35 Burst results for "Lauren Vogel"

"lauren vogel" Discussed on Run That Prank

Run That Prank

02:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on Run That Prank

"Watt I. Thought these kids job every Get. And the Corolla virus going to have to see me this this. Inside, of drinking. On, come get your kid. Tell me one more thing babies twenty one and tell me what is the bad. It's I. Mean the bad is radio show in laying. Steve. Harvey. Morning Show. You're. This new Mayo y'all. Damn. Teach she posted teaching my baby going seven. Great. Come down there. She said good. All right. Thank you nephew coming up. Strawberry letter. For today this subject Steve is crazy. You'RE GONNA love this letter the subject is my baby won't stop cussing. Tailor made for you. She needs to. She needs some advice. Probably. Would this baby? Your Mom Rodin here new. All right. We'll get into the letter coming up at the top of the hour. Again, this subject is my baby won't stop cussing right after this you're listening to. Show. What if I told you that you have ots haunted houses and even inexplicable magic tricks are all caused by the same creature and what if I told you these powerful, an ancient beings are meant to be feared the hidden. Jin. A new podcast from iheartradio and Aaron, Manque is grim and mild explores the legends of these ancient and terrifying creatures. Join me rub each other as we step into the world of the Hidden Jin. Listened to the hinge in on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. If. You Crack Open an American history book. It's sure to be filled with founding fathers, bloody wars in the inventions that brought this country to the industrial age. But there's a whole other world that waits for us in the shadows tales of unlikely heroes, world changing tragedies and legends that are unique to this country spirit. So join me Lauren Vogel bomb for a tour of American history unlike any other through new podcast from iheartradio Aaron. McKie's grim and mild get ready for American shadows. Listened to American shadows on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts..

Apple Steve iheartradio Aaron Manque Mom Rodin Lauren Vogel McKie Harvey Strawberry
Why Is 'Mayday' the International Distress Call?

BrainStuff

02:55 min | 2 months ago

Why Is 'Mayday' the International Distress Call?

"Stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here. Mayday is an international distress. Call used by airplane, pilots, captains, and some emergency response personnel, the US coastguard deals with roughly twenty five thousand distress calls every year, some of which involved the mayday code. The signal arose just after world, war one as air traffic between Britain and mainland. Europe increased dramatically. All nearby nations needed an internationally understood signal that would alert authorities urgent aircraft problems. So, why not just use the standard? SOS call that Navy captains used when they were in trouble. Well ships communicated through Telegraph, Using Morse Code, and this technology made SOS of three dots, three dashes and three dots unmistakable by contrast aircraft pilots used radio calls and SOS, owing to its continents could be misheard as other letters like F. One Frederick. Stanley Mockingbird, a senior officer in London was put in charge of finding an appropriate code word. He reasons that because so much of the air traffic flew between Croydon. England and Paris France. It might make sense to use a derivative of a French word. He came up with mayday based on the French pronunciation of maybe or help me, which itself is a distilled version of eighty or come help me. The US formally adopted mayday a distress signal in nineteen, twenty seven. Due to radio, interference and loud ambient noise, a pilot's told repeat the word three times when they used the call. This repetition also serves to distinguish the transmission from others that simply refer to the mayday call. Although any situation in which it's being used as probably a little panic filled the federal aviation administration encourages pilots to offer specific information in a specific order, so that emergency responders exactly what they're dealing with. I told repeat. The word made a three times then the station address the aircraft call sign type the kind of emergency, the weather, the pilot's intentions, the current position, and heading the altitude, the fuel, remaining in minutes, the number of people on board, and finally any other pertinent details.

Stanley Mockingbird United States Lauren Vogel Navy Europe Croydon Britain F. One Frederick Paris France England Officer London
Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

BrainStuff

03:42 min | 3 months ago

Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

"Lauren Vogel here. A remote freshwater streams somewhere in the eastern United States the waters cool. There's a reasonably fast current, and the bottom is littered with big flat. Rocks sounds peaceful, doesn't it? What you're imagining is a perfect environment for trout, and for something else to every so often anglers who cast their lines in such places wind up catching North America's biggest salamander. This thing leaves an impression specimens measuring twenty nine inches long. That's seventy three centimeters have been documented and the beefy EST adults way forty five pounds. That's about two to two and a half kilos. These four legged amphibians have compressed heads and torsos, meaning that judging by outward appearance. It thinks someone had squished these critters flat with a rolling pin. Another key attribute is there brown to Greyish skin which hangs noticeably loose around their flanks. Early settlers didn't know what to make of. These guys baffled by their appearance. Some folks began calling them that offers devil dogs or mud devils. The species would receive. Scientific name crypto branches allegany intil eighteen. Oh! But nowadays most people know this strange salamander. The Hell Bender. Hell benders are divided into two sub species northern Arkansas and southern Missouri are the home of the endangered ozark. Hell Bender the eastern hell. Bender has a broader distribution having spread itself across the Great Appalachian region and parts of the Midwest. Though sadly, it also got conservationists worried. Some Amphibians are equally at home on land and in the water, but hell benders are more or less totally aquatic. Their skin absorbs oxygen, pulling it straight out of the water that leaves Hell Benders at the mercy of pollutants and excess silt runoff dumped into their streams by forest. Clearing projects sure doesn't help. One report published in two thousand seven by the US. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that the ozark hell bender will become functionally extinct by the year twenty, twenty six in less protective measures are taken. As Twenty nineteen. It was still classified as endangered by the US fish and Wildlife Service which said that in some good news, most populations of the hell bender. Endanger of extinction and therefore do not warrant listing under the endangered species, act. To help boost populations of the ozark hell bender. The Saint Louis Zoo teamed up with the Missouri Department of Conservation and established a successful breeding program in twenty eleven. And just last year Pennsylvania reading awareness about this wonderful species by naming the eastern Hell Bender it's official State Amphibian. Maybe such efforts will improve the Salamanders PR. There's a pervasive belief that the hell bender has venomous bite, but this is untrue. The Hell Bender wheeled no venom and spite rumors to the contrary. The Infineon's do not hurt game fish populations. crawfish make up over ninety percent of the hell. Benders Diet, other potential prey items include tadpoles, smaller, Salamanders and small fish. The creatures are most active at night. They spend their days taking refuge under submerged logs or stream bottom rocks,

Bender United States Wildlife Service Lauren Vogel North America Infineon Saint Louis Zoo Missouri Department Of Conserv Midwest Arkansas Great Appalachian Missouri Pennsylvania Official
Why Is Our Blood Red?

BrainStuff

02:49 min | 4 months ago

Why Is Our Blood Red?

"Hey grainstuff Lauren. Vogel bomb here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. I admit we originally wanted to do this episode. Hey because it's interesting but be because we are fans of horror and we wanted to demonstrate the episode on Youtube by dumping a bucket of fake blood over my head. Carrie style. If you happen to look it up. I apologize in advance for what counted as my acting ability at the time but the subject remains fascinating. Our blood is always read even in our veins when it looks blue. Here's why a brain stuff it's Christian Sagar. Do you remember in the movie carry where they dumped pig blood on that girl at her prom while the annals of human biology actually published an article in two thousand and twelve showing that humans are excellent detectors of pig blood but we are far less developed at detecting human blood. They concluded that human blood has no specific smell or appearance. That triggers immediate recognition. So blood is always read right. But why does it have to be read contrary to popular belief? It's not blue when it's in our bodies even when it's Deok's oxygenated but oxygen is part of the color. Along with the protein molecule haemoglobin the detaches to oxygen it carries from the lungs to muscles as blood gets pumped through the human body and while blood is always red shade depends on how much oxygen carrying for instance. When you cut a person's arteries open they bleed. This really bright red blood because of the complex formed between Hemoglobin Iron and lots of oxygen. But if you look deeper into the circulatory system and peered into vein that was delivering all of its oxygen. You would see that. The blood is a deeper Maroon. Color so veins they look blue or green mainly because of skin and skin. Pigmentation plays a big role. Since everyone's skin is a different color. Our veins look different. Especially because the tissue above our veins scatters red light. But let's blue light right on through. Even the Veins Reddish Brown. They appear to be blue from the outside. So is the way human beings perceived color another factor here as well yes. Researchers have shown that it

Veins Reddish Brown Christian Sager Christian Sagar Youtube Vogel Lauren Carrie Style
Why Was the Mad Hatter Mad?

BrainStuff

03:26 min | 5 months ago

Why Was the Mad Hatter Mad?

"To brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. If you've read Lewis Carroll's Alice's adventures in Wonderland or seen the movie adaptations the character of the mad. Hatter is bound to have left an impression. He's eccentric to say the least as presides over a rollicking tea party that Alice attends but the idea of being mad as a hatter will in the British sense mad meaning crazy not angry. It didn't come from Carol and if you like. Alice have a tendency to fall down. Rabbit holes this phrase is an interesting one. Carroll's book was published in eighteen sixty five but the Oxford English dictionary puts the earliest known use of mad as a hatter in eighteen twenty nine. That's three and a half decades before any march hare's or dorm. I sipped tea or the Cheshire. Cat made his famous claim of the General Madness of the inhabitants of wonderland. Where all mad here? The actual origin of the phrase mad as a hatter is unknown but it's believed to be connected to mercury poisoning in hat makers several years after Allah's had her first appeared in eighteen. Eighty three the phrase hatters shakes was used to describe the condition caused by mercury poisoning. The symptoms include muscle tremors and mental and behavioral changes. Wonderland's hatter behaves strangely in the novel as do most of the characters but his friend seemed to accept his oddities as being normal today. Mercury poisoning is known to the medical and scientific communities as Eric Ism. The modern list of symptoms include irritability and mania both of which the hatter displays. But there's also sleep disturbances. Depression disturbance hearing loss and those telltale tremors at least the bladder of which the hatter does not seem to have though to be fair. He only appears briefly. You may be glad to learn that. Although short term exposure to Mercury Ken 'cause Earth Ism. It usually goes away if you can avoid further contact with mercury long-term exposure such as that that dental professionals and chemical workers experience can mean the symptoms persist in any case. Eric ISM is a rare disease after the tea party. During the playing card court trial to determine who has stolen the tarts the hatter explains the king that he has no have his own because he sells all of the hats he has which brings us to the last stop in our rabbit hole. A what does mercury have to do with hats? It was part of a process called carrying in order to make felt which is what many hats are made of. You have to get the for of a beaver or rabbit to stick together in a Matt. Thick stiff fabric. A which means you have to get the for off of the skin to get the for off the skin. Cleanly mercuric nitrate was used. It came to be known as caring because the solution would turn the edges of the pelts orange as it dried modern haberdasher use hydrogen peroxide to remove the from the skin which is a slower but much safer process but apparently lose. Carol didn't mean to slander hatters via his tea party.

Hatters Hatter Eric Ism Alice Lewis Carroll Mercury Ken Wonderland Carol Vogel Lauren Sleep Disturbances Cheshire Tremors CAT Depression
Why Are Fruit Flies Science Superstars?

BrainStuff

04:42 min | 6 months ago

Why Are Fruit Flies Science Superstars?

"We'll come to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. If you've ever swatted fruit flies hovering over the fruit bowl on your kitchen counter and wondered what purpose they could ever possibly serve humanity. You're not alone. They are small. Today are annoying but humans owe them a huge debt of gratitude for their contributions. The science modern genetics one species in particular. Drosophila melanogaster is a superstar of tiny annoying things at least five Nobel. Prizes have been awarded to scientists for their work on fruit flies. Yes the lowly fruit fly and the larger glorious urge human have together tackle genetics and done a lot of cool stuff but like why fruit flies. And how do you keep them out of your kitchen? And do we need to blame scientists for them? Being in your kitchen to begin with a fruit flies have been used in biological studies for a long time which means there are a lot of tools and resources for scientists using Drosophila melanogaster to ask interesting questions. But there are some specific reasons. The species has always been a darling of geneticists for starters in genetics. It's helpful to have research subjects that can cycle through generations rather quickly and fruit. Flies are great at that. We spoke by email Thomas Merritt PhD professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Laurentian University in Ontario Canada. He said fruit flies create a new generation about two weeks making breeding them in the lab. Simple there are also small and easy to rare and care for and it's easy to house as many of them as you need in a single lab at one time also. Fruit flies are surprisingly similar to humans and other vertebrates their Sophomore Molyneaux gaster has fourteen thousand genes and we humans have somewhere between twenty thousand and twenty five thousand and about eight thousand of those genes analogous similarly must fly. Biochemistry is the same or similar to ours. Merritt said fruit flies are great to work on if you're interested in variation between individuals or genetic lineages there are also a great system. If you're interested in experimentally altering the environment they are so small we can do things like keep thousands of flies at different temperatures to see how temperature changes metabolism or gene activity in one. Study IN MY LAB. We used a small conveyor belt to slowly turn the vials. We keep the flies in this. Simple instrument is essentially a fly treadmill. And we can get literally hundreds of flies exercising on a small desktop but fruit flies can be annoying in a lab just as they can in your kitchen to begin with their small and it's very difficult to dissect a fruit fly in case you're wondering and although we share many of the same genes genetic networks were separated from them by hundreds of millions of years of evolution. So it's hard to make assumptions about ourselves based on what we find in these little insects because there are substantial biological differences between us. Merritt said there are certainly questions that are better asked and larger or evolutionary more closely related species like rats and mice a similarly. There are questions now. For example changes in genes through evolution. That are better asked and organisms. That are even smaller can be kept in even larger numbers and with even shorter life. Spans like bacteria or fungi but we can't blame scientists for the proliferation of fruit flies in the world. They would have been there regardless. Merritt explained Drosophila. Melanogaster is a cosmopolitan species. Meaning it's found essentially almost anywhere. We find humans. A fruit fly has pretty simple needs in order to prosper and multiply and those needs are usually met in our homes a moderate temperatures and a source of fresh produce. That's on the overripe side. This is why fruit flies live high on the hug and places like dumpsters compost tapes and Kitchens Merritt said a one interesting thing is we seem to see more flies inside in the early fall. I think that's from flies. That have been happily breeding and multiplying outside all summer. Moving into the warmer inside spaces as the weather cools. The good news is the fruit.

Merritt Kitchens Merritt Thomas Merritt Vogel Lauren Molyneaux Gaster Nobel Department Of Chemistry Professor Ontario Canada Laurentian University
"lauren vogel" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:55 min | 6 months ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To house of works now I'm your host Lauren Vogel a researcher and writer here has the forks every week I'm bringing three stories our team about the weird and wonderful fans as we've seen in science technology and culture this week a college kid turned a standard Honda civic into a self driving vehicle for seven hundred Bucks and related even in adults is now a diagnosable disorder the first editor Yves Jeffcoat our freelance writer Dave Roos explore question does the United States secret service protection and why for how long the cost between January and the end of February Donald Trump junior and his brother Eric visit Uruguay the Dominican Republic the buy in Canada to celebrate the opening of new trump branded hotels and golf courses and to take on other trump organization projects and potential investments secret service officers tell the brothers on these trips with US taxpayers covering the bodyguards airfare hotel rooms and meals the secret service won't release his travel expenses but the hotel tab and apply alone was estimated at nearly one hundred thousand dollars according to The Washington Post according to federal law the secret service is authorized to protect the sitting U. S. president and vice president or the next in line for the presidency their immediate families and all former U. S. presidents and their spouses as well as their children under age sixteen while in office neither the president nor the vice president can decline secret service protection but their spouses and adult children can almost all presidential families have accepted for secret service protection for as long as the law allows Bill Clinton and George W. bush even asked for extensions.

president George W. bush Eric Donald Trump writer researcher Lauren Vogel Bill Clinton vice president Honda The Washington Post Canada Dominican Republic United States Dave Roos Yves Jeffcoat editor
Why Can a Mongoose Take on a Cobra?

BrainStuff

03:29 min | 8 months ago

Why Can a Mongoose Take on a Cobra?

"Now available on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. It will come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. There aren't very many animals out there that could could fight a King Cobra and eat it for dinner but a mongoose is one of them before we go any further. Let's talk about Mongoose. In general have you ever seen among us. There are twenty nine species of them and not all of them. Look the same but they are all long bodied short eared. SORTA weasley looking animals. They they aren't very closely related to weasels. Though if you're an animal in the order Carnivora which is the order of mammals are mostly carnivorous and have teeth adapted for flesh-eating you can either be on team dog or team cat. Weasels are related to dogs. And however much mongooses look like weasels they. We are firmly on team cat fact. A mere cat is a type of Mongoose and cat is right there in its name. Mungo says live in colonies and most species. He's live in Africa. Although one species the job and Mongoose has been introduced to Europe and is also wreaked havoc and ecosystems all of the world especially on islands like Hawaii. Puerto Rico and Jamaica although mongooses are small. They're bright feisty and what scientists call non-discriminatory predators. That is if they can catch or kill it. They'll eat it up to and including venomous snakes and an animal like that can do a lot of damage on an island. But how can it be. That Skinny Mongoose can take on one of the most venomous snakes in the world. Like the Hulking King Cobra whose venom can kill an adult human. And around thirty minutes the grudge match was popularized in Rudyard kipling's eighteen ninety four short story Rikki Tiki Tavee. But that's not the only time among us has contributed to popular popular culture a Hindu fable about among us in a snake dates back to at least three hundred. B C E in the nineteen thirties. A family on the Isle of Man claimed claimed talking Mongoose named Jeff Spelled. GEF by the way lived in their walls by turns threatening them protecting them. Killing rabbits for their dinner and telling jokes in the story became a tabloid sensation and the paranormal investigation. That resulted is the subject of a recent book called Jeff The strange tale of an extra special talking Mongoose News in the real world a few specialized traits have allowed Mongooses to add venomous snakes to their list of entrees for starters mongooses uses are quick and agile and have strong jaws and thick

Mongooses Mungo Jeff Spelled Rudyard Kipling Lauren Carnivora Rikki Tiki Tavee Vogel Puerto Rico Europe Africa Hawaii Jamaica
Why Are Bananas Berries, but Strawberries Aren't?

BrainStuff

03:08 min | 8 months ago

Why Are Bananas Berries, but Strawberries Aren't?

"Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio Burgio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. There is an age old war of terminology in the culinary world that you're probably familiar with tomato fruit or vegetable. There's another lesser-known existential crisis in the kitchen. That demands attention to bananas. Are they berries this and if so what the heck are berries anyway. Botanically speaking these particular dilemmas may have never crossed your mind but once you start digging into the topic you might find you end up with more questions than you started out with for instance. What even is a fruit buttons consider fruit to be the parts of flowering implants that develops from the ovary and vegetable? That's a little trickier since. It's pretty much any part of the plan. That isn't considered a fruit or seed within the fruit family. You've got sub categories that include citrus stone fruits palms like apples and pears droops like peaches and apricots and pertinent torch discussion today berries. The differences between these subcategories comes down to which part of the plants flower ovary produces these skin flesh and seeds of the fruit in question. The technical definition of a berry is a fleshy fruit produced from a single very. If you're not too familiar with botany. The definition probably isn't helpful at all but once you learn that oranges and tomatoes fit that definition to a t and therefore could be considered berries. You start to the question reality go step further and find out that strawberries yes. Those delicious red fruits with Berry literally in the name aren't officially berries. Either either. Their accessory fruits meaning the flesh that surrounds the seeds doesn't actually come for the plants. Ovaries but from the ovaries receptacle didn't think would be talking so much about ovaries in this episode. Did you by the way raspberries aren't technically berries. Either it all goes to show that our language and especially the connective tissue between between our everyday language and our scientific language is highly flexible so scientifically speaking. What exactly is a berry? Well a berry has three layers of flesh the EXO carp or the outer skin the mess. Oh carp or the flesh in the middle and the endo carp which is the innermost part that holds the seeds and guess what has all those layers though yellow peeled white fleshed seed carrying banana. which by the way is the number one fruit choice in the United States according to the? USDA in two thousand seventeen every

Berry Iheartradio Burgio Vogel Lauren Usda United States
Can Camping Help Us Sleep Better?

BrainStuff

02:24 min | 9 months ago

Can Camping Help Us Sleep Better?

"Hey grainstuff Lauren. Vogel bomb here in this Hetty era of peak efficiency officiency in productivity when APPS and software. Promise you the fastest path to personal or professional organization. You might even want to regulate the amount of time that you spend dozing between excessive screen. Time longer working hours you might be desperate for a more natural and probably earlier bedtime but setting a sleep schedule is no small no matter how ever a study published in current biology shows that there might be a rather simple solution a weekend. Camping could be the path to an earlier bedtime and no. That's not because of exhaustion from constant grizzly vigilance. Although that can't hurt it's because we rely on electrical light at night and get get to little exposure to daylight so our circadian rhythms push for later bedtime. Our Circadian Rhythms Are Twenty Four Hour Cycle of behavioral responses to light and bark this and that controls our biological clocks. The researchers studied campers for a week in the winter and a weekend in the summer to test seasonal snow and environmental circadian changes during the winter. The cameras used no electronic light at all. The study found that after spending time in natural real light in darkness the participants adapted to the natural light dark cycle. They slept longer and went to bed earlier than they would electrical environments a whole two and a half hours hours earlier for the winter group notably. The research shows that even around the winter solstice when nights are long folks enjoyed an earlier bedtime after being out the nature for a few days Milton levels which regulate wakefulness and sleep rose night and fell right when the camera's got up the typical cycle but before were they trump through the wilderness. They're MELATONIN levels. Were slightly off following hours after they got up meaning their bodies still desperately wanted to sleep. Camping camping is particularly advantageous on the weekend. The research also shows because that's when we usually wake and sleep later and have circadian delays. Even more benefits might come from knowing humans respond to seasonal light so strongly a Kenneth Right a CO author of the study points out that workplaces with more natural light could lead to more arrested and productive workers so it is possible to reset our biological clocks just like a lot of animals.

Vogel Lauren Melatonin Milton Twenty Four Hour
Why Can We Hear Others' Footsteps, But Not Our Own?

BrainStuff

04:09 min | 10 months ago

Why Can We Hear Others' Footsteps, But Not Our Own?

"Welcome to the future of spaceflight experience. The journey live and stay tuned for the crude rude launch. Featuring Boeing's first commercial commander Chris Ferguson. Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here. You're walking down a deserted street to all quiet in your thoughts and suddenly you hear footsteps. Of course your own footfalls were making noise too. So why is it so easy to ignore our own noises and so easy to hear others. Scientists scientists have long known that we're capable of tuning out our own personal noises but we're previously in the dark about how the brain accomplishes this feat. The results of a new study published in the Journal. Channel nature aims to amp up our understanding of this phenomenon by focusing on footsteps. We spoke with lead researcher. Dr David Schneider and Assistant Professor with the Center for Neuroscience at New York University. He explained we wanted to understand how the individual cells and our brains are neurons. Work together to make that happen. I've been to do that. We studied mouse brains and we built an augmented reality system. So that when mice ran we could experimentally. Control the sounds. They heard we. We could give them a couple of days with their walking making one sound then. We could unexpectedly switched the sound. The research was conducted at Duke University School of Medicine. The scientists soon discovered that when the mice expected they're walking to sound a particular way the neurons in the auditory cortex. One of the main hearing centers of the brain stopped responding into the noise. Schneider said it was almost like they were wearing special. Headphones could filter out the sound of their own movements in contrast when we played an unexpected sound neurons and their auditory cortex had large responses. The scientists soon realized that as the mice were becoming familiar with the sounds of their own. Walking there were some important. Connections being changed between the auditory cortex and the motor cortex. which is the part of the brain responsible for moving? Schneider said the connections and strengthen onto inhibitory neurons in the auditory cortex that are active. When the mouse heard the footsteps sound the end result was that every time the mouse walked a group of inhibitory inhibitory neurons were active to create a photo negative of the sound. The mouse expected which could cancel out the expected sound when it was heard. The experience isn't limited to footsteps. Either Schneider said the heavy breather rarely knows that they're heavy breather because it doesn't sound as loud to them and I think the same is true of key strokes folks assure I can hear my own keystroke when I'm typing but I don't usually get annoyed by them but if someone's sitting next to me was typing heavily. Drives me batty for any any creature. Accustomed to being hunted like mice. This ability to filter out one's own innocuous noises and focus on the more potentially dangerous ones is critical. This is also the same phenomenon at play when we sing. Speak or play music. Schneider explained we usually have an idea in our head for what sounded like to produce use when I sit down at piano and strike the keys for example. I know what music I want it to make. But when we're practicing we often get it wrong the mechanism that we've described in this paper. The ability to ignore the expected consequences of our movement gives us the extra cool ability to detect. When we've got it wrong so if I play the piano just right I hear it sure but my auditory cortex is pretty silent but when I play it wrong I get a much larger response as a result. The brain is able to interpret Britt that responses. Hey that didn't sound right. Maybe I should move my fingers a little different next time that allows us to learn from our mistakes though. The researchers are still trying to figure out what exactly how such errors signals are employed by the brain when learning language and music

Dr David Schneider Chris Ferguson Duke University School Of Medi Boeing Lauren Vogel Commander Researcher Britt Motor Cortex. Assistant Professor New York University Center For Neuroscience The Journal
Are Less Experienced People More Confident?

BrainStuff

03:26 min | 11 months ago

Are Less Experienced People More Confident?

"He rain stuff lauren. Vogel Bam here with an episode from the archives for you back when our host one Christian Saker this is one. That's come up and I think all of our conversations and frustrations lately are less informed. Armed people more confident and if so why bring stuff. It's me Christian and Sager. If you're like most people you think you're very good at some things and are able to admit your less good at others. You probably think you're superbly-talented in one honor to areas and hey you may be right you try to be honest with yourself about your strong points and you're weak ones and you likely shake your head in pity at people you see as well. Oh stupid say things like. Why don't they understand that they're bad at doing stuff? Well there is an answer. But you're not gonna like it and this answer it doesn't just apply to people you think of as dumb it applies to everyone on earth including you and me. It's not a matter of intelligence necessarily a difficult fickle thing to measure but it is related to competence the ability to do something well in nineteen ninety nine psychologist named David Dunning and his Grad assistant didn't Justin Kruger tested. A group of students in several categories the ability to think logically to write grammatically and to spot. Funny Jokes folks. They also asked students to rate their skills in these categories. That is when they noticed something. Weird the people scoring below average on these tests were just incompetent in these categories. They also didn't know they were incompetent. And here's the kicker the less competent they were are the more competent. They ranked themselves. This is a phenomenon called illusory superiority this is a cognitive bias. Bias wherein people tend to rate their own abilities as above average multiple. Studies have proven this effect in everything from firearms to college. DEBATES AND MED students opinions of their interviewing skills. It doesn't seem to matter what specific skill were talking about. The less person knows about it the more likely they are to overestimate their knowledge. While dunning and Kruger popularized this effect in modern society. They weren't the first people to notice the relationship between confidence modesty. Honesty and skill philosophers throughout the ages have contemplated this idea like Bertrand Russell. Who famously wrote the trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure talk? Show in the intelligent are full of doubt. And here's another weird thing. People with actual competency are likely to actually underestimate their abilities. Researchers believe this modesty comes because competent people are more aware of how much they don't actually know as well as their field in general they also also consistently overestimate the performance ability of others. It all goes back to

David Dunning Justin Kruger Sager Vogel Bertrand Russell
BrainStuff Classics: Why Is Bacon Considered A Breakfast Food?

BrainStuff

03:13 min | 11 months ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Is Bacon Considered A Breakfast Food?

"Soap I'm Lauren Vogel bomb and I've got classic episode for You. From our erstwhile host Christian Sagar Bacon may have seen its peak internet fame. A couple of years ago but it still has a home on many humans. It's plates especially at breakfast. But this wasn't always the case here's why tapering stuff. It's me Christian. Sager her every day before I head into the studio I have a healthy hearty breakfast of eggs coffee and of course bacon. Well I'm vegetarian. So in my case it's Veggie Bacon. Who has their life together enough to eat breakfast every day anyways right? That's crazy talk but the point is this if you are in the United States than you already know that Bacon is one of the most popular breakfast foods in civilization right up there with eggs. But this wasn't always the case for much of American history. Breakfast would be something simple like a slice of buttered toast with coffee and orange juice and believe it or not. There's one man responsible for changing the way. America eats breakfast his his name Edward Bernez. I know I know you're probably wondering how could just one guy sway. The minds of millions wasn't bacon already around. Yeah sure Bacon Bacon or cured pork has been around in European cuisine for hundreds and hundreds of years. But it wasn't thought of as a breakfast food. So in nineteen twenty I five and out foot named the Beech Nut Packing Company hired Edward Burnett as to boost their bacon sales most ad guys at the time would have high tailed the to a pitch room brainstorming. Catchy slogans like making Bacon for example or that Bacon pancakes song from adventure time but Bernez didn't go straight for ADS. Instead he commissioned a study in a quote scientific poll Bernez had a physician asked five thousand doctors. The same loaded did. Question is a quote hearty breakfast better than a light breakfast to replace energy lost by the body at night because of the way the poll was phrased as most doctors agreed. That hearty breakfast was superior. Bernez reported these quote scientific results to other doctors across the United States. He also so embarked upon a broadcast and print campaign reporting these results along with advertisements for Bacon. This campaign exhibited some brilliant if not exactly ethical strategies I it used the appearance of objective scientific evidence. Second this evidence came from trusted sorority figures in third it sounded like nutritional advice rather than an ad whether you like Bacon or not. You can't argue with the results. beech-nut profits Sword and today Bacon is a major

Christian Sagar Bacon Edward Bernez United States Lauren Vogel Beech Nut Packing Company Edward Burnett America
Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

BrainStuff

03:06 min | 11 months ago

Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel I'm here with great news. Cockroaches are quickly becoming resistant to several different insecticides. All at the same time. Cool cool cool one Michael SCHARF. A professor in the Department of Entomology at Purdue University along with his team found these pests are developing cross resistance to multiple classes of exterminators insecticides insecticides. The team's work was published in the June twenty nineteen issue of scientific reports. The problem is that each class of insecticides works differently to kill these his creditors so exterminators frequently mix them or switch them up to combat infestations. Cockroaches are resistant to multiple insecticides. Well you can see where this is going. Sheriff and his team used apartment buildings in Indiana and Illinois. That had infestations of German cockroaches as their experimental grounds I because it is very glamorous. They caught some of the roaches and tested them to see which insecticides had the lowest resistance on the roaches low resistance Austin spins the roaches would be more vulnerable to the treatments which scientists went onto us for six months. Sharf said in a press. Release if you have the ability to test just the roaches. I and picnic insecticide. That has low resistance that ups the odds but even then we had trouble controlling populations the researchers rotated -tated three different insecticides. That method kept the roach population stable over six months. Meaning it neither increased or decreased when they mixed to insecticides leads. The Roach population flourished according to the press release flourished being just about the last verb. Anyone wants to hear when talking about cockroaches when the the team used just one insecticide for the entire six months and the roaches had low resistance to that particular insecticide they were nearly wiped out. Well great right not really. Because of even ten percent of the roaches had resistance to that insecticide. The population would increase. Sharf said quote four to six fold in just one generation ration-. We didn't have a clue that something like that could happen this fast during this test. The Roach is also developed resistance to several other kinds of insecticides decides even if the new generations had never been exposed to them before so now what Scharff said he recommends combating roaches with more than chemical warfare including traps and vacuums quote. Some of these methods are more expensive than using only insecticides but if those insecticides aren't going to control or eliminate a population you're just throwing money away oh and hey you've probably heard that

Sharf Scharff Michael Scharf Vogel Lauren Professor Indiana Purdue University Department Of Entomology Austin Illinois Six Months Ten Percent
Could Science Create a Better Blood Supply?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 11 months ago

Could Science Create a Better Blood Supply?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and Redeemer Miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your Wallet Credit Approval Required Capital One Bank USA NA welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here for years scientists have been toiling away in laboratories trying to make blood better or maybe more accurately better for more people that's one of the things at the withers research group at the University of British Columbia is working on pretty much every day you may know the basics of blood types humans have various kinds if you need a transfusion say you're injured in an accident or you're in the operating room awaiting some procedure you need the right type of blood either A. B. Ab or Oh oh and either positive or negative you need either your exact blood type or type o-negative which is considered universal and acceptable by all according to the American Red Cross blood transfusions needed every two seconds in the United States and every year four point five million lives are saved by safe transfusions so so type O is in high demand and in short supply so scientists have been fiddling with waste convert type A blood into type oh that would solve a lot of supply and demand and problems and they're getting closer every day for more than four years the withers lab on the Vancouver campus of ub see has been just science in the heck out of the challenge researchers there have been experimenting with different approaches to Strip certain sugar molecules from the surface of type a red blood cells effectively turning the cells into type oh which do not contain those sugar molecules these molecules antigens are what makes transfusions of different types of blood problematic type-b type-b blood for example contains antibodies that will attack those sugars on type a blood cells if the bloods mix and vice versa but having no I antigens type O blood is not attacked by other blood types antibodies which is why Typo is in such great demand the answer to ridding type ABE lot out of its antigens I proposed and demonstrated in the nineteen eighties was to use an enzyme that would in effect eat those sugars withers and his team building on that were searching for a better enzyme they turned inward in a manner of speaking they turned ultimately to the Human Gut withers explained planed what you're doing is you're essentially choosing an environment likely to contain enzymes to do the job you want and then you try to isolate your jeans and ultimately your enzymes from that environment one of the key steps is in my mind is actually choosing your environment in the first place is it going to be a bunch of soil some ocean water what's it going going to be withers and his group considered places where blood and bacteria would come in contact say in mosquitoes or vampire bats or leeches wither said but the complication is that it's only primates that is apes and ourselves that have the Abo blood system so mosquitos etc would have to be feeding on human blood and none of my graduate students seemed keen to volunteer the researcher settled on the human got the gastrointestinal walls where bacteria have been found to feed on similar sugars the theory was that they could take human DNA from a stool sample and isolate the genes that encode the bacteria to do who their sugar eating thing in the gut then they could see if that bacteria would do the job on the sugar on type a blood cells and fortunately for them human poop is in relatively tim great abundance after screening cataloging and sequencing the DNA the researchers finally found combination of enzymes that worked which effectively stripped stripped the sugars from type a blood their findings were announced in June of two thousand nineteen in the journal Nature Microbiology Post Doc Student Peter Raphael the lead the author on the paper said in a release this will really drive forward the option for blood banks to manage the blood supply as soon as we can be sure it's safe testing to establish that the enzymes don't strip the blood of anything else and the enzymes get all of the antigens from the surface of Taipei blood cells continues wither said definitely the research is still ongoing one part is doing all these things on safety the other part is trying to look further to see if there's even better enzymes and also to lookout for better enzymes for converting be type blood we focused on a because that's the most challenging one before and partly because there are reasonable enzymes for be the weather's group also is perfecting new methods of screening DNA at a smaller volume of it maybe soon could help make blood shortages a thing of the past today's episode was written by John Donovan and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more in this month of other bloody awesome topics visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and from podcast my heart radio is the die heart radio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite shows at IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward that's why so many people work with us on everything from city he traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems I._B._M.. Let's put smart to work visit I._B._M. dot com slash smart to learn more.

IBM Lauren Vogel Two Seconds Four Years
Should You Really Punch an Animal in the Nose If Attacked?

BrainStuff

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Should You Really Punch an Animal in the Nose If Attacked?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Look into brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vogel bomb here. Let's say something has gone horribly wrong and you're in a physical fight with another human person. If that person punched you in the face what make you back off some might say that getting punched in the nose hurts like unreasonably so and that they would disengage others might argue that it would merely incite their ire after the initial shock kolin would kick in and then make even quicker work of their opponent when it comes to animal attacks the answer to whether a punch to the nose would stop an attack pretty much lies with what kind of animal you're considering punching and let's just make it clear right now that you should do all you can to avoid provoking animal attack and that if you're not being attacked punching any kind of animal is means for admittance into the special hell but that aside let's talk about a few different animals that have a reputation for needing a good stick in the nose and and whether that would actually help save your skin. The shark is the animal. Perhaps most commonly singled out for a defensive sucker punch. The rumor is that a good hard punch to the snout is going to send a shark reeling. There are a couple of problems with this. Though one is that it's super hard to punch anything underwater making dump on the nose pretty unrealistic another issue while shark noses are sensitive their gills and is are much more vulnerable punching one in the nose probably wouldn't do enough damage to stun it and you've got the added problem of needing to get a little too close for comfort to its enormous gaping jaws so perhaps no on punching sharks unless it's actively early and aggressively up in your face your best bet would generally be to swim away quickly and quietly as possible and keep in mind that we're not sharks preferred snacks. They usually approach humans out of curiosity rather than predation another suggested attacker for which a punch in the nose might work bears in many many cases. It's best to play dead around bear if they're just curious or if a mother is defending her cubs playing dead means they'll likely lose interest in you and amble on but it's also certainly appropriate to try to fight off aggressive bear and while it's not a sure thing punching more hitting bear is certainly going to help you fight it off so go go ahead in clocking in the knows if it's absolutely necessary of course the animal that's really going to be useful to punch is one that has a wildly sensitive snout so we present to you the animal it would be most useful to open the knows if it were attacking you. The star nosed mole with one hundred thousand sensory three neurons in its snout. It's extremely sensitive to touch however you'll almost certainly never need to defend yourself from one although they look like creatures out of a gemmell del toro film the star nosed mole is the size of a mouse and way more interested in eating worms than in bothering you today's episode written by kate kirschner and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is the production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more in this and lots of other sensitive topics visitor home planet housed networks dot com and from our podcast my heart radio doesn't iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows money vertical of it and i'm jason jason pfeiffer editor in chief of entrepreneur magazine and what we know is this. If you're not talking about money. You're never gonna make any bit in our podcast hush money. We debate the uncomfortable the questions about money in life like do you give your friend alone. Who pays on the first date and how do you ask for a raise. Then a celebrity judge joins us to decide who's right listen and subscribe to hush money on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Cubs Lauren Vogel Gemmell Del Toro Jason Jason Pfeiffer Entrepreneur Magazine Editor In Chief Kate Kirschner Tyler
What's the World's Biggest Food Fight?

BrainStuff

05:13 min | 1 year ago

What's the World's Biggest Food Fight?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vogel bomb here. There is a mother of all food fights and it is thumbing tina tomato fight. This is the largest food in the world and it takes place on the last wednesday in august just east year in the small town of virginia spain near valencia. The fight has gotten so huge that as many as thirty thousand participants descend upon when y'all to hurl squish tomatoes at each other an entire week dedicated to a festival with music food revelry end yes lots of tomatoes on that wednesday you'll be hard impressed to get anywhere near the town centre where truckloads of tomatoes are brought in for the big fight but don't worry from about noon to one pm chances are you can be just about anywhere in town down and still get in on the action. No one is exactly sure about the origins of let thumbing tina their stories of a food fight that broke out between friends and escalated go to a full town of flying tomatoes. Other origin stories include anyone from a bad musician to city councilman getting pegged with tomatoes by angry townspeople. One in story was simply that a tomato truck turned over in the center of town. People decided to have a little fun in the aftermath. The most commonly agreed upon origin has to do with a town parade full of townsfolk folk wearing giant headed costumes sometime around nineteen forty-five legend has it one of these human bobbleheads fell over during the prayed after some kids tried to join in and his costumed head was knocked off. He was so angry that he started fight with any in all takers. The local kids retaliated by raiding nearby tomato stand and assault him with the messy fruits. It's the following year the same kids reenacted the event and it followed as such year after year until it was a bona fide town event the city council and local police. We're less than excited about it and attempted to stop at various points over the years but they eventually embraced it and the notoriety brought to the small town of just nine thousand people. If you want to take part in the world's largest food fight you better make plans ahead of time the sheer number of people who come to y'all tomatino each year versus. The actual size of the town means that it's nearly impossible to find accommodations there. Your best bet is to reserve a room at a hotel or hostel in nearby. Valencia trains leave for bone. Y'all about once at our you should also he'd the following unofficial rules. The start and end is marked by firecracker respect the starting and ending times you you must crush each tomato before you throw it and avoid hitting the tomato trucks for the first thirty or so years of the food fight. It was strictly a b. y. o._t. Affair since nineteen seventy five though the ammunition has been trucked in by los colorados disown louise bertran loosely translated. This means the calvary or army of san luis bertran. The patron of the town of brunell roughly two hundred thousand pounds of tomatoes are brought in for the festival. That's about one hundred thousand kilos kilos. The police are pretty forgiving. During the fight as long as nothing violent happens and the crowd seized the fight immediately upon hearing that second firecracker after the partying continues and the clean up begins the tomatoes are hosed from the streets into the sewer system locals and shop owners chip in on the hosting duties but the majority of the washing away comes in the form of firetruck hoses so far the town is reported no nefarious activity or injuries and those traveling tuban y'all have been respectful of the tradition and its rules rules. If you plan on going to spain to take part in local montana you should heed the following tips. Do not wear flip flops or any close you care about. Don't don't throw any kind of non tomato object in the food fight including your own shirt do bring a change of clothing especially if you're traveling by train to and from when y'all also also bring along swimming or snow skiing goggles to avoid the sting of tomato juice in your eyes make sure your phone and any other devices like cameras are housed in watertight casings and finally know that there are no spectators at my dna. If you're there prepare to leave read. Today's episode was written by charles w bryant and produced by tyler clinic. If you haven't checked out chuck's new show moody crush you can find it anywhere. Podcasts are found brain. Stuff isn't production eye. Radio's has stuff works for more in this month's of other structured lee messy topics visit our home planet house works dot com and more podcast from iheartradio like movie pressure. Isn't the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Spain San Luis Bertran Valencia Lauren Vogel Tina Louise Bertran Apple Virginia Assault Los Colorados Brunell Radio Charles W Bryant Tyler Clinic Chuck Montana Two Hundred Thousand Pounds One Hundred Thousand Kilos
What Can You Do If Your U.S. Money Gets Mangled?

BrainStuff

04:45 min | 1 year ago

What Can You Do If Your U.S. Money Gets Mangled?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vogel bomb here. Let's say you get a little forgetful and leave your day planner with tickets to a baseball game in two hundred dollars in cash on the roof of your car and that they plan are just happens to fall fall off at a railroad crossing. Everything gets mangled when the four oh five freight train goes barreling through the crossing the baseball tickets are gone. The planner is a lost cause and all that's left. The cash is a chewed up twenty dollar bill. You can't possibly use it. Can you or can you most damaged u._s. Cash whether it's shredded by a train damaged in a flood or even if your dog eats it is covered through the u._s. department of treasury's bureau of engraving and printing or b._p. And specifically gli their mutilated currency redemption service but it takes a lot for a bank note to be considered mutilated bills that are dirty limp defaced torn or in other words more than one half intact. Don't go far enough the b._p. Defines mutilated currency as bills that have been quote severely damaged to the the extent that its value is questionable or security features are missing that means a twenty dollar bill from our railroad example is simply torn. It's no problem get out the tape even spend way but let's say you find a cache of cash buried in your yard. I mean that happens all the time right. The bills have deteriorated to the point that security thirty features such as the watermarks color shifting ink security thread or three d security ribbon are no longer visible or have been destroyed now. Things are a little more complicated implicated in cases like this again. This happens all the time right. You'd have to submit what's called a mutilated currency claim to the ep. It's basically a letter describing how the currency got damaged. You'd include. It's estimated value and other contact information including your banking information. You also need to send the money to the ep where they will examine it. This process can take anywhere from six months to three years depending on how complicated the case and how damaged currency the treasury department has guidelines on its website about how to package up the cash for shipping but in general you'll need to send it in the exact same condition. You found it if the currency was flat. Keep it that way if it was a role. Don't try to straighten it. One caveat defaced coins shouldn't be sent with paper currency coins go to the u._s. investment for evaluation and are not redeemable for cash value only the value of the metal. So how much can you get back for your damaged cash. That depends on what the b._p. Examiner fines treasury department regulations state the u._s. Currency can be exchanged for full value. If more than fifty percent of the bill is identifiable viable as u._s. Currency and enough of any relevant security features remain or if fifty percent or less of the bill is present and treasury examiners are convinced that the missing portions have been destroyed the u._s. treasury department handles about thirty thousand mutilated currency claims annually valued at more than thirty million dollars. The most common causes for damaged currency are fire water exposure to chemicals and explosives damage from rodents animals or insects and deterioration or petra fixation from barrio. Today's episode by patty rassmussen and produced by tyler claim brainstorm is production of iheartradio's stuff works for more on this must of other topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and from podcast from iheart radio is iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows and we're back at the ron burgundy podcast season do baby the pressure team. What win do i brush my teeth. Whenever what else does on holidays and sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect smell of your breath breath. The smell of rare steak aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

Iheartradio Treasury Treasury Department Apple Lauren Vogel Ron Burgundy Patty Rassmussen Tyler Fifty Percent Twenty Dollar Thirty Million Dollars Two Hundred Dollars Three Years Six Months
Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production indivi- heart radio. Hey brain stuff lauren vogel balm hair someone gazing out at the ocean from the maine coast seized very different hues is them someone's squinting at the c. from sunny beach on a greek island but why does the ocean come in so many shades of blue of course ocean water is an inherently blue blue. It's clear that we see on the surface are the result of light being absorbed and reflected by the water itself. Whatever is floating and living in it and the surface of the ocean floor below low it a glass of water will of course appear clear as visible light passes through it with little to no obstruction but if a body of water is deep enough that light isn't reflected off the bottom it appears blue a basic physics explains why light from the sun is made up of spectrum of different wavelengths the longer wavelengths links appear to our eyes as the reds oranges while the shorter ones appear blue and green when the sun's light strikes the ocean it interacts with water molecules and can be either absorbed or scattered. If nothing is in the water except water the longer read portions of the spectrum tend to be absorbed by the water molecules whereas the light of those shorter wavelengths is more likely to go deep hit water molecules there and scatter back up towards her is making the ocean appear blue depth depth and the ocean bottom also influence whether surface appears a dusky dark blue as in parts of the atlantic or casts as safir like shimmer as in many tropical locations. We spoke nasa astronaut gene carl feldman. He said in greece the water is this beautiful turquoise color because the bottom is either white sand or white rocks fox. What happens is the light comes down and blue light gets down hits the bottom and reflects back up so you make this beautiful light blue color in the water darker sand rocks or other formations mean darker water. The color is further complicated by the fact that the ocean is rarely just water but is instead instead teeming with tiny plant and animal life plus suspended sediment or other natural orban made contaminants oshii offers monitor the oceans color the way that doctors read vital signs of their patients color seen on the ocean surface reflect. What's going on in its vast. Depths felt ben who's based at the nasa goddard watered space flight center in maryland studies images taken by these sea viewing wide field of you censor satellite launched in nineteen ninety-seven from its perch more than four four hundred miles above earth or nearly six hundred and fifty kilometers the satellite captures van gogh like swirls the oceans colors the patterns are not only mesmerizing but they also also reflect where sediment and runoff make water appear adult brown and we're microscopic plants called phytoplankton collect nutrient rich waters often tinting at green federal plankton use chlorophyll to capture energy from the salem to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy and then waste through this process called photosynthesis phytoplankton generate about half of the oxygen we breathe oceans with high concentrations of phytoplankton can appear blue green to green depending on the the density some length the water yellow reddish or brown tint phytoplankton serve as the base of the food web and primary source of food for zooplankton which are tiny animals animals eaten by fish the fisherman eaten by bigger animals like whales and sharks. It's when oceans become polluted runoff. The amount of phytoplankton can escalate late to unhealthy levels fellow painted feet on the pollutants flourish and them die sinking to the bottom to decompose process. The depletes oxygen from the water over the past fifty years oceans zones with depleted oxygen have more than quadrupled to an area roughly. The size of the european union part of the cause may be an increase increase in ocean temperature due to climate change since warmer water supports less oxygen in coastal areas phytoplankton blooms are suspected to be the cause title plankton may serve as the base of ocean food chain but as feldman says too much of a good thing is not a good thing on a map on feldman's office. Wall is a marker showing knowing where there's little human. Interference and ocean water is perhaps the clearest on the planet in this region off the coast of easter island in the southeast pacific ocean. The water is deep and remarkably clear due to its location in the middle of giant oceanic. I which is a large circular current. Its central location means. There's minimal mixing of ocean layers nutrients aren't pushed up from the deep bottom the purity of the water there coupled with that make the ocean appear a deeper indigo than perhaps anywhere else. Feldmann albin said the light just keeps going down down down. There's nothing bounces back. Here is the deepest blue you'll ever see in today's episode certain by amanda onion and produced by tyler playing raines is a production of iheartradio's has to works for more on in this amounts of other topics is their home planet has dot com and from podcastone my heart radio is the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows aw today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Carl Feldman Nasa Orban Feldmann Albin Greece Maine Iheartradio Easter Island Amanda Onion European Union Maryland Wall Salem Raines Apple Fifty Kilometers
Do Beaches Need Seashells?

BrainStuff

06:14 min | 1 year ago

Do Beaches Need Seashells?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production indivi- heart radio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vogel bomb here. We humans tend to enjoy the ocean so it makes sense that we'd want to take a piece as of at home with us but be warned beachside souvenir hunting can land you in prison. If you go overboard case in point early in summer of two thousand eighteen a texas access woman was fined five hundred dollars and sentenced to fifteen days in jail by a florida judge for illegally harvesting forty. Queen conch shells her key west vacation. Queen conches are marine greene's nails who live in gorgeous shells of their own making florida allows people to collect the vacant shells but it's illegal to take one. That's still occupied by alive conch. The shells of the aforementioned i mentioned texan took had living breathing molluscs in them. Florida has a vested interest in these nautical treasures on the shell loaded island of santa bell a barrier community near fort myers beach coming as a major draw for tourists and when residents noticed their precious commodities were vanishing. They took action in the late. Twentieth century local local started worrying that out of towners repelling too many shells as a conservation measure. Santa bell banned the collection of any shells with their original mollusks still living inside as well as does any sand dollars starfish and sea urchins. The ban took effect in nineteen ninety five and has since been extended throughout santa bell's home county. If you've noticed shell depletion on the beaches he visit know that it's not just a matter of light fingered vacationers organized poaching has become a serious global concern. We spoke by email with vincent instant nyman an anthropology professor at oxford brookes university in the united kingdom and a twenty fifteen study he co authored nyman documented the illegal trade of indonesia's protected shells calls the indonesian government keeps a list of molluscs that are illegal to trade or collect within the republic's jurisdiction chambered nautilus triton's trumpets and some giant clams are among the creatures ostensibly protected by law there yet poaching is rampant. Neiman's paper tells of twenty illegal shipments were intercepted by the indonesian authorities between in two thousand eight and two thousand thirteen but together these busts yielded more than forty two thousand shells a protected species valued at seven hundred thousand dollars nyman even said it's very important to note that we're not talking about individual tourists collecting a couple of shells on the beach putting them in their suitcase and bring them home. We're talking about a large scale commercial trade where the shells are collected by active fishing scuba diving cages etc and where entire sections of the ocean floor are emptied he stresses the poachers like to grab occupied shells and then destroy animals within them. He explained that when the animals are alive their shells are usually excellent condition as opposed to shells that have been discarded and washed washed up on the beach which are often damaged mosques aren't the only animals who've been hurt by the reckless over hunting of sea shells when sales nautilus and other sea animals die of natural causes other creatures like to move into their former shell homes we also spoke by email with michael kousky an ecologist at the university of florida he he said the most obvious examples are hermit crabs which use empty shells as protective armor. There are in fact many marine habitats. It's hard to find an empty shell because hermit crabs inhabit but almost all of them when there aren't enough shelters go around hermit crab populations are curbed and housing is just one service that unused shells offer some sea creatures creatures and birds eat them for mineral supplements calcium carbonate others use the sturdy shells as anchors from other mollusks barnacles and many more the harvest of these shells isn't just bad for the local ecosystem. It's also bad for the environment and ultimately for the humans who live and visit their take yoga beach a lovely slice of the iberian peninsula tesla located in sao paulo spain hot vacation destination. That's enjoyed increasing popularity wanting to know more about how this rise and human activity was affecting the ecosystem colo. The ski rolled up his sleeves and hit the scene from july of nineteen seventy eight through july of nineteen eighty-one. He and his colleagues put together monthly catalogs of all the seashell material they could find on your a beach kulakowski returned decades later for a new round of surveys beginning in two thousand eight and ending in two thousand ten. His discoveries weren't encouraging tourism data revealed field an almost three fold increase in visitation between one thousand nine hundred and twenty ten during that same period the number of seashells on your beach fell by more than sixty percent coincidence incidents probably not other beachside communities should be worried about the same kind of decline in seashells and not just for environmental reasons shells tend to break up into particles that are bigger than typical sand grains these shell fragments helped beaches fight erosion by locking up making it harder for winds waves and water currents to move shoreline shoreline sediment around if we moved to many sea shells it'll become harder for beaches to resist the forces of erosion and that it affects short side buildings roads and other infrastructure so what's the solution nyman notes in many countries. There are excellent laws in place to prevent overharvesting companies and individuals should follow the existing existing regulations and the authorities should enforce them. It is an economic crime and should be handled such he added the prosecutors. Judges must take large-scale poaching operations more seriously. Today's episode was written by mark manzini whose name i've been mispronouncing for about about two years now and it was produced by tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other multidisciplinary topics visit our home planet has works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Florida Santa Bell Lauren Vogel Iheartradio Texas Nyman Texan Indonesian Government Greene Fort Myers Oxford Brookes University Neiman Sao Paulo Spain Mark Manzini Apple SKI Indonesia
"lauren vogel" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on TechStuff

"He there in welcome to tech stuff i'm your host jonathan strickland i'm an executive producer with how stuff works in the love all things tech and today we're going to revisit an old friend of ours tech stuff listener rob that's that's not the old friend he's just he's a listener a friend not old friend he asked me a while back if i could do a follow up episode or two about microsoft which of course is the world's largest software company the last episode i recorded on tech stuff about microsoft's specifically was the microsoft story part two and that published back on july tenth two thousand thirteen that was back when lauren vogel bomb was co host of tech stuff and the show has changed a lot since then as the company microsoft today tend to go into much greater detail whenever i do a story about a company then i used to do back in those days so rather than just pick up where i would've left off back in two thousand thirteen i thought it would be valuable to give a quick overview of the company leading up to twenty thirteen and then pick up in real detail from there so i'm gonna give kind of a high level look at the history of microsoft it's not the same level of coverage i would give if i were doing this all for the first time but it's more than just the the the summary so paul allen and bill gates co founded microsoft on april fourth nineteen seventy five that was almost exactly one year before steve jobs and steve wozniak would go onto co found apple bill gates would actually drop out of harvard in order to start this company allen and gates started out by developing a basic interpreter for the al tear eight hundred basic as.

executive producer microsoft steve jobs steve wozniak harvard gates jonathan strickland lauren vogel paul allen bill gates co one year
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and am l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here you're in a stinks and i'm not joking this enigmatic outer solar system planet has long headache credibility problem with it being the butt of countless immature jokes now astronomers have discovered a gas in your ennis's clouds that does nothing to curtail this humor at all thanks science the newish study published in the journal nature astronomy has discovered the chemical signature of hydrogen sulfide in the planet's clouds a compound gives rotten eggs their distinctive stench besides launching a bevy of new puns this finding could transform our understanding of how our solar system evolved a may also help us to understand the atmospheres of massive planets orbiting other stars a first a bit of background you're in us has only been visited by a spacecraft once when nasr's voyager two's zipped past the planet in nineteen eightysix the fly by produced many beautiful and i conor views of.

ennis nasr lauren vogel nature astronomy
"lauren vogel" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Hey listeners lauren vogel bomb here whether the topic is popcorn or particle physics my podcast brain stuff explorers and explains the everyday science immed world around us our topics include anything and everything that we find curious like can you be addicted love did veloce raptors really hunting packs do vegetarians farts smell worse tune in every weekday wherever you get your podcasts for a brand new episode produced in association with how stuff works dot com and award winning source of explanations for how are weird wonderful world really works hello the internet welcome to season thirty two episode for dailies i guys were may twenty four two thousand eighteen my name is jack o'brien ak i always feel jeff o'brien's watch me that is courtesy of shit oh actually i i meant that up today oh that's why that that was was who was that courtesy of oh me and i am thrilled i always know it's a good aj when producer on a hose nia touches the inside of her nose just like she can barely sandal psychosomatic secondhand embarrassing and i am thrilled to be joined as always by my co host mr miles oh man.

jeff o'brien producer lauren vogel
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go rocket mortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here sales are very attached to their shells literally these slow moving molluscs grow protective shells to which they are physically connected eviction means death no snail can survive being torn away from its private calcified fortress but how exactly do snail's shells develop and what sets them apart from other types of animal armor before we get to that a bit of snail one oh one the total number of snail species could be as high as forty three thousand most of us are familiar with landbased varieties or those that live in ponds but marine snails also exist and when it comes to procreation certain species reproduce sexually while others are self fertilising hermaphrodites whatever gets the job done right they all do have one thing in common though snails all hatch from eggs generally the parents lay these eggs in loose soil or fix them trucks though a few species are over vigorous meeting.

lauren vogel
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go rocket mortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here considering the popularity of brain teasers and brain training apps you'd think the people would know quite a bit about the brain's role in education but according to a recent study the general public and even educators have a hard time squashing misconceptions about the brain and learning for instance many of the research participants believed that students brains shrink without sufficient water and the kids are less attentive after devouring sugary treats both of these statements are totally false by the way the brains behind the study published in the journal frontiers of psychology gave a survey featuring thirty two true or false brain related statements to three different groups of people educators the general public and people with high neuro science exposure that is those who had taken many college level neuro science courses of those thirty two statements the researchers focused on seven common myths that stem from what they call single explanatory factors that's ones that reduce the complexity of.

lauren vogel
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states an l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here we live in the age of if you see something say something what started as a public antiterrorism campaign in the wake of the september eleventh attacks has morphed into a state of vigilance for any kind of suspicious behavior and sometimes it pays off in two thousand sixteen for example a day after twenty nine people were injured in a string of new york city bombings two men saw suspicious bag with wires sticking out of it left on a dumpster in elizabeth new jersey they alerted police which used robots to disarm five pipebombs later that night another nine one one call led police to a man sleeping tavern doorway who turned out to be the bomber but for every report suspicious activity that leads to an arrest there are many others that are unfortunately not based on any kind of criminal act but on bias airline passengers of arab descent have been pulled from flights or not allowed to board when fellow passengers notified flight attendants of suspicious behavior that included reading the news on there.

lauren vogel new york
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and mls consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here normally snow looks white this is because the ice crystals that make up clusters of snow reflect and scatter every color frequency in the visible light spectrum so when sunlight bounces off snowbank all those colors blend together giving the snow a white appearance or at least that's what usually happens every so often though mother nature throws a curve ball with a blanket of non white snow plenty of the elder was a roman naturalist who lived from twenty three to seventy nine sea in one of his books he wrote about red tinted snow which ancient travelers sometimes encountered his hypothesis was that snow changes color as time goes by like a rusting of iron snow itself plenty wrote redden's with old age and reports of crimson colored snow kept pouring in over the next two millennia to figure out what's really going on we spoke by email with climate scientists randall survey he reports people in the dark and middle ages were often freaked out by it a professor at arizona state university serving he dedicated an entire book to weird weather stories in two thousand five titled freaks of the storm it includes a passage on red snow a servant he points out there charles darwin himself once came across white snow in the andes mountains that turned blood red is another important figure who witnessed the tinted precipitation was surge on russ a british naval officer and arctic explorer a reddish or pinkish snow isn't just a historical curiosity it's still being observed in february twenty eight teen for instance a puddle of red water that turned out to be melted vermillion snow was found in glacier national park so what's the beckenham behind this in some cases scarlet dust may be a contributing factor and he said.

redden professor arizona state university russ officer glacier national park lauren vogel charles darwin
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states an l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here the finding of a new dinosaur species is always caused for celebration to dino enthusiasts memorizing new names favorite pastime just ask some parents including mine sorry about that face guys and on an academic level recently discovered species could help us better understand the story of dinosaur ian evolution occasionally they provide clues to other mysteries as well on january twenty ninth two thousand eighteen the scientific journal nature published a study announcing that the remains of a previously unknown dinosaur had been found in egypt lov nectar before the beast has been dubbed man sour source shaheen size wise it wasn't too impressive but the discovery still has a lot of scientists very excited that's because by virtue of its age and anatomy meant sour soroush might settle a debate about where the african continent was located on earth when the non avian dinosaurs died out alfred wagner was a meteorologist who in nineteen fifteen made the case for theory he called continental drift this is the idea.

alfred wagner lauren vogel egypt
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and mls consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey brain stuff lauren vogel bomb here let me take you to a farm there nineteen hosting cavs pushed their noses over waist high fences around individual pens they're milling about no red barn with the soccer field it's dinnertime they're hungry and they've just spotted their favorite person a farmer pulling a green wagon loaded with bottles of warm milk he lifts the bottles and feeds each in turn coaxing shy cavs and hedging strong ones as their tails whip and bellies full the farmer rubs their necks and backs affectionately scratching behind an ear to a stereo plays classical music in the background though it's mellow tunes are temporarily eclipsed by the records of the meal in its place the farmer offers a soothing monologue that settles over the cavs black and white coats the farmer dean patterson tells us when you feed kaffa bottle of milk and when you rub him on his necker on his back and makes him feel so much better kill load the empty bottles back onto his wagon and return them to the milking parlor which is.

cavs dean patterson lauren vogel soccer milk
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support for brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply and understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and mls consumer access dot org number three zero three zero welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works hey rain stuff lauren vogel bomb here it may seem like a ridiculous schnitt i but it's actually a mind bender why can't you taste your tongue a thirteenth century indian mystic dini schwa even used it in contemplation on the very nature of being along with its fellow sense organs of is years nose and skin the tongue serves as one of the primary ways we experienced the world and form a working model of it was same riddle is frequently applied to the i though we can certainly see our own eyes reflections we can feel our own skin though of course the tip of your left index finger can't touch it self and be ear cannot hear it self but neither does it make a sound the tongue however lurks in our mouth like a layered beast flipflopping its way through our daily conversations tasting our food and occasionally dislodging a little bit of it from our teeth perhaps we're more inclined to ponder the mystery of the tongue due to its hidden nature or the many lingering myths regarding its functionality tongue.

lauren vogel
"lauren vogel" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Are they using that in a way that i don't appreciate well i don't know i i also didn't read the book which is in varying but i think the book is like very good people and i think it's a good thing it just feels like i i don't know for for those of us like in meshed in it we don't necessarily need it like i think like i think it's the same way that like it's good for white people to read like tana has or something but i don't really think like it should be required reading for black people who've right after that experience yeah i just like i don't know i feel like working at reduction with everything going on in the world just like there's so much heavy stuff about being a woman out there that i'm like i do i don't need to search for it there's so much heavy stuff period right now found myself gravitating toward kind of silly this yeah more yeah which is fun time for all of it hi i'm dillon fagin and i'm kathleen quilliam and we're the host of the question booth the question booth is both the name of a real place and a new podcast from how stuff works each week strangers wander into our lovely quiet booth here in atlanta georgia and have a conversation with me about a big question like why are people mean and if you could smell one thing and one thing only what would it be we're going to share some of their answers with you and find out surprising ways that were more like than different also have guest joining us every episode to phyllis and more on that week's subject premiere episode has house to folks own lauren vogel bomb for example summingup it's a show that's all about glistening learning and exploring what binds us all together and we hope you'll join us make sure to subscribe to the question booth on apple podcasts or your favorite pod catcher episodes drop every friday and until them see you in the question booth.

tana dillon fagin kathleen quilliam georgia phyllis atlanta lauren vogel apple
"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hi this is john rorick from the rock band the long winter but i'm ken jennings from the syndicated crucial jeopardy we have a podcast called omnibus it's a time capsule of our era and we put a new entry in the ground every tuesday and thursday listen on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts and subscribe to never miss a single episode two welcome to brain stepped from how step with bard mobile hey brain steph lauren vogel bomb here imagine your hours into a late night poker match holed up in the basement of a sketchy watering hole where tensions are rising you know you should quit while you're ahead be you just can't bring yourself to leave any possible winnings on the table the streak has gone on so long it's like you can't lose except you do one bad card deals you a killer blow dispel is broken and you're hot hand is gone unfortunately it never existed in the first place researchers have taken great pains to prove that the hot hand bias is exactly that a bias it's humans in meat predisposition that makes us believe we see patterns including winning or losing streaks where none exist especially when preservation or gain involved now we know that monkeys have the same superstitious bias to oh and they really love to gamble it seems we species have more in common than just the ninety three percent of our dna during a study by researchers at clarkson university and the university of rochester rhesus monkeys played a fastpaced computer game with builtin rewards correctly guess the next step in the pattern get a treat however even when.

john rorick rock band ken jennings time capsule clarkson university university of rochester ninety three percent
"lauren vogel" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on TechStuff

"Stuff you missed in history class tracy view will sit in holly for i also hosted a show called pop stuff which was all about pop culture the first episode published on october third 2011 it was about time travelling through fall tv was actually all about the shows that the hosts were excited about so if you want to hear which shows in two thousand eleven holly in tracy were really waiting does see you can go inland download that episode and find out say time travelling all over again the final episode a pop stuff with air on june 3rd two thousand thirteen and was called greatest hits perfume the culture of sent i used to host a show called forward thinking it was a video series and had a companion audio podcast the focus of both shows was to take a speculative look at the future often this would center on technology but we'd also take science art culture and other topics at the consideration joe mccormick and lauren vogel bomb hosted this show with me in our first episodes it's called the internet of things more efficient than you and it published on february 15th 2013 fun fact that was my six year work anniversary the day that show went live later that same year ben bowlin and matt frederick launched a new series called stuff they don't want you to know which focuses on strange stories infringe theories i actually gave the show that name that name was my idea it's one of like three good ones of had since i started how stuff works no brown has since joined that show add their first episode ever was called edward burn as the most famous mant man you've never heard of that polish of october 25th 2013 julie douglas one of our editors actually she used to edit my articles hosts a show called the stuff of life herschel tends to publish in seasons it requires a lot more work both on the research side and the post production side but it's a really cool show you should check out a few episodes of.

tracy joe mccormick lauren vogel ben bowlin matt frederick edward burn julie douglas six year
"lauren vogel" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Do you know the amazing story of how the us the men's hockey team advocated for equal pay or know what the mommy tax as and how it might be holding you back at work what's that he what half of your friends on social media selling leggings and beauty products line while i'm emily and i'm bridget and these are just some of the topics were gonna tackle on stuff bomb never told eu severe shared a listen on apple podcast google play spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and make sure you subscribe to ever listen episode hello and welcome to foodstuff i'm an eerie and i'm lauren vogel bomb and this is our episode of foodstuff aims that israeli hightech that affects only invest red eye so there's a lot to talk about here yet get right into it what is based food is food for space travel yeah and as we all learned in the simpson's episode deepspace homer in which homer simpson let's potato chips and then ants loose in a spacecraft you've got it takes them special considerations before you take food into space of because the equipment up there is you know kinda delicate and any kind of loose particles are drops of liquid could just seriously muck things up in the near isiro gravity of orbit and yes i said nearzero gravity it's not really zero gravity there's always gravity kind of kicking around so a technical point but an important one because of science.

social media bridget eu potato chips apple google spotify lauren vogel homer simpson
"lauren vogel" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"lauren vogel" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Fictional stories we're not going to do wrong times special occasion you know what i mean like and we also have a ton of fantastically talented other people coworkers s that are featured in this yeah of if anybody noticed but the stuff they don't want you to know team has sort of grown a little bit actually the whole past of works team but were lucky enough to be able to tap two of these folks in alex interest in name in helping us out alive peta probably hear us drop in their names from timetotime so you're yelling at a here super producer alex in this story and apparently tryst intel's ben he loves him i think we cut that by going to say the region uh so i you'll also you also here as some other uh collaborators of ours right longtime listeners will recognize uh lauren vogel bauman any recent foodstuff fame do you probably be able to tell who's who of way we've already said too much so let's let's uh cut past the cheesecake and let's cut the g at that growth like that he has the most awful explique out from ism for a fart because it makes cheese sim gross yet really like unfair to cheese relious all i don't know what you guys i'm getting a little hungary is anybody interested in know hit number fast rejoinder slim.

peta alex intel producer lauren vogel hungary