explore amazing destinations in the Caribbean. There's plenty to explore on board to like surfing, an endless wave on flow writers, sixteen storeys above sea level satisfying, your culinary curiosity with international flavors from award winning chefs onboard every night or defying gravity in the I fly as you skydive onboard. Why just vacation in the Caribbean when you can go on an adventure with Royal Caribbean. Come seek at Royal Caribbean dot com ships registry Bahamas. Hello. And welcome to save her. I'm an eerie, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and today, we're talking about energy drinks. Yeah. It's been an interesting research week doing, energy drinks amp birthday cake. Yeah. I didn't. I haven't consumed either of those products while researching this, but I still feel like sort of bad about myself. Even though you didn't even though I didn't. I'm just like, oh, they're just both in my brain all solution around. Yeah. And as I told aren't before we started recording. That sounds like a very particular year in my call. Birthday cake and energy drinks. And also like a a song from an EMA band. Oh, no. Oh, I'm sure. Yeah. As sure as I end that someone has made a birthday cake flavored energy drink. I am sure. That some band made that song. And if you are that band, let us know. Oh, yeah. Right in I definitely want to hear that. I do too sounds right up. My alley. I used to drink a lot of energy drinks two to three a day when I was in college. And when I was first an internet, this company me, and Matt Frederick y'all have a problem. Yeah. I just I'm just a minute. Yes. I believe you. We would we would work really late, and we would each get like as the six PM our roles around. We would get one of those white sugar free Rockstars and big Tallinn's. Now, I only drink them on road trips, generally. Or when I have a very intense deadline, and I still. Go for the sugar free Rockstars, not a sponsor. That's just what I would go for or those coffee flavored monster ones, but they're very hard to find actually tricky in these parts. In fact, this is a fun Pete behind the scene. Okay. If you go back and listen to the mayor, she not area for sewed. I had woken up at four thirty AM that morning and had driven six hours straight to the studio to record that upset, and I had had three to four energy jokes and some donuts any and I felt so high like size a kite. I was like I remember you kept like you sort of went into like cat mode. Like, you sort of kept staring off into the corner. It's nothing really, suddenly, and I was just giggling just giggling all the time. I mean, not that we don't normally do that. But actually, the reason this was just giggling. Yeah. And I honestly have enough triple. Falling asleep. So I don't really need. No any energy. He probably shouldn't do that. No. This was not a good decision is a decision and I used to love jolts and surge when I was a kid. Oh, goodness. Oh my gosh. I loved them. I'd get him before. I'd go to the movies. I don't know why. I want to be all test of Mufid Treasure Island. I remember that experience in particular. I was mysteriously gifted with some jolt socks MRs dearly. They just showed up it just showed up on my desk. I think Ramsey got them from someone else. I I'm not offended by it. But I like them. Yeah. Dribble stylish and I remember during the finals week at my college. If you went to like we had to student markets if you went to them during finals week, he would see people walking out with cases of energy. Oh my goodness. And you had to get there like a whole weekend advance. If he wanted to get the top pick. Well, very popular. I was never that into. I found out early that I was caffeine sensitive like the first time that I encountered a blended coffee drink. I was like this is the most delicious thing ever, I should have three and I could see through time and space and feel my blood flowing through my Danes like the individual cells. So this was when I was like seventeen eighteen maybe and yeah. Yeah. From that formative experience I have been careful with. Yeah. It's it's energy drinks. Didn't really I mean, I guess jolting surge were L when I was a kid. But yeah, the true. Red bull monster kind of era didn't come until I was a little bit older. I preferred the sugar-free rockstar. Is that the one that you said that you like, yeah. Yeah. In the white can. Oh, man. I don't know. Why see I well, we've got to people saying that that's the one and also Mattie, Fred, I always Fred I was good with them in all things of taste, the three of us are top top level experts. Yes. No doubt in your mind about that. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. I didn't drink them that often mostly back in my in my club days, if you can imagine the club day, you can imagine someone with my haircut. I used to die at black. And I went Goth dancing a whole lot and yeah, Gotha eighties dancing. And so I would let myself have half a can before we went. And then I could drink the other half afterwards. I love that. So so you were like golf. Fueled by you'll buy rock star. I I mean, I don't know why they haven't contacted you for sponsorship just seems like a missed opportunity. I'm waiting for the call any day. Now, I'm picturing like in in south park that kind of their golf dancing, but you're in a club. That's more or less. What I looked like. I'm pretty sure perfect. Okay. All right. All right. This brings us to our question, energy drinks. What are they? Well, energy drinks are a category of usually carbonated beverage that's marketed specifically as having the ability to pep you up. Make you awake alert energized. They can attempt to this through any number of ingredients. Caffeine is often key. It's like a fun times nutritional supplement. That's the idea that they're selling anyway flavors vary, but there's often a sort of like metallic or medicinal twinge to them and a lot of sweetness and some citric tartness. Yeah. Yeah. I find that the flavor after two sips is not great. Yeah. They it helps if they're very cold because maybe that's just like numbing your taste buds. I dunno writes, some are sold is concentrated shots instead of full on beverages. And okay, if you've ever wondered what all those ingredients you see listed on the cans are supposed to do. How stuff works dot com has a quick rundown. Caffeine, of course, is a stimulant that blocks. A dentist in the brain. Which causes a chain reaction that releases adrenalin your heart beats faster, your liver releases sugar into the bloodstream and ups the dopamine in your brain, you feel good? Yeah. Yeah. F- Adrain is a stimulant that works on the central nervous system. It's a common ingredient in weight loss products and decongestants. There have been some concerns as with overdoses of caffeine about the effects. It's affected on the heart taurine is a amino acid that's naturally produced by the body. It helps regulate heartbeats and muscle contractions. And yeah, a lot of people aren't really sure I mean, not just people like researchers aren't sure like what effects it has as an additive. But the rumor that it comes from bolt testicles super false. That's not. That's not accurate that. Oh, that's yeah. That's people would say that. That's why it's called red bull because the taurine that's one of the main ingredients comes from. But also like tourists. You know, the, oh, sure. Okay. I mean, all yeah. Also both. Testicles? Why not either? Ginseng is a route believed by some people to have several medicinal properties, including reducing stress, and perhaps boosting energy levels b vitamins. We talk about those on the show a whole lot. Actually, I'm their their vitamins that very basically helped convert sugar into energy, and yeah, Goran a seed is another stimulant it comes from small shrub in Venezuela. Brazil or that's where it's native to anyway contains caffeine. So it's a added source of caffeine carnitine is an amino acid that plays a role in fatty acid metabolism. Creating is an essence that helps supply energy for muscle contractions and ginkgo biloba is made from seeds of the good blow. But tree it's thought to enhance memory kind of a question Mark there, nutritionally speaking, let's get into health speaking of nutritionally. Speaking. Okay. All right. Well, first of all energy drinks can contain a lot of sugar and less you're getting sugar for your star sponsor. Like, for example, is sixteen ounce bottle of coke contains fifty two grams of sugar some energy drinks contain like twice that like sixty to a hundred I've read so. Yeah. That kind of sugar content can especially through repeated use overtime can decrease your body's ability to to handle sugar, which can lead to diabetes. It's also not good for your gut bacteria like the sugar will feed like kind of the crappy ones and the rest of the Bill go like, oh what a world. I know what that's like. Oh, jeez. I do too. There's some weird research out there like the combination of caffeine taurine and were on a might promote an enhanced a pop toasties, which is the programmed cell death that your body carries out to like flush sells for a number of reasons. Like, maybe they've reached some biological expiry date or maybe they've been stressed out by an attack from a virus or exposure to radiation and your body's like. Rid of that it's going to spread. It's generally a helpful process in the body though. Too much of it leads to stuff like muscle, atrophy or like blood disorders or neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's. So that's weird. Yeah. That's pretty strange. Yeah. I haven't read about what I just. That is something that people have reported interesting. Yeah. It's like a fallout drink wait the fault took place in the fifties. No future. Yeah. It's the future. Fifties. It's the Fisher fifties. That's exactly what it is. Which I find very charming. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And then really the the key ingredient in all of this though is that massive dose of caffeine. How massive is. It will a five hour energy has like hundred twelve milligrams of caffeine. Some of those shot style ones can have up to two hundred milligrams the drink style beverages generally have like seventy two two hundred forty milligrams and for for comparison twelve ounces of cola has about thirty five milligrams at eight ounce coffee has about one hundred milligrams. Fill out of caffeine. So it's a bunch, and and this is actually something fun that I learned in this research over caffeine can lead to a medical condition called caffeine intoxication the symptoms of which including Zaidi, insomnia. Gastrointestinal upset muscle twitching restlessness and periods of inexhaustible eighty in exhaustive -bility. Goodness. Yeah. Also caffeine is a diabetic which means that it flushes more water than usual from your body through urine. So it's really easy to get dehydrated. If you're drinking a lot of these. Yes. Which is why? And we're not going to go into this too much, but the whole red bull and vodka thing. That's what caused a bit of a health scare. Yeah. If you're putting yourself up like that while also using a depressant, it can really confuse a lot of signaling going on in your body. And maybe make you think that you are less drunk than you are. Yeah. Which can lead to like car accidents and stuff like that. If you're cocky. And like other things that I just said, I know that it sounds a little bit like a little bit dire. And I've got a couple more dire facts where you towards the end of the episode. But like, okay. A lot of the supplements including caffeine in energy drinks, have kind of like mixed results in your body. Really? Like studies have shown that consuming a certain amount of energy drink will improve like indoor in exercise, and the feeling of alertness, maybe your reaction times, probably your mood your ability to concentrate, but when you take too much those positive effects can turn negative real fast like like, generally stimulants pup you up because they trick your brain into thinking that there is an emergency happening. So, you know, you're you're red alert you're like primed for fight or flight, and that's okay. Short term or in small doses. But in larger doses or longer term, it's like over clocking your body. Like, it puts stresses on you at both system and a cellular level. So drink responsibly. Drink your energy drinks responsibly. Yes. The the recommendation is no more than one per day one like twelve ounce sixteen Sweden and yet when. One one unit per day one unit per day. Okay. I shall take this into consideration. Again, I've rarely have them any more. But a lot of people do because if we look at numbers. Oh, yeah. Energy drinks are a big business in twenty twelve the energy drink market made eleven billion dollars some pointed out that really these drinks aren't that different from sodas, except when it comes to the price tag. And I have to say that was one of the most like. Droop. Soupy facts. So the episode for me. Yeah. Well, it's a super disc caffeine. Yeah. And the price tag and the price tag and after multivitamins. They are the most consumed dietary supplement for American teens and young adults. Really? Yeah. Not a surprise. No. I mean, the biggest demographic for them is men eighteen to thirty four. And I think a third of young adults report drinking them, but. I mean, this is a different podcast. But when I look back at my time in highschool, and this is when energy drinks for becoming big. I that schedule I was on was ridiculous. And I can't believe that that was like expected of a high school student. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Me too. I got maximum for hours of sleep a night. Oh, yeah. And that was just like working, right? Yeah. Doing homework and stuff Lou different show. But I can see why energy drinks are a popular thing for young adults. But alright what about the history of energy drinks. What about it? Well, there's a lot of it. But we'll get into that. After a quick break for word from our sponsor. Today's episode is sponsored by Royal Caribbean. Chances are you're listening right now because you're the curious type, maybe you're looking to discover something cool and unusual or explore the expected real Caribbean is all about exploring new territory to as in literally their vacations bring you along to explore amazing destinations in the Caribbean. And there are tons of opening experiences right on board to a like a defying gravity in the I fly as you skydive on board shooting down the ultimate abyss a slide with ten floors of thrilling twists and turns satisfying, your culinary curiosity with international flavors from award winning chefs onboard every night surfing an endless wave on flow writer, sixteen storeys above sea level, letting your imagination soar inside Skype pad a VR thrill ride at sea and realizing that adventure doesn't happen. If you just go along for the ride why just vacation in the Caribbean. When you can go on an adventure with Royal Caribbean. Come seek at Royal Caribbean. Dot com. Ships registered you Bahamas. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. I say energy drinks are prote- new and they took off in the two thousands, which they do feel very early two thousands to me. But I didn't realize they were that new or at least the ones that we I think when we say energy drinks, you're thinking. Oh, yeah. The specific category. I mean, like coffee and tea have been around for a minute. Yes. And there was a pre Columbian highly caffeinated drink in the Americas that people would drink and then promptly throw it up L. It was seen as a purification ritual or perhaps a pre battle stimulant or perhaps both. Okay. Whatever you're into pre-columbian dudes. We we don't we don't really we're not in a good space to tell them to get them in kind of advice that is true on a number of levels. The history of modern day energy drinks began in the nineteen sixties with a product from the Japanese company Taisho pharmaceuticals this drink Lipton van de was advertised as a medicinal drink that raised energy levels with the help of a mixture of ingredients like, Tori, niacin and an array of vitamins and minerals. After the end of World War Two amphetamines were really popular but laws passed in the nineteen. Fifties made them much more difficult to access to ban de was meant to fill a market void. If you will you could get these and small bottles similar to a five hour energy drink today, and this along with other highly caffeinated and fortified drinks became really popular. Among Japanese businessmen looking for success by the nineteen eighties as opposed to like the cocaine thing that was happening over here. I guess that's a payroll that we could draw. Maybe maybe not an early commercial for one of these featured Arnold Schwarzenegger coming out of the other like Jimmy Muli. Remember that do you really? It's great. Oh my gosh. I just had a moment of very intense regret that I didn't take the time to find the car show. He aren't Schwarzenegger areas coming up in a lot of episodes recently on what's going on. It was another commercial which featured a business superhero signing deals and making presentations asking can you fight for twenty four hours a day businessman, businessman, Japanese businessmen. It was very intense. Okay. Technically in some places. I looked out when I was researching this some people include Coca Cola and the time line of energy drinks back during the the brief period when cocaine was one of the ingredients supposedly supposed coca still denies that. Yes. They do. Also, some people included the predecessor to Coca Cola French cocoa, and you can see our soda episode for more about that. While Japan normally gets the credit there were few other contenders. One comes from the UK and 1927 invented by chemist, William Owen. It was called glucose Zayd, and it was sold to hospitals as a way to provide energy to patients with cold, and or flu the name changed to Luca's aid in nineteen twenty nine it rebranded in nineteen Eighty-three with this slogan. Luca Sade replaces loss energy and sales tripled in six years after that rebrand. So hey, I believe it's still around. I think you can still get it. Another contender Dr enough E N U F. Yeah. A vitamin fortified caffeinated soda which was invented in Chicago in nineteen forty nine in never sold. Very well. But apparently, you can still find it in Tennessee. I believe. Yeah. It picked up a bottle while we were at it's like sitting either. In my desk, or at home all busted out, you have a, but I have doctoring. Yeah. Oh my gosh. This is great. Dr enough tagline was by the way. And I don't know why this tagline didn't help it break the sales chart the answer to a housewife's prayer, the bosom companion of tired farmer businessman, and to shift into hug here for young Johnny or married. They could do a lot of things it could. But apparently, not sell. It was for everybody except no one at all anyone skipping ahead to the nineteen eighties. So two companies were doing their utmost to compete with coffee things like jolt cola, which promised all the sugar and twice the caffeine. Coke had ads calling for Coca Cola in the morning. Jeez. Just not to be outdone, Pepsi, introduced Pepsi. A M. Pepsi A m I I try to be tolerant of other people's food food ways y'all, but I get genuinely grossed out when I see people drinking Coca Cola in the morning. I think that that is a thing in some places in the world. I think that that is a fact that we will get to. I I'm happy for people to be happy. But hoof it just I don't know it just makes my stomach gurgle. Oh, my mom does that she drinks it sugar free Dr Pepper in the morning for the caffeine 'cause can't have coffees too much. And she doesn't like TI. Okay. Yeah. Don't do. It makes you happy. Yeah. Mom, and nineteen eighty-seven a big name. Inter citric seeing red bull. It was essentially the same as the ten d. And by this time Japanese energy drinks like that one had made their way to Europe. But with the addition of caffeine and sugar and carbonation the drink invented by Austrian named Dietrich Mata shits was named after the Torian amino acid modest hits was the international marketing director of an auction company that sold bathroom products before he discovered energy drinks, not in Europe. But while on a business trip to. Bangkok and he quit his job in nineteen Eighty-four to join forces with a Thai energy drink company that produced crossing Dong also known as tight red bull. The inventor of red bull Kalaheo you've aja died in two thousand twelve as one of the richest people in the world. Wow. From what I understand that. It was essentially the exact exact same formulation. Yeah. For over a decade. Red bull stayed mostly confined to Europe. It wasn't until nineteen Ninety-seven which just by the way was very formative year in my life that red bull debuted in the United States New millennium new you new energy drinks, Hans unnatural developed monster and introduced it to the market in two thousand and four we see five hour energy start to appear in stores from two thousand five two thousand six sales of energy drinks in the US took off increasing by sixty one percent to red bull. The most well-known energy drink by then topped an annual two billion dollars in global sales. Also in two thousand five to get fusion pharmaceuticals for loco the alcoholic energy drink. And as you might imagine. This drink raised a lot of health concern. Turns and it was removed and reformulated to get rid of the caffeine, taurine and Goran a-. And then reintroduced on shelves in the US and twenty ten and I remember being in tenth grade in health class and hearing stories of kids whose hearts had stopped because of energy drinks. And in twenty twelve it was reported that over a four year period of five hour energy was the cause of thirteen deaths pressed because of this Washington state took steps to make energy drinks illegal for children under eighteen France, Denmark, and Norway have banned red bull and Canada requires that it comes with a warning label in the US has been involved in over ninety filings with the FDA since two thousand nine from two thousand seven to twenty eleven the number of emergency room visits due to energy drinks doubled. And as of two thousand eleven forty two percent of those visits involves taking energy drinks alongside alcohol or other drugs. Yeah. Yep. Over the years, energy drinks have promised all kinds of things not only energy, but things like invigorating your genital organs. I find energy drinks a certain type of extreme interface advertising. There's an advert cocaine the energy drink is called cocaine. Okay. Interesting. Branding that implies drinking. It will turn you into super cool vampire, not like a lame vampire like a really cool. Like. Fish from Meyer club. Oh, man. Yeah. So that's about. Teaching. I don't know why we didn't do the whole episode in that like in your figure. Yeah. This missed opportunity. I mean, I guess we can start over again from the top right now. I have to go get an energy drink if we're going to do that. Yeah. I don't know how long my folks would would last doing that. But. We could always give it a old college tries to say. Well, we still have a little more for you. We do. But I we have a quick break for word from our sponsor. If you haven't checked out my new series the end of the world with Josh Clark. The now's a great time to start the holidays are over the doldrums of winter had begun. And there's no better time to explore existential dread than right now. But wait, there's more to the end of the world than that. Yes. The series is about existential risks. But it's also about hope the threats that are coming our way that could wipe humans right out of existence. Could also be just the thing that makes us band together. In a way that humanity never has before in the end of the world. I take you on a journey across time and space from the moment and asteroid collided with earth and set off a chain of events that wiped out the dinosaurs to the post biological future where we live in a digital format. If we don't already we'll explore big questions like whether we're alone in the universe and exactly how artificial intelligence could take control of our world from us. It also has a beautiful score. In cinematic sound design. So it's an adventure for your mind. Which is just the thing to snap. You out of the winter blahs all ten episodes of the end of the world with Josh Clark are available for you to binge now on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get podcast. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you. One more bonus. Fact, I forgot to look it up before we got into the studio. So I just googled it right now. But okay. So why are energy drinks so yellow there so yellow so yellow, yeah? Kind of gross color, really, which is by. I'm very glad that they're sold in cans and not bottles. But yes, it's from beta carotene, it's from one of the things that are about it uses to make vitamin E. Makes sense. Yeah. Also makes carrots that color and cheese yellow. I can't wait till we do an episode on carrots. Ooh, it's going to be a good one. I I used to eat a bag of carrots everyday like a big bag because my vision was deteriorating. Oh, and I, you know, the share say, but I can't wait to do research. Because from what I understand. It's actually just night vision that it helps it might be no vision. But I thought it was gonna help all of my all of your shirt. Nope. Still had to get classes. It's basically based there's a little bit of nutritional fact in there, but it's basically just World War propaganda from UK, fighter pilots. Darn it World War Two propaganda poor middle school meeting a bag of carrots every day. Hey, I that's like a lot of fiber. That's great. I did it as someone like go. And I'd be towards the end like shake you trying to get more carrots. Well. I'm Sarah affecting. I'm sorry past Anne after that. Like, I felt so portrayed. I didn't care. It's for years. We'll you know, they'd make me nauseous share you'll nauseated you eat them because I'd been eating bags of them. Yeah. That's that's not a serving size. No, oh, it wasn't good. I switched to bags of him an MP nuts. And that was worse. Anyway. This about brings us to. Yes. Of our our episode on ener DJ jinx with a brief aside about carrots brief care to side episode for coming. Yeah. And to realis-. We have a future in this. I I think that's clear obvious. Never get a hold of. All right. Chris wrote. I'm a PHD candidate in food science at UC Davis. And I've been listening to the podcast for years. I'm super excited to listen to your episode about oranges because I now have something to write in about. My dissertation work is actually centered around citrus greening and the impact it has on important biological pathways in the plant by using some pretty awesome analytical chemistry and molecular biology techniques. In academic circles. We usually refer to citrus greening by the Chinese name Hong Dong being abbreviated h LP, and it is a major concern among citrus growers in California. Most of Florida's oranges are processed into juice and choose from infected trees can be blended with that of healthy trees below a certain threshold without being noticeably bitter to a consumer the vast majority of California grown citrus. However is eaten fresh, which means there is no way to hide bidder. Misshapen discolored or otherwise defective fruit a major complication for growers is that the early symptoms of HIV are easy to confuse with common nutrient deficiencies or other diseases like citrus trust does. Maybe and citrus stubborn. I don't want to give away too much information about my research. Gotcha. But my end goal is to understand how key pathways in the orange trees are manipulated in response to any of these stresses and pathogens that is so cool. That's so fascinating. All that's great. Yes. Oh, man. We love hearing from folks doing food research. Yeah. Yeah. When you when you publish Chris would you send us like a link to your paper that yet? Please do. Yeah. Oh, okay. All right. Victoria wrote. I literally just thought of recommending ice as a topic for you lovely ladies. When I updated my podcasts and saw you beat me to the punch for history in south Bristol, Maine. My neighbor town is the Thompson ice house. They are still open and provide ice for the area in February whether permitting, they host an ice harvesting party at the pond and store huge blocks in the ice house, which is insulated by sawdust the ISIS bought and used by local fishermen for the long sea trips. Locals can also buy ice in the summer and speaking of summer Thompson ice households and ice cream social every summer this year held on July. Seventh two thousand nineteen using the ice from the pond it is so delicious, that's lovely a real functioning ice house. Yes. Oh, I've never I did. I didn't know such thinking. Still existed in the world. I want to go. I know we have to. Yeah. You you. You look cold just thinking about it. And he just visibly shivered. She's also wearing a parka in here right now. You guys it's chilly. I took off my flannel to like just hang out in my t shirt, and she's like. We'll do just fine. Yeah. Yeah. I mean. I I would love to visit the ice house. But I would come very prepared perhaps might look a little bit ticket. That's oh, no, that's fine. Thank you Laurin. Thank you. And thanks to both of them for writing in. You can also write to us or Email is Hello at saver pod dot com. We're also on social media. You can find us on Instagram Twitter and Facebook at savior pod, we do hope to hear from you. Thank you as always a super producers, Andrew Howard and Dylan Fagin. Thank you to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good things are coming your way. If you haven't checked out my new series the end of the world with Josh Clark. The now's a great time to start the holidays are over the doldrums of winter had begun. And there's no better time to explore existential dread than right now. But wait, there's more to the end of the world than that. Yes. The series is about existential risks. But it's also about hope the threats that are coming our way that could wipe humans right out of existence. Could also be just the thing that makes us band together. In a way that humanity never has before in the end of the world. I take you on a journey across time and space from the moment and asteroid collided with earth in set off a chain of events that wiped out the dinosaurs to the post biological future where we live in a digital format. If we don't already we'll explore big questions like whether we're alone in the universe and exactly how artificial intelligence could take control of our world from us. It also has a beautiful score in cinematic sound design. So it's an adventure for your mind. Which is just the thing to snap. You out of the winter blahs all ten episodes of the end of the world with Josh Clark are available for you to binge now on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get podcasts.

caffeine Caribbean stimulant Royal Caribbean Josh Clark Royal Caribbean Coca Cola Bahamas Laurin Vogel writer Tallinn cocaine Chris UK Goran
Baha'u'llah born - Nov. 12, 1817

This Day in History Class

06:50 min | 1 year ago

Baha'u'llah born - Nov. 12, 1817

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson and it's November twelfth. But how LA the founder of the Baha'i faith was born on this day in eighteen seventeen. I've also heard his name pronounced slightly differently. Among adherents, he was born in Tehran, Iran and from birth. His name was Missouri Hussein Ali he was born into a noble family, and he was known for his skill as a horseman at a poet. He also was an excellent calligrapher he had very little formal education as we might think of it though. And that was really typical for a young man of his station at the same time. He was known to be very bright and very intelligent and knowledgeable about all kinds of subjects including having an extensive knowledge of Islam. He was also known for being very compassionate, especially when it came to matters of injustice, he got married at the age of eighteen and he would take other wives as well later. On his life. He was expected to be a civil servant like his father was and after his father's death. He was offered a position. But he turned it down. He really thought there was too much corruption and materialism and the civil service he preferred to try to make a modest living managing the property that he had inherited when his father died, and he also wanted to use what he did have to help other people as much as he could he became known as the father of the poor by the time. He was in his early twenties when he was twenty seven he learned of a young man who was known as the bub, which is Arabic for the gate or the gateway people believed that the Bob was a messianic figure a figure who was intimidated among Shia Muslims and the Bob also heard of Baha and sent him a scroll. We don't know. Exactly what this scroll said. But whatever it did say it had a dramatic effect on him. And he became one of the Bob's followers who call themselves bobby's in eighteen. Nine forty eight Bala who hadn't yet taken. This name was arrested and punished for following the Bob then the Bob was executed in eighteen fifty for treason. A lot of his followers are also killed at this time and Baha became his successor. The two of them had never met in person, but they had corresponded extensively and before his execution. The Bob had sent beheld all of his papers two years later, though, the how was falsely charged in a plot to kill the Shah of Iran, and after that he was imprisoned in Tehran and a police called the black pit while he was imprisoned. He had divine revelation that he was the prophet that the Bob had been foretelling after his imprisonment how low was banished. It was the first of a series of banishments. He started out going to Baghdad and then to Constantinople then Adrian OPEL where he survived an attempted poisoning at the hands of his half-brother after about ten. Ten years in Baghdad in eighteen sixty three beheld the publicly declared himself to be the divinely chosen leader. The Bob had previously for told. It was coming says first public declaration of this. He was a messenger from God and a manifestation of God and this led to sectarian violence. He was banished once again from the Ottoman empire. And he was sent to Aker in what's now, the north west of Israel, which was at the time a prison city of the Ottoman empire. Imprisoned to there though, he started expanding his teachings and those the Bob into the religion. That is now known as behi- he wrote religious texts there and developed a following as he was gradually allowed more freedom and more people were allowed to come into Acker and see him a core. Part of the behi- faith is that God has revealed himself to humanity throughout history through a series of messengers. And each of these messengers has. Founded a religion these messengers include Abraham Krishna Zoro, Astor Moses, Buddha Jesus and Mohammed so Bhave, which means glory of God in Arabic, and is the name that he took for himself is the most recent in these series of holy messengers that are central to the behi- faith, but Howlett lived in Aker for the rest of his life. And today that is the behi- holy land. He died in eighteen ninety two and his eldest son became his successor in his work and his teachings. Thanks to Eve's Jeffcoat for her research work on today's podcast, and thanks to Casey, p Graham and Chandler maze. For their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts and wherever else to get your podcasts, and you can tune in tomorrow for one of history's many bloody days. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you podcasts.

Bob apple Baghdad Iran Baha Asheville North Carolina Tehran Hussein Ali Anna REEs Dilling Fagin Laurin Vogel Harvard LA producer Twitter Katie golden iheartradio Aker
Will an Asteroid Kill You?

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

40:22 min | 1 year ago

Will an Asteroid Kill You?

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Some of the jobs, you might get an ASA really awesome Saudi titles, Larry Morgan and be called Bishop commander or even better you could be the head of planetary defense. He's there is is that like a real title. Absolutely wait to what are we? What do we need to defend against like road planets evil planets? We're not expecting to attack from Mars, but we do need to be defended against killer asteroids from outer space that would be an Armageddon. That's right. That's why they have Bruce Willis on call at all times for movie. Die hard in space in space. No one can hear you shoot a gun. It's not hard to dine speeds. Hello, I'm Lorraine. And I'm Daniel, and this is Daniel and hor hate explain the universe today. We're talking about a pretty big question. What comes to humanity which is? Is an asteroid gonna come and kill us. All so grim stuff grew him stuff. But also important. I mean, you might brush this off as a relevant, but we know from some pretty recent scientific history sixty five million years ago, the dinosaur extinction was caused very likely by an asteroid impacts the other day just the other day in geologic terms, so he could happen to us. That's right. And so since we're all concentrated on this one planet, you know, all of our humanities eggs in one basket. Almost literally it's a reasonable question to ask. So Daniel went out and asked people industry or are they concerned about asteroids killing us, all here's what they said. Well, maybe it's a possibility. I mean, it's quite possible. But there has to be certain things to happen for that to in order that take place. He's gotta have holes in the ozone. You gotta have meteoroid coming. You gotta be able to project it, you know, you gotta know. I mean, we have the technology. So you can stop it. I think there's a chance. Yeah. Are you worried about it? I read that like it's a low probability, but every day that goes by the probability like compounds. So that there's a high chance now. But honestly, like, it's whatever like if it happens. It happens. You know? It's all the question it probability. But. It's a there's a finite possibility. So seemed like a lot of people were aware the danger. But a lot of people also said put it off. They're like, well, it's a possibility. But they don't think about it. Right. There's like a fascinating Disentis. They they don't seem that concern. Yeah. Like, I got other stuff to worry about gas in my car, or am I gonna you know, self self-driving Uber gonna run me over? Yeah. They seem to be more worried about that. They seem to be very pragmatic like, I know the probability small, so I'm not gonna worry about it as much as I'm going to worry about you know, getting run over by car. Yeah. This is like hierarchies word, you know, it's like that's on the list of things I should worry about. But I don't actually have time to worry about just ignore it. It'll go away. Right. So that list of problems, and then some people seem to have just like this super confidence in in scientists and engineers yonder like, I know we could kill us all, but you know, I think we probably have the technology, and they're probably working on it. I love that slash I'm terrified by it. Because I love that. They're like, yeah. Scientists are pretty capable. I mean in the movies all it takes to solve this problem is like couple pots of coffee in a musical montage. And the scientists have an answer. Right. I love that. Don't forget the chalkboard. You know? Here's the solution. It's always at least one musical montage though. Right. I'm terrified though because it means that they're like, well, I don't have to worry about it. We don't have to do anything, you know. So I'm sure science has it covered in as you learn in today's episode there, certainly are some vulnerabilities there. You know, the possibility that nasty word if it comes could wipe us out, even if we do see it coming. It's non zero the probability, it's none zero. So definitely on the list of things you should worry about. But probably don't have time to do anything about. Anyway. Right. Right. Okay. So what what is the probability then that we're going to get hit by an asteroid seven. Seven. Probably is fascinating sort of unknown. And you know, you have to think about like, what is the kind of thing that's gonna hit us. Right. So we're talking about rox. Right. And when you look out into space, you see the bright stuff you see the stars. You see the moon? You see things that give off light. There's other stuff out there. That's dark that. You don't see in less. It happens to reflect light you'll be like shining from moonlight or sunlight or something. So there's a huge member of rocks. That are still out there in in the solar system and in the universe. And that's what we're talking about like, a big rock slamming into the, and I thought I was super interesting to find out that, you know, we we people see movies like, oh, we're going to get him by an asteroid. It's usually like this thing that comes from the void of space. That's gonna hit us out of the blue. But the truth is apparently that we're surrounded by asteroids. There's like zillions asteroids that were like hanging around is right. Yeah. Absolutely. There's rocks everywhere in our solar system. And you have to understand like how our solar system came to be VR solar system is like gravity. We slowly over billions of years pulling together rocks and rubble and dust into larger pieces, right, right? Like, how do you form a star? You get a big ball of gas. And you wait a billion years and gravity eventually pulls it together and compresses it and compresses it's so much that it turns into like a fusion bomb. Right. That's how powerful gravity is over long times. Right. Given enough time he can pull anything together. But it doesn't get everything. So there's still enough rocks up over to make earth and enough bits leftover to make Jupiter and not all those bids get pulled into a planet. And that's why you have things like the asteroid belt, which has a huge number of rocks in it. They're like the the crumbs from for making the planets, right, right? Somebody ate a cake, and the are there crumbs left over and they didn't sweep up. Yeah. Raking like meat balls or bright or something? And you're like, you're like, you grab some and you like you patted down you make something, but there's always all these little bits lane ram, usually wipe down my counter, but whoever system didn't and for scale like I look this up. And if you add it up like all of the rocks in the asteroid built, it's like, you know, one twenty fifth of the of the size of the moon. So most of the stuff in the solicits late. That's it. Yeah. Yeah. It's four percent of the moon. If you add up all the stuff in the asteroid belt, all that stuff. I thought it was like thicker and more massive and fascinating lease some of them. It's mostly a few big rocks. Like half of the stuff in the in. The asteroid belt is just four really big rocks. But there's a lot of rocks out there. How many rocks are there? Any rocks? Are there is there an estimate like, well, there's we don't know the number of rocks in total mom because you can't count the really tiny ones like big one. One. We know these small ones, and as they get smaller and smaller there are more and more, and as they get really small they get really numerous and then the recently impossible to see an impossible to count. And the thing to understand there is that obviously the biggest rocks and the more dangerous. Smallest ones are less dangerous. We're mostly worried about the biggest Ron right, right? Like, some of those rocks are pretty big like we need to worry about the the rocks in our solar system that we're like hanging out with like I was thinking like an analogy. Is that like we're like we're in the toilet. Right. And this toilet is is swirling around and we're like this little pebble on it. Is this your personal toilet model of the solar system? Yes. I think the Purna Cas rejected that didn't he explicitly? Yeah. I don't think they had toilets back then. Right. All right. Go ahead. So yes, it's like we're swirling around and we're this little ball. But there's all these other little ball squirming right around those, and we're just hoping that in this world around. None of them are gonna hit us. It's like this chaotic giant thing. Right. Isn't it? That's right. And I want to talk a little bit more about that. But first quick break. Hello earth. Actually. Hello universe. Yeah. We are here to tell you that. In addition to Tuesdays and Thursdays when you can get your regular stuff. You should know episodes. Just as you always have the last ten thousand years a ten years ten years. We're now adding a whole new episode of a spin off show, that's really the same show. It's just a shorter episode. It's called short stuff. Yeah. We said, hey, sometimes we have topics that maybe aren't robust enough to fill out a full forty five minutes stuff, you shouldn't have pursued. But we don't want to shortchange these topics these people, and so let's just make them short. Get over here. Short stuff and jumping our feet, right? Exactly. It's kind of like the Roper is to our three's company. Yeah. Or it's kind of like after mash to mash exactly, although it's like neither one of those because those were regular links. This is shorter everybody. Yep. So you can go to apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Tests or just look for it in your feet every Wednesday from your friends, Josh Chuck, and Jerry, it's stuff. You should know shorter is sometimes better. Right. So let's think of this system is big swirling mass. I think that's fair. -nology mean a toilet bowl. Makes it sound like everything is cycling towards the center, which hopefully not gonna get flushed into the sun. Right, right. But but you're right. Everything's been swirling around the beginning. I think there was a lot of bumping, right? It was a big disorganized mess in swirled together. And the bumping how planets and stars and all that kind of stuff. But now billions of years later, right? The earth is at least four billion years old billions of years later things have been swirling around for a long time. And things that we're going to bump together and form together. Mostly have things have settled down. Yeah. We're sort of in the, you know, happy middle ages of the flush. We're waiting for the big flesh. Yes. So the interesting thing is that there are rocks in our solar system. Which means they hit the earth could do serious damage. Biggest rock in the asteroid belt is a nine hundred fifty kilometers across which is huge. Yes. Enormous. That's full Ohrid. Oh, I don't know. But the one that killed the dinosaurs was about ten kilometers across no way. So none had nine hundred fifty climbers across a planet BUSTER. So there's definitely stuff in our solar system, which if it hit us could do serious damage. Maybe you're right. That's a surprise to people. Yeah. Yeah. It's like we're living with him. It's like a roommate could kill you at anytime. We're like your neighbor sort of something we we were custom to you know, you try not to look in their windows too, much and get too worried about it. But yeah, you never know when your neighbors going to smash into you and cause an explosion the size of a nuclear warhead. Yeah. Let's talk about the the the spectacular grip stuff. Like, what's the probably surviving an asteroid hitting us? Right. Yeah. And that again depends entirely on the size, for example. There are asteroids hitting the earth all the time like things that are less than a meter incised size. These rocks more hitting the earth all the time. But the earth is big and these asteroids are small and every time you look up in the night sky. You see a shooting star that is a rock hitting the earth. That's something like a windshield. Right. We have this this atmosphere which protects the earth and protects us from various cosmic rays, but also from space rocks because what happens when a rock hits the atmosphere. It's sort of like, I don't know like an elephant hitting a waterbed or something, right? It's it impacts, and it gets it pushes the air out of the way. But it gets heated up that air so fast. The air feels like this giant jet trips at way, right? Yeah. Exactly. Like, all those movies went spaceships are reentering atmosphere. That's because of all the friction from the air on the spaceship and spaceships usually have like nice protection, fancy tiles or something that protect the astronauts from from being burnt to a crisp. But a space rock is just a rock and sometimes made of ice or rubble or or whatever it doesn't have that. And so usually the burn up in the atmosphere, and that's what Shooting Stars are. So we're constantly being hit by very small ones, which we couldn't have seen it advanced because they were too small, but they don't do any damage. So air is good. There is good reason. Good thing we have it. Yeah. But then about one every five years or so you get a rock that's like five meters size, and the rock five eaters and size has a lot of Connecticut energy to it. Right. It's been traveling through space for a long time by the time it hits the earth has been pulled him by gravitational field. It has about as much energy as the nuclear bomb that exploded over Hiroshima. It's a lot of energy to find meter esta is about like, this is of a minivan or school bus. Yeah. Yeah. It's about a school bus and it blows up about once every five years one of those. It's the earth and makes a pretty spectacular explosion. Now. Most of the earth, of course, is covered in water, and we're not like imaging all the atmosphere simultaneously, and these things can happen in the upper atmosphere because you might be thinking, I think I'd notice if somebody blew up in nuclear bomb every five years, but these kind of things can happen. We don't necessarily notice them really to five years ago. We had here she missile. Asteroid hit us. The odds are that sometime in the last five years. There's a good chance that a pretty big rock hit the atmosphere and burned up on entry leaving as much energy as a horrific explosion. Yeah. And the energy isn't quite as concentrated as focused in one spot as the Hiroshima explosion. But yeah, you can leave a substantial amount of energy like by the time it reaches the ground or the ocean and has much energy. Yeah. I think in order to reach the ground is that about the threshold five meters. And remember there was a pretty big explosion over Russia in two thousand thirteen in Celli. Yeah. I seen the videos on YouTube. Yeah. Everybody's on the videos. It just happened like one morning, huge explosion, the sky like like an enormous bomb and everybody was and like a thousand people I think hurt when that happened and nobody size coming right? Like, there was no warning. The warning was when it appeared in the atmosphere, and it just blew up. And that's exactly what happened. And I think little bits of it might have reached the ground, but mostly. Exploded in the atmosphere. So if it had been like twice the size somebody could have been hit by an asteroid. Yeah. Absolutely. And the bigger they get the more dangerous. They get you know, if he gets big enough, then it's you know, it can it can explode in the atmosphere in the huge clouds of dust and rubble and all sorts of stuff, and he can win it hits the ground. It can throw up enormous clouds of dust and rubble, and that's where the danger really lies like not necessarily. Even are you actually hit by a rock like being actually physically hit by the rug from space is tiny fraction of the danger on the real dangers is just that he'd like covers the sun. And you know, I guess he would call it like environmental catastrophe. Environmental catastrophe. I was looking for like asteroidal winter. The winter after Royal winter. Yeah, we're coining new science from we have the toilet bowl universe. And the asteroidal winter. You almost wanna be hit by an asteroid large. You know? So they die instantly, and you don't die from this agonizing post-apocalyptic environmental disaster. Well, I guess you can choose how you go. I mean, if the asteroid hits the earth, and you get vaporized media hits your city, huge explosions, you know, entire cities destroyed, you know, can make like a crater like a thousand kilometers wide or something you could is the and you might prefer that. Because what comes next is like a cold long winter, you know, where all the crops die and only people who stockpile a lot of lentils. And there are gonna survive. But also if it hit the water, you have a whole other problem, which is like massive sue Nahmias, right? I mean, go back to like ours base cow hitting a waterbed, or I guess we were talking elephant or something like if a big rock hits the ocean. You might think oh great. That's gonna absorb the impact will. Yeah. It's going to absorb the impact. And it's gonna Zorba form of a huge wave. Right. Like a wave Collado high could wash over the the planet. It's crazy. But it said it depends on this is right. So we're getting pelted all the time. I little ones as they get bigger and more and more dangerous and at some point it's like an other world. That's right. I think if they get big enough, then we're talking planet killers. You know, something that starts off super volcanoes. You know, like rips open the earth's crust and releases the magma and the lava that's underneath and we're talking about not just a soon nominees and not just earthquakes not just the sky full of dust, but also massive oceans of lava covering the ground. And so that's that's pretty serious stuff. But you know, that's unlikely that that requires a really really big rock, you know. And I looked here. Also, get a five kilometer wide rock carries a hundred Zetter jewels. That's tend to the twin three jewels. Right. And so. Comparison is that a lot that's a lot like an average American uses about ten to the eleven jewels in a year and all of humanity uses like ten to the twenty jewels in one year. So that one collision carries like thousand years where the energy for humanity. So it's a huge amount of energy in a big collision like that. But again, remember, the really big ones are rare like estimates, for example, that rock five thousand meters wide this where we're talking about here is like every twenty million years or so, but we could be at the end of that lifespan. So so that's the thing. It's like, there's rats all kinds of sizes out there from little ones big ones and beer. They are the less likely. We are to get the less common. They are. But the more destructive the are. That's exactly right. It's kind of like the this kind of. Kind of opposing curves, you know, like bigger, but less likely but more dangerous. That's right bigger is less common. But more dangerous. It's absolutely true. And there's another piece of good news, which is the bigger. They are the more likely. We are to see them right into spun them, which means we might have some idea about what where whether they're coming or not. Well, yeah, it's talk about that. Like, how do we see them? And like what's NASA? Doing people seem to have all these great confidence and scientists, and when I laid all NASA have a lot of friends that national. So you guys are awesome to like, what are they doing about it? How do they see them? Yeah. The have a dedicated team that talk of they're called the planetary defence force or something and they really called the near earth pediatrics. Planetary defense team. Are they called the near earth objects group? Yeah. Neo near earth of is what they study, and they'd be basically use telescopes and they scan the sky, and they look for rocks, and you have to spot these things at the right time when the sun is reflecting off of them. So that we can see them on earth because they don't glow right there. Duck rocks, and the rocks respond differently light some of them respond in this kind of leading condition that kind of letting conditions different brightness, basically have the pay attention. All. The time and notice one, and if you get a few pictures of it, the more pictures of you can get the more you can you can know size and its direction, and if you know it's size and its direction than you can plot. It's course into the future. You can say, oh, I think I know where this rock is. And which direction it's going and like which orbited saying, right? Yeah. And use my model of the solar system and understand where it's going to be and we're we're going to be and then they can project forward and the more measurements. They have the tighter that band of uncertainty is like the tighter the projection is for where that rock is going to be over the next year or decade or century, and they can plot movements, and they can say whether or not we're in the clear not. So it all comes down to NASA sky scanning the sky with their telescopes looking for these rocks and hoping spot once they see like bright dot moving in this guy. And they can maybe take several measurements. You can see curving or going to certain speed. So you can tell from from that. You can tell kind of what the trajectory around the sun is. Yeah. And they've been doing this for few decades. And so they've seen these rocks. Go around the sun a few times, and they get better and better measurements. And so they can make better predictions. And that's why it's so that it's easier to see the big ones right because they reflect more light and they're just easier to spot. So it's good that the big ones. The more dangerous ones are the easiest ones to see. It'd be. It'd be scary. If the smaller ones dangerous because they're basically invisible, right? That's like the planetary defense strategy. Right. It's just like look out try to spot him before they hit us step number one is figure out is one gonna hit us. And at this point. They've looked at in the solar system they've been watching for while. And they're pretty confident that they've seen all the ones that pose really any danger all the ones that do really any danger to the planet or two significant civilian population. All the ones above that are in size, for example. He think they know all of the all of our neighbors that could kill as we think we. Have have a check on. Yeah. They think they see him like a registry of. Yeah. But you know, the could always be one hiding like they've only seen what they've seen by definition haven't seen what they haven't seen. Well, we've been living what? And so if it had been there, we probably would have seen it. But you know, that could only takes one right only takes one to break their their model of of how they should be seeing these things it'd be hiding somehow. But yeah, they've seen all those big ones. And they've plotted those trajectories, and they're pretty confident that in the next hundred years, at least, none of those big neighbors are gonna hit us. Yeah. I've seen those plots. Crazy, they're like picture of the solar system. And so we're we're undis- orbit around the sun. But then there's like hundreds of rocks right there. You have to keep track of their orbits. So it's like a it's like a huge mess this model. Right. It's like our orbit. But then like orbits like a hundred things going in all kinds of elliptical. Shades in hopefully, we don't intersect one of those lips. That's right. That's right. Yeah. And the thing to understand also is that the system is a little chaotic right Leslie said we've been driving around this toilet bowl for billions of years and things are mostly stable. But if some rock comes from outer space from deepen away from the solar system and gives just a little nudge to to some other rock that rocket bumpy. Gravitation? Don't even have to bump just like affect the orbits of one thing that could affect the rid of another thing which affects the over to another thing, and this could cascade 'cause like a pile up, basically, which could knock one of these things out of it. And you know, then you could change its trajectory. So it's it's a difficult problem from sort of chaos theory point of view that a little perturbation hold Lee. Change the answer. Yeah. Let's talk about that a little bit more. But I quick break. Hi, I'm Lindsay Marshall. We're the hosts of tumble a podcast that explores stories of science discovery, we take you behind the scenes how science actually works with help from real scientists will travel to the largest pack clemmie in the world. Find out what earth would be like if there was no moon give you scoop on the science and much much more find tumble wherever you listen to podcasts or best robot ever dot com. So you have to keep looking and keep updating your model. That's right. You have to keep looking any buffeting your model, and you have to be aware that they're definitely things that are not in your model. Right there things that you haven't seen. And so you're right. That like there's a lot of stuff in the after a belt and we've seen most of it. And I think the guys and gals at Nassar pretty confident that they seen those things. But then you have to worry about things like comets, right comets. Oh, that's something different. Yeah. That's something different. And it's part of our solar system. But some of these things have really long periods like really long orbits like a hundred years or two hundred years, which means they could be on a trajectory to hit the earth in fifty years. We just wouldn't see them right now because they're so far out there and they've never come by the earth while we've had strana me. I mean, we've only been looking at the sky for you know, a few hundred years we only had modern telescopes for decades. So if there's a planet killer out there. That's headed towards earth. And just hasn't come by in the last seven decades, or so we might not have seen it in. So we'll only when it's closer to us. Yeah. And you might think when that seems improbable invented that story. Right. But it actually happened once and it happened only like was it twenty five years ago. It happened that then comet came into our solar system out of the blue. Yes. End smashed into a planet out of the black out of the black. That's right. Like that. That's awesome title for a book out of the black. Yeah. Comet shoemaker Levy came out of the black and with and with into the solar system, very high speed. And the other thing is these comments are moving really fast by the time, they come close to the sun going much much faster than any asteroid, and it came around the sun, and it actually got broken up by title forces into a bunch of twenty three pieces, and this is really awesome. Because we could see that it was going to hit Jupiter months and weeks before it happened. Like they saw coming to the solar system. They recognized it they plotted this dejected. Wow, that's gonna hit Jupiter awesome. I know any thought like, hey, maybe we should warn potential people in Jupiter instead of like, hey, let's make some popcorn and exposure. What are we going to do? What are you sending watch? The amazing thing was that it brilliant, a twenty three pieces becau-, which means that we got to see twenty three different impacts onto Jupiter. And the thing is that space is big, right? So like us, thank you is impossibly improbable that this thing would come out of the blue and hit a moving planet. That's moving pretty fast around this. But it actually happened it actually happened. Yeah. And Jupiter is not a small target. Right. It has a lot of gravity. And so you don't have to get that close before Jupiter like sucks you in. And and that's how it got. So big right accumulated stuff by pulling it in. But this something I love about this. You maker Levy story. First of all this amazing stuff like each of the impacts when it hit created a fireball bigger than the earth. Like, wow, we could see from here. I remember watching this through telescopes. You could see the impact and these enormous fireballs really Creamer like paying attention because I don't remember this happening. What? But you are you're near telescope watching Lega feed. Yeah. I was a nerd in high school and tell us where are you really? Hard to believe. I know I'm so cool now. Right. That's why it's difficult for you. I was totally nerd in high school, and we had these tales scopes and everybody around the world was watching. It was a fascinating. Like, I thought the whole earth was transfixed apparently everybody, but hor-, hey was paying attention. I had I was interested in other things school. The the guys and girls at NASA named the bits of the combination. At the a the be the pieces ride the, and then they started hit, and you know, the first one hit Jupiter in the called the a spot where the hit and then the b. To you know, the F spot and there were like. So they had the F spot and then the G impact site, right? And then the H spot, that's funny. Because that that the G is spot is kind of a. Probably only came about not that long before the eighties. Right. Yeah. I think that was a cultural thing and they can. Haase Mickley, cultural, space-based and all human based. But the lesson there is none that Jupiter has g spot that we should all search out. But the lesson is that these things happen, and it happened in the last thirty years that means it's not that unlikely could happen again. Right. So we should be on the lookout for comets. It's good the Nasr's but looking at asteroids, but comets a real danger. Keep funding keep funding NASA. Right. So the question she really be is not is an asteroid gonna kill us. It's like is a comet gonna kill all. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Is a common can kill us. All is a fair question that we don't know the answer to because we can't possibly see all the comments because some of them are so far away. And okay. And we haven't seen them in a while. Yeah. Well, so now that I'm concerned. What can we do? You know, people seem very confident about scientists. We've all seen Armageddon. And we seem Bruce Willis deflecting asteroid for us. What can we actually do? Is that for real where you just sit back? Drink your coffee and watch the the people go to work, right? Just for that musical montage. And then you get your solution. Yeah. The short tape and tape and like and spare parts. Yeah. You're gonna push glasses up your nose a few times. And you know, then you get to the answer. The short version the answer is earlier you see at the better you're much better off seeing something which is going to hit the earth in six months or a year and something's gonna hit the next week. And the reason is that you have two options really one is deflect and the others destroy deflect or destroy defectors are the two options if we know something's coming at us. We can deflector strike. Yeah. Right. We're coming up with great titles for science fiction novels. We have ended. Lecter destroy right idea behind the Frank is these things are traveling really fast in the earth is also moving fast. So if you could just nudge it a tiny bit like a year in advance. It was totally changes trajectory and can miss the earth by a few minutes. And that's all it takes. Right. Just has to fly by instead of smacking into us. Not that easy. Target to hit. It's like threading a putting our threat through a needle. Yes. I get such things that if you can make it go off a little bit ill. Totally miss the. Yeah. It's like a sniper shooting a thread through a needle from a mile away in somebody pushes him very slightly or nudges the tip of his rifle than he's gonna miss. And so if you can this thing a long time in advance and somehow deflected then you could be safe. But you know, how you going to do that? How how would you do that? Yeah. Yeah. You'd have to build a rocket to go up there. And visit it somehow one thing you could do is, you know, just bump into like sense, which literally bumps into it. And it another thing you do it's called the gravity tractor. Which is an awesome name. Is you just send something up that which hangs out next to it? And it's gravity gently pulls on it over a long period of time a few weeks or months cheeses trajectory. Yeah. Grass. Like like, hey, what's up? Standing next to you. Compare compare. Yeah. Yeah. So those deflect some have you could change its trajectory a little bit. You could save all of our lives. Okay. But you have to know way in advance. Like, you have to see it coming and you had to be able to get there. And we don't have great technology there. I mean, we have pretty slow rockets. It would take a long time to get something to Mars, for example. And so to get something to like Jupiter c coming we need much much faster rockets. And so people are have ideas, you know, like plasma based rockets, it could be much faster to deflect the stuff, but we don't have the technology. Like if we saw tomorrow, a comment that was going to the earth in a year or not like ready to launch with some awesome rocket that could do this. We take us years to develop that wrong. It's just not a priority right now. That's deflected option. B is destroyed destroy it. Right. So you think all it just send up new cried? But what happens if you're if the asteroid the comment is like about to hit the earth like tomorrow, and you set up a nuke to blow it up or you're just going to create like a thousand tiny bombs instead of one huge bomb. Right. That's a thousand radioactive tiny bays. It doesn't really help you because it's still delivers all that energy onto the earth. So you have to blow it far enough in advance that then the pieces are going to miss the earth. And also, it depends on what is it made out of is it a loosely held ball of rubble which case blowing it up doesn't really change very much. Or is it a tightly bound rock in which case blowing it up could fracture it, and you get to rocks each like pass just on the side of the earth. Like, it depends a lot of. Do you have to be lucky to be lucky, and you have to you have to get it early enough? So you can't just sit here and say, oh will blow it up when it gets here. Right. That's not a good idea. They might as well just blow yourself up. All right. So let's recap. It's the isn't asteroid going to kill us. All and I we learned that. We're surrounded by asteroids. There's a bunch of 'em in our own solar system. Enver going to get hit by one. It's gonna come from our own solar system, most likely. That's right. And there's even other stuff we didn't talk about like, there's the stuff outside beyond Neptune and this stuff further out there that we didn't even touch on. We just talked about the stuff in the asteroid belt is the closest to the Wednesday seen. Yeah. Okay. But the bigger they are the more likely they are to kill us. But also the beer, they are the more likely. We are that we have seen them. And we know there were tracking. That's right and all the big ones in the solar system that are potentially planted killers or human extinction makers we've seen those guys were pretty sure that hundred years is clear. That's according to the good work done by our pals at NASA. But even more dangerous could be a comet more than an asteroid because those could come out of the blue and of the black him coming out of the out of the void. Let's board term there. And. So it's a comment which may be more worried about. Yeah. Comment some because they're potentially going faster, and they're harder to spot we wouldn't necessarily have seen them. And we have an example of one hitting a planet just in the last few decades. So it's not just crazy science fiction idea. So the strategy is look out and make sure that we see early enough. So we can do things like deflected or destroy. That's right. So we should definitely keep funding NASA because it's only because of NASA, and they're worldwide partners that we have any idea, but without there, but we also desperately need to get cracking on some defense systems. You know, building things that can go out there and protect us in cases happens or, you know, another strategies like, let's spread the human eggs out of just this basket onto some others. Because is very unlike earth in Mars are both going to be hit by Nasser at simultaneous. So we could like get human planet. Yeah. Exactly. I mean, the kind of stuff we should be working on. Well, cool. I feel great now. Passing the most people go through their lives and don't worry about these essential threats. Right. Because you can't there's nothing that you can do about it. It's not like if you spent five minutes of your day working on this problem. It's going to help humanity or something. Right. But it is important that we all think about this when it comes to time to funding science and basic research and NASA because that's that's when we can do something about it. When we support candidates support basic research. That's when you're helping the planetary defense system. Right. Well, technically, everything's existential crisis to you, right? Like getting hit by a truck. That's pretty existential crisis for you. You wouldn't. Yeah. Every night worried about. Sorry, please be careful when you three. Look up from my phone. I promise. All right. Well, thank you for joining as thank you very much for listening to worry about the end of the world and keep your eyes on the sky. Yeah. The cat for the void watch out for the void. You have a question you wish we would cover send it to us. We'd love to hear from you. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and Daniel and Hori one word or Email us to feedback Daniel and hor hey dot com. This podcast is simple to uncover the truth to clear, my aunt's name to put the real killer behind bars or died trying I'm Tig Taurus. And this is lethal. Lethal lit a take Torres mystery a six part scripted podcast series coming to your favorite podcast app. Mondays starting October twenty ninth. Subscribe now to never miss an episode.

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Interview: Cookin' With Jazz

FoodStuff

59:04 min | 1 year ago

Interview: Cookin' With Jazz

"Today's episode is brought to you by city. Do you catch yourself daydreaming about your next getaway. The sun the beach an ice cold drink in your hand but the american airlines advantage mile up card from city you can go from daydreaming sunbathing by earning miles on everything you buy. It's the card that turns everyday purchases into miles like two times advantage miles at grocery stores plus. You can earn a special bonus miles offer after qualifying purchases the gets even closer to your next getaway had to city dot com slash save our podcast to apply for the american airlines advantage mile milo card today. Hello welcome saver collection of iheartradio and stuff media. I'm and i'm laurin vogel bomb and today we have an interview for you. Yes we have so many interviews stockpiled oiled. I'm glad we're we're sharing them. Yes because <hes> some of them this one in particular are just so much like the voice of a person in a personality personality and <hes> within them a part of a culture subculture and yes this one is a mr. dickey brennan who we met an our trip to new orleans which also feels like when was that oh gosh decades linnea who even know no one was even alive then <hes> yes <hes> the the brennan family collectively owns and operates thirteen restaurants in new orleans. They're a little bit of a dynasty yes and we he spoke in our new orleans episodes about how we got in touch with dickie in in particular in like meeting him and it was it was really great because it was just kind of comedy of errors. Oh yeah that turned out in the absolute best way possible because we weren't looking to we we. We thought that he was above our pay grade. Yes and his publicist was just sort of like our marketing. Human was sort of like oh yeah no do you wanna talk to dickie like shore and we got poboy us and fries and one of those <hes> bourbon thing one of those two so it was pretty <hes> pretty good. It was incredibly lovely. I was not expecting to eat that much and then i ate everything everything hopefully there's not too many mouth noises and this interview hopefully not and also i believe he he invited us to his house at mardi gras and i haven't forgotten forgotten is so serious and he comes knocking on the door. Who could you forget us us. Oh i'm sure he strikes me as the kind of guy who doesn't forget a face or your name agree anyway so yes let us get to the interview picture it. We're on the <hes> that the interior balcony at a at a large table in bourbon house in new orleans which is this grand the beautiful decked out restaurant and <hes> we've been in a crazy rush all morning trying to figure out how to actually get into the building. <hes> we finally get in uh-huh <hes> we through through a different entrance. Yes go up to a bartender at this relatively unrelated bar and say we're so sorry. Do you know aware dickie. Brennan might be and he just points kind of kind of languidly and says why he sitting right over there and sure enough he was so so so we're still in this head space like our we go in and then we get up to this like just beautiful empty place and tickets so gracious and end. This interview follows high of course you. I'm dickie brennan and <hes> here and you you are the founder and owner of a restaurant group here in new orleans yeah several restaurants five years ago. I started the company but i grew up in a family business restaurant family family so you know my entire life has been involved in the restaurant world food world. So what was it like growing growing up in and around your family's restaurants you know <hes> we lived in this neighborhood. Call the garden district and in the neighborhood they had this russian call commander's palace. Show commanders is like the second oldest restaurant in new orleans so in sixty nine we we missed more passed away. My dad went to pay respects who live two blocks away from the web to miss moran and she's like i made ears. Oh i won't run a rash on my kids with the time we had brennan's down the french quarter and my dad's like well. We're in the restaurant business. We live neighborhood. If you want to sell it let us so we bought commander's your spouse in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine so as a kid. Are you kidding. This is like you know our our play playground you know so i was around nine years old at the time and i can't recall john my life where i wasn't doing something around this wonderful restaurant that and <hes> you know just special part in my life when when did you when when did you start cooking aghast at the restaurant had been twelve thirteen years old and was at saumur former pawprint chef <hes> you know and i guess <hes> maybe early but ah in the professional and it was more around twelve or thirteen that i actually got to participate in the professional kitchen which was kind of neat editor at home as you're making a divide. Have you always been there so i love food. I mean i'd come home from school and make i'd scramble six eggs just as a snack to hold me over until dinner so <hes> so now i was always cooking both of my grandmothers phenomenal cooks and my most great coke choose run around busy so <hes> we had this wonderful woman that <hes> they're all uh all over this city these wonderful women that <hes> that just can cook and they cook the families and katie said or just like a second mother and i grew up with a woman tall mandy and you know just it was interesting when someone's cooking so i mean i had so much opportunities to be around cooking as a kid professionally at home. Knits talk really part of the culture in new orleans. What can what kind of dishes do you remember from back then childhood. Essentially my dad would sit down early. Really we have dinner at the house and then he'd walk two blocks commanders and go taste everything in the kitchen and eventually have a meal there so we you know at home it was more home cooked ho recipes <hes> you know it'd be red beans and rice with pickled pork swede pickled pork in many people nowadays experience pickled pork in their red beans the protein meat that we would all fight over. We're having red beans and rice nowadays. Everything's on sausage. You know sausage red beans. <hes> just a lot of chicken krill unit just is great smother chicken with rice and they were louisiana so that was rice and a lot of our meals that you have so <hes> josh gumbo amid stop. There's always something coming out of pot so <hes> how how is <hes> uh that influenced what y'all do at restaurants you know what i love about new orleans one our climate we can farm eurorail to is always something come into the sea so that played a lot of what you need at home as as well as what was on the rest of menu the other thing is we're at the mouth mississippi reverence most fertile fish browns in the world something we have so much a bounty the of seafood and it's all season and some of it's in the mar some of it in the in the coastal waters and a lot of its inland so i mean like when our blue decribes are going out of season crawfish common in the season says always something that's gonna peak at different times of the year and really i mean maiden rossi and the restaurants and did homes. We're eating. What's season which speaking and a lot of options when did you. When did you know that you wanted to be part of the part of the family business. Did you ever have a moment where you're like nascar this. I'm gonna connotes. Were encouraged to be in the business. You know and <hes> so there's no pressure to be in the business. I can't think of a time where i was like screw this. I don't want to be in the business. I just was you know. Osama luckiest gone the world. I grew up. Just hello tom and a hell of a location with a hell of a family you know a mentioned commander's palace family bought it in my earlier years we my dad and his rose sisters left brennan's in the seventies mid seventies we decide to divide up the family business so so when they moved into commanders brennan's was flagship and brennan's you know my dad worked sunday breakfast because his old assist allah wanted wanted to work saturdays because she loved entertaining so he'd wake up and go to work thousand people for breakfast at brennan's. I mean it was a big signature when we bought commanders. Twenty people came by the church on a sunday. That was a good crowd so he's bored. He's like i can't and he's like i'm not doing breakfast this imprint. That's that restaurant believe there so we were somewhere on the trip and we're eating and there was a ban out in the lobby plants of music. We're having brunch and he just he came. I wanna do jazz brunch and so we called albany corn and great trumpet player in so freeman showed up and they roamed around the dining hall at the time. We did this great brunch menu and you know i work the first jazz brunch with my dad. You know that was where it is today. I mean every restaurant city as jasper to to be out with your family. Watch them create something. It's been so interesting. I mean it's always something like jazz branches. We were talking about how how do you feel like there's cross cross connections in between how how how a kitchen works and how those conditions work like. Oh absolutely we always say cook them with jazz a main. You know our our seasonings here. I mean we use a blend of seasons. You know and it's really enhance flavors. Take something makes it blossomed so i mean it's like making music. Here's definitely a great great correlation between making music and making food. I mean that's we. Are you know the other thing happened in the seventies it paul poonam was an american local guy whereas a lot of the chefs were europeans. <hes> paul knew all the former. They grew up in the council. Yeah so we start happening commanders early on in the savvides we started doing local regional foods one thousand nine hundred eighty one commanders turn heart years old and so we there was this award that they would give nine restaurants around the country the holiday they awards and <hes> it was always done in chicago an annual dinner and people would receive the awards although russian church around the country would go take so we asked could we hosted in new orleans this year and have i help celebrate a restaurant being a higher olwin america and so everyone you know all these restaurant tour chefs from around the country tain nuance and i'll never forget the debtor <hes> one of the of course we saw shelled crabs which was the time of the year we didn't know if they'll be busing out or not so we have plan b if it wasn't gonna be as such but it came from a certain faulk we had squad. It was from a farmer in mississippi. Everything on the menu and we had written was boosted. Where where where did it come from who was raised in it. They had an american wine with each course. This is nine hundred eighty one. We had dot com seventy seventy eight cabernet. Which was his first vintage so i mean it was take bread. We had callaway made a late harvest. Dessert wine called sweet nancy. Everything was american and we that night told all these restaurant tours which basically back then and you either talion french german if you will find awning restaurant most wind downtown's. They weren't neighborhood restaurants that we know today and the next year was the first american resource oppose him where people in america started saying. We're regional american and restaurants. Were not a french german italian dinner now. Look at the world we have today. I mean it's classically trained for american american chefs c._i._a. Have given young americans men and women the opportunity to become great chefs you know and so these things didn't it wasn't an american food scene. It was you classically european train and then that just changed. I mean in the eighties changed. We became american. Can we start educating and so much of that happen at commanders and like i said i can't believe i was sitting. There has a young kid. I mean that's where i started winona. It's never stopped the american food scene so it's been a nice journey really. Do i mean it. It sounds like you like firsthand. Personally you witnessed cajun. Creole cuisine go from being something that was really just cooked in homes or neighborhoods to into a national to a national trend and something that people respected. I mean home time. How how wild is that been. The creativity is really. I guess when you mentioned cage krill for so many generations nations it was the same dish. There wasn't a lot you know. Red beans and rice beat supplies. Gumbo was coming with in the last twenty thirty years. It's i really believe it's because young american men and women have gotten in these formal educations so they have this foundation work from thinking america with creative you know in a city like new orleans is e. That'd be great guy. We we created jazz jazz world music by played a certain way. I mean what happened new orleans. We'll college change the world. You know music so this creates a and that's what i love. It's hard for us to say. This is a career or cajun dish because they've all you know the regional regional seasonal products you know both cuisines and now they're blended <hes> which is exciting because it's through is always should evolve and it's just like us. I mean i think my palate evolves over the years. You know whether it's food wine spirits. It's the parakeets changing so it's nice to seek food evolving. Yes we have some more of our interview with dickie for you. But first we have a quick break for sponsor- <hes> in the montgomery recount maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people to things from the early early days of the investigation are clear. No one knew for sure who committed the murders but some had a theory about who engineered them soon as i heard the details yes. I knew my dad was involved right away. We know it was lawrence horn. I mean i knew wealth instantly lawrence. Everybody knew that lawrence horn was responsible possible. Nobody even better but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country watching tv in his los angeles home and he could prove proven beyond a reasonable doubt. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts. It's on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts um we're back. Thank you get back into the new. Orleans is more songs than ideal. City tenfold really smart decisions. Uh yes <hes> chretien. Tradition are are you. Are you sort of a nerd for for the cocktail history around here have you yes and i'm passionate. I think are can't help it. I mean my god. It's so much a part of off how we knew all live life you know and so it's a daily part of our culture is connecting with people and majority of that is connected on a table with the end. How can you not have a great male without spirits wine align such a rich tradition in this city being a part of creating a cocktail. You know <hes> it goes way back. Originated originated something like a cocktail. Just the the bourbon i mean the way bourbon evolved it was <hes> new orleans at the time what and getting a sh- you know the brand eight coming from the old world so they knew they were making some whiskey up the river and they said send us some west gauge will they didn't know how to ship with whatever they had to take which basically was white dog ms moonshine on they had to figure out how to get to new orleans so they took these wooden kegs eggs use things like nails storage that had ross so they had the sanitize wooden kegs which they charged inside inside. They put this white dog in the keg senate down the river when it got here drake it they sent word back up he said send there's some more of the red whiskey and what are they talking about. So that's why we're sitting here. Bourbon house i grew up with a dad and i think so many people drank the european spirits the scotch gin spock's he just kept saying it's american eric android drink bourbon american <hes> you know even goes back to the way we all the american theme while restaurants back in the seventy s and eighty so <hes> you know and the other part of the story with with the bourbon whiskey common down here they didn't send the barges back then so that most of the houses here the foundations are made from the wood off these barges so the man that came down from kentucky there was a great opportunity for them to make money they get enough money and it was <hes> it was a spanish at brought horses to america so long was the spanish occupied. I still don't know how we call french. Quarter is filtered spanish occupation but so they had the money and they would buy a horse. I in this trial. It's not just traits it goes to new orleans to louisville and then back up to go back home and those horses would what seated the horse industry and kentucky so new orleans is a very interesting city. When you study you find out you know just all his stuff so you know that's why i say i mean. The world is potentially it's creative. It's always evolving. It's live and it's growing. There's no better city to be in the food world in new orleans so i've never the thought of doing that other than what we did. <hes> how all right so so you've got. You've got bourbon bourbon coming in from kentucky. You've got rum coming in the caribbean and all kinds of other other ingredients putting around. How did i mean other. People are just kind of going like oh. That's great how to cocktail. Culture start here going way back in time with the creation of a cocktail tails. I think it was just a part of the <hes> the daily routine you know there were called coffee houses and that's that's where you would take the right to go in and have a drink you know in the middle of the day or in the morning you know when i lived in france if you go to the market arkadi early in the morning then you go into the coffee shops so when might be having expressive at someone else's having a cocktail you know and then ah you know so. I think a lot of that culture was here in the city. Drinking i love about about today. Is it's like went in the eighties. We started educating with caller institutes. We we now have a generation and they've gotten educated. In the spirit world what we call mixologist you know not quite sure yet where we're going with the the name but they're professionals and they're really <hes> can give a costumer experience that you didn't experience when you walk in and say give me an old fashioned. Do you know now it's with our. Would you like with your old fashioned you know and then the young they saw just say well. Tell me kind of what what are you like. Would you like sweet. The hitter picks right wrong or picks right bourbon to have that great experience <hes> so i mean it's. I don't know what it's like in ten years but what's happened in the last ten years has been crazy certainly in the spirit world. Are there any drinks for which you're a traditionalist. Is there anything that you want the one way and that's the way that it should be or do you like rip steel like that experimentation. You know there's some things that i don't want to mess wealth like a bloody mary. You know there's the original recipe. It's very basic. You know great tomato juice a little bit of a with shower sauce tabasco. That's it and i think when you make that drink and he drank with a good bucket. It works nowadays was sticking so many things in it and it gets to gritty putting all these too much pepper too much. You know that's i'm like don't mess with a good thing now. If you wanna mess mess with it call it something else because we certainly have created some great things from a bloody mary so i'm all about evolution of whenever never whether it's food spirits cocktails i think that's the exciting part and <hes> and we've never been in a better time on where the quality of the evolution of these traits or whatever spin has been better. I mean it's phenomenal. What's going on right now. It is are there any evolutions from from your places here that you're particularly elderly proud of or excited about so i grew up where we made the basic milk punch and the years it was brandy milk punch josh then our family started doing bourbon milk punch so i grew up with very simple burger milk punch recipe uh-huh and when we opened up on bourbon street urban house the proliferation of two dockery shops up and down the street you know and they're real sweet. I mean not knocking them in the front thing about new orleans you can walk up and down the street with a cocktail so we knew we wanted to do something to add to enhance to be a little different so we create a frozen bourbon milk punch. It's it's <hes> i call it. An adult milkshake is basically you know. It's not what you would find in the in the dockery's sweet. Not i mean this is. It's a cost that we freeze with bourbon and you know it's true. I've become more of our signature. Items items was good appalachian on urban plunge but he also had mardi gras can really muscular here so we do the king cake in. Which is the king cake. I what is what does that look like well. We got on top kinkaid chef little different colored sugar so we do a little bit of dusting <hes> the one. I really liked his family creative banana foster we have at which is whoa so at palace where we feature brahms derivative of the bird milk punch but it's an n._f._l. Sue milk punch and so it's flavored bananas some sentiment and the wrong but it's another one he's frozen greg so the nice as you get to an end of a meal you don't wanna have a desert these strengths it become the go to for a lot of our clientele and being the french quarter of new orleans. It's li- deal thing finishing a meal you know and you can take it and go outside to what's going on a lot of interest in wanting to walk around the front court so our adult milkshakes have become very popular. We decided that bananas foster last night by the way it was not not the drink but the whole thing it was so good <hes> <hes> do you have a do you have a favorite or perhaps a shortlist. I hate it when people ask me my favorite thing. I'm like everything literally favorite. Do you have a favorite cocktail something that you just go back to all time maybe that'd be a ramos gin fizz <hes>. I don't know why this it's <hes> i can't say it's on the top of a bunch of you know. I've always loved the breakfast drinks and they're all you know break milk punch. The size rack you know is a wonderful. I've put it more in the category in t something i wanna enjoy before. I'm going to have a meal you know and just the flavoring. Oh you think of a size right my god. It's it's the whiskey but then you run the glass with you know burp sane is our local than his and then you put in these different bidders so many ingredients in these bidders they they were created by pharmacists in new orleans way back because for medicinal purpose but it was all food based shit the bidders or face from food products spices <hes> something what's going on when you put all that with great bourbon you know boom. That's i mean make sure mouth. Go wow what's going on here so <hes> i've been fortunate that i've always been able to enjoy been exposed going up in new orleans suggests some incredible spirits cocktails so you mentioned you. Were reviewing a restaurant in new york recently what other things besides all this stuff and doing with best what what else are you involved in our our biggest thing would last five years as a new culinary. It's to downtown new orleans and i say culinary but it's really you know we're going to start start off this january with the baking and chef curriculum but it's it's really an institute that we hope evolves and a lot more than just training chefs so we say hospitality want to focus on the front of the house service in a real plan from day one when we found this incredible property. It's hard thousand square feet. It's a beautiful building in downtown owns was to partner up with all the the different universities and we don't want to recreate the wheel here but we think our industry you know went up made reference to call to america. Would it started doing the help. Young american classically trained. It's changed the food saying you know you had finding finding restaurants in the downtown's then you had mom and pops neighborhood restaurants are mom and pop neighborhood. Restaurants are the same quality of you know four star restaurants that would have existed in a formal environment downtown so that was education and so there's the the food the industry is huge. I mean we're the biggest employer behind the government. <hes> and it's just involves a lot of things i mean off. I don't want to ramble on me. I can rhyme on a lot about this as we like rambling when i say we want the ball use this as an example. There's no architecture school. In america has any concentration on food service designed on the architects will give you a restaurant. They loved it but they'll ask you who's doing kitsch and typically. It's the person that sells you the equipment and they have the computers and they put it on that and they send it to the architect. Architects naps and it's a person who's the selling certain brands is designee kitchen. Our hope is is that we can go the next level to where they could be. The people that are trained in with is the ultimate kitchens. <hes> you know we've evolved the equipment. We just redid palace cafes kitchen up twenty seven years in next to each station that has traditional which would be gaspari put in an induction brings next to. I'm trying to get our young culinary to learn how to cook on a different but it's it's going to be. You know it's what is going to be. The future best. <unk> uses best pieces of equipment lot research development so with gnocchi ideas. We don't want to start an architecture school. Tulane has an incredible one two miles up say charles at all if do har one teacher that knows food service designed and created a an an m._b._a. Level for architects to go get the specially where they really kitchens and put that under the not bryant so i mean it's one teacher teaching something that no one teaches and it's because crave the smoky institute which is about trying to create education to all different areas of the world and then you take two lane and l._s._u. Medical schools and how much is there was with tropical science doc school food being part the r._n._d. Of food going into madison going into healthcare so really trying to create a new industry nolens at higher education who which one focus on the food world would it can be but the no we've always been involved in a lot of things we never grew up with parachute. They would always say no. You can't just be inside your four walls you. You have to be a party community. Be a party industry. <hes> you know and get get out there so i mean we've all my goodness. This town has so many great efforts going on and good causes and you know. It's hard to kind of list things that i've been involved in over the years one fun th we just. We're gonna do this. The thirty something years ago we created a louisiana children's museum even down to the warehouse the house and so last year they've been building a brand new facility in city park are municipal park and and <hes> and so we're gonna do the food service in the new children's museum which is really exciting also in city park. You have another africa going on growth that we do that bro that and it's a it's a farm. It's a working form so that people can learn inch educated so we're really excited about taking what we're doing. In the museum with the kids got to the farming going on on and what we can do together. It's gonna be a great project. You know work with the kids and educate them on where food comes from and how to cook it wasters right now. I was reading about this. You helped institute a waster. Shell recycling program. You know i love fishing and i'm i'm going to my cousin is a great fish camp just up thirty minutes south of the city and i'm driving down there one day in where a lot of oyster boats. It's you know it's it's a commercial fishing village as well as recreational camps. This is huge male of limestone in rock and they've got a front loader. That's scoop it up and putting it on so that when they going out the rebuilding living beds because we have to move always hard if we're gonna do fresh water diversions to rebuild demolish in the biggest obstacle is it's not fishermen catch fish and move around. It's the only saddam is that have a lot of time invested in making a bet so the lot efforts to make beds in different areas so that we can bring fresh water and i'm like there's no limestone louisiana. I don't know how far you gotta find. Lomb says so we're buying a product doc was shipping it here and we're trying to rebuild bits when we have so we can grow oysters. We avoid shells that we throw away they go to the landfill forever and it's just it makes sense so that kind of instigated. What can we due to recycle. How can we get these oyster shells as part of rebuilding the coast instead of letting him fill up our landfills so so it worked out i mean it's been a very successful how many to move talking like four hundred thousand tonnes. The recycled waster salt feld which awesome replacing the barrier islands losing serving grounds raised right so that they can build a bed but they would put them in these baskets. It's like a sleeve you fill it up betide then he goes inside a crate so that these could be anchored and they're like looks like this table in there. Maybe this deep and so art doc coastal roach coastline wherever it is in the marcia would out on it just keeps erode so if you take this basket ascot and you put it ten yards in front of where the existing coast is anchor man it just natural fill in instead of the erosion going in one direction we build back the coastline and that's what's worked really nice with this choice of recycling so mean because of that that will make it progress so it's exciting i mean it's something we should <hes>. What's the what's. The food didn't drink community around here. What's what's it like not just not just <hes> you know people coming in and enjoy things obviously but what's it like working with working with these farmers and and these producers and and other restaurants around town al-qaeda sorry for people that do other stuff i have to talk to a former or go out on a boat fishermen and being outdoors and to see all these understanding where it's coming from and then bring it into the restaurant all these wonderful talented people that want to cook you know and they they want to see someone enjoy it. I mean i've never not enjoyed this experience. You know the daily deep ritual of that food part now trying to make the business work and looking at the payroll and all the other thing you know that's not the fun part the day but the food part the product part you know that this season it just came in the back door. You know then we get to prep it in a way that we can give it to someone and they really just have a great experience. That's good stuff that always said about our business. People came to us and have a good time. You know and you really help create memories of people people together celebrated they'd as opposed to if i was a banker people come a timid. I need money. Maternity got to go fob doctor doctor. You go because you're hurt. I mean people come to us. Have a good celebration. It's a real positive attributes. We've got a bit more of this interview left but first. We're going to take one more quick break for word from our sponsor. <hes> <music> and we're back at the ron burgundy podcasts do baby carolina. Here is a pathological yeah okay. So what does her brain like. I normally would disagree with this but i made a pact with ron earlier so let's go with wendy. Brush your teeth. What when everyone else does on holidays and sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect. This smell of your breath bother you. I mean the smell of rare steak and aged aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me. You're bleeding a little bit for the back of your shirt that means it was a good waxing. They got the entire hair follicle cool. I know so ron is how long has it been bleeding. It's been bleeding all night lar- shouldn't go cheap on waxing. I had to throw my sheets so this is ron burgundy until next time don't use public restrooms you listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts and we're back anki sponsor and back the interview <hes> what do you what do you see coming in the future other than this this awesome institute like you know what a what a what do you what do you hope for her. Y'all and for new orleans and i guess what what other problems are you working on tackling one of my hopes with this new institute gnocchi amaze me how many young men and women work in new orleans restaurants and they never get past passed the line cook position. They don't become that manager outcome. The chef chef and i'm convinced it's because they don't have that formal. Education in a lot of these people aren't going to be over to lead state goto johnson and wales colorado sue. Would it's just not not going to happen so one of our biggest from day. One mission with this new institute is we want to take certainly wanna take individuals cooking for fifteen years i mean they're in it and they know what to do and they have great skills very talented but the i to put them in that classic varmint where they say learn away which if you don't you can make holidays as like michael jordan in playing basketball but if you don't know the word emulsified in the chemistry behind which deal why it works it. I think it keeps you from having confidence in that lack of confidence is where these men and women don't go the next level because there's so many i've worked with over the years. Here's an upset komo. Why don't you take a little responsibility. No i'm good deal what i'm doing and then i've seen young men and women from out of state that have graduated from these programs and so many of them i wanna cook in new orleans and so it's as young confident you know someone just graduate coast was coming in and they get in the sous-chef position and then they become the shops i mean i'm certainly not knocking. Angola gospel may be at greater example of you know angle came in so i worked my family and you know look look where he's gone so i really hope this institute because in new orleans we have certainly have our challenges when it comes of say racial relationships and so and a lotta people leadership on both sides when you have them conversation a lot of time. The leadership was so on abc's anybody out of the african american community c._b._s. The chef will be in the business owner. You know you know at some point you know we bombed and so i think this is an opportunity ferrari industry instead of people being you know stock and can't get to the next level that this should open that door and because because we have the talent it's like musicians jazz musicians worldwide. We have athletes that have just incredibly probably have more of in the n._f._l. Than anywhere you're we have the same talent they can cook. They just don't have that education to where they're going to be a shout. My hope is in a short period of time. They'll there'll be men and women out of this community. That'll be a chef in new york city the east coast west coast and really changing that path that had really been here in new orleans so it's a big one but it's it would help you all so much you know a moore wonderful city. We have so much going on for us but i just you know my dream is submits. It and it's not a great city when like we're saying i mean not every man and woman in this community has a path to really live american drink. My family has lived the american dream we had nothing worked hard and we had a lot of good luck. Where are you know we're educated and it helped us with an american so kaos thank you. I guess speaking of learning. Is there anything anything that you feel like. You're still learning personally. Sorry didn't mean to get first of all you know. I mean just go through different vision life me. I have grown up kids kids in the mail getting educated getting great 'cause they wanna come into the family business. My nephew's already in the business working was aw some kind of age and i grew up with my dad was certainly this way. He didn't wanna be eighty year old going to work telling everybody to do. He wanted me to get educated. Sake come back home and sit around with him and team and we talk about something. I'd be able to go. We haven't tried this or why. Are we doing that that because i don educated and that in a short period of time the team would be going juniors not here because junior junior serious who's got some skill and just become part of the leadership team so we had these early transitions from the senior generation to the next generation of being able to run the business and i really valued the time after i graduated from college when and went worked outside the family before i came back and to see it to be on the other side where i'm now my dad watching the markets. Go get that exposure and they're smart. They get better than i did with what their experiences are but they bring it home and so i'm looking looking forward to transition and out having the term i want to be on the lawn. I want to help them won't be there the resource whatever the nate i want but it's their turn to do it so so it's a wonderful part of my life. I mean i'm freeing up. I don't have all the responsibilities and i've got a great team that they don't need me to open a restaurant close restaurant and <hes> so mice pretty good yeah demoura that celebration caring there ooh yeah. Is there anything we would like to speak to you that we didn't ask you about or would do this. Okay just philosophy. I mean we have four restaurants and i mean bourbon house was when we first decided let's focus on a spirit and with all the history we've talked about bourbon there was let's do the spirits here <hes> palace cafe more recently. We did a major renovation. We we added a bar on the second level because really didn't have a bar and we decided to do wrong now. Made rum my god hundreds of years ago we started growing sugarcane in louisiana and it was the jesuits and one of the first areas as they grew sugar cane was right across canal street. Where palace cafe is. I mean that's where they were growing. I mean sugars what makes wrong so so that was our connection with wanting to do that spirit and then at the steakhouse. It's always been that classic the whole world spirits the scotch the wrong i mean balk jin but families are so we have of an irish whiskey collection there just to pay some hollis show our heritage and it's a nice way that we can do it and then you know our youngest well you know so. We just recently ended a martini card so we go to the table. Side martinis and you know this is where we keep saying. I'm a big. I don't want to change for the sake of change but you got to evolve. You know so there's it's fun for us. This is where instead of that martini just showing up. It's a whole different experience. I mean you look at these credible aw products that are going to garnish that or the options to take your martini to another level and a real train professional. That's making it perfect perfect right temperature the glass why short let's do it right then then but i knew this restaurant taboo you know it's it's in a part of the quarter. Where originally the french court it was built. It's right next to st louis cathedral you know when they founded the city and decided this is where we're going to push build the city eighty there was a priest there and they said bill the church there and it's the oldest cathedral in america but it's it's where the city was to bell. We're right next to a block. Behind is the oldest ballroom in america because we celebrate celebrate so it's just that feeling of being around that area there we do sparkling in champaign. It's it's where we should celebrate and it's part of liberty theater. Which is the oldest community theater in america so it's about going to enjoy theater in this wonderful rastrick aw with a balcony of the courtyard champagne sparkley kinda works out of bar so i love the fact that we focus on something in by rations totally different different experiences but just just mad tom for we can kind of find something that we can specialize. It's been what we're gonna. Do it. The louisiana children's museum yeah we were. We were talking yesterday to <hes> <hes> isaac troop brace <hes> yeah but i'm and we're talking about how new orleans is different than many other places in the way that is that it treats alcohol in the way that it you know the way that kids are allowed to grow up around it rather than it being kind of like cheriton things happen your experience you know and i mean in my experience in france you certainly consuming wine and stuff like that at a table at home merrily age i mean our kitchens where we would sit on the family mail before the service and we certainly drank what you know so i only he's just new orleans but i think new orleans we live like i'll never forget who who's one of the original anchorman frank with david brinkley so he was whatever chow cronkite three did the nightly news and he was a dear friend. He was in new orleans. All the tom he had had he was having dinner with my aunt. Allah and handful handful of people is probably a lindy badge one group of characters and and the whole night kept saying you know we we can't get this right and we're not you know it's all things that she was disappointed with with the leadership of the city and we couldn't get anything you know and he was just a polite gentleman. They had a fantastic meal. Think animal was very young the chef so it'd be back in those eight late eighties so he calls the next maury says our it pains me that you'd that upset with new orleans. He said first of all couldn't have had more fun last night always loved the company and the food was fantastic then he says nobody's trial but as much as i've seen so much in my life i did he said i want to tell you this when are going to italy. Nothing works on strike roy. Everything's off tom. Talion do something they live life their daily cultures. They live life breath. He says anywhere else trialed certainly in america is only one other place that i can say the local people live life. He says it's no old world. Y'all live like this is get over all the stuff not working so here. I'm the next generation and i've always said i want my say. It'd be great you know went to be perfectly clean and everything working and all that stuff but when i think of that it helps me get over. My love hate relationship where i'm like disappointed. We're not <hes> doing something better because the man was right. I mean we really connect with each other all day long and we live so so we have arrived at the end of this interview. We hope that you enjoyed it. As much as we enjoyed doing yeah and i hope that you you also had someone bring you boys. Oh yeah in the middle of it or that. Maybe you went and got a poboy. I oh we should put like poboy warning at the top of the episode. We should rookie paddick mistake. I when i get back from these trips we we have these massive. Get transcripts of everything we had this big document where we just put it in quotes that we like and i remember for some some interviews it ends up being the whole and you eventually have to go like well. We only can't use everything everything so yeah. I think he won. He was one of the ones who made it into a lot of episodes but i i really get a kick out of just kind of going through the whole thing so i hope i hope y'all also feel the same way i hope so too and i also hope you'll you'll reach out act. Does you can email us. Our email is hello. Hello at xavier pod dot com. We're also on social media. You can find us at saver pod at <hes> instagram and facebook and twitter. We do hope to hear from you. Savor is production production of iheartradio and stuff media for more podcasts from iheartradio. You can visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows thank you as always tour super producers dylan fagin and andrew howard thanks to you for listening and we hope that lots more good things are coming your way and we're back at the ron. Burgundy podcasts season do baby wendy pressure team. What ah wind do i brush my teeth. Whenever what else does on holidays in sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect smell of your breath. Bother you being the smell smell of rare steak and aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio laps or wherever you find your podcasts.

new orleans america dickie brennan louisiana iheartradio josh gumbo bourbon house tom commander new york ron burgundy mississippi apple laurin vogel lawrence horn Orleans iheartradio moran france
"Steamboat Willie" Released - Nov. 18, 1928

This Day in History Class

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"Steamboat Willie" Released - Nov. 18, 1928

"Uh-huh. Hi, I'm Josh Clark of stuff, you should know. And I have a new podcast series called the end of the world. It's about all the ways humanity might accidents. Wipe ourselves out with the amazing new technology beginning to develop like artificial intelligence. Sure, it's heavy stuff. But it's also enormously interesting and surprisingly kind of inspiring to if you're a fan of the deep dive check out the end of the world with Josh Clark on apple podcasts, the iheartradio app and everywhere you get podcast and join the conversation on social at hashtag e OT w Josh Clark. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy. Be wilson. It's November eighteen steamboat Willie made it stay on the stay in nineteen twenty eight. This is often remembered as the first animated appearance of Mickey Mouse. But that's not quite right. So here's the story while Disney had started an animation company in Hollywood with his brother ROY in nineteen Twenty-three, but they hadn't quite gotten it financially successful yet the company had created two animated series was Alice comedies and one was Oswald. The lucky rabbit Oswald was pretty popular, but then in nineteen twenty eight Disney went to what he thought was going to be a contract negotiation with distributor, Universal Pictures. But he found out that universal actually owned all of the rights to the Oswald cartoons. So he needed to comp with a new lead character that character was of course, Mickey Mouse and the first two. Mouse cartoons were finished in the spring of nineteen twenty eight one was called plane crazy plane is spelled P L A N E. The other was the galloping Gaucho and like his earlier cartoons and a lot of other films at the time even most other films at the time. These were silent synchronized sound was still in its infancy. The first feature film with synchronized sound and dialogue was the jazz. Singer would had come out just a year before so Disney thought that this might give him an opportunity to make an animated film with synchronized sound, featuring his newly created mouse character the title of their work in progress was an image to BUSTER Keaton's steamboat Bill junior which had come out that year as well. And the film featured Mickey and Minnie mouse and peg leg Pete, and I mostly light hearted set of scenes set aboard a steamboat a lot of it to the tune of a song Turkey in the straw. Another misconceive. Option about all this is that Disney himself did all the creative work with this. But like very many of the other early doesn't cartoons. It was really animated by a I works. This process of creating the film was full of trial and error. Because like I said, synchronized sound was really knew the whole idea of animating film, where the sound was gonna match up to it was happening on screen was really complicated and also new so they started out using a metronome for timing. And they did a lot of tests and then worked days and nights to finish it scoring. This film was also a huge challenge. The orchestra needed to match what they were playing to what was happening on the screen, and that turned out to be a lot harder than you might expect. They finally added a bouncer ball to the print for the conductor to use as a guide, and that was a massive improvement over there. I attempts to play the score recording for this film was extremely expensive and Disney had to sell his car to make payroll just two weeks before. The film debuted and they had to borrow money from promoter, Harry Rickenbach to get the film screened at all and the end though, it all worked out steamboat Willie was released at the colony theater in New York on November eighteenth nineteen twenty eight they wanted it to open on Broadway. So that it would be reviewed and the audience loved it. And so did the reviewers got very positive write ups in publications like variety and the New York Times steamboat Willie spent two weeks exclusively at the colony theater before being sent onto other theaters to show there as well money continued to be tight for Walt and ROY Disney, though, even after this happened that went on for a really long time. But this was the first of a lot of successes, and of course, it put Disney on the path to creating feature length animated films, and what would grow into a massive media empire. Thanks to Eve's Jeffcoat for her research work on today's episode case kicker and Taylor Mays for their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to the. In history class on apple podcast, Google podcast, and wherever to get your podcast, you can tune in tomorrow for a prime minister who was not just a first at this point. She's an only. Hello, I'm angry, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show food stuff all about these history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on her first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

Disney ROY Disney Josh Clark Willie Oswald apple New York Times BUSTER Keaton Universal Pictures Asheville Laurin Vogel North Carolina New York Mickey Hollywood Taylor Mays Fagin Singer
What Was The Great Pox?

BrainStuff

04:34 min | 2 years ago

What Was The Great Pox?

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. William Shakespeare mentioned diseases often in his place probably because he was literally surrounded by them. I mean, aren't we all? But during his London-based lifetime in the fifteen and sixteen hundreds such notorious illnesses as the plague typhus and malaria, ravaged, citizens all made more potent and deadly by rodents overcrowding, and virtually nonexistent sanitation systems also striking fear into the hearts of just about everyone were smallpox and the great pox known today as syphilis. The two conditions actually present similar rashes despite being different in terms of type of infection and transmission smallpox is a virus spread by breathing. Syphilis is bacterial and almost always sexually transmitted. The hallmark of both diseases was a body riddled with pustules, also known as pucks fell to the people to distinguish between these horrors. Thus civilised became known as the great. FOX, not because the pockmarks of civilised were larger than those of smallpox, but rather because in the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries, it was the greater fear. Syphilis was likely introduced to Europe when Christopher Columbus go that guy and his crew brought it back from the new world in fourteen ninety three. Although there are other theories, the timing is definitely suspect. The pandemic began in Europe pretty much right after they returned killing many. Even those we're lucky enough to survive where typically covered in scars and went blind. Of course, the Europeans for their part left behind smallpox and other diseases in the new world sometimes intentionally which along with slavery would wipe out millions of native Americans. Fortunately, smallpox has now been ratified by vaccine and we have penicillin to treat syphilis. Shakespeare's writings indicate an interest in syphilis, such as in the play, Tim Nevada things where he references the use of inhaled vaporized mercury salts, a common treatment for the disease at the time. In fact, one of his best known quotes was originally a reference to Cecil. A plague on both your houses from Romeo and Juliet was first Apotex on both your houses. Thanks to multiple references of civilization has works. Historians have wondered whether Shakespeare himself was infected known for being a little bit of a hustler. His signature during the last years of his life indicates that he experienced a tremor, which is a common side effect of mercury poisoning, which as we said was the treatment of choice for syphilis. Of course, any number of physical illness can cause a tremor. So it's unlikely that this posthumous diagnosis will ever be confirmed. Today's episode was written by Elliott Hoyt and produced by Tyler claim. You can find brain stuff, phone cases and other rain stuff in our shop at t public dot com slash grainstuff. And of course, for more on this and lots of other poxy topics, visit our home planet, how stuff works dot com. So what do you turn when it's a y. oh, you turn. It's a moment of life transformations that happens whether you're ready or not. No matter the change. The questions of the same. How do we get fearless when we feel uncertain? We switch directions without getting totally lost and Huckabee actually enjoy the ride. We get honest, and we talk about it and we definitely laugh our way through it. 'cause shift happens, I'm Lisa is Joel Herzog join us as we navigate our own big life challenges on a new podcast, you terms be sure to subscribe on apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Syphilis William Shakespeare Europe smallpox apple Anna Faris Asheville Dilling Fagin North Carolina producer Laurin Vogel Apotex Huckabee penicillin FOX Christopher Columbus typhus malaria Elliott Hoyt