17 Burst results for "Lauren Vogelbaum"

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:44 min | 2 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"My ground contact time to help me run faster. It's also using GPS to learn my favorite routes. So I can race against myself. And all I have to do is run. Apple watch series 8. Now with an enhanced workout app, advanced health sensors, and car crash detection. The future of health is on your wrist. iPhone 8 or later required. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and this, this is a classic episode of the podcast. Today's episode goes into the historical and technical sides of how southern style biscuits work. Hey brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here. When you think of light fluffy biscuits, you may think of the other traditional foods from the American south that they pair so well with a fried chicken, gravy, and homemade jam. But biscuits like the ones we eat today in the United States are fairly modern culinary creations. Throughout much of history, biscuits weren't at the center of dreamy breakfasts or chicken dinners. They were hard, thin, durable, dry, and meant for survival. The word biscuit comes from the Latin word panic biscuits, which means twice baked. And so it's no coincidence that a biscuit was once similar to biscotti, the Italian cookies that actually are twice baked. Soldiers in Ancient Rome received hard biscuits in their rations. They had no leavening agent or fat, so they lasted a long time. Hard biscuits of some type were the MREs or meals ready to eat of military personnel for centuries, and have been known by the names hard tech, ship's biscuit, Seabiscuit, and pilot bread. Fast forward to the antebellum south. Biscuits were still tough and flat, and typically were only eaten in wealthy homes. Most people living in the south at the time ate cornbread instead. That's because most mills in the south were great at grinding corn, but not at processing wheat. So only the rich could afford flour, which often had to be shipped in from northern states. Beaten biscuits, which could be considered the precursor to the modern southern biscuit, were only a little better than hardtack. They included fat like butter or lard, but still no leavening agent. So beaten biscuits remained flat and only slightly lighter because the dough required 15 minutes of kneading or beating. It wasn't until several 19th century innovations came along that we got what's now recognized as a southern biscuit. First, better flour mills, most of them in the Midwestern United States, and increased wheat production, dropped the price of flour enough that less than wealthy southerners could also afford to buy flour. And the development of chemical leavening agents, such as potassium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, and sodium bicarbonate, what we now call baking soda helped biscuits reach new heights without yeast or beaten eggs..

Lauren vogelbaum Lauren Vogel Ancient Rome Apple United States
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:35 min | 3 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and this is another classic episode of the podcast. In this one, we get to the bottom of a much repeated but completely untrue myth that consuming dairy products increases your mucus production. Hey, brain stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here. Medical myths are stubborn. Going back to ancient China, texts associated the consumption of milk with a thickening of phlegm. And 12th century Jewish physician Moses maimonides wrote in his treatise on asthma that milk could cause, quote, a stuffing in the head that exacerbated symptoms of asthma. 800 years later, doctor Spock, a 20th century American pediatrician who wrote a popular book about baby care, directed parents to limit dairy while babies were sick, especially with upper respiratory infections. For nearly a thousand years, medical professionals have been telling us to lay off the dairy or face the mucus consequences. But is it true? A review of the literature published in September of 2018 in the journal archives of disease and childhood concludes that there is virtually no connection between dairy products and upper respiratory mucus. And that the myth might actually be preventing children with conditions like asthma, cystic fibrosis, or even the common cold, from getting enough nutrients, like calcium. According to the review, studies dating back to 1948 have indicated that there's no link between milk and flam. But the myth is pervasive. A 2003 study in the journal appetite asked 345 random Australian shoppers, whether they thought milk causes mucus. Of the a 111 shoppers who drank whole milk, almost half of them were of the opinion that it did. But only 25% of the 121 reduced fat milk drinkers said that they believed milk caused mucus. The difference in perception might have something to do with how milk feels in the mouth. It is, after all, just droplets of fat suspended in water. The current researchers wrote in their review, this could well affect the sensory perception of milk mixed with saliva, both in terms of its thickness, coating the mouth, and the after feel. When small amounts of emulsion remain in the mouth after swallowing. This may explain why so many people think that more mucus is produced when, in fact, it's the aggregates of milk emulsion that they are aware of lingering in the mouth after swallowing. So it's really just a feeling, not a fact. And furthermore, the researchers suggest that since milk is a good source of calories and minerals like calcium, the long-standing cultural belief that milk is bad for children with respiratory problems could mean kids aren't getting the nutrients they need. This could lead children growing up with weaker bones and shorter stature..

Lauren vogelbaum Lauren Vogel asthma Moses maimonides respiratory infections Spock cystic fibrosis China
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Things you can do, like asking your healthcare provider if an authorized oral treatment is right for you. Learn about an option at treat COVID-19 dot com. This message is sponsored by Pfizer. Hey, there's a better way to fly. Instead of being stuck in endless lines and packed onto planes, try simplifying your travel with surf air, save an average of two hours on every trip and avoid crowded airports with a new way to fly private, with surf air, you'll fly from smaller airports closer to your home. There are no lines, no waiting, and no stress. Surf air dot com, the best alternative to commercial air travel that makes flying easy. Get a free quote on your next flight at surf air dot com. There's a better way to fly private. This clip is brought to you by Coca-Cola. The holidays always find a way. It's about enjoying the real magic of the season by surrounding yourself with good friends and family, delicious food, and of course an ice cold Coke. This is our very first episode as look at the radio for the Michael duda network. We're beyond thrilled. We're in a legitimate studio space, and we have not seen the inside of one of these in many years. Coca-Cola, proud partner of the Michael dura podcast network. Listen to new episodes of your favorite shows, available on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. The holiday season can be magical, joyous, festive, and expensive. Very, very expensive. And if you think we mere mortals have a hard time keeping up with the food shopping, gift giving and otherwise high priced merriment, imagine how Santa Claus feels. Well, a London based company by the name of true luxury travel did just that. Putting themselves in the shoes of jolly old saint Nick and plotting out his Christmas budget. Of course, many holidays are celebrated around this time of year, and consumers who don't even have reindeer tend to spend a lot. According to a Gallup report from earlier in December of 2022, Americans plan to spend an average of $867 on gifts this year. This number has held pretty steady since 2019, but it hardly accounts for the time and effort necessary to produce package and ship all those gifts all over the world. While some may believe that all that magic happens through factories and shipping agencies, others know that the real magic happens in the North Pole. Here's what Santa could be spending to fulfill all those dreams. Okay, there are approximately 2 billion children in the world. A give or take a few 100 million. And because a fair number of non Christians are known to celebrate Christmas, that means that approximately 45% of the world's population commemorates that day. That adds up to about 900 million kids getting gifts on Christmas. And not just one toy each, mind you. Let's set the number of gifts that kids receive that day at a nice, even and arbitrary ten. That means Santa's workshop is churning out approximately 9 billion toys books and ugly sweaters. The summer more costly to make than others, but if you assume even a very low two and a half Euros per gift, that's €22.5 billion on the whole lot, which is about 23.9 billion U.S. dollars, as of this recording. And Santa's good, but he's not a one man show. A true luxury travel estimated that he'd need around 132,000 elves to do all the menial labor in the workshop. And now, of course, we do not have numbers about the wage rates at the North Pole. But let's take, for example, the federal minimum wage here in the United States, a witch is $7 and 25 cents an hour. With hope that Santa is giving his elves a competitive pay rate and robust benefits package. But even at that bare minimum, if all those elves are working 40 hours a week, year round to ensure those gifts go out on Christmas Eve, that's $15,080 per year, per elf. For an army of elves, that's about 1.9 billion a year. And again, with hope it's a lot higher. Estimates for the cost of employing a factory worker for a year. In North Pole adjacent Finland, range around €41,000, or over 43,000 U.S. dollars, including benefits. So it could be completely reasonable to assume three times our initial estimate, or around 6 billion U.S. dollars. And then, you have to keep the workshops lights on and the heat. The North Pole chill is no joke, and the workshop must be massive, and estimated 1.2 million ft², or about a 111,000 m². And so, assuming U.S. prices, the clauses could be shelling out another 1.6 billion on electricity and 2.2 million on natural gas. So another 1.8 billion total. And let's not forget those reindeer. The aforementioned travel company relied on the estimated cost of owning a horse to calculate the cost of caring for reindeer. The average cost of maintaining a horse in the U.S. is $3900 a year. And Santa has at least 9 reindeer, including Rudolph. Also, if we assume Santa's sleigh is as expensive to maintain as a luxury car, then he's shelling out at least $1800 a year to keep things running smoothly. All told, including a range of other factors, including snacks for the staff, but workshop overhead, and suit upkeep, true luxury travel estimated Santa's

Michael duda Coca Michael dura Cola Lauren vogelbaum Santa Pfizer U.S. Santa Claus Nick Apple London
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Classic. In this one, we go into the widely annoying, but surprisingly confounding causes and cures of hiccups. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and today's question is how do we get hiccups? Science isn't sure, actually. But it's not that medical science has been ignoring hiccups. When these spasms are frequent or persistent in adults, they can indicate over a hundred different diseases and disorders from multiple sclerosis to cancer to appendicitis. And hiccups themselves can get serious. And what's called intractable cases, hiccups don't stop for more than a month, and can go on for years without relief, leading to complications like irregular heartbeat, weight loss, insomnia, and emotional distress. The understandably. But okay, science isn't totally ignorant here. We know the basics. Hiccups are reflexive spasms of the diaphragm and glottis and more on both of those in a second, caused by irritation to any of several nerves throughout your body. During normal, non hippy breathing, you move air into and out of your lungs, partially thanks to contractions of your diaphragm. It contracts pulling downward as you inhale, giving your lungs room to expand. Then releases relaxing upward and letting your lungs contract as you exhale. And all that air moves through your throat and importantly through your glottis, which is the opening between your vocal cords. But during a hiccup, at least half of your diaphragm for some reason contracts sharply. About 80% of the time, it's just the left half. Go figure. That contraction starts pulling in a deep breath, but that breath gets cut short by the glottis snapping shut, about three hundredths of a second later. The hick sound comes from that sudden closure. In most cases, hiccups are caused by irritation of the phrenic nerves, which control the motion of the diaphragm and send your brain sensory information about what's going on in various parts of your neck and body. That irritation is usually from your stomach distending when you accidentally swallow air, or when you eat or drink too much too fast. Especially carbonated beverages like soda or beer. In rare cases, lots of other irritations can be at fault, more serious than having over drank soda or beer. Such as infections of or trauma to anything that the phrenic nerves touch, like a tumor pressing against them in your neck or pericarditis, which is the swelling of the membrane around your heart. Irritations of the vagus nerve can also be hiccup culprits, possibly due to its connection to the larynx, along with everything from your small intestine to the inside of your ear, and lots of stuff in between. If you're looking to get rid of hiccups, some of the most common home remedies really are worthwhile. They work by either overloading the phrenic or vagus nerves or by interrupting your involuntary breathing cycle. For nerve overload, try biting into a lemon, placing a spoonful of sugar on the back of your tongue, pulling on your tongue, or having a friend tickler scare you. On the respiratory end, try holding your breath, gulping down a glass of water, or breathing into a paper bag. And if nothing works, hiccups generally go away on their own. If they do stick around for more than 48 hours, see a doctor just in case. The purpose behind this reflex is still a mystery. Some researchers say that they could be vestigial spasms related to how our amphibian ancestors controlled their gills. Others postulate that they help with breastfeeding. Hiccups can release small amounts of air from the stomach into the esophagus, where it can be exhaled. So hiccups might serve to get air out of baby stomachs, making more space for milk. Today's episode is based on a script that I wrote for a brain stuff video. Poor house stuff works dot com. A brain stuff is production of iHeartRadio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and is produced by Tyler clang. For more podcasts, my heart radio visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Passing the ball is fun. The Frito lay past the ball challenge is more fun. Join Frito lay the official USA snack of the FIFA World Cup 2022 for their past the ball challenge. Look for the golden world soccer ball and explore the ever growing community..

Lauren vogelbaum appendicitis pericarditis multiple sclerosis insomnia cancer trauma Tyler clang Frito Apple FIFA USA soccer
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:39 min | 4 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey brain stuff, I'm Lauren bogle bomb, and this is another classic episode. But when you release a helium balloon, it's freedom is temporary. Eventually, it must fall back to earth. But when? And how? I'll let former Lauren explain. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and today we're talking about balloons. Helium balloons that have escaped the clutches of their human captors to float far beyond the mortal realms straight up into the infinity of the stars. Well, not really. I hate to burst your, well, balloon. But that's not what balloons do when they are released. They burst, blame the composition of our atmosphere. Helium balloons float because their buoyant in the air like a beach ball is buoyant in water. Blooms don't fly, the air around them sinks, pushing them upward. That's because helium weighs just 0.18 grams per liter. Nitrogen and oxygen, which together make up about 99% of the air we breathe, weigh 1.25 grams, and 1.43 grams per liter, respectively. And okay, most helium balloons these days aren't filled with 100% pure helium. Depending on the company selling it, about 20% may be regular old air to help keep costs down and preserve the global helium supply. But as long as the weight of the balloon plus the helium mixture inside of it equals less than the weight of the air around it, it'll keep on moving up. However, nitrogen and oxygen aren't distributed evenly from sea level to outer space. Earth's gravity holds air close to the surface. The higher up you go, the thinner, AKA less massive, the air gets. Just 5 miles up, there are only one third as many nitrogen and oxygen atoms around you. Ten miles up, there are only one tenth as many. So a helium mixture balloon wouldn't keep floating up forever, because eventually it would be heavier than the air around it. It'll stop when it hits a point of equilibrium. However, however, as evidenced by the lack of a thick layer of party balloons up in the sky, that's not how the story ends for free to balloon. Enter atmospheric pressure. Since the elements that make up our air supply hug the surface and thin out at increasing altitudes, the pressure that the air exerts on objects also drops and increasing altitudes. Lower atmospheric pressure outside means the gases inside a balloon will want to expand. How much that balloon can expand depends on what the balloon is made of. A latex rubber is pretty common and can stretch a lot. Mylar, which is a trade name for a type of stretched polyester that's strengthened with a film of evaporated metal, does not stretch. So how long the balloon lasts before bursting depends on the material and how much helium mixture is in there. A half full balloon will last longer. Also, since latex is porous, a bit of helium mixture will constantly seep out through the balloon's walls, possibly giving it a little bit more time. And finally, how the balloon pops will depend on the temperature of the air around it. That temperature will decrease as the balloon rises through the troposphere. This is the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere, extending four to 12 miles above the surface. At the top of the troposphere, temperatures reach negative 60°F, that's about negative 51 Celsius. Latex and mylar both become brittle around negative 40°F or Celsius, so if they make it up that far, they'll lose their ability to expand, and they won't pop. They'll shatter. So, when and how balloons burst depends on three things, what the balloon is made of, how much gas is.

Lauren bogle Lauren vogelbaum Lauren
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Is it dangerous to bathe in a thunderstorm? A bathtub would be a lot easier. Seriously though, it's long been rumored that taking a nice hot soak in the tub or enjoying a shower is a dangerous proposition when electricity is coursing through the sky. The basic answer is yes, absolutely. It's better to put off bathing until after the thunder stops rolling. But let's discuss why this is even a question. There are a lot of myths about lightning. Understandably, it's pretty mythic. Bolt of lightning is hotter than the surface of the sun. It can reach some 50,000°F. But, for example, a plane getting hit by lightning isn't usually that big of a deal. Although pilots do try to avoid thunderstorms, planes are built to safely conduct currents. And contrary to the saying, lightning will strike the same place twice. A many tall structures are hit often. Even the old rubber tires on a car will protect you from lightning strikes adage is false. A car is safe because it has a metal roof insides to conduct the current to the ground. There are a lot of common misconceptions about how lightning works and what it can affect. So it's not that weird to think that the old don't shower during a storm line is just another myth. But don't be mistaken about this one. It really is dangerous to bathe during a thunderstorm. And not just theoretically dangerous, ten to 20 people a year in the U.S. alone are injured while messing around with household water during a storm. And that doesn't just mean sitting in the tub, waiting for literal lightning destroy. Doing the dishes, or even just using faucets, can be dangerous, too. The reasons are grounded in the pipes. A lot of pipes used in household plumbing are made of metal, which attracts and conducts a bolt of electricity. And the water itself, even if it doesn't contain conducive impurities, which it probably does, will help conduct the electricity. So, cover yourself in the wet stuff, either in a shower, bath or just using the faucet in general, and you help that electric current jump right to you. But running the taps or bathing during a thunderstorm isn't the biggest threat for health and welfare. Every year, around 20 people in the U.S. are killed due to lightning strikes and hundreds more injured, though most often when they're outside and a flat open area, like a beach or a.

Lauren vogelbaum U.S.
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"And employees wear masks. All buses and trains have improved air filtration. And we're working hard to get all our trains back on the track. My name is Jeff doubt. I'm doing my part to keep the D.C. area moving. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here with another episode from the podcast archives. This one just happened to come up in the rotation during this unfortunately appropriate time of rising gas prices. It concerns what running on empty actually does to your car. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Experts say you should keep your gas tank at least a quarter full at all times. Obviously doing so will keep you from getting in a dangerous situation where your low on gas and too far from gas station to fill up, but there are other less obvious reasons to keep a little gas in your tank. Driving on an empty tank or even one that's getting close to the dregs in the bottom can cause damage to your car in a number of ways. You won't get very far driving on empty, but in the moments before you do stall out, your car's catalytic converter, which is part of the exhaust system, can be damaged. You could also get debris stuck in your fuel pump by running your tank too low. That's because any tiny particles that find their way into the gas tank settle at the bottom, and they tend to stay there until your car is trying to grab every last bit of fuel that it can. When the fuel pump sucks up the last of your gas, any debris in your tank will go along with it. And the particles can get stuck in your pump or in your fuel filter. In early model cars from the 1980s and older, the gas tanks are usually made of metal, and as they deteriorate, harmful deposits can build up in the bottom, a newer cars have plastic fuel tanks, so sediment usually makes its way inside the tanks from contaminated fuel. But getting sediments stuck in your fuel pump isn't the only way that you could be damaging it. In some cars, the fuel pump is located in the gas tank, and the gas acts like insulation and lubricant as it flows around the pump. If you're constantly running your gas tank dry, the fuel pump could be overheating, which will cause it to wear out prematurely. But how far can you actually go when the gas gauge hits E? Well, that depends on your car. Different vehicles have the gaslight configured in different ways, though most cars will illuminate the light when there are about two to three gallons that's 7.5 to 11 liters left. Some bigger vehicles like trucks and SUVs light up the empty indicator when there are about four gallons or 15 liters. That's about a 16th of a tank left. How far those amounts can get you is another variable that depends on your car's efficiency, your driving style, and whether you're in the city on the highway or stuck in a traffic jam. Some newer cars have a display in the instrument cluster that keeps a running tally of your range, or how many miles you can drive on your current tank of gas. These displays are pretty accurate, but again, they are just estimates. Changing road conditions or any number of other factors can affect the accuracy of this gauge, which could leave you stranded if you're really cutting it close. So it's a good idea to get in the habit of filling up before you use strictly need to. That said, if you find yourself in a situation where you're running low, don't worry, you're not going to ruin your car. Just get into the practice of filling up whenever your fuel gauge reaches the.

Lauren Vogel Lauren vogelbaum D.C. Jeff
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"You can combat it. Hey brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Many of us are familiar with the feelings that low blood sugar produces. Crankiness sets in. Some of us get abusive, others downright hostile, usually a glass of juice a candy bar or some other well timed snack clears this honest to goodness condition colloquially called being hangry, a cross between hungry and angry. I call it you wouldn't like me when I'm hungry. But why does hangar happen? Some people have good self control, and others don't. In recent years, scientists have linked self control to nutrition. They say self control requires energy. If your body is mining for energy and finds none, well, self control goes out the window. It all comes down to the amount of glucose our bodies process. The human body is a machine made of meat, like all machines, it needs fuel. That fuel comes in the form of glucose, AKA blood sugar. Our bodies convert the carbohydrates and the foods we eat into glucose. The body then stores some of that glucose in the liver and muscles as glycogen and stores some as fat. When our blood sugar is low, the hypothalamus, the portion of the brain involved in hormone production, among other things, gets bent out of shape, throwing the body's hormones out of whack and suppressing serotonin, a neurotransmitter. Serotonin has a hand in controlling mood and appetite. It's often called the feel good neurotransmitter because it can relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety. If your body stops processing serotonin, your mood can shift, you can get tired or forget things. Your concentration becomes poor. You might even get angry. Still, your blood sugar has to drop like a rock from 70 to a hundred milligrams per deciliter to less than 55 milligrams per deciliter. For the hanger games to begin. An April 2014 study published in the journal PNAS confirmed the people really do get hangry. The researchers studied whether low glucose levels were responsible for greater aggression in married couples. Scientists studied a 107 couples and monitored their glucose levels twice a day for 21 days. To measure their aggressive impulses, the researchers asked each person to stick between zero and 51 pins into a voodoo style doll representing their spouse, with more pins representing greater anger. When the three weeks were up, the researchers asked each couple to play a game, designed to measure aggression. The scientists allowed the winner of the game to blast the loser with loud noise as both sat in separate chambers. There was a catch, however. Each person wasn't actually turning up the volume. Regardless, those participants with low glucose levels believed they were hammering their spouses with high decibels of irritating noise. The authors concluded results suggest that interventions designed to provide individuals with metabolic energy might foster more harmonious couple interactions. In other words, eat some carbs before you argue. And this study was just one of several linking self control to glucose levels in the brain. Another study concluded that those who drank a beverage high in glucose were less aggressive than those who did not. A still another study found an indirect relationship between diabetes, which is marked by poor glucose metabolism, aggressiveness, and decreased self control. Although causation is always hard to pin down, these studies suggested that a spoonful of sugar helps diminish violent or aggressive behavior in the short term. Of course, consuming too much sugar and other simple carbohydrates can lead to poor glucose metabolism in the long run. So while a cookie may be a quick fix if you need to focus, it's best overall to consume balanced meals and snacks, containing enough protein and fats along with those sweet carbs to.

Lauren vogelbaum PNAS anxiety depression diabetes
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Time zones are headache fuel. Even if you're not moving rapidly through them yourself, which is a great way to screw up your sleep schedule, just trying to schedule phone calls between them can cause all sorts of trouble. Time zones also have political quirks here and there. At the continental United States is split into four recognized time zones. Yet China, which is around the same size, just has one. Still, that's not to say that the layout of earth's time zones is totally random. By international custom, our planet is divided into a series of longitudinal lines that run from the North Pole all the way down to the South Pole. These form convenient boundaries for the 24 widely used time zones. Since those lines converge into a single point at each of the two poles, what does that mean for the poles? If you're physically standing at the South Pole, or chillin at the North Pole, then what's the local time? First, let's clarify what we mean by the poles. Earth has a magnetic north and South Pole. They drift based on what's going on with our planet's magnetic field. But they're generally situated somewhere in the Arctic and somewhere in the Antarctic. Compasses point toward the magnetic North Pole. But these spots have nothing to do with longitude lines. The geographic North Pole on the other hand is a singular place, the counterpart to the geographic South Pole. These two spots are where earth's outer surface intersects with its axis of rotation. A due to the tilt of the earth's axis, each only has one sunrise and one sunset per year. It's 6 months of light followed by 6 months of darkness, so in time is a little meaningless there anyway. But it's also where the world's longitudinal lines overlap. Which brings us back to the time zone issue. It doesn't generally matter what time it is at the geographic North Pole, because nobody lives there. There are no permanent structures at the geographic North Pole because it's located in the Arctic Ocean. Ships passing through these waters can pick their own time zone. Sometimes vessels sink themselves up with the time zone observed in a given country or city farther south, often the one nearest to them at that moment. But it's up to them. In 2019 through 2020, a North Pole expedition crew aboard a ship named the polar stern, lodged themselves in an ice float to conduct research, and changed their time zone once a week. Things are a little different in Antarctica. The South Pole lies above solid ground, and so do the continent's many research stations. Each one usually sticks to a pre designated time zone from some other spot on the globe. Maybe from the country that has territorial claim to that part of the continent. Or the country that owns the station, or the country that houses their supply base. However, researchers from a particular country may choose to operate on their home time, just to make scheduling those calls a little.

Lauren vogelbaum headache Antarctic China Arctic United States Arctic Ocean Antarctica
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This is an estimated price based on your insurance coverage. When the legal teams finally did get subpoenas to speak with the monastic candidates, they were surprised by the demeanor of the boys. When we did get a chance to meet those children. It was to us shocking what we saw. They were clearly well groomed, they appeared sin, but not malnourished. Pale as if they hadn't seen the Florida sun at all. And they were rigidly dressed. Listen to new episodes of sacred scandal every Monday on the Mai kultura podcast network available on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts. At princess, we believe everyone deserves a real vacation, and there's never been a better time to book than during our best sale ever, with drinks, Wi-Fi, stateroom location upgrades, specialty dining and more all included, because when you're in a real vacation together, where you don't have to think about anything, you can enjoy everything. Book now during our vesele ever, visit princess dot com or call one 800 princess. Auburn's three two 22 subject to availability visit princess dot com for details copyright 2021 princess cruise on limited chips are Bermuda and British registry. When a trivial accusation started on an anonymous Internet forum, the Korean hip hop star Tableau was at the top of his game. But then, rumors started to spread that he wasn't who he said he was. I'm Dexter Thomas, the host of a new podcast from vice about a bizarre conspiracy to turned into an international obsession. Listen to authentic, the story of Tableau on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff Lauren Volga bomb here with a classic episode of the podcast. A lot of non human animals are smarter than we give them credit for and can be taught all kinds of things. If, properly motivated. In this one, we explore how researchers have made educational inroads with bees. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Back in 1988, two entomologists, Joe Lewis and Jim tumlinson, joined in a project that, for the first time, uncovered the ability of an insect to learn through association. It was at the time not only novel, it was an out and out revelation. An insect, in this case, the parasitic wasp, which feeds on and eventually kills certain agricultural pests, could learn in a most basic way. Think pavlov's dogs except smaller and fuzzier. From that study and other similar research by, for example, darpa, the U.S. Department of Defense advanced research projects agency, we have spun forward to the point where honeybees now have successfully sniffed out long buried landmines in Croatia. That's a long way from some 30 years ago when Lewis and Tomlinson released their findings in nature magazine to the astonishment of many. Lewis said, you talk about training in insect period and you get the look. The eyes start narrowing. It just doesn't make sense. So how did they start making sense of it? Let's talk about associative learning. The whole idea behind this is fairly simple, even if no one dreamed decades ago that insects could do it. With pavlov's dogs, when an outside stimulus, a bell is often cited, was associated with food, the dogs salivated. The dogs learned intuitively that the bell meant food was coming. For the Lewis Tomlinson wasps, various odors that the wasps didn't normally recognize, like vanilla or chocolate, or mixed with something that was associated with the pests that these parasitic wasps were trying to make their hosts. After a very short time, the wasps associated the vanilla or whatever with the insects that they wanted to attack, and thus would fly toward the odor. It took less than 5 minutes to train the wasps, which, like bees and dogs, have olfactory senses, thousands of times more powerful than a humans. As the studies continued, new researchers linked the smell of various chemical compounds in explosives to food. Today, a honey bee trained for just two days could associate the smell of explosives with food and seek out that smell. Two big advantages to training insects to track odors rather than say a dog, they learn faster, and there's a lot more of them to teach. But releasing a swarm of wasps or bees onto a battlefield, or even a now quiet meadow in Croatia that may be littered with mines, has its challenges, of course. Tracking the insects is foremost among them. It's impossible as Tomlinson points out to put ships on each of them, and you can't, as Lewis says, put a leash on a bee. Still, scientists can trace the insect's movements in at least small numbers through devices like drones and webcams, and something early researchers called a wasp pound. Lewis wasp pound about the size of a large coin, contains 5 wasps, a tiny camera, and a computer fan that pulls air through a small hole in the bottom of the device. When the hound comes near the target smell, the wasps, Lewis says cluster around that little hole like pigs to a trough. Another problem researchers face is scale, training one wasp or one B at a time can be laborious. Scientists have come up with methods to train more than that. But insects, like people, learn at different rates. So mass learning is not as accurate. In addition, bad weather, or anything that disrupts the insects ability to smell can cause difficulties. Research is continuing. Tomlinson and Lewis never envisioned bees sniffing out bombs. A tumlinson is a Professor of entomology at Penn State and Lewis a retired professor and a research entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in tifton, Georgia. They were looking for ways to control pests biologically rather than with pesticides. And in fact, they were very successful at it. Along with UK scientist John Pickett, Lewis and Tomlinson won the 2008 wolf prize for agriculture, considered by many as a type of Nobel Prize in the field. From the official announcement on the wolf foundation website, they were awarded the prize quote for their remarkable discoveries of mechanisms governing plant insect and plant plant interactions. Their scientific contributions on chemical ecology have fostered the development of integrated pest management and significantly advanced agricultural sustainability. Whether their work eventually will help form the basis of a widespread practical use of bees and wasps in sniffing out bombs or drugs, remains to be seen. Even they have some doubts. Tomlinson said, you can train insects to find a mine. That's not a problem. But then you release them into the field to find a mine. How do you track them? Unless someone comes up with a small chip so that you can track them with some electronic means, I don't see how in the world you can use them. And says Lewis, to move it from the lab to the actual field, you have to scale it up and refine it. But we clearly can see that it can be practical in development. It's technically feasible. It's all on valid science, the ability is there. It's about the demand for it and putting the infrastructure in place for that. Scientists have been trying to find ways to harness the remarkable power of smell for years. Bees, some believe have such strong abilities that they can smell out illnesses, even cancer, a Spanish designer went so far as developing a prototype bowl, complete with honeybees that you can breathe in to to see how the bees react as a sort of Proto diagnosis. And tests are being done.

Lewis Tomlinson Dexter Thomas Lauren Volga Lauren vogelbaum pavlov Jim tumlinson U.S. Department of Defense adv Lewis Tomlinson Apple Croatia Joe Lewis Tableau Bermuda Auburn Lewis wasp darpa Florida tumlinson U.S. Department of Agriculture
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and this is another classic brain stuff episode. We as a culture are fascinated by last meals. If you choose it, how do you choose? If you don't, what does it say about your habits? This episode concerns the last meal of the man that would become the oldest natural mummy we've ever found. Otzi, the Iceman. Hey brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Y'all may have heard of folks emulating the diets of our ancient pre agricultural human ancestors for health and welfare. You know, paleo, but thanks to recent research, we now have an actual ancient menu of sorts to follow. The last meal of otzi, AKA the Iceman, a 5300 year old man whose frozen body was found by German tourists in the Italian Alps back in 1991. An international group of researchers has conducted the first in depth study of the contents of otzi's stomach and small and large intestines, as detailed in an article published in a July issue of the journal current biology. They used a combination of multiomics, studies involving different biomolecules, such as ancient DNA, proteins, metabolites, and lipids, plus microscopic examination, to reconstruct the exact composition of otzi's food intake, just before his apparent violent death for massive bleeding caused by an arrow wound in his shoulder. Otzi's stomach still contained a small amount of food that he was in the process of digesting, including animal muscle fibers, and plant fragments, as well as metabolic compounds that indicated the presence of dairy products and whole grain cereals. In addition to the chemical analysis, the researchers also analyzed DNA they found in the food, and studied bacteria in otzi's gastrointestinal tract. From that, they determined that otzi's last meal probably consisted of ibex and red deer meat that he ate either fresh or dried, and fat from grazing animals or dairy products, supplemented with einkorn, a wild species of wheat. Otzi's diet was high in fat, with its residues making up between 27 and 46% of his stomach's contents. The researchers think that that wasn't by accident. In the cold, high altitude environment in which otzi lived, it was a challenge to avoid starvation and energy loss. The researchers wrote the Iceman seemed to have been fully aware that fat displays and excellent energy source. Puzzlingly, otzi's stomach also contained particles of toxic bracken fern and mosses, which may have come from plant material to wrap his meat. Another possibility is that otzi took the toxic fern as a medicine for intestinal problems related to parasites found in his gut. But we should mention that otzi's diet may not be demonstrative of the diets of his era. Ancient hunter gatherers diets varied greatly according to the region where they lived. While otzi 8 meet in grains, inch people in what is now Botswana got 70% of their calories from carbohydrates and sugars in melons and starchy roots, for example. Ancient diets were necessarily local. Today's episode is based on the article otzi the Iceman ate a high fat last meal on how stuff works dot com written by Patrick J Tiger. Brain service production of iHeartRadio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and is produced by Tyler clang and Ramsay Yang. Four more podcasts from my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. I'm Chelsea Clinton, and I'm so excited to be back with a new season of my podcast. In fact, we're marking women's history month with 12 trailblazing women in sports, media, politics, and more, talking about the progress we've made or lost and how far we still need to go. From soccer star Megan Rapinoe, to White House correspondent April Ryan, to fashion designer Stella McCartney. These women have risen to the top of their fields and are fighting for equal opportunities for everyone. So I hope you'll join us and listen to in fact with me, Chelsea Clinton, on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Big brother, North Korea's forgotten prince, is a new true crime podcast that dives deep into the life and mysterious assassination of the man once destined to be North Korea's next dictator. Join me Eden Lee, as we investigate a twisting tale of espionage, palace gossip, and political backstabbing, and dive into the motives and suspects behind the most bizarre assassination plot of the 21st century. Listen to big brother on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts..

otzi Otzi Lauren vogelbaum Italian Alps Patrick J Tiger Tyler clang Iceman Ramsay Yang Chelsea Clinton Megan Rapinoe Botswana Apple Stella McCartney North Korea White House soccer Eden Lee Ryan
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"At princess, we believe everyone deserves a real vacation, and there's never been a better time to book than during our best sale ever, with drinks, Wi-Fi, stateroom location upgrades, specialty dining and more all included. Because when you're in a real vacation together, where you don't have to think about anything, you can enjoy everything. Book now during our vest sail ever, visit princess dot com or call one 800 princess. Offer in three two 22 subject to availability visit princess dot com for details copyright 2021 princess cruise on limited chips are Bermuda and British registry. Charles didn't have just any coronary artery disease. He had Charles coronary artery disease. Michelle didn't have just any heart attack. She had Michelle's heart attack. At VCU health poly heart center, we know every heart is unique. And as Virginia's only nationally ranked heart program, we'll keep them beating healthy and strong. VCU health Polly heart center. Learn more at VCU health dot org slash heart. Hi, this is Bill Clinton. After years of being interviewed, I'm looking forward to doing the interviewing. Please join me on why am I telling you this for conversations with some of the most fascinating people I know. We'll share stories and talk about ideas that deserve more attention. And why we should be hopeful and optimistic about our future. Listen to why am I telling you this on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff Lauren vogelbaum here with a classic episode from our archives. I love stage magic and sleight of hand, precisely because I know that it's fake, but that doesn't always mean that I know how it's done. It creates a space of curiosity for me. In this episode, we go behind the scenes of stage magic to talk about the relationship of magicians, too, their assistance. Hey brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here. In magic industry lingo, magicians assistants are called box jumpers because to the audience, that's all the lovely assistant appears to do. She's there to distract the audience. You know, look pretty, smile big and wave your hands around, then pop out from the padlocked box, precisely when the magician says, ta-da. But magic insiders know the real story. When the trunk lid closes, the sheet is raised, or the saw is lowered into the box, it's often the assistant who does the real magic of the illusion, a releasing the latch on the false bottom and cramming herself into a two foot space while executing her third costume change of the evening. All before the guy in the top hat says tada. Although magic is undeniably a male dominated profession if you only look at the name on the marquee, those who know the most about the stagecraft behind the magician assistant relationship say that the industry isn't as sexist as it might appear. Blair Barron, who co produced the 2008 documentary women in boxes about the unsung magician's assistant, explains that on stage both the magician and the assistant are playing roles, roles that artfully play off of the audience's gendered expectations. Barron says, the biggest misconception is that the magician's assistants are marginalized, objectified, bimbos, if you will, who are deferring to some guy. When actually, in my experience, they are the brains behind a lot of the illusions. Barron would know, she married into one of the royal families of magic. Her husband, Dante Larson, is the son of Irene and Bill Larson junior, two of the cofounders of the magic castle in Hollywood. The world's preeminent magic club. And Irene, who passed away in 2016, was herself an accomplished magician's assistant in her day. Barron says that Irene and her generation of assistants doubled as the business brains of the operation, keeping track of finances and booking appearances. And although they played integral roles in both the planning and execution of illusions, these old school assistants never wanted to steal the spotlight from the magician, often their husband by billing themselves as equal partners. Modern magicians assistants see their roles a little differently. Hannah Lin waxter is half of these South Carolina based duo, the waxers, magic and illusion, who perform a weekly show at the Carolina opry theater in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Hannah is still primarily the one who gets locked in the boxes, but says that she and her husband Brandon are very much equal partners on and off the stage. Hannah considers herself a magician, not just an assistant, and does a few solo tricks in the act. She also runs the show backstage, giving technical and lighting cues to stage managers, and making sure the next illusion is lined up and squared away. But Hannah admits that at the end of the day, her primary role on stage is, quote, to make sure the magician looks good, which often means contorting herself in two tight spaces or dangling from high wires without giving the audience a clue about how incredibly difficult it all is. Or how many bruises scrapes and sprained ankles, she's endured along the way. And despite her husband's efforts to give Hannah equal billing and equal credit on stage, the audience often can't see behind the traditional magician assistant divide. Hannah says, after shows, folks always want to talk to Brandon and congratulate him on his magic. They'll literally push me aside. We also spoke with dean Carnegie, a veteran stage magician, and the magic historian behind the blog, the magic detective. He explains that the first magician's assistants were the product of a new school of magic that emerged in the mid 19th century called the illusionists. In the 1850s, pioneering French conjurers, Jean Eugene, Robert houdin, the inspiration for Houdini's stage name and boutique Ulta created startling illusions that involved the levitation or disappearance of a second person, and assistant Carnegie says. Robert houdin's pursed assistant was his young son, but is more illusionist entered the game. The assistants were invariably female. Women it turned out were much more effective victims in the minds of the audience. When a woman was in peril, it raised the emotional stakes. And that still seems to be true, says Barron. She said, they've tried to reverse it and have the female be the magician in the alpha role and the man be the assistant, and it doesn't work. No one cares. Magic trends come and go, and for the moment, the bigger names and magic are focusing on close up card tricks and mind reading, which don't require assistance, or at least not visible ones. But there are plenty of acts like the waxers who still wow with set piece illusions, executed with precision choreography. Barron, who now runs the Los Angeles drama club, a Shakespeare program for kids, reminds us that what the audience sees on stage is itself a play within a play. She said, the assistants are winking at.

artery disease VCU health poly heart center VCU health Polly heart center Barron Lauren vogelbaum heart attack Lauren Vogel Michelle Irene Hannah Charles Blair Barron Dante Larson Bill Larson coronary artery disease world's preeminent magic club Bermuda Hannah Lin waxter Bill Clinton
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"If you're struggling with alcohol or drugs, recovery centers of America can help. The holidays are over, the new year is here, and the time to act is now. Expert private care at recovery centers of America will get you on the road to recovery today. At our award winning and fully accredited treatment centers on the eastern shore and in southern Maryland, you will be treated with compassion, dignity and respect by our dedicated team of professionals. You will also benefit from specialized programs, 24 hour medical care and the comfort of our outstanding facilities. Let us help you. We will answer your call 24/7 and can get you into treatment as soon as today. If outpatient care is right for you, you can receive a same day assessment in a ten therapy in person or virtually, and because we accept most private insurance plans, you get premium care without the premium price. Don't wait, start your new year, start your new life today. Call one 8 8 8 recovery now. That's one 8 8 8 recovery. This is Roxanne gay, the host of the Roxanne gay agenda, the bad feminist podcast of your dreams. Each week I talked to an interesting person about feminism, race, writing in books, and art, food, pop culture, and yes, politics. We can't escape politics. Listen to the luminary original podcast the roxane gay agenda, every Tuesday on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. What's up, guys, I'm Rashad below. And I am Troy millings and we are the host of the Ernie leisure podcast where we break down business models and examine the latest trends in finance. We hold court and have exclusive interviews with some of the biggest names of business sport and entertainment from DJ Khaled to Mark Cuban, Rick Ross and Shaquille O'Neal. I mean, our alumni list is expansive. Listening as our guests reveal their business models, hardships and triumphs in their respective fields, the knowledge is in death and the questions are always delivered from your standpoint. We want to know what you want to know. We talk to the legends of business sports and entertainment about how they got their start and most importantly how they make their money. Earn your leisure is a college business class mixed with pop culture. Want to learn about the real estate game, unclear is how the stock market works. We got you. Interested in starting a trucking company or a vending machine business, not really sure about how taxes or credit work, we got it all covered. The earnings leisure podcast is available now. Listen to Ernie leisure on the black effect podcast network, iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and this is another classic episode from our archives. From this one digs into communication among animals. And how creatures from different species or even different kingdoms can get their messages across. Hey brain stuff Lauren vogelbaum here, a good birdwatcher can identify the local species, not just by sight, but also by sound. It's something the Audubon society calls birding by ear, with practice and a good field guide, avian enthusiasts learn to recognize the trademark tweets, cheaps and hoots that various birds emit. Mastering this skill requires a basic understanding of how and why our feathered Friends communicate. Often a given species will use its own distinctive set of sounds, like mating calls and territorial threats to get assorted points across. Take The Rock pigeon. These guys court each other with gentle coups, and two signal distress, they use a harsh grunt. If an individual rock pigeon is to survive in procreate, it must be able to recognize both vocalizations. But do a pigeon's noises mean anything to passing crows or cardinals. Can birds understand the calls made by other species. We recently discussed this topic with Robert De McGrath and ornithologist and behavioral ecologist at the Australian national university. McGrath has co authored multiple studies about interspecies communication and birds. Much of his research has dealt with avian alarm calls. These are the warning cries that birds sent out when a predator is cited. As macgrath tells us via email, just about every bird species we have studied locally respond to other species alarm calls, and we suspect eavesdropping on other species calls is widespread around the globe. Perhaps this is not surprising given that almost all species are vulnerable to predators and so should use any available cues that predators are around. One good example of this phenomenon can be found in the relationship between black capped chickadees and red breasted nuthatches. The two songbirds have much in common, both species are indigenous to North America and attain similar sizes. They're also wary of raptors. When chickadee CA gos hawk owl.

Lauren vogelbaum Troy millings America Ernie leisure Roxanne DJ Khaled Rashad Mark Cuban Shaquille O'Neal Apple Audubon society Rick Ross Maryland Robert De McGrath macgrath Australian national university cardinals McGrath North America raptors
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Maybe you have a loved one who forgets routine tasks more than usual, like letting the dog out, or struggles with chores like laundry or cooking. Sometimes what may seem like a senior moment consistent with normal aging could be symptoms of MCI, the earliest clinical stage of Alzheimer's. If you or someone you know is experiencing difficulties like these or other memory issues or mood changes, talk to a doctor and consider asking about cognitive screening. You can also learn more about MCI and its most common cause at its time we know dot com by Biogen and azai. This episode is brought to you by discover. At discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why with discover card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S. they are night 24/7. They can also get help by using the discover app or messaging them on the website. Because having the option to connect with a real-life person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call, send them a message online or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you. Live. Discover. Learn more at discover dot com. At princess, we believe everyone deserves a real vacation. And there's never been a better time to book than during our best sale ever, with drinks, Wi-Fi, stateroom location upgrades, specialty dining and more, all included, because when you're in a real vacation together, where you don't have to think about anything, you can enjoy everything. Book now, during our best day ever, visit princess dot com or call one 800 princess. Offer in three two 22 subject to availability, visit princess dot com details copyright 2021 princess cruise on limited chips of Bermuda and British registry. Welcome to brain stop. Production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vocal bom, and this is another episode from our archives. The one dependable thing about diet fads is that they're sure to rear up at the beginning of the year. Today's classic regards a recent one that involves eating, activated charcoal. Is that a good idea? And why are people doing it? Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Maybe you don't cringe at charcoal concoctions that turn your teeth temporarily black and the pursuit of a gleaming smile. But charcoal, smoothies? If a line must be drawn, perhaps swilling a thick earthy smoothie with the unappealing hue of a mud puddle, presents just such an opportunity. Activated charcoal, the same stuff left over after you grill a steak is making its way into everything from smoothies and juices to pasta and bread. It's widely touted as having detoxifying properties. And in some cases, this is true. You'll find activated charcoal and water filters, toothpastes and facial cleansers, where it does trap pollutants. Its ability to cling to certain chemicals and toxins is why it's used as an emergency treatment for poisonings and overdoses. Just a 50 gram dose of activated charcoal has the surface area of about 7 football fields. That's a lot of little nooks and crannies that can be used for absorption, all created by the high heat burning of wood or coconut to create an ingestible carbon. And yes, I said adsorb not absorb. Absorption is what happens when something soaks in. Adsorption is what happens when something sticks on. Because of all of those crevices and activated charcoal, you might say that its surface is molecularly sticky, though certainly the word absorb is fine to use colloquially. Activated charcoal superpowers are, however, relegated to the digestive tract. Sure, it can work as a powerful deep cleaner on surfaces like teeth and skin, but it really shines by trapping poisons anywhere along the journey from ingestion to expulsion. There are misguided assumptions fueling the charcoal taking trend, though, including the idea that the substance can absorb any so called toxin in the body to improve your overall health. Adding activated charcoal to food and drink for frequent use could actually cause nutritional issues because it indiscriminately absorbs vitamins and minerals too. Nutritionist pip Reid told The Huffington Post, activated charcoal doesn't decipher between toxins and good nutrients, so taking it too regularly or with food means that the charcoal will also absorb the nutrients in your system. The same goes with any medications you take. We recommend do skepticism about any nutritional trend that promises to detoxify you. Your digestive system and liver do an excellent job of that already. And frequently, the best way to keep yourself detoxified is to eat a balanced diet of vegetables and proteins to keep those systems working well. I know that's less instagrammable, but it's more scientifically accurate..

MCI Alzheimer's azai Lauren vogelbaum Biogen Bermuda Lauren U.S. pip Reid football The Huffington Post
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Maybe you have a loved one who forgets routine tasks more than usual, like letting the dog out, or struggles with chores like laundry or cooking. Sometimes what may seem like a senior moment consistent with normal aging could be symptoms of MCI, the earliest clinical stage of Alzheimer's. If you or someone you know is experiencing difficulties like these or other memory issues or mood changes, talk to a doctor and consider asking about cognitive screening. You can also learn more about MCI and its most common cause at its time we know dot com by Biogen and azai. At princess, we believe everyone deserves a real vacation. And there's never been a better time to book than during our best sale ever, with drinks, Wi-Fi, stateroom location upgrades, specialty dining and more, all included, because when you're in a real vacation together, where you don't have to think about anything, you can enjoy everything. Book now, during our best day ever, visit princess dot com or call one 800 princess. Offer in three two 22 subject to availability visit princess dot com for details copyright 2021 princess gros limited chips over Bermuda and British registry. At princess, we believe everyone deserves a real vacation. And there's never been a better time to book than during our best sale ever, with drinks, Wi-Fi, stateroom location upgrades, specialty dining and more, all included. Because when you're in a real vacation together, where you don't have to think about anything, you can enjoy everything. Book now during our vest sale ever. Visit princess dot com or call one 800 princess. Offer in three two 22 subject to availability, visit princess dot com for details copyright 2021 princes cruise on limited chips over Bermuda and British registry. Welcome to brain stop, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here, a Stevie Wonder once sang that superstition is when you believe in things that you don't understand. And maybe he's right. Step on a crack, break your mother's back. Break a mirror, get 7 years of bad luck. We've all heard the sayings and rhymes. But how many of us really know what they mean? Or more importantly, where they come from. As of 2019, a survey by research for good found that just over half of Americans strongly or somewhat believe in superstitions, like finding and picking up a penny being good luck. Superstitions rise to our minds when we want more control or certainty about something. We want an explanation for why things go wrong or right. And for whatever reason, we're quick to attribute success or failure to something seemingly innocuous, like a rabbit's foot or a clover with a unusual number of leaves. A psychologists believe that when we carry items like these, they actually do have a placebo effect, fueling positive thinking. Conversely, if we lose that lucky object, we think negative thoughts. Today, we wanted to talk about a few of the superstitions that come from sailing and fishing. A lot of these beliefs date back several centuries and are still held in varying levels of seriousness today. For example, it's bad luck to sail on a Friday. If you whistle or sing into the wind on a boat, a storm is sure to follow. Sailors who wear earrings or have tattoos won't drown. And it's bad luck to have women on board because they make the sea angry or jealous. But two of the most enduring superstitions have to do with of all things, bananas, and suitcases. In both cases, these items are strictly forbidden on board. Many charter fishing boat crews have steadfast restrictions about bringing bananas on the boat, because it's believed that they'll cause bad luck. It found aboard, the bolt may return to the dock to purge the offending fruit. Some charters go so far as to prohibit brands like banana boat sunscreen, or banana republic clothing on board. Mariners have even been known to object to fruit of the loom underwear. One sport Fisher claimed had treated wearers to wedges and then cut the labels out. This is particularly odd because the fruit of the loom graphic doesn't even have a banana on it. Though some say the banana was left off because of this berry superstition. There are a few different ways people say bad luck may come to you if you bring bananas on a fishing boat. One is that boats carrying bananas don't catch fish. The origin of this belief may date back to the 1700s, and trade through the Caribbean. The wooden sailing boats of that time had to move quickly to deliver bananas before they spoiled. And fishermen had a hard time catching fish on such fast moving boats, which may be how the superstition came about. Another that originated during this time is that bananas will cause about to sink. Perhaps after many boats never made it to their destinations, all of which were coincidentally carrying bananas. Another banana related superstition says cargo could be more directly deadly to the ship's crew working near them. And, to be fair, in actuality, fermenting bananas do give off methane gas, which could conceivably get trapped below deck and kill any crew members unlucky enough to stay in the hold too long. Another popular theory goes that venomous spiders may have hitched rides and bananas. And once those bananas were on board, the boat would be host to any number of lethal critters. And then, of course, there's the theory that banana peels just caused crew members to slip and fall on deck. But I mentioned suitcases being a no go too. They are considered harbingers of death or illness. Even when camera crew boarded the crab boats to film Discovery Channel's reality series, deadliest catch, they were asked to leave their equipment suitcases on the dock. This superstition has variations, too. Some sailors are wary of all luggage. Some only ban black suitcases and bags, which are considered bad luck because black is the color of death, and a metaphor for the depths of the dark cold sea. In some say that travel bags resemble body bags. So why do cruise hang on to these superstitions? Probably for the same reason that the superstitions began. Even with modern understanding of science and weather patterns, we still perceive the sea as a mysterious and treacherous place, and many fishing operations are indeed dangerous work. Beliefs and superstitions are passed down from generation to generation, and it's a brave sailor who turns their back on tradition. Would you be willing to see what happens when you.

MCI Alzheimer's azai Lauren vogelbaum Bermuda Biogen sailing Mariners Fisher Caribbean Discovery Channel
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Are we think of fingerprints as being something each of us carries around on the terminal knuckle of our fingers? Unchanging, and unique from everybody else's. That might be true for our digits, but new research suggests that our brains have fingerprints, too, and that we can find them pretty quickly. Using an MRI machine, neuroscientists can create what amounts to a map of your brain called a functional brain connectome. The human brain is a little like a country with different regions in it. One region for a short term memory, another for hearing, another for hand movement. The first map of the brain was published in 1909 by a German physician, who defined 52 distinct areas of the brain. These days, these brain regions are called cortical areas, and researchers have identified a 180 of them, and they're connected by these little neural fibers that act as highways. A connectome is based on the activity that a person is doing. And what parts of the brain, this activity needs to use. In 2015, a Yale University study found that no two brain connectomes are the same. That when given MRI images taken of the same several brains over the course of a few days, the connectivity fingerprint of each brain could help scientists match up the brain with a study participant with around 95% accuracy. Then, in a study that appeared in the journal science advances in October of 2021, scientists examined how long it actually took to capture a snapshot of a person's brain fingerprint. In the past, MRI images were captured over the course of several minutes. But the research team wondered if they could be taken in a shorter time. In a press release, researcher Enrico amicus said, until now, neuroscientists have identified brain fingerprints using two MRI scans taken over a fairly long period, but do the fingerprints actually appear after just 5 seconds, for example, or do they need longer? And what a fingerprints of different brain areas appeared at different moments in time. Nobody knew the answer. So we tested different time scales to see what would happen. Amico and his colleagues found that 5 seconds didn't cut it. But one minute and 40 seconds was long enough to capture a brain fingerprint, and further that an individual's unique brain map began appearing first in sensory areas of the brain, unlike those related to eye movement and visual perception and attention. Brain fingerprints and regions related to more complex functions like the frontal cortex developed over longer periods of time. The research team plans to compare the brain fingerprints of patients with Alzheimer's to those of healthy people. Emicho explained in the press release, based on my initial findings, it seems that the features that make a brain fingerprint unique steadily disappear as the disease progresses. It gets harder to identify people based on their connectomes. It's as if a person with Alzheimer's loses his or her brain identity. Knowing this could mean earlier detection of neurological conditions like autism, stroke, or dementia. It might cause.

Lauren vogelbaum Enrico amicus Yale University Amico Emicho Alzheimer autism stroke dementia
"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"lauren vogelbaum" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Are made, or the history behind some specific law or tradition. And I like those, but I also like this one, and because the question asks is a little bit bigger. How did life on earth begin? Could it have come from beyond the stars? Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. Imagine a comet hurtling through the nothingness of space. It smashes into a planet causing destruction, but also bringing life. That's because hitching a ride on the surface of the comet where tiny traces of organic material, or even alien eggs, explaining how life could spread across the cosmos and arrive on our planet. Panspermia, meaning seeds everywhere is the name of the theory that life on earth may have cosmic origins, and it's been both debated by scientists and featured in works of science fiction. Now, a group of nearly three dozen scientists from around the world are putting a tweak in the theory, suggesting not that earth's earliest life had outer space origins, but that panspermia may be responsible for the Cambrian explosion. That's a point in Earth's history approximately 451 million years ago, when most major animal groups appear in the fossil record. In their article, cause of Cambrian explosion terrestrial or cosmic published in a 2018 issue of the journal progress in biophysics and molecular biology, 33 scientists tie the rise of unique animals. Tardigrades, octopuses, and the bevy of other odd and unique animals that flourished at that time, two panspermia, suggesting that many of these relatively bizarre and never before seen creatures descend from organic alien material. The authors write, it takes little imagination to consider that the precambrian mass extinction event was correlated with the impact of a giant life bearing comet, and the subsequent seating of earth with new cosmic derived cellular organisms and viral genes. But we haven't cracked the mystery of life's origins just yet. This new paper isn't built on any new discoveries or research, it's a literature review that for the most part references the author's own existing work. But that's by design the authors acknowledge. They write, we are acutely aware that mainstream thinking on the origin and further evolution of life on earth is anchored firmly in the terrestrial paradigm, our aim here is to facilitate further discussion in the biophysical biomedical and evolutionary science communities. Panspermia is at this point only a concept, but it dates back well before the last hundred years or so of modern science fiction. Way back at the turn of the 18th century, French diplomat and natural historian Benoit de may proposed that life across the cosmos could have been seated from space. And a few scholars even interpret ancient Greek philosopher and axa goris of Klaus omana's musings along the same lines. He spoke vaguely of cosmic seeds 2500 years ago. The paper has already drawn skepticism astrobiologist Francis west hall, for instance, points out that while some forms of extremophile life have been observed surviving in the vacuum of space for a short periods of time, this new paper's suppositions would require eggs, embryos, or other cells survive thousands of years, if not more in space. A west doll told newsweek when discussing the paper, unfortunately, it is all too easy to pull information out of the literature to support one's hypothesis. Nature is incredible, and I do not think it is necessary to call on extraterrestrials to explain it. An alternate theory for the Cambrian explosion goes by the name snowball earth, and it suggests that 715 million years ago our planet became encased in ice for a 150 million years, killing most existing life forms, and that a massive thaw.

Lauren vogelbaum Benoit de axa goris Klaus omana Francis west hall newsweek