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"lauren walsh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:46 min | 7 months ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Visual documentation of suffering around the world it's probably more obvious than ever but what is the purpose of taking and showing images of war and crisis what do we see in conflict photography what speaks to us and how is that change will join now live by Lauren Walsh author and photo journalism professor at New York University and by the award winning conflict photographer Ron I Viv welcome both Lauren has just written a book on conflict photography more on that in just a minute I'm gonna refer to it on I've got it here first Ron do you think you could say what do you think the primary role is today all of the war photographer it remains as it always has been this this desire to raise awareness to make the public knowledgeable what's going on in the world and photography being a universal language is something that can often change the some idea of what what are normally refer to as statistics and as example of ten thousand people died here which is the number that is hard to comprehend but when you see an image of somebody somebody that suffered a death or relatives that is mostly reacting to it it changes the viewers reaction to this whole concept do you need to shock is that the only way of moving people I'm not sure it's only shock I think it's looking more for empathy is trying to say you know what your human being people these photographs remain beans and even though they might come from a different part of the world such as always a shock on day I think they are but I think it's important that the way that the photographers are bring those photographs to the viewers as a way to create more of an emotional relationship with the image not to just say like look how horrible this is but also to have a a feeling of I want to help I want to change something I want to understand what's happening Lauren feel book you spoke to run another award winning photographers and and leading photo editors about their experiences tell us about the whole idea behind the book sure the book is conversations on conflict photography just came out and I wanted to think about the role and the value of conflict photography in the contemporary world in a way that I couldn't find in any other books and that was to give voice to the people who make and distribute this kind of imagery so the photographers the photo editors tell us about some of the photos in the book there's a range of photos there are the ones that would fall under that heading of shocking and there are some with dead bodies but there are plenty of images that you would also call beautiful there some you might even calls serene because I think conflict photography can take many forms and conflict doesn't just happen on the front lines of pleads far back from that affects civilians and run photography can change politics counted even a single shot I'm looking from this book a photo of the opposition party candidate for vice president in Panama being attacked by parliament paramilitary supporter of the dictator of Panama this is from may nineteen eighty nine the man's wearing a white shirt that he's hate with blood it's a very dramatic photo is as the protests to raise a stick to him tell us about the impact of that one well the impact which was during an election held by a dictator and the mac covered in blood was the vice president elect being beaten up by paramilitary supporter of the photographs for one up in the covers of many magazines and newspapers around the world and basically told the world that this dictatorship in Connemara was violence was abusing human rights and the United States which at that time and a supporter of the dictator has started to change its policy seven months later when the United States invaded Panama US president George W. bush actually mention the photograph is one of the justifications for the invasion it wasn't that I supported the concept of the invasion but it was his understanding that the tower if you like this could play a role in communication information and education I think that is what we are all trying to do in this world conflicts I just handed Tom rivers another example of a photo that he'll ask you about and maybe describe Tom run it is the the R. can paramilitaries and an individual standing over someone who's just been shot on the streets in the in Bosnia in nineteen ninety two and they kicking the dead bodies are controlling the dead bodies let me ask you this question Ron do you feel that in in this world of the internet social media two pictures have the same impact today is they had maybe in nineteen ninety two are we desensitize as a society the conversation desensitization has been going on since I started doing this job in nineteen eighty nine and so all without question there is an over abundance of imagery I think we only need to look at certain images from the last few years look at the impact of what they've had so we look at the picture of Alan Kurdi the young artist child on the beach look at how that photographs change the conversation about refugees migrant eccentric you look at the United States a photograph from the US Mexican border of a small child crying one while the mother is being interrogated by border police that change the conversation the United States so photograph still can rise above the noise and still have great impact about question the photos that was just mentioned that was used in trials in the war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia wasn't it wrong it actually was it was used a number of trials to indict and convict war criminals in fact actually doing research on the photograph first on that I'm working on with Lawrence we discovered that there's a speech given at the beginning of the Hague that the photograph was actually given credit for the inspiration for starting the whole tribunal Laurie curry you know I think this point that you made Lauren about how this is even behind the front lines this is affecting huge numbers of people and I I mean I've found and and I think that's what you're referring to to that you know these are people just like us is the thing and and we're just lucky that we were not the ones there there's there's very little difference and I think when these photos help they can give you that that feeling don't tell you look at this image of these people in a lying there in a sweater on the ground anything how you know that could be any yeah absolutely I think a number the photographers that I spoke to for the book talk exactly about that point of trying to collapse that bridge of distance and to make you identify you the viewer identify in some way like I have a child and I'm seeing a child who's injured and therefore and as Ron was saying I feel some kind of empathy I need to know more with that particular photograph from Bosnian nineteen ninety two when up for this film that run in there doing biography of a photo we've interviewed many people and most people will respond to the sweater right that the the civilian she's on the ground and it's a very identical identifiable sweater and they'll often say oh my mom had a sweater like this or I have a sweater like that and yet becomes a point of identification away for a person to move inside a photo and a history that may otherwise have been outside from their life are you sometimes worried about an unhealthy interest of in images of extreme violence and conflict some people will look such images on the internet just because of the content I think it's something to certainly think about when I interviewed the photo editors they're the ones who are often grappling with this how much how much violent imagery do I allow it to go forward to be disseminated how much do we hold back and most of the photo editors that I interviewed would say things like if it's so violent that it's going to make the viewer turned away I don't want to publish it I want to pull you into the story not push you away from the story I don't want to create sensationalized stories I don't I mean that was this even a question of how much let's say terrorist created imagery should we are a true media entity ever publish a because it's it is news when terrorists attack but you also don't want to give a platform to terrorists so this this question of do we disseminate that kind of imagery or not run a final word to you on this war photographers are a red breed and they often die early if not that mentally affected by the things that they witness how long do you intend to go on well I mean I I have actually grappled with the concepts like PTSD and saunas and many of my colleagues and something to appreciate its impact but I do think that having witnessed the impact of my photography on the world it's it's it continues to inspire me that I need to keep doing work like this as well as the next generation has to come in and do it and and they are doing it sing amazing work from current conflicts that are affecting the way people think about the way the world works today many thanks Ron Aviv photographer and Lauren Walsh author of a new book called conflict photography you with weekends on the World service and was staying with photography now at the end of the program but photography of a very different type of woman of another era mentioned door a mall and generally people either what know the name might vaguely remember that she was once the girlfriend of artist Pablo Picasso a new exhibition at the Tate modern here in London sets out to reclaim Dora mas own artistic work as photographer and painter Arantes correspondent Vincent Dowd has this report the new show it mixes cultural and social history and passionate romance in nineteen thirties in nineteen thirty five Dora Marr was stills photographer to Paris film studio she met Pablo Picasso twenty six years her senior and already famous mark became his lover and some claim the most important news he ever had professor Mary and cools wrote a book about your mom a very great fashion photographer fascinating because as a such peculiar photographs very surrealist arriving shadow we and that feeling of sort of doom and gloom round them and then some remarkably funny she was so dramatic durable and also with to get that for eight years she photographed progress on his best known painting in nineteen thirty seven his portrait crying woman was in part at least based on her but the early a photography was almost forgotten commission for elegant fashion magazines and documentary work recording the poor of Paris Catalonia and briefly London and a Louis Tate modern there's a kind of dark glamour two door mas work there's also a playful element that is times borders on the subversive on assignments for friends street photography she also contributed to surrealism after they split mark more often painted this just one recording of Dora ma made in nineteen ninety by Francis Morris who now runs take Milton did you cry a lot because so well this is the best it's a little bit too personal to talk about she says the years with cancer who did bring happiness but also fury biographer Mary and Coles says as a personality Dora mall was the castle's match it was certainly the most intellectual of them she could talk about so when we got to get an echo anything else world events she could discuss them of course in Spanish with him he was with a as well as dramatic and her kind of a motion then carries over into that discussion and what was going on do you sing she just accepted that she would not have frankly that no woman would have an exclusive relationship with Pablo Picasso accepted anything that whole angah meant that she never never accepted anything door model was not accepting person the exhibition has well over two hundred images marshaled for fashion magazines exhibitions and a real take reviews I'm a Lewis says she deserves to be reassessed to remind us to reduce photography for to montage assessing the better nine nowadays some elements of this exhibition the street photography the extent of her commercial photography I think will be a surprise to many visitors as well have painting but it's it's almost impossible for anyone who's in cafes orbit to survive that without being someone that the existence of the cast a shadow history is how does that and now is the opportunity to look again at the stick is it's very difficult to know we can only speculate what would have been most courageous victory had she not cast a interest indoor mall after her years with cancer who used to be nonexistent the show let's take molten runs until March and asks if Dora Marr should not be more than just a footnote in someone else's biography Vincent download reporting Laurie a woman in Picasso's life was and the intellectual match of the great man who to thought off the art world is getting a little less sexist I think it's really interesting it's a moment where these women are coming out from the shadow of these men and you realize that they were in every way they're equal but it just wasn't the the time where they were allowed to be recognized for that I just saw I mean I completely astonishing exhibition of the of Jackson Pollock's wife work here in London and I was floored that I had not heard of her and seen this before it was amazing and so I think it's it's a you know just things have changed and people are going back and looking a little deeper these people that were just completely in the shadow of someone bacon fans hello I think I think it's it's great and the times are changing and and and yes it it becomes more of a a wider review of of what maybe things that we thought we knew about and now we see a more full and detailed complex picture how about all the books that were probably written by the female companion to the famous male right but there's some well and to get my daughter has a sign up this is anonymous was a woman good points nori caring and told rivers have been our guests during the course of the last half hour on this edition.

New York University Lauren Walsh professor Ron I twenty six years seven months eight years Milton
"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

01:55 min | 8 months ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Is located at one fifty West Seventeenth Street which is just down the street. From one of the original locations of being h photo Daulat listeners would like to catch up on more of your work which websites instagram. Where could they go to see more of your work? Dot Com three three dot net. That's my own site in the agency but I also run a blog shade. The News Dot Com So those would be good but there is the show coming up at the Vienna Next month in the later this month in thirteen thirty in London. And we'll have all of this information in our show notes And as a book should be buying looking at you should now have arrived at the Rubin on Steidl which is fabulous publisher of books. Folks I mean Hera came to a festival in March. He said I wanted to your book. I said you know I've got a show at Rubin in November Says Keeping The manuscript is August. I'll give you a book. And he did it was I just came from going in and the work incredibly hard all shifts weekends and I've just been told that the book has physically arrived. It's called the tide will turn it's edited by. Vj Shot but it also has a beautiful letter by the great writer around the Roy. Okay all right Lauren. Your new book is conversations on conflict. The target fee and it's available now right. Yes it's been out since early October. Okay and I was just flipping through the early and it's it's a powerful book that I definitely want to go back and Revisit Fisher. Thank you really really good and if people want to catch up on more of what you're up to can they go to Lauren. Walsh DOT COM easy. Okay and again all this will be our show notes as well Lauren. Welcome back against against always great having you as a guest here Shell pleasure honor having you here in our studio It was a fascinating discussion..

"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

12:19 min | 1 year ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Honey, a Balkan war journal Afghanistan, the road to Kabul and Haiti twelve January two thousand. Ten his most recent book lost roles led to the project. We're going to be discussing today lost roles America. Lauren Walsh, should we also had the pleasure of speaking with it photo Ville is a writer and professor at both the new school and NYU. We, she's the director of the gallatin schools. Photo journalism lab Lauren is the editor of Macondo a photo book, documenting the long-term conflict in Colombia and co editor of the collection, the future of text and image. She's also the co editor of the millennium villages project of photography book on efforts to relieve extreme poverty, and sub Saharan Africa her latest book conversations on conflict, photography examines, the value of documenting war, and humanitarian crisis in the contemporary moment. She's also currently co directing with Rana Vive biography of a photo, a documentary film about two iconic images of conflict that have shaped the course of history. Welcome, lauren. Welcome Ron great to see you. Is again, like earned having us this project. We were talking just before the show started up, we've been reviewing it lately, and it's more than just pictures from rolls of film that people have finding it's an incredible insight into people's connection to photography. Before we start talking back bring us up to date about how this project started with two hundred rolls of film, and how it got to where it is today. Well, it started actually with a conversation with Dan Milner, a photographer, large in amazing expert on photography who works with blurb, the on demand publishing covering and blurb had just come out with new technology to do on traditional press photo books, and they were looking for people to work with to show how great the quality of these books were sedan came me today. Do you have an idea for a book, and I kinda thought about it, and we're kind of batted around snidey as and I said, you know, Dan, I've got, like thirty forty rolls of film in. A ziplock bag in my studio that I shot I don't really know what's on it. Maybe we should take a look at that. And said, sure, you know, we'll pay for the processing, which is obviously expensive, especially for freelance photographer, like myself. So I was like, okay great. It was sent off the film, and we got the pictures back, and it was like, oh, this is kind of interesting. It was a mix of personal and professional and sedan is kind of interesting. You know, I have another sixty seventy rolls of film. Okay. Come on. Let's let's do that one. We did that in law, this really getting interesting. So, Dan, you know, I have another hundred rolls that I found kind of basically going through my studio, and finding bags where former assistant to sort of talk them into filing cabinets and so on stuff. I didn't even know where it was collected as much as I could find and we processed all the film. And what kind of started out is one, a exercise, just get film developed, and then to kind of all of this could be come a gimmicky kind of thing all of a sudden turned into something much more serious. And as Dan and I started to look at the work as kind of came across and started to answer the question me about some of the photographs which were connected, of course, to my life about my memory, what I remembered, what I didn't remember and how we were looking at a number of the images had actual physical mold on it, and color shifts. And it was it was a mix of everything from processing. Coda chrome. In the black and white process lab to color nag to slide film that, you know, the greens shifted, and so on and, and other stuff like black and white film, Triax came out, like the shot twenty years ago, it was perfect, and that those sort of changes on the decoration, the film, started to mirror, my all sort of degradation my memory as I'm getting older. I was starting to realize that I wasn't remembering everything, and I was starting to look at photographs, and I would not know where these photographs were taken, I knew people were, I know what was happening and one of the things for throughout my career having documented, so many historical moments from nineteen eighty nine till present that people would often come to me and say, do you have a diary, or do you take notes and say, like, no, I don't because I know that whenever I look at a photograph I can tell you what's happening in that for rap what happened before. What happened after insanely couldn't I realized by not having? That connection of processing, the film within a certain period of time after shooting it, I lost that that bond between or the meta data creation. I lost it and this became one very disconcerting to me, again, kind of talking about my own kind of memory, but also the, the fascinating kind of exploration, and there were also like all of a sudden photographs, kind of appearing, all of a sudden of, of great friend allies on Boola, who was one of the founders with me at seven, who passed away a few years ago, and all of a sudden, she pops up on the screen at a wedding, and it was like all of a sudden these like bitter sweet like I'm so happy to see her she's smiling. She looks beautiful, but at the same time kind of ignoring the loss of a friend, or there was another series of photographs of these people middle-aged couple or maybe a little bit older. Looking at me, like I'm family. It was a kind of one of those family pictures. I had no idea who they were I went around to my family. Nobody else. Who, who they are to this day? And no idea why these people are on my phone, and then I wasn't your and it was your film, though. It was yes because there were other images on that role. I recognize but not right. Were there any chance that there would have been an incredibly important photograph in any of these films? I mean so, so happens a word on there were a few photographs primarily because, basically, I guess people the first questions people as a professional photographer. How did you wind up with so many roles that you never do out and actually cheesy? But also just to explain it, so basically. That's two hundred rolls of film is from twenty five years. Right. So you're talking about less than ten roles a year and what actually happened was, especially in the beginning of my career where was so expensive to process. I would go and shoot something on spec. Then I would pitch it and if nobody was interested, I would just put the rolls aside and said later, when I have money, I'll develop it, and they never happened. And then as I got more successful, I would say off to incitement for the New York Times, magazine and Kathy Ryan and say, okay, we want to shoot it this way in colored, I would doubt put all the energy into that. But it also have a two and a quarter black and white camera just to shoot gave her an option. And sometimes the editor weather's Kathy somebody else will say, yeah, we'll process it and other times it say now we're not really interested in also kind of put it aside. Or now, I know this is like again going way back to the days of film. But there were times when you're shooting in advance in New York, you're inside shooting, a press conference, you're shooting, tungsten, three twenty and all of a sudden you have to run outside. You've only shot five frames on that role. You rewind. I'll shoot it later, you put it in the bag. Then you go to the airport five times, you realize, oh, that we'll film is still there. I'm not going to give that to anybody put that aside. So it was kind of all these mix of different things and then stuff of my family or, or girlfriends, or so on kind of all getting kind of mixed up into pile, so that eventually winds up into this amalgamation of a lot of roles and kind of these little snippets of, of my life. And it was so this, this book, the loss roles became the sort of fascinating conversation about memory about the end of the analog error about my own life and the first thing that. This sort of conversation on the bigger picture was asked Loren Loren. I had met, we, she interviewed me for her book conversations on conflict photography in Lawrence, an expert, a memory and photography. So I asked her to write one of the essays in the book the book was published, and they went out on this book tour. And as I traveled around the United States, I would ask people who here has a roll of film undeveloped, in undeveloped, roll of film, that's exposed sitting in the camera box and almost always more than fifty percent of the audience would raise their hand and say, I don't know what to do with it. The phone amount is gone. I have no idea what to do this film, or there's no place to do it. Or we just put it aside and start shooting where their iphone or whatever or before that the instamatic. So there are all these different variations of things that replaced kind of traditional negative film shooting, and at that point, I was like, wait a minute. This is really interesting in that I started to hear stories like one friend of mine came to me and said. My father just passed away. My sisters went to the house to start cleaning up in he arrived, a day later or something like that. And he asked him like, what did you guys do they, and they said, oh, yeah. We found a bunch of film will obviously, there's nothing to do with it of film, so we threw them away. Oh. And that's not an unusual story that people think like this is basically useless that are start throwing away their film and all sudden it's like, wait a minute. This could be a real opportunity, a call to action like to save these memories that are locked away. Exactly, like what happened with me. So basically that was the sort of the birth of loss, roles America, and then basically asking Lauren to get involved in Robert peacock on to get involved on. We decided to expand this and most importantly, we brought Fuji film America on board who are processing scanning the film, free. I mean, this is all for free, and then we're cricketing to crack otherwise. Major piece. So this is a huge part. In Lauren talk a little bit more about the value of this public archive because it's pretty it's pretty unique. I think one fast question I do have you when you start asking people if they had rules of film is about fifty percent of the audience would have film ranges, from Eleni all to up. Okay. So there'd be millennials who's like when they were fifteen were given a camera and shot it. And then just toss it aside to what percentage of these people said, I don't even know it's on this role compared to people said, you know, I have is film. I know it's on it, but I never developed any idea what the ratio between unknown mysteries. And I'd say the majority did not know what they say. I'm really not sure what's on new based on what I read in the archive description. Okay. So just immediately put out, which is obviously the first the next question, somebody will ask is, I don't want you looking at my. So we set up a system, another important partner in the project is photo shelter, and so what photos, the film gets scanned at CRC labs here. New York sent over to photo shelter to secure website that only the viewer can see viewer then chooses. The one one or two images are right about they can download the scans the negatives again. Then get returned to them. And basically, we don't we don't go and look at the work is completely Mitch determined by by the so you haven't used that you end up keeping with it. They ended up donating to the project who owns those pictures. Is it a shared copyright, you own them how we have the rights to use the photographs it's part of the agreement? Okay. Submit to use the photographs in relationship to anything connected to loss roles America. Gotcha. But we can't I can't go and give the extra Getty or sell it to coke Farren. I would immediately goes, I'm a photographer. I'm obviously. The Tigers and you don't take a look at the, the other the only they choose the ones they want and the rest are unknown to you guys pretty and how do you feel about that aspect of it? And wondering as a photographer and editor, whoever, you know what if there's something much better on that role and what's more interesting or that's of no concern? It's really their memories and there, it's a power of that archive and learn go more into it. It's exactly what it is. I think it's a different way of thinking about what is better or best when it comes to Darby, it's not about the composition, or the visual per se. But it's, it's the combination between what you're looking at and the, the memories in stories if people decide to share..

Lauren Walsh editor America Dan Milner New York Rana Vive Kabul Haiti NYU Ron Colombia New York Times Saharan Africa Kathy Ryan director Afghanistan gallatin schools Tigers coke Farren
"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"There are some of them members are indigenous most of these photographs digital or analog because I would imagine animal film in developing and he's kind of exotic where you're working. Well, yes, it is. But I would say I've been photographs will kill killer analog their film photographs developed by Hotan Kilani sock and printed in the dark room. And these are all silver gelatin print. So one third of what is here is completely analog film photography and printed in silver gelatin. The rest is digital. Can we speak. Higest crowd easier also. Can you your role in this project share? I just recently got on board with Pablo any sack. And basically since they're mostly based in Chapas, they wanted some feet on the ground in New York, and I did my master's thesis in Chapas about five years ago and studied anthropology and human rights. And I've just been really interested in how many different layers. There are to tell the story of Chavez through every single generation, and there's just been a lot of polarize views, and a lot of as Pablo is saying reclaiming of the indigenous narrative there and sort of celebrating, but also trying to adapt that narrative into the way. Mexico is evolving as a nation. We're familiar with your work. When you were there at working on your degree. I was familiar with track. I'm gonna this. I know I know bunch of people there. Yeah. Pretty interesting like we didn't know how to expect with like their resolve the people looking at the pictures because the pictures are not pretty are more document. Some of them I really strong in the sense of why they were present. So we were, you know. Winston corrected, many of them are very strong and looking around, you're not so many. So what did they know how to spec how people will be e? Yeah, so so far is so interesting that we are having connections with people that are interested in Tijuana's and some of them, they just remember places or even though photo efforts that are in this exhibition. So has been really amazing. I just say that Chapas is a place that if you've been there, it really takes a hold of you. And so the people that you know have come by that have had any sort of contact with the region are just so excited to see the stories here in New York. We believe in the power of the image as an element to that been shaping a reality in the sense of memory, I have learned from kill to print and from his follows from his history. So that's the image that connected us and we are connected now with this project. And we trying to connect more people with a pictures with four of us with history. Bill is a great opportunity for all of working in Chiapas to connect to the larger world of autocracy. That's why we came. That's why we organized this exhibit because we know here in New York. There's such a strength of organizations and work in photography, and we think that it's worth for people to know about what's happening down in the south of Mexico, not just in Mexico City, but also for folks down there to connect to the organizations and the activity of photography. New York stood good job here. Thank you. Thank you very much. We hope you're enjoying this edition of the h. photography podcast. Send us a tweet at be h photo, video Pash tag h photo podcast. Okay. We speaking with Ron her div and Lauren Walsh of the seven project, and the pictures here are pretty startling who'd like to tell us about a little overview of the film and then Ron can give you some background. So it's a film about two photographs. One was taken in Panama thousand nine hundred nine..

New York Chapas Mexico Pablo Hotan Kilani Winston Ron Tijuana Mexico City Chavez Bill Lauren Walsh Panama Chiapas five years
"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"The nice folks over at the pin number foundation. There's also a food and beer garden and photographs are everywhere, but a majority of the exhibitions are housed in shipping containers. And like last year we wanted about the events speaking with the Taga Fers editors and exhibit curator's first up, we're going to speak with Michael Lorenzini of the New York City municipal archives who alone with Matthew minor organized a show from the archive of the WPA federal writers project. We spoke with Michael about this impressive collection and his thoughts about the mission of the municipal archive, which he's been part of for over two decades. We stay in the new cruise. We speak with teachers and students from to New York City high schools, the high school of fashion industries, and my alma mater the high school of art and design. We had a chance to talk about the long standing photography programs and their current exhibit telling a story and selling an idea from there. We head over to an exhibit consequences slash consequences, which was organized by photographers from Shabbat Mexico. After a short break, we're going to return with Ron Viv and Dr Lauren Walsh of the seven foundation. Exhibit the focus of our chat is their upcoming film. Biography of a photo which traces the impact of two photographs. Ron Aviv took early in his career which have left indelible marks on the countries in which they were taken not to mention pretty much everybody who's viewed these photographs. Our next stop is to contain a curated by the authority collective and their exhibit the littlest thirty under the radar photographers. Here we're going to speak with members of the collective and photographer Arlene Geraldo whose work is included and we wrap up this visit. Fota Ville two thousand eighteen by speaking with curator Krista Dick's from the Los Angeles based gallery wall space, creative about their exhibit internal ballistics. Let's start with Michael Lorenzini from the New York City. Municipal archives with Michael Lauren's Zini with the WPA archive. We got some amazing black and white photographs. They go back decades specifically from the w. Which the nineteen thirties, correct? Yeah. The WPA was part of the Roosevelt's new deal Depression-era ways of battling unemployment. They had a number of different projects, and one of the largest ones involved the arts was w pay federal writers project. Now you said writers photographers. So the there was the federal art project, and there was the federal writers project, and there was federal music and theater and all these things. But the federal writers project had units in states which are forty eight states at the time, and they had a New York City unit, which was the largest of the units, and they collected photographs from the federal projects, and they also had their own staff otographer is that they sent out to document a lot of those photographs. Once that most peop- a lot of people are familiar with this notable photographers want to rattle off a few names. Well, I, I mean the in this exhibit the names, people are going to recognize. Is Dorothea Lang and Bernice Abbott, and we do have an number Abbott prints in the in the collection and couple of Dorothea lines. But I think what's interesting about the show is a lot of the other photographs are by either. We don't know, took them or their by photographers. The general public hasn't heard heard of before. How many were there. They're all together. We have never been able to compile a complete list of all all the photographers. Because like I said, some of them are are not lie on not listed in the in the New York City unit, though. I think we've been able to at least two dozen photographers and in that collection but the and but then he also collected, like I said, photographs on the federal art project and for commercial photographers. I think what's interesting is that a lot of these photographs, if you look at them, they're almost snapshots and they're kind of you'd even say mundane in many, many ways, the ordinary yet when you look at them, they are record of some of things that people in places that don't exist anymore. And they say an awful lot. You look at one photograph you seeing architecture, seeing the way people are dressed. You seeing automobiles, you're seeing occupations that don't even exist anymore. You don't see too many push cards now now. So the inspiration for the show is a one thousand nine hundred show that was done..

New York City Michael Lorenzini Michael Michael Lauren Bernice Abbott Dorothea Lang Shabbat Mexico Ron Aviv Arlene Geraldo Dr Lauren Walsh Ron Viv Matthew Krista Dick Los Angeles Roosevelt two decades
"lauren walsh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today's lesson in everything on the, internet lives, forever comes, courtesy of. Major league baseball Sean nukem trae Turner Josh hater they, are all pro baseball players in their mid twenties and each of them has had to apologize over. The past two weeks for homophobic and racist tweets. They sent back when they were. In high school Lawrence Walsh. Is a brand strategy she works with. Professional athletes she's here. To, talk more about it. Welcome to the. Program hi thanks for having me so just? Clear are any. Of. These players clients. Of yours they are not okay you sound relieved So we learned, of you from reading an Associated. Press story about this so we know you have, some thoughts if you, have a twenty five, year, old client who is new basically do you just say. Out of the gate go clean your social media posts yes. For anyone anyone that we work with, that's actually, the first step that we take as we go through every single account that, they've ever? Had and? Look at every single post that they've ever put up since the inception of the account is deleting enough I mean I feel like. You can find, anything on the internet especially stuff that? Maybe is. Forgotten you can have a lot of times people even you know these days we'll take screen, shots however, you just, have to. Do what is in your control so you have to, hope that you know deleting is enough but also we asked the questions I've you know do you. Have people out there who may be have a. Vengeance against you pass relationships are. There is there anyone else. That we need to speak with where. Somewhere down the line. Something, could come up in. The world of. Sports everyone's got rifles so that seems like? A tall order. It. Is it is Definitely? Isn't. And you, never know how it's going. To come out but the thing is it's about being prepared so that when it comes out you have a plan and that's typically what we try to do is we will ask our clients and say just be. Honest with, is is there anyone out there who may have something, on you and what they have. A reason to bring it to light and if, they say yes we're, going to dig into, it, and we're gonna actually have an action plan you know. It may we may keep it away and it may never. Have to be used but there is, a plan, in place that we can get ahead of that issue soon as it comes, out okay? So that's? How you advise people in the meantime do you think there should be a kind of statute of limitations on some of these tweets. Some of these, players have have said look I was. Young I. Was stupid You know. I was kidding and I was a kid should they be, held to account. For, things they did when they were teens here's the thing it comes down to who are they today if they are a different person because for a. Lot of them it was honestly seven eight nine years ago then you have, to give them a. Little bit of the benefit of the doubt because we all were different people back then, however if their actions today, are still reflecting things that they put out back then then of course they absolutely need to be held accountable solve that? We know that there, are, young people for instance who try and keep their Facebook clean so to speak. Because they, know that. Colleges might be looking at their social media do you think young athletes, have felt the same way I mean is this them kind of catching up to their peers I actually think. That. It hasn't really come across as. Strongly as it. Showed I'm hoping that seeing the consequences that these athletes are facing that it will However I? Still think a lot of a lot, of, these young athletes. Think that they're Invincible or they also thank you know who am. I. I, you know I'm a high school and the high school student athlete I'm not a professional athlete, who cares what I put out there so hopefully. It starts to ring true but I, also want, to put a little bit of onus on the coaches and on the staff and the people who are viewed as leaders. And the people around them who are setting the example? To have, them push a little bit harder and say look it? Doesn't matter what you put out today it's something that could come out ten. Fifteen twenty years from now and have an effect on you, Lauren Walsh is. The, president and CEO of l. w. branding PR sports agency thanks so much thank you You're listening to all things considered on WNYC.

Lawrence Walsh president and CEO baseball Lauren Walsh Sean nukem Facebook Josh seven eight nine years Fifteen twenty years two weeks
"lauren walsh" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"lauren walsh" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"How are you doing great. This is a. Whole new vista for folks. Like me who are a little bit longer of, tooth remember when athletes. Were known, for what they did on the field and maybe doing the TV commercial where they shaved without water but, now they have to be so aware. Of how they do not just now in the moment but also how they comported themselves in the past right, I know we've, just confirmed, a digital world that everything. That happens off the, field You know whether it's on your social media what you're doing in public someone is recording it. Right as you mentioned gonna screen shot and somehow some way it will come to surface Lauren it's gotta be it's a fine. Line too because on the one hand if you want to generate followers and get re tweets he, kinda got to walk the little bits and on. The? Other hand you go over that edge is going to have the completely bad effect Yeah I think. You're absolutely right so what, we usually do with our clients you know we put it out there To allow their fans you get, to know the next person because when it comes to being a professional athlete you people put them. On this pedestal and forget, that they are human figure out a way to yourself was on. The, fan for connect so you. Wanna do that but there are certain things, that you, stay away from certain topics That obviously that that old thing that your parents used. To say you know think twice about it you know maybe you shouldn't put it. Out there and we kind of stand by the same rules our clients rely with Lauren, Walsh l., w. branding agency that handles athletes. In their social media both their their. Past in their present I think. A lot of what struck people about this hater. Story Lauren is the fact that we know you shouldn't do certain things on social media we think that younger people are certainly more savvy than older folks like us, who maybe you know just throw it all out there don't realize that this stuff is, eternal younger folks are more savvy yet, we see younger people consistently getting caught these things I'm guessing you must see it with some of. The clients you deal with, that you get to it before it hits the light of day We do I, mean every, every client that we work with. Before they even reach the draft and. Try to get them before they're. Even going in any sort of training before the. Combine but we literally go through every single post that has ever been put out there from the time that they signed up for an account He I think back I mean it has seven years of dot But he writes seventeen and when he was, seventeen nowhere in the back of his mind was he thinking Monday I'm going to be in the all. Star game, in someone's, going to find what I'm saying here today so that's I mean that's. Exactly, what we're doing after we encourage agents or the actual players wow is that you, have to, go back to it, because the thing. That you know professional athletes their career is athlete it's the, same we see it in the professional world, where your corporate professional they get caught whether it's thirty interview process. They don't get hired or someone, finds that they put out there the same thing goes for that, so, so different for professional athletes and isn't, it also wise advice Lauren that if you do have sex tape you should keep it locked up in the Bank. Deposit vault and take. It out, and watch it on your birthday Yeah oh yeah absolutely yeah because everyone has raised.

Lauren Bank Walsh l. seven years one hand