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"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:19 min | Last week

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Can thank you so much for the. The courage and the openness and the spirit of exploration to take a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Rome and then write about it. Thank you, thank you. You can also listen to Tim Megan's recent interview about the Immortal Irishman from our show archives at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. A clergywoman from Iowa has a few ideas. You'll appreciate on travels to boost your spirit. That's next on travel with Rick Steves. What places connect you with what you might think of as something, holy or sacred as a travel writer and Episcopal Deacon Laurie Eric's has been on doesn't different pilgrimages in the US Europe South America and the Holy Land. They've taken her to learn about many forms of religious and spiritual practice she collects these adventures and her encounters with spiritual leaders in her book called Holy Rover Journeys in search of Mystery Miracles and God Laurie Ericsson welcome to travel with Rick Steves thank you for having me wreck. It is amazing when you think of the cultural diversity on this planet. How much religious diversity there also is, and it is pretty realistic. Test Vice that into your travel dreams, isn't it? I think so, and I think one of the things that people sometimes forget is that trips to holy sites or almost certainly the first tourism that it would be one of the reasons why you would be willing to leave the safety of your village home would be on a religious quest of some sort and so pilgrimage sites are I think the earliest form of tourism that we we know of, and you can actually be moved and I love to be moved emotionally when I'm traveling and and you've done so much traveling where you get out of your comfort zone, and you find yourself moved in ways should. You didn't know you'd be moved now in your book, you explain how you? You were raised a Lutheran, and then you traveled all over the world of religious faiths, and you ended up back in the Christian folded. And now you're a pastor in fiscal church at the the rundown on your itenerary of different religions in your own personal faith journey. What religions have you embraced just very very quickly, so I grew up Lutheran and then in my twenties, I was a neo pagan wiccan that I dabbled in Buddhism, and then I came back to Christianity and became an Episcopalian and then sort of came back to Buddhism as well and also have a great respect for native American, especially Lakota traditions, so I'm a real. I'm a Heinz fifty seven. Sure are and I. In your book, you talk about how this wonderment of traveling with your faith in mind hits you when you noticed. There were tears coming out of your eye in front of the desk where Martin Luther translated the Bible. In hiding in a castle in Germany five hundred years ago. What was that experience like? I think one of the reasons why it's good to travel to holy sites is that they teach us about ourselves, and so that experience of being where Martin Luther translated the New Testament made me think about my childhood made me think about the strong faith that people that I had known when I was growing up and made me reevaluate that I had been I'd been too quick to throw that out and gained much deeper respect for Martin Luther and what he had done. Done as a result that tears to me are powerful message from the divine I haven't shared this much I. Don't think anywhere, but I was sitting on a carpet in a Mo in a mosque in the holy land in a monk. No, an imam was evangelizing, and he was filled with love, and he was so beautiful, and he hugged me and I cried, and I cried, because it was so joyful to have a Muslim, bring me to spiritual tears, even though I'm a. In the Christian, it opened me up and it can be in less. You've done with native American faiths. It can be thinking of beautiful ideas when you're communing with nature at Walden pond, it can be in a progression of Devout Catholics at Lord's talk about a couple of places that have surprised you in your travels in that regard. One of the chapters in my book is about Tibetan Buddhist. Temple in BLOOMINGTON INDIANA, which is one of the major Tibetan Buddhist sites in North America, was founded by the elder brother of the current Dalai Lama, and I was astonished to find a little bit of Tibet. In the middle of the Midwest Ni- end I was also really moved by the welcome that I had. Had there from the Rinpoche a Rhumba. She has a word meaning honored teacher, and that sort of experience that you had in Moscow of just being welcomed as a person that didn't make any difference who I was where I came from there was this moment of connection between two two children of God, and that's a profoundly beautiful experience. especially I think when it happens across fates. re-assuring thing to know that there's so much more that unites says than divides us, this is travel with Rick Steves. We're finding the sacred on the road with travel writer and Pester Laurie Ericsson and.

Rick Steves Martin Luther Laurie Ericsson Holy Land writer Rome Tim Megan Walden pond Laurie Eric Moscow US Iowa Germany South America Tibetan Buddhist North America BLOOMINGTON INDIANA Temple
"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:59 min | 2 weeks ago

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"To do it, and then he's going to be too many people on my bridge. Well I think anybody that gets out of bed at six o'clock in the morning and get some piece of that bridge, so elaine as we look back after one year. What is the the basic prognosis for us? Who traveled to Paris to see the Notre Dom while it's being restored? Can we get near it? Will we be able to go into it? Actually someday feel like they will be able to restore the cathedral to. It's previous glory. It's going to be a long way off the president of France in his televised a to the nation right after the fire. Declared that Notre Dame would be rebuilt an even more beautiful than before any wanted it done within five years that was extraordinarily ambitious and optimistic in that is certainly. Not Going to happen, it's going to take longer than that to get notre. Dame completely restored. Visitors to Paris are not going to be able to walk into Notre Dom or even get very very close to Notre Dom. They'll be able to walk around it, and you can also go on my bridge if you WANNA see it from behind, but the restoration is very very delicate, and there are so many unknowable, even one year after the fire is the structure still solid is they're going to be a rebuilding of the forest of trees that would require hundreds of oak trees to be chopped down much of Notre. Dom was restored in the nineteenth century by via Leyla, Duke and he had a vision for Notre Restoring Notre Domino when he built the spire that fell in the fire of a year ago, and he said in a project of this sort one cannot proceed with enough prudence and discretion. A restoration can do more harm. To a monument than the ravages of the centuries and the fury of rioters, and I would argue that that holds true today and that those architects. who have been arguing for prudence and caution. Should be heard. Leave it to the French people to deal openly with these complicated issues and to treasure and take care of their heritage, which is part of our heritage. Elaine thank you so much for reporting on this. Let's check back when Notre Dame is open again and retakes. It's primal place in the life of the French people with pleasure. Thank you so much. Oh When does it trip turned into some sort of spiritual pilgrimage? Laurie Eric's tells us what it's like to be a holy rover in just a bit but next Tim. EAKIN returns to travel with Rick Steves to tell us about his remarkable trek from England.

Notre Dom Elaine Paris Rick Steves Laurie Eric president France Duke Tim Leyla England
"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

09:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Brunel was the heretic who was burned for believing what every third grader today knows to be true, simple science, the interesting thing. Thing, he's staring across with his cowl at the. Vatican less than a mile away now that history turns and pivots now we have a Pope Pope Francis who embraces science who spoke to the American Congress and said don't be climate denial, but don't deny science. Who had Stephen Hawking? Come? visit him and loved talking to him and hearing about it, and said that every new thing we learned from science is evidence of divine, so, but it was interesting because the statues right there in the in scratchy that celebrates hedonism and secular is right and. I think the at the base of the statue. To Bruno from the people, he foresaw Oh. Yeah, and the people. He says actually the pope today, exactly right That's the point I. Make Great Today. Who who's celebrated a square appeared say in being named after Martin, Luther Exams Change and he really reached out to Lutherans to. So. This is an ongoing thing and to be travelers. We can be open to that to be a tourist is to have a bucket list and take a Selfie to be travelers to go to learn about a place in broaden your perspective to be a pilgrim is to learn not necessarily about the place, but about yourself can be transformational, and your book is a testimony to that i. love this notion that you talked about in your book there no way. The way is made by walking, it's from Saint La brea the patron saint of the homeless. He was a wander all his life, and he died in the Coliseum scabs and wounds all over at the age of thirty seven. He lived in France, and he still lives on. There's a big celebration his name, but he spent his entire life with other homeless people, wandering around Europe and that wonderful line I found early on in the pilgrimage of became one of my themes that there is no way the waves made by walking, and it's sort of a universal sentiment. If you take that to heart, and you're open I, think a lot of things will happen to you Tim Eakin, thank you so much for the I think the courage and the openness and the spirit of exploration to take a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Rome and then write about it. Thank you, thank you. You can also listen to Megan's recent interview about the Immortal Irishman from our show archives. RIC Steve's dot com slash radio. A clergywoman from Iowa has a few ideas. You'll appreciate on travels to boost your spirit. That's next on travel with Rick Steves. What places connect you with what you might think of as something, holy or sacred as a travel writer and Episcopal? Deacon Laurie Eric's and has been on a dozen different pilgrimages in the US Europe South America end the Holy Land. They've taken her to learn about many forms of religious and spiritual practice. She collects these adventures and turn counters with spiritual leaders in her book, called Holy, rover journeys in search of Mystery Miracles and God Laurie Ericsson welcome to travel with Rick Steves. Thank you for having me Rick. It is amazing when you think of the cultural diversity on this pet. How much religious diversity there also is, and it is pretty realistic to spice that into your travel dreams, isn't it? I think so and I think one of the things that people sometimes forget. Is that trips to holy sites or almost certainly the first tourism that it would be one of the reasons why you would be willing to lead the safety of your village and home would be on a religious quest of some sort and so pilgrimage sites are I think the earliest form of tourism that we we know of, and you can actually be moved, and I love to be moved emotionally. Traveling, and and you've done so much traveling where you get out of your comfort zone, and you find yourself moved in ways should. You didn't know you'd be moved to now in your book, you explain how you were raised a Lutheran, and then you traveled all over the world of religious faiths, and you ended up back in the Christian fold, and now your pastor and Piscopo Church at give us the rundown on your itinerary of different religions in. In your own personal faith journey, what religions have you embraced just very quickly so I grew up Lutheran, and then in my twenties I was in the opaque in a wiccan than I dabbled in Buddhism, and then I came back to Christianity and became an Episcopalian and then sort of came back to Buddhism as well and also have a great respect for native American, especially Lakota traditions, so I'm a real. I'm a fifty seven sure and. In your book, you talk about how this wonderment of traveling with your faith in mind hits you when you noticed. There were tears coming out of your eye in front of the desk where Martin Luther translated the Bible. In hiding in a castle in Germany five hundred years ago. What was that experience like? I think one of the reasons why it's good to travel to holy sites is that they teach us about ourselves? And so that experience of being where Martin Luther translated the new? Testament made me think about my childhood made me think about the strong faith of people that I had known when I was growing up and made me reevaluate that I had been. I'd been too quick to throw that out. And really at gained a much deeper respect, Martin Luther and why he had done as a result of that, you know tears to me are a powerful message from the divine I haven't shared this much I. Don't think anywhere, but I was sitting on a carpet. Carpet in a Mo in a mosque in the holy land in a monk, no, an imam was evangelizing to me, and he was filled with love, and he was so beautiful, and he hugged me I cried, and I cried, because it was so joyful to have a Muslim bring me to spiritual tears, even though I'm a died in the world, Christian it opened me up and it can be in as you've done with native American faiths, it can be thinking of beautiful ideas when you're communing with nature at Walden pond, it can be a progression of Devout Catholics at Lord's talk about a couple of places that have surprised you in your travels in that regard. One of the chapters in my book is about Tibetan Buddhist Temple in Bloomington Indiana, which is one of the major Tibetan. Buddhist sites in North America was founded by the elder brother of the current Dalai Lama. And I was astonished to find a little bit of Tibet in the middle of the Midwest. I and I was also really moved by the welcome that I had there from the Rinpoche a remember. She has a word. Meaning honored teacher, and that sort of experience that you had in a mosque of just being welcomed as a person. Make any difference who I was where I came from there was this moment of connection between two two children of God, and that's a profoundly beautiful experience. Especially, I think when it happens across faiths. Reassuring thing to know that there's so much more that unites says then divides us. This is travel with Rick. Steves were finding the secret on the road with travel, writer and Pastor Laurie Erickson, and she's the author of the Book Only Rover Journeys in search of mystery, miracles and God. She's recently published a book about the end of life customs of different societies, and it's called near the exit. Her website is Laurie. Erickson Dot net. What about the in you had with the Chief Priest? In the ICELANDIC PAGAN RELIGION OF? Also were. Absolutely I had great respect for him. One of the things I write in my book is that you can sort of tell when someone's done their spiritual homework. And I think he has you know he is someone who is really steeped in the traditions and mythology and the history of Iceland of the people. He's a faith leader. He Shepherds People's spiritual lives, and so at a great interview with him. One of the things I love about my work as an I would guess you can relate to this is it gives me the chance to ask. Questions of people who I think are really interesting and I think religion is endlessly interest and people who have spent a lot of time thinking i. mean people don't just entertain themselves watching TV, but they're out there rolling challenging themselves. I like what you wrote about just getting close to nature with the whole Walden pond sort of thing and I've often been hiking originally Alps and thinking. This is the greatest church in Europe and. A holy roller it would be on top of an ALP. And, then I went to lure kids in France that super. Catholicism yes, yes, but I i. read about that. In relation to have two sons when our her son was five months old, he nearly died an injustice. So I didn't go to lords at that time, but when I went to Lord's, it was with that experience really uppermost in my mind, because Lewis of course is the famous healing shrine, and I've been to lords in to see the faith, the power of. With their loved ones in stretchers and crutches and going up to that site, and to think that people have been doing this for generations and generations. It's just so exciting to find a way to respect that, even if it doesn't fit with your own religious views. Yep Absolutely, and I think to the at the shrine. There is this sense of commonality there, because if everyone knows someone who is ill, or you have that in your own personal story, or it's in your future I, mean it is the universal one of the universal experiences of needing healing and lured..

Rick Steves Martin Luther Walden pond Europe Deacon Laurie Eric France Holy Land writer Stephen Hawking American Congress Pope Francis Brunel Bruno Laurie Ericsson Saint La brea Germany Rome Tim Eakin RIC Steve Midwest
"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:13 min | 3 weeks ago

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"This be a reminder that it only takes a moment to make a moment call eight, seven, seven, four, Dad, four, one one or visit fatherhood dot Gov brought to you by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Ad Council when severe weather strikes, it's important your in the know, even if power goes out and cellular networks down, radio, convener lifeline and next radio is the free APP THAT BRINGS FM. Radio right to your android smartphone, no data or cellular network required, and it won't drain your battery. Go to the Google play store right now. Download the nextradio APP to your android device. Stay tuned to this. This station and please stay safe for a full list of compatible devices. visit next radio APP. Dot Com Megan thought he'd try walking the ancient pilgrim route from Canterbury. darrow coming up, he explains how your beliefs can be challenged by the medieval mindset, especially when you confront it in person, some of them would start out as Christians and end up his eighth others would start out as atheist and indescretions, a trip to Germany Laurie, Eric's connect with her spiritual heritage. She sent traveled as far as Peru and as close as South Dakota to look for what sacred there are places all over the earth where people can have this sort of rich life changing travel experience. And Paris correspondent Selena remembers what it was like one year ago. When word got out that the Cathedral of Notre Dame was on fire, it was an absolute nightmare, and it affected people in very strange ways. There are places on earth that can move you deep within. We'll find some of them just ahead on travel with Rick Steves stay with us. Hey I'm Rick Steves for the last fifteen years, our mission on travel with Rick. Steves has been to stoke. Your travel dreams into share inspiring stories from every corner of our globe. While the world grapples with the pandemic of Corona virus, we understand that trips are temporarily off the table for many of us, but we'll get through this and we'll keep on traveling. When this crisis becomes old news until then let's use this time to stoke. Those travel dreams as we enjoy hearing from our friends and experts about their adventures..

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:20 min | Last month

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"To you tim. Egan, thank you so much for the I think the courage and the openness and the spirit of exploration to take a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Rome and then write about it. Thank you, thank you. You can also listen to Megan's recent interview about the Immortal Irishman from our show archives at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. A clergywoman from Iowa has a few ideas. You'll appreciate on travels to boost your spirit. That's next on travel with Rick Steves. What places connect you with what you might think of as something holy or sacred as a travel writer and Episcopal Deacon Laurie Eric's has been on a dozen different pilgrimages in the US. Europe South America and the holy, land. They've taken her to learn about many forms of religious and spiritual practice she collects these adventures and encounters with spiritual leaders in her book called Holy Rover Journeys in search of mystery, miracles and God Laurie Ericsson welcomed at travel with Rick Steves. Thank you for having me. Rick it is amazing when you think of the cultural diversity on this planet, how much religious diversity there also is, and it is pretty realistic. Test by that into your travel dreams, isn't it? I think so and I think one of the things that people sometimes forget. Is that trips to holy sites almost certainly the first tourism that it would be one of the reasons why you would be willing to leave. The safety of your village in home would be on a religious quest of some sort and so pilgrimage sites are I think the earliest form of tourism that we we know of, and you can actually be moved, and I love to be moved emotionally when I'm traveling and and you've done so much traveling where you get out of your comfort zone, and you find yourself moved in ways should. You didn't know you'd be moved now in? In your book, you explain how you were raised Lutheran and then you traveled all over the world of religious faiths and ended up back in the Christian folded. And now you're pastor Episcopal Church. I'd give the rundown on your itinerary of different religions in your own personal faith journey, what religions have embraced a very very quickly, so I grew up Lutheran and then in my twenties, I was in Pagan and Wiccan then I dabbled in Buddhism and then I came back to Christianity and became Episcopalian, and then sort of came back to Buddhism as well and also have a great respect for native American especially, Lakota traditions so I'm a real I'm Heinz fifty-seven. And I. In your book, you talk about how this wonderment of traveling with your faith in mind. Hit you when you noticed. There were tears coming out of your eye in front of the desk. Where Martin Luther translated the Bible. In hiding in a castle in Germany five hundred years ago, who had experience like? I think one of the reasons why it's good to travel to holy sites is that they teach us about ourselves, and so that experience of being where Martin Luther and translated the new? Testament made me think about my childhood made me think about the strong faith of people that I had known when I was growing up and made me reevaluate that I had been. I'd been too quick to throw that out and really gained much deeper respect for Martin Luther and what he had done. As a result of that tears to me are a powerful message from the divine. I haven't shared this much I. Don't think anywhere, but I was sitting on a carpet in A. A month in a mosque in the holy land in a monk, no, an imam was evangelizing to me, and he was filled with love, and he was so beautiful, and he hugged me and I cried and I cried because it was so joyful to have a Muslim. Bring me to spiritual tears, even though I'm a died in the World Christian. It opened me up and it can be in less. You've done with native American faiths. It can be thinking of beautiful ideas when you're communing with nature at Walden pond, it can be in a progression of Devout Catholics at Lord's talk about a couple of places that have surprised you in your travels in that regard. One of the chapters in my book is about Tibetan Buddhist Temple in Bloomington Indiana, which is one of the major Tibetan Buddhist sites in North America was founded by the elder brother of the current Dalai Lama and I was astonished to find a little bit of Tibet in the middle of the Midwest I. End I was also really moved by the welcome that I had there. There from the Rinpoche a Rhumba. She has a word meaning honored teacher, and that sort of experience that you had in a mosque of just being welcomed as a person didn't make any difference who I was where I came from there was this moment of connection between two two children of God, and that's a profoundly beautiful experience. especially I think when it happens across faiths. Reassuring thing to know that there's so much more that unites says than divides us. This travel with Rick Steves were finding the sacred on the road with travel, writer and Pester. Laurie Erickson and.

Rick Steves Martin Luther writer Rome Laurie Ericsson Egan Laurie Erickson Megan Laurie Eric Walden pond US Europe pastor Episcopal Church Iowa Germany Heinz South America Tibetan Buddhist Temple North America
"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:19 min | Last month

"laurie eric" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"You can thank you so much for the I think the courage and the openness and the spirit of exploration to take a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Rome and then write about it. Thank you thank you. You can also listen to Tim. Megan's recent interview about the Immortal Irishman from our show archives. At Rick Steves DOT com slash radio. A clergywoman from Iowa has a few ideas you'll appreciate on travels to boost your spirit. That's next on travel. With Rick Steves. What places connect you with what you might think of as something holy or sacred as a travel writer and Episcopal Deacon? Laurie Eric's and has been on a dozen different pilgrimages in the US Europe South America and the Holy Land. They've taken her to learn about many forms of religious and spiritual practice. She collects these adventures and turn counters with spiritual leaders in her book called Holy Rover Journeys in search of mystery miracles and Laurie Ericsson. Welcome to travel with Rick. Steves thank you for having me. It is amazing when you think of the cultural diversity on this planet how much religious diversity there also is and it is pretty realistic test. Vice that into your travel dreams isn't it? Oh I think so and I think one of the things that people sometimes forget is that trips to holy sites or almost certainly the first tourism that it would be one of the reasons why you would be willing to leave the safety of your village in home when be on a religious quest of some sort so pilgrimage sites are I think the earliest form of tourism that we we know of and you can actually be moved and I love to be moved emotionally when I'm traveling and And you've done so much traveling where you get out of your comfort zone and you find yourself moved in ways. Should you didn't know you'd be moved now. In your book you explain how you were raised a Lutheran and then you traveled all over the world of religious faiths and you ended up back in the Christian fold. And now you're a pastor PISCOPO church at give us the rundown on your itinerary of different religions in your own personal faith journey. What RELIGIONS HAVE YOU EMBRACED? Just very very quickly. So I grew up Lutheran and then in my twenties I was a neo pagan and wiccan than I dabbled in Buddhism and then I came back to Christianity and became an Episcopalian and then sort of came back to Buddhism as well and also have a great respect for native American especially Lakota traditions. So I'm a real. I'm a Heinz fifty-seven seven sure are and I think in your book. You talk about how this wonderment of traveling with your faith in mind hits you when you noticed there were tears coming out of your. Ira in front of the desk where Martin. Luther translated the Bible in hiding in a castle in Germany. Five hundred years ago. What was that experience like? I think one of the reasons why it's good to travel to holy sites. Is that they teach us about ourselves. And so that experience of being where Martin. Luther translated the New Testament. Made me think about my childhood. Made me think about the strong faith of people that I had known when I was growing up and made me really valuate that I had been. I'd been too quick to throw that out and really gained much deeper. Respect for Martin Luther and what he had done as a result of that tears to me are powerful message from the divine. I haven't shared this much. I don't think anywhere but I was sitting on a carpet in a Mo in a mosque in the holy land in a monk. No an imam was evangelizing to me and he was filled with love and he was so beautiful and he hugged me and I cried and cried because it was so joyful to have a Muslim. Bring me to spiritual tears. Even though I'm a dyed-in-the-wool Christian it opened me up and it can be in less. You've done with native American. Faiths it can be thinking of Beautiful ideas when you're communing with nature at Walden pond it can be in a progression of Devout Catholics. At Lord's talk about a couple of places that have surprised you in your travels in that regard one of the chapters In my book is about Tibetan Buddhist Temple in Bloomington Indiana. And which is one of the major to Buddhist sites in North. America was founded by the elder brother of the current Dalai Lama and I was astonished to find a little bit of Tibet. In the middle of the Midwest. Ni- end. I was also really moved by the welcome that I had there. From the Rinpoche a Rhumba she has a word meaning honored teacher and that sort of experience that you had in in a mosque of just being welcomed as a person. It didn't make any difference who I was where I came from. There was this moment of connection between two two children of God. And that's a profoundly beautiful experience especially I think when it happens across fates reassuring thing to know that there's so much more that unites says than divides us. This is travel with. Rick Steves were finding the sacred on the road with travel writer and Pester Laurie Ericsson and.

Rick Steves Martin Luther Laurie Ericsson Holy Land writer Rome Megan Tim Laurie Eric Iowa Walden pond PISCOPO US South America Midwest Germany America Ira Indiana
"laurie eric" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:33 min | 9 months ago

"laurie eric" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"S who would dig up corpses and eventually decided digging up corpses too much work leaders murdered people and she examples of that in her Wax Museum and then she also had examples of King George and and other royal figures and would pay money to create really elaborate building that matched their royal garb and so she understood that these were things that would draw people in for a while had the most popular tourist site in Europe Dylan this has really been funded take atlas obscure all the fascinating sights and atlas obscure and see it through the lens of Halloween thanks for joining us and I hope you have it creepy thank you all of the CNN August clergywoman travelator takes us on a life-affirming trip with the not so grim reaper that's next on travel with Rick Steves family difficulties forced Episcopal Deacon Laurie Erickson to explore how our experience of the end of life varies around the world as it traveled under she's explored Mayan temples the value of the Kings in Egypt and even tourist destination graveyards. Laurie Eric's joins us now on travel with Rick Steves to share insights from her global tour of death and dying which she writes about in her book near the Exit. Laurie thanks for being with US thank you for having me Rick so you're an episcopal he can and you know pastors deal with life's stages and of course death but you add to that the experience of travel how is travel shaped the way you view death but I do have a somewhat unusual combination of interests and specialties I do think that there are surprising connections between travel indepth I have always looked to journeys to help me figure out things and to help me see how other people have dealt with some of these big questions thousands of life and many of the world's holy sites have a component of death in them and one way they might have been hallowed because of some tragedy or the might be healing shrines but I think there are a lot more correspondences between traveling death than people might realize so when I introduce a radio show we're going to talk about out near the exit a book about death the not so grim reaper you write that it's about death but it's not necessarily depressing how can you give us a more joyful spin on death well one of the truth the perennial truths that I discovered rediscovered for myself in researching and writing the book is that the knowledge did that we're going to die paradoxically is one of the best things we can do to live life more fully and with more zest and I think to that part of the reason why death is set to problematic subject is that we usually encounter it in a time of great grief and one of the reasons I think to travel with the grim reaper is is in my book is the chance to have a more philosophical perspective on debt to see the way in which other cultures have dealt with it does he mummies in Egypt for example that was strong experience for me and get the chance to think about it you know with a bit more of distance and to see it as part of this grand parade eight of life that we all experience it's a big package and it's interesting you see that because just a couple months ago I was in the famous capuchin monastery in Palermo in Sicily and surrounded by hundreds of corpses in their their skeletons still clothed hanging on the wall all around you I was with a capuchin friar among who took me on a wall can you give me a little sermon as we walked and he was joyful and I asked him why are you joyful and he just gave me the most beautiful comment about how all these corpses were a reminder to him that there's so much more to life than what we embrace here in our in our mortal little stint on earth and for him the strong belief in the afterlife this was just a celebration that this is a springboard to something else is that something that could resonate with other religions or is is that it a Christian approach to death oh absolutely I think there are a lot of correspondences across cultures and across religious traditions you know the details vary yeah of course but I think many many people of faith have a sense that death is not the end and that was one of the really fascinating things for me to.

Rick Steves Laurie Eric Laurie Erickson Wax Museum Laurie CNN King George Egypt Europe Dylan
"laurie eric" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"laurie eric" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Lawyer for the Texas Department of criminal Justice today told the Texas supreme court the disclosure of where the state gets its drugs used for lethal injection injection could result in physical harm. The state is trying to keep the pharmacy's name secret claiming opponents of the death penalty could conscious could launch a campaign of violence, Laurie. Eric Cunanan, are you wanting the pharmacy name has everything? But to name what's left. The only piece of information that's left in this case is the one piece of information that law enforcement needs to provide any measure of safety to the pharmacy. That is involved in this case a group of death penalty public defenders say the name of the pharmacy is necessary to ensure the drugs used in lethal injection is mixed correctly. The supreme court took a matter under advisement. Texas falls off the top of the list of the best driving states in America wallet. Hub puts out this list every year based on fifty different criteria such as roads gas prices and traffic last year, Texas, finish number one on the chart this year drops to fifth Texas finished tense for traffic and infrastructure, Texas, did do well though in gas prices one Texas lawmaker wants to state's minimum wage bumped up to fifteen bucks an hour. KRLD's? Chris summer has more house Bill won ninety four's from Houston area. State Representative Ron Reynolds, he says Texans currently working a forty hour week at seven twenty five an hour. Make just over fifteen thousand dollars a year Reynolds says eighty nine percent of those who would benefit from his planner overage twenty or more than half or female. Not you know, when you think about minimum wage, some high school student earning, you know, pocket money. This is people trying to support their families. Lot of single moms Reynolds says the fifteen dollar minimum wage would boost the state economy and provide greater stability for businesses. Chris summer, NewsRadio ten eighty KRLD..

Texas supreme court Texas Texas Department of criminal J Ron Reynolds Chris summer State Representative Eric Cunanan Laurie KRLD Houston America fifteen thousand dollars eighty nine percent fifteen dollar forty hour