29 Burst results for "Lauren Summer"

"lauren summer" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on Short Wave

"We're beginning with a giant pile of dirt. Okay i'll go with it. i'll go with it. okay. It's not just any pile of dirt. It happens to be right outside of facebook's campus in the san francisco bay area where we're standing right. Now is the outboard levy of the facebook campus in menlo park. That's kevin murray. He works for the san francisco creek joint powers authority which is an agency that works on flood protection in the area. We're walking on top of that levee which surrounds the tech companies brightly colored buildings. So why does facebook need a levy. Well the company's headquarters is right on the shoreline of san francisco bay and over the last decade. They've built huge state of the art buildings on the waterfront. So the levy is protection from the bay. But kevin told me levy isn't exactly the right way to describe it because a levee is designed to protect people at has to meet engineering standards that ensure it holds up these don't those structures that are providing flood barrier now are not adequate and are subject to failure if we have a really big tide or a big wind event or a big storm surge so lauren did facebook know that when they built their they did and now the risk is getting even bigger because sea levels are rising in a hotter climate so the region is looking at building a bigger levee. Sixteen feet tall. It will cost more than one hundred million dollars and the federal government. Just preliminarily awarded about half that money. But that's raising questions about who should be footing. The bill for adapt into the consequences of climate change. Coastal cities are going to need billions of dollars to protect their shorelines from rising

Mattie safai Lauren summer lauren hey mattie npr facebook san francisco creek joint powe san francisco bay kevin murray menlo park kevin lauren federal government
Google Plans to Expand Its Campus  Which Might Become Unsafe

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 4 months ago

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus Which Might Become Unsafe

"Google is expanding its campus in the san francisco bay. Area the companies. Planning to build offices as well as housing and greenspace near the shoreline which is at risk from rising sea levels. And that's raising the question of whether building there should happen at all. Npr's lauren summer has the story as a city planner in silicon valley. Michelle king. here's all about one of the biggest headaches in the bay area housing. Oh my goodness housing. Here is extremely expensive. Sunnyvale has very high cost of living in may the median. Home price in sunnyvale. Where king works was one point. Eight million so the city is looking at a different kind of housing higher density. That's walkable transit and greenspace. It would go into a part of town called moffett park right now. It's just offices lots of low rise buildings with wide parking lots one of the most sustainable things you can do is put people where they work and put people where transit is so. This is a huge opportunity. This isn't just sunnyvale vision. It shared by one of the largest landowners. Moffett park google over the last five years. The company has quietly bought more than seventy properties. Here worth almost three billion dollars. Jeff holtzman is google's director of real estate development for sunnyvale. We're incorporating sustainability into everything we do in our developments and we're doing it to support our employees but also the community and hopefully the environment. Sunnyvale is in the process of rezoning the land to allow google to build new offices and housing and just to know. Google is one of npr's financial supporters. And there's one more detail the city is looking at. This land is on the shore of san francisco bay which puts it right in the path of sea level rise sea level rises already happened. I we've seen about a foot over the last hundred years. Christina hill as a professor of environmental planning at uc berkeley. We're standing on the edge of the bay where a high tide is coming in. Hill says sea level rise will make these tides even higher by as much as seven feet by twenty one hundred. But that's not the only problem there's also seawater in the soil under our feet the groundwater and as the c rises that to- of saltwater under the soil is gonna rise also

Lauren Summer Michelle King Google Moffett Park Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Jeff Holtzman NPR Silicon Valley Bay Area Headaches Moffett Christina Hill Uc Berkeley Hill
The Purple Urchins Don't Die

Short Wave

01:41 min | 8 months ago

The Purple Urchins Don't Die

"Everybody i here with npr. Climate correspondent lauren summer. Hey lorne hey okay mattie. Today i want you to picture diving in the pacific ocean. Okay like where this is headed. You look down but instead of seeing rocks and seaweed and stuff you see purple purple. Yeah hundreds of round spiky purple things. It's looks like someone rolled out a purple carpet over the sea floor. As far as you can see their purple sea urchins. Morgan murphy cannella is a diver and she seen an explosion of them off the northern california coast. Okay what's going on these urgency taken over. What used to be kept for us. you know. That's the seaweed that grows thirty to sixty feet tall so it creates us really. Lush underwater forest urgency eat kelp but normally not enough to really hurt the whole kelp population. But there have been some big ecological shifts that have led to the urgent explosion and now there are so many urchins. The kelp forests are disappearing. So does that mean that. The fans are going to go away. Actually no i mean you might predict a major die off because there isn't a lot of food left that hasn't happened. Morgan says they can endure that kind of like zombies. They can last for a long time without eating and they just they just live their job very bizarre anibal after respect them though so now the big question is is there anything that can be done you know. Has the scale tip too far or can. The kelp forest be brought

Lauren Summer Morgan Murphy Cannella Mattie Lorne NPR Pacific Ocean Northern California Anibal Morgan
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | 1 year ago

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Biden. You could listen on both 93.9 FM or a 20. You can also ask your smart speaker to play W n my C Tomorrow. Things considered just ahead tonight Patchy fog. Cloudy skies Low 63 degrees with more fog in the morning tomorrow Partly sunny through the day near 70 for rain is possible late tomorrow night. More fog. More clouds to love about 61 degrees. You're listening to W n my C. It's 7 20. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from total wine and more where in store teams can recommend a bottle of wine, spirit or beer. For any occasion, shoppers can explore more than 8000 wines, 2500 beers and 3000 spirits. More at total wine dot com and see three C three Done. Ai Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot From NPR news. This's all things considered. I'm Tanya Moseley and I'm Ari Shapiro. Record breaking wildfires in the West have destroyed more than 10,000 homes and buildings this year. Many people there have little idea of the risk they face and as an NPR investigation has found few states require that risk to be disclosed. NPR's Lauren Summer reports. In a year like this one, it's easy to get frustrated with being home all the time. That's a feeling that Jennifer Montano misses. You realize quickly. It wasn't that bad being stuck at home because now.

NPR Jennifer Montano Tanya Moseley Ari Shapiro Biden. Lauren Summer
"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More at total wine dot com. Stand by the listeners of cake. Time now is for 35. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm telling you, mostly in South Pasadena, California and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. Tens of thousands of homes have been damaged or destroyed and floods or wild fires this year. Many of the people who lived in them had no idea they were in harm's way. NPR's climate team has been investigating why it's so hard for many people to get information about flood and wildfire risk when they move. And what you can do to protect yourself, Lauren Summer and Rebecca Hirscher are here to talk about their findings. Hello, you two. Hey, this's been a record breaking year for hurricanes and wildfires. So obviously flood and fire damage is big news. But why did you want to focus on what individual residents knew about their risk? Lauren? Yeah. Every year now, Rebecca and I stand with people in the wreckage of their homes and They tell us they had no idea this was possible. They didn't know the area could flood they didn't know was prone to fire and climate change is making these disasters for extreme and you know, because people don't know about these risks. A lot of the people they didn't have adequate insurance. They'll tell us or their savings were wiped out, or they didn't have a plan to evacuate and ended up in physical danger. So we really wanted to know rise this happening and why don't people know more about their risk? Are there things people can do to learn more? So let's answer those questions. Starting with fire. Lauren, You have been covering the wildfires out in the West. What sense do homeowners there? Have the risk that they faced well. California is no stranger to wildfires right, But for many people, there's still a sense that natural disasters happen to other people. Just last week, I was with a family in Napa Valley who had to evacuate from a wildfire. CIA. Kendall Osborne was returning to see her home for the first time with her husband, Kelvin. We moved here just in time for the 2017 fires that was an eye opener. So I think we evacuated three times since we're being here. This time. They're two story house burned to the ground. There was there was basically nothing left. So having dealt with fire repeatedly, what were they warned about the risk before they bought their home? Yeah. I mean, they're home isn't an area of high fire risk, and when they got their disclosure packet, you know, with all the information about the house, there were a few sentences on one page that mentioned the potential risk. But if you bought a home, you know there's a ton of paperwork and it's really easy to miss it. He actually grew up in Southern California. So she remembers fires from her childhood. But then she moved away. We've been gone for 21 years, so I came back and didn't even think it didn't occur to us. Even that minimal disclosure they got those few sentences about fire risk is rare. California is only one of two states in the West. They require any wildfire disclosure. And then let's talk a little bit about flooding. Rebecca is it the same situation where not much disclosure is required? So flooding is a little bit different. There are 29 states with laws.

Southern California Rebecca Hirscher Lauren Summer NPR Kelvin Ari Shapiro Kendall Osborne CIA Washington Pasadena Napa Valley Rebecca
"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

"Other week. My freezers full because of the food that I mean they provide us with more than enough I mean, ah! It does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But We're grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career crystal cold and worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far from any towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. She says. We don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Hotel was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward. Her toe says wildfires could be categorized almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of a new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR Aren't your station by name. You're listeningto. All things considered from NPR news. W sponsors include Netflix, presenting the trial of the Chicago Seven from Aaron Sorkin, based on the true story of the 1968 protest organizers, who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot and the trial that followed. On Netflix. October 16th..

scientist NPR NPR News Northern California Lauren Summer California Colton Netflix Aaron Sorkin University of California Paul Flab Matthew Hotel Holden San Antonio Supreme Court Chicago
"lauren summer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Freezers full because of the food. I mean, they provide us with more than enough I mean, it does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But We're grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career crystal cold and worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far for many towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Colden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. But, she says, we don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Hotel was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of the new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches..

scientist Lauren Summer Northern California NPR News Colden NPR California Colton University of California Supreme Court Paul Flab Matthew Hotel San Antonio Lee forest Ecologist Merced University of New Mexico
"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Full because of that, I mean, they provide us with more than enough I mean, it does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But We're grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them, and millions of other Texans isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm fall flat in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire, scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned. Actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career crystal cold and worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in. A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far from any towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. But, she says, we don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Heurtaux was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR NEWS nomination of a new Supreme Court justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters. Particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic is Election Day approaches. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. You're listening to all things Considered from NPR news at 5 18. There is some traffic.

NPR scientist NPR News Northern California Colton Matthew Heurtaux California Lauren Summer University of California Supreme Court San Antonio Lee Holden forest Ecologist University of New Mexico Merced
"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Two Children under seven. Because of an illness and the pandemic. He was out of work for several months. Now he travels to a food distribution every other week. My freezers full because of the food that I mean they provide us with more than enough I mean, ah! It does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But Grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career, Crystal Colden worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far for many towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. But, she says, we don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Heurtaux was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of a new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. This is definitely when I see state team just ahead on all things considered. Last night, demonstrators lit fires in the street in Borough Park in Brooklyn to protest new covert restrictions. While the restrictions are being driven by data from the city and state health departments, many in the so called hot spot zone say the restrictions are anti Semitic. We'll talk to W is Glen Hogan, about the latest stated WN Y C is supported by Hackensack Meridian, John Ther Cancer Center, the only cancer center in New Jersey to receive.

scientist NPR NPR News Northern California Lauren Summer Colton California Borough Park Paul Flab University of California New Jersey Matthew Heurtaux Brooklyn Holden Glen Hogan Crystal Colden
"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

"23 has two Children under seven. Because of an illness and the pandemic. He was out of work for several months. Now he travels to a food distribution every other week. My freezer school because of the food that I mean they provide us with more than enough I mean, ah! It does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But Grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career, Crystal Colden worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far for many towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. But, she says, we don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Heurtaux was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of a new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion. Come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches. Just ask you're smart speaker to play NPR Aren't your station by name..

scientist NPR NPR News Lauren Summer Northern California California Colton Supreme Court University of California Paul Flab Matthew Heurtaux Crystal Colden Holden San Antonio Lee forest Ecologist
"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My freezers full because of the food. I mean, they provide us with more than enough I mean, It does get tiring, sometimes eating the same thing. But Grateful. That's what matters. He and his fiance hope they can turn it around financially and eventually stop relying on the food bank. But for them and millions of other Texans, it isn't clear when that will be possible. For NPR News. I'm Paul Flab in San Antonio. The wildfires here in California have spawned a new word. Giga Fire. That's a fire that consumes more than one million acres, a milestone that the August complex fire in Northern California hit this week. Overall, a record breaking four million acres have burned in this state this year. But some fire scientists say focusing on Lee on the numbers of acres burned actually does more harm than good. NPR's Lauren Summer reports early in her career crystal cold and worked as a firefighter and one summer she was fighting ablaze in Northern California. You know, every day for our shift we would drive in A couple of hours in the middle of nowhere and take a stand and try and implement the day's activities against this fire, and it just Didn't feel right to me. They were putting out a wildfire far for many towns in an ecosystem that's adapted to fire. She got more concerned about it. When she became a fire scientist at the University of California, Merced said. If you don't allow fire to burn in those places regularly, you get a buildup of too many trees. And that is what we have seen is driving. Ah, lot of these really large fires, Holden says. That means some fires can be good, while others that destroyed homes are bad. She says. We don't talk about them like that. Wildfires are often reduced to one metric how big they are and big implies bad. Instead, Colton says, the focus should be on the human costs. The number of evacuees or homes threatened, focusing on fatalities focusing on homes. Is going to get us to the place where we can say Oh, okay instead of trying to suppress the fire, maybe we should be trying to do the things that we know will minimize home loss is focusing on the size of fires can obscure another important thing. How dangerous they are. The thing that's absolutely striking to me. This fire season is how quickly some of these fires were spreading. Matthew Hotel was a forest Ecologist at the University of New Mexico. He says. Extreme fires create their own weather. A fire can start to create its own winds and then become this Basically self fulfilling prophecy, right as it can really start to drive itself forward her toe says wildfires could be categorized. Almost like hurricanes are so people know how urgently they need to evacuate. Because in a warming world, these kinds of fires will only become more common. Lauren Summer NPR news The nomination of a new Supreme Court. Justice has added a new dimension to this year's election for some voters, particularly around the issue of abortion come back tomorrow morning to hear how religious conservatives are thinking about the topic as Election Day approaches. Just ask your smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. This is doubled. Even my C Stay tuned. There's more all things considered just ahead. California has a long history of oppressing black people as slaves and in other ways. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevent you from buying or selling homes to African Americans. Now the state is setting up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people. We'll have that story just ahead on WN. My C stay with us. W. N. Y. C is supported by Saint Francis Hard center, New York state's only specialty designated cardiac centre, offering one of the leading cardiac care programs in the nation. More AT C HS cardiology dot or GE.

scientist NPR Northern California NPR News Lauren Summer California Colton Matthew Hotel University of California Paul Flab New York Holden GE Supreme Court San Antonio Lee
"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

"This weekend is going to be hot, too. If it seems like heat, drought and wildfires are all piling together. It's not your imagination, Scientists say climate change makes them more likely to happen at the same time as NPR's Lauren summer reports. It takes a lot for heat to make headlines in Tucson, Arizona, a Stephanie Small house realized listening to the radio recently. A couple days ago, I said, Well, no heat warning for today. It's only gonna be 106. Apparently, we're not over entered in. Everybody should be out enjoying the weather, but this year is getting people's attention, Small House says. She's president of the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and she also runs a cattle ranch outside of Tucson in the 20 years that I've been here on the ranch. This is probably just the second time that I can remember. Summary that Spencer dry on top of the heat. The entire Colorado River, which is key for Arizona's water supply has been in a 20 year drought. Is there tension in the community right now? In the ranching community? Absolutely. Is their stress. Absolutely thes. Rare. Events are simply becoming more common, says Moody Sad, a professor of civil engineering at Boise State University. In a study in the journal Science Advances, he says that trend is clear over the past few decades. Basically, droughts are getting more intense and heart years are getting more hot. And the cycle between them is intensifying droughts and heat wave's feed each other, he says. When the soil is dry, more of the sun's energy heats up the air, then it's hotter, making more water evaporate, causing more drought. It's a climate change driven cycle we have to move past. That traditional thinking ofthe heat waves and droughts and fire separately. Because they will work together. They they are the reason that we're seeing so many disasters happening. Disasters like the extreme fires across the West this year. What is happening in California is a preview of what we'll see Everybody. We need to act now. We do not have any more minute. I'm not talking about the years. We do not have any more minutes to cut our emissions because in a hotter climate, he says, disasters are teaming up. Lauren Summer NPR news As we track relations between the US and China relations that are tense and getting tenser stopped for a moment to consider Taiwan for Taiwan. The situation presents both unprecedented opportunities and plenty of challenges to take through just a few of.

Spencer Stephanie Small house Lauren summer Tucson Arizona NPR Arizona Farm Bureau Federation US Colorado River Taiwan president Science Advances Boise State University professor of civil engineering California Moody China
Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

"It's been a record shattering year for heat in the American West and this weekend is going to be hot too. If it seems like heat drought and wildfires are all piling together it's not your imagination scientists say climate change makes them more likely to happen at the same time. As NPR's Laura Summer reports. It takes a lot for heat to make headlines in Tucson. Arizona as Stephanie Small, House realize listening to the radio recently a couple days ago he said well, no warning for today it's only be one hundred six. Apparently. We're not over a hundred ten everybody should join the weather but this year is getting people's attention. Small House says she's president of the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and she also runs a cattle ranch outside of Tucson in the twenty years that I've been here on the ranch. This is probably just the second time that I remember a summer that's dry on top of the heat the entire Colorado River, which is key for Arizona's water supply has been in a twenty year drought. Is there tension in the Vermont Community Right? Now ranchy community absolutely is their stress absolutely these rare events. Are simply becoming more common says, Mogi Sunday professor of Civil Engineering Boise State University in a study in the journal Science advances he says that trend is clear over the past few decades basically routes or getting more intense and hot years or getting more hud, and the cycle between them is intensifying droughts and heat waves feed each other. He says when the soil is dry more of the sun's energy heats up the air then it's hotter making more water evaporate causing more drought. It's climate change driven cycle via have to move past that traditional thinking of heat waves and droughts and fires separately. Because they would work together they. They are the reason that we are seeing so many disasters, happening disasters like the extreme. Across the West this year, what is happening in California is a preview of what we'll see every. We need to act. Now we do not have any more minute I'm not talking about the years we do not have any more minutes to cut our emissions because in a hotter climate he says disasters are teaming up lauren summer NPR news.

Stephanie Small Arizona Tucson NPR Mogi Laura Summer Small House Arizona Farm Bureau Federation Colorado River Civil Engineering Boise State Vermont California Professor
"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Shea Stevens. A wildfire. Bernie, north of Sacramento, is now the largest blaze in California History after consumer over 731 Square miles as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports a new study. Shows that Maura Americans are at fire risk than previously thought. The August complex fire has now taken the top spot at almost half a million acres burned for other fires. Still burning are also among California's top 10 largest. Hotter climate, along with overgrown landscapes is fueling that growth, fire, experts say. And more and more homes are being built in fire prone areas about 60 million homes are at risk, according to research from the University of Colorado Boulder. Many of those homes aren't built with fire resistant materials and the majority of fires that threaten them were caused by people. So a key step is stopping those fires from starting in the first place. Lauren Summer NPR news During a campaign stop Thursday in Michigan. President Trump had more dire warnings about the nation's future if he loses the election in November, Trump narrowly lost the state in 2016, and recent polls show him trailing Joe Biden. Michigan Radio. Steve Carmody has more with Air Force One is a backdrop literally surrounded by thousands of manly massless supporters. The president took aim directly at his Democratic opponent in November. If bite wins. China wins If Biden wins the mob wins if Biden wins the rioters, anarchist arsonists And flag burners when Trump talked about bringing back manufacturing jobs in Michigan, though the state's manufacturing sector has actually lost thousands of jobs.

President Trump Joe Biden California Shea Stevens Maura Americans Michigan Radio NPR president Michigan Bernie Lauren Summer Lawrence Summer University of Colorado Boulder Steve Carmody China Air Force One Sacramento
"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So a key step is stopping those fires from starting in the first place. Lauren Summer NPR news President Trump calls Bob Woodward's latest book, A quote, political hit job. Woodward's reporting included more than a dozen interviews with Trump himself back in March. Trump told Woodward that he played down the dangers from the virus so people would not panic. Here's the president today. Responding to questions about why he told the public the virus was like the flu, and it would soon go away. I want to show Level of confidence and I want to show Strength as a leader, and I want to show that our country is going to be fine one way or the other. So far more than 191,000. People in the US have died from Corona virus and the death toll continues to climb, while President Trump says we are rounding the corner on dealing with the pandemic. Stocks finished lower on Wall Street after a choppy trading session. Tech stocks have been at the center of the markets. Wild swings the tech heavy NASDAQ dropped 221 points down almost 2%. Dow Lost 405 points down almost 1.5. This is NPR. This is doubled even mice in New York. Good evening up Sean Carlson. As near City public schools prepared open later this month. Tens of thousands of staff members are returning to get ready. A few of them also have tested positive for covert 19 City councilman remark. Trager chairs the Education Committee. He says he's worried the school system does not have a well coordinated response. I've been arguing this entire time that they're not prepared. They're not able to safely operationalized plans and this is proof of that. He says Test and tracers have not investigated all close contacts of the teachers who tested positive and he's worried within person school's starting in less than two weeks. The school system is not working closely enough with the health Department. Concerns over the Corona virus pandemic have caused a split in ceremonies Commemorating the 19th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. W Denny Lewis has more For almost 20 years, families have memorialized the victims of the 2001 and 1993 attacks on the World Trade Center by reading aloud the names of those killed But this year, the onsite ceremony organized by the September 11 Memorial and Museum will instead era pre recorded reading over speakers due to concerns about covert 19. A separate ceremony organized by the tunnels to Tower's Foundation will continue the tradition of reading the names allowed just a few blocks away at Zuccotti Park. Both memorials will only allow family members to attend in person, though the museum's will be streamed online. Police say an empty A cleaner has died after falling between tracks and a train yard in the Bronx early this morning. The NYPD says officers found the 40 year old worker unconscious and unresponsive. At the 239th Street hub. Emergency responders pronounced the man dead at the scene. Authorities say he was trying to cross the tracks but fell An investigation is ongoing and the city medical examiner will determine the cause of death. For.

President Trump Bob Woodward Sean Carlson NPR Trager president Lauren Summer Corona flu NYPD US New York Denny Lewis World Trade Center Zuccotti Park health Department Education Committee
Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

"D. Y. E. N., dot com slash NPR to learn more many people who lose their homes wildfires or in hurricanes did not know they were in harm's way. You can understand that this might happen. You know that the houses near the words or near the. Coast, but you don't quite realize the risk don't quite realize the extent of the danger. One major real estate site is now showing a homes flood risk along with photos of the kitchen and living room so that people will know this is one way that climate change has become a more direct part of home-buying. A long-term decision that a lot of people make our reporting from NPR's climate team starts with NPR's Rebecca Hersher. It's obvious to a lot of Americans that climate change means more flooding more than a thousand homes and businesses are flooded in the Jackson Mississippi Southern Louisiana Sixty thousand homes north. West of Omaha is still dealing with the math more than four hundred homeowners. Even, though government flood maps have been around since the seventies, there was no mention of flooding on real estate websites until today Leslie Jordan is a vice president of the website realtor dot com, which lists more than one hundred, ten, million homes. Flooding is the most common costly natural disaster in the US. So realtor DOT COM has added flood information to every listing Jordan says that's thanks in part to a new privately funded fled information project called flood factor. Matt E B. is one of the CO founders of. Flood factor which rates houses on a scale from one to ten. So if it's very likely a very deep flood, you'll get a flood factor of ten for that property. If it's very unlikely, then it'll be a flood factor one, the ratings take into account climate change particularly sea level rise and more extreme rain ev says that kind of Info has actually been out there for years. It's just that regular people haven't had access to it. A. Democratization of this information is the way that we like to think about. It because there are people who already have this information and they're already acting on it people like mortgage insurance companies and large real estate developers, some of which have fought against public flood disclosure laws. So are other real estate sites also going to add this information. Can you say We are hopeful and happy to engage in those conversations with folks and that less than specific answer made my colleague Pr's Climate Team Lauren summer wonder what is going on with the other real estate websites so she called them i. I I asked Zillow if they're thinking about publishing flood, risk their number of challenges with that, and it's something that I think sooner or later would be a great feature to include Jeff. Tucker is an economist at Zillow who has studied how the homes they help sell art risk from climate change hundreds of billions of dollars just tremendous amount of real estate at risk primarily from coastal flooding for instance, Tucker. Says the company has had internal discussions about including flood risk, but they expect pushback from some users the current. May Be very unhappy to have that kind of information surfaced. If they're interested in selling their home, I heard the same thing from Taylor Mar lead economist at red. Fin. Could this actually reduce the value of this existing homeowner and essentially take away a lot of their net worth Marceau's on the buyer side Redfin survey show that three quarters of them. WanNa know about natural disasters before making an offer but he says that Info can't. Crowd out other fell on the website. If we made the whole front page just about flood risk, they might not be as easily able to navigate how long the commute is. For example, Maher says they're looking at testing including flood

NPR Dot Com Zillow Leslie Jordan Marceau United States Tucker Jackson Mississippi Southern L D. Y. E. N. Omaha Matt E B. Rebecca Hersher Vice President Maher Redfin WAN Jeff
"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

"And provide electricity When solar turns off, California has already mandated more storage be installed. But while the state is trying to move away from fossil fuels, some argue the blackouts make the case for keeping them around. Mark Spect, an energy analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists, disagrees. The solution is definitely not more natural gas power plants really, If anything, this is an indication that California should speed up its investments in clean energy and energy storage. After all, he says, Climate change is making heatwaves worse. So burning more fossil fuels to deal with that is somewhat counterproductive. Lauren Summer NPR news This is NPR news, and I'm Cherry Glaser with this case yard up. News Update. The head of the U. S. Postal Service says he's suspending cutbacks to the agency until after the fall election. This comes after a lot of pushback, including from many California leaders. Congress members, Judy Chu of Pasadena and Adam Schiff of Burbank, both held news conferences yesterday from post offices in their districts. Calling on the Trump administration to reverse the cutbacks in its case here, W's drone, Campbell reports. California has joined several other states in suing the Trump administration, claiming the cuts could interfere with mail in voting. The federal suit alleges that reducing the postal Service by removing male machines cutting hours and delaying some deliveries would impede state's constitutional ability to administer a free and fair election. California Attorney General Javier Sarah, timed in on the suit, saying President Donald Trump fears a fair election so called reforms by the Trump administration have led recently toe widespread male delays and concerns about safe mail in voting during the Corona virus pandemic. Congressman Adam Schiff, during his appearance at the downtown Burbank Post office, said delays are hurting his constituents, including veterans, seniors who need medication and small business owners. Schiff welcome news that the cutbacks will be suspended, saying showed the victory of public pressure. But he said the cuts should be reversed in full for K C. R w I'm Jerome Campbell. You're listening to morning edition here. W sponsors include HBO presenting Westworld nominated for 11 Emmys, including Outstanding Supporting actor in a drama series for Jeffrey Wright.

California Congressman Adam Schiff Mark Spect Trump U. S. Postal Service Donald Trump Jerome Campbell Burbank Union of Concerned Scientists NPR Judy Chu HBO Lauren Summer Cherry Glaser Congress
Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

Environment: NPR

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

"Most of us have heard of saving the elephants or saving the polar bears. But what about saving their parasites scientists are increasingly finding that parasites are key part of ecosystems and many risk of extinction NPR's lauren summer explains. When your job is to study parasitic worms, not everyone wants to hear what you do for a living. It's not a popular topic of conversation cocktail parties. I can tell you that Chelsea would is assistant professor at the University of Washington parasites a major public relations problem they're gross and slimy and most people don't really like thinking about them. But the fact is that they're really important in ecosystems would. Says just look at a flat worm she studies in California Ponds I. The parasites starts as an egg inside a bird, the birds about the egg, which infects snails than it goes from the snail to frog, but the parasite needs to get back in a bird to finish its life cycle. So it causes deformities in the frogs legs, which makes it easier for birds to catch and eat them which helps. Sustain. The bird population would says, it shows how humble parasites can influence the entire food web. But if birds are threatened, we're GONNA. See some parasites decline possibly to extinction in the presence of environmental change, which is why team parasitology released a new parasite conservation plan. The first step is simply identifying them of the millions of parasite species only about ten percent are known to science says Schuyler Hopkins of. North Carolina State University. We know nothing about them. We don't need another name Oh definitely don't know what they're doing with the ecosystems. Many parasites are just as vulnerable as their host animals are to climate change and habitat loss but even though an animal may be listed as endangered, it's parasites aren't, but they could be added alongside their more visible hosts. It would be a really great way or easy way. To get a lot of mileage for her site conservation because humans tend to gravitate to animals like us. It is the wolves and the grizzlies and the polar bears mostly the mammals that really get people's attention Jacob Malcolm Works for the advocacy group defenders of wildlife. He says, it's not all bad. That humans focus on those charismatic critters saving their habitat can also help the less charismatic species in their ecosystem. So whatever chances his group launches a save the Leeches campaign pretty close to zero. So now's the time leach lovers of the World Unite Lauren summer NPR news.

Schuyler Hopkins Chelsea Lauren Summer NPR University Of Washington North Carolina State Universit Assistant Professor California Jacob Malcolm Grizzlies
"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It takes the total number of so called quarantine states to 22 a number that's been growing weekly. A potent greenhouse gas on his methane is on the rise, according to a new study, scientists warn that could dramatically increased climate change. NPR's Lauren Summer is more The atmosphere is warmed by both carbon dioxide and methane. But you can think of methane as a thicker blanket. It's about 28 times better at trapping heat. And humans are adding more of it to the atmosphere, according to the global carbon project that comes from leaks from oil and gas wells and pipelines. It also comes from farmland and from the digestive systems of cows and livestock. All methane emissions are growing from many countries, Europe has been able to cut its emissions by using less fossil fuel and eating less meat. Lauren Summer NPR News on Wall Street, The Dow is up 556 points. The NASDAQ rose 97 points today. You're listening to NPR. Live from the news. I'm terrorist. Siler, California Health officials announced New Corona virus testing guidelines today, the state will outline tears that prioritize who gets a test and how fast those tests tests are processed. Priority will goto hospitalized patients and people in nursing homes, jails and prisons. State officials also announced an effort to move more testing to healthcare offices and local labs. Lourdes Castro. Ramirez, who heads the state business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency, says the move is allowed to expand testing this wall out vulnerable populations to be able to obtain appointments at the state testing facilities. Officials say they plan to release emergency regulations that would ensure health coverage, including the cost of tests. Louie's restaurant near San Francisco's Cliff House, announced yesterday that it will close permanently because of Cove in 19 Alice will flee has more perched above the Pacific Ocean on the western edge of the city. Louie's restaurant has been serving up classic American food for 83 years. But after a four month closure, with no end to the pandemic in sight, it was announced that the family owned restaurant would shut down permanently. In a statement posted to Facebook, the restaurant's owner, said that the decision to close was difficult, but they felt that indoor dining created an unsafe environment for staff and that to wait out the pandemic was financially unreasonable. Closure comes amid a surgeon Corona virus cases yesterday, Governor Gavin Newsom re imposed a state wide ban on indoor dining..

NPR Louie Governor Gavin Newsom Lauren Summer Facebook Europe Lourdes Castro Consumer Services and Housing Siler Cliff House California Pacific Ocean Ramirez San Francisco
"lauren summer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Go away from developing Britain's five G network, plus two Somali refugees are now school principals in Minnesota and hope to serve as an inspiration to others. Those stories next. But first the news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Speer. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she is absolutely willing to delay or forgo the August recess to get backto work on the next Corona virus relief measure. NPR's Windsor. Johnson reports Pelosi's urging lawmakers to reach a bipartisan compromise as unemployment claims in the U. S continued to skyrocket. Democrats and Republicans are still at odds over numerous provisions of the next relief package, including jobless benefits, state and local government relief, direct payments to individuals and liability protections for doctors and businesses. In the meantime, millions of Americans are on track to lose as $600 federal unemployment benefit that's scheduled to expire at the end of the month. NPR's Windsor Johnston Countries in the Americas now account for about half of all cases and deaths from Cove in 19 globally. NPR's Ping Guang reports. Those numbers continue to climb, according to the World Health Organization countries in North and South America, including the U. S. Have reported their highest ever daily case counts in the past week. Pan American regional director Karissa at Yen says deaths in the region are also rising, particularly in Brazil, Mexico and the United States of America, reporting some 77% ofthe other debts over the last week. I'm currently experienced in some of the deadliest old bricks in the world. A chance is restricting travel and closing schools had helped flatten the curve in recent months. She says countries must continue to use public health measures that are proven to work to slow. The virus is spread and limited staff toll pain. Wang NPR NEWS Your Governor Andrew Cuomo is adding form or states to the quarantine list as he seeks to prevent the spread of covert 19 almost today, announcing residents of Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio and Wisconsin will be required. Quarantine for 14 days upon entering New York state that takes the total number of so called quarantine states to 22 a number that's been growing weekly. A potent greenhouse gas on his methane is on the rise, according to a new study, scientists warn that could dramatically increased climate change. NPR's Lauren Summer is more The atmosphere is warmed by both carbon dioxide and methane. But you can think of methane as a thicker blanket. It's about 28 times better at trapping heat. And humans are adding more of it to the atmosphere, according to the global carbon project that comes from leaks from oil and gas wells and pipelines. It also comes from farmland and from the digestive systems of cows and livestock. While methane emissions are growing from many countries, Europe has been able to cut its emissions by using less fossil fuel and eating less meat. Lauren Summer NPR News on Wall Street, The Dow is up 556 points. The NASDAQ rose 97 points.

NPR House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Americas Minnesota Jack Speer World Health Organization Andrew Cuomo Windsor Britain Europe South America New York Lauren Summer regional director Johnson
Will Covid-19 have a lasting impact on the environment?

Coronavirus Daily

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Will Covid-19 have a lasting impact on the environment?

"The pandemic hit air travel in the US is down ninety five percent the morning rush hour. Traffic report has become unnecessary. Many of you are asking what impact this is having on the environment. So Lauren. Summer is with us. She covers climate change for NPR. And it's good to have you back. Lauren Hi Ari. Let's start with a question that a lot of listeners have asked this one comes from Walker in Ames Iowa the oil consumption due to know car travel and almost no air travel must be much less. Is this lack of carbon dioxide production low enough to meet the goals of the Paris accord is more than enough just to remind listeners? The goals of the Paris accord that was to keep global temperatures from going up two degrees Celsius with an aim of less than one point five degrees Celsius. What's the impact of this slowdown of the global economy? Lauren yeah so as you might expect is having an effect on global carbon emissions largely because demand for oil and coal has really fallen and this is all over not just the US. So scientists are starting to put out studies projecting. What would this look like by the end of the year? If this activity continues you know we all stay locked down a little bit and they're coming up with maybe an eight percent drop in carbon emissions for this year now okay. That would actually be unprecedented. I know it maybe sounds like a small number. That's bigger than the drops during the last recession or during World War Two. But here's the thing that is about. The level scientists save world needs to be cutting emissions every year until twenty thirty to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. That's you know that one point five degrees Celsius that you mentioned and I think scientists are also pointing out shutting down. The economy is not the way to reach. Those long-term emission cuts right. It's these bigger emissions changes like switching to renewable energy. Okay we got a lot of questions. Also about some of the short-term environmental impacts of the pandemic. This one comes from Lois in Raleigh North Carolina. Beautiful spring filled with crystal clear. Low humidity days here in North Carolina because having fewer cars on the road or the factories closed affect the weather but about the global shut down factories. Might that be affecting the weather. Here I've heard a lot of people wondering about this actually clearer. It is yes in a lot of cities gotten cleaner. People are driving less in some cities. I mean car. Traffic is down forty fifty percent. Planes are not flying either so that's actually helped improve local air quality but it is very important to say. The weather plays a huge role in your local air pollution. So if it rains you know it clears the air and the spring typically is not like the summer. It's not our worst season for air pollution. Other places actually though haven't really seen much of a drop because there are things like factories and refineries that are still emitting and trucks are still on. The Roads. Goods are still being delivered to stores. I understand you've been talking with some scientists who are studying the effect of having so few cars on the road and the what are they trying to understand exactly. Yeah I mean. This is a particular interest in cities that have really problematic air and in those cities. They have to try to figure out. What can we change to improve air quality? I mean this is actually kind of just a real world test of that one. Scientists told me that this would be like if in Los Angeles for example. A third of the cars on the road were switched to all electric cars. They don't burn gasoline. They get electricity and in California. A lot of that comes from solar and renewable. So it's cleaner. We have one listener. Who wants to know whether this pandemic could cause environmental damage? The here's Valerie in Arizona. We hear a lot about the air pollution being reduced but not much about the increased fast action Styrofoam especially in food service. What about the possible negative effects on the environment from the Corona virus? That's a good point. All of these restaurants that have switched to delivery or takeout. That's a lot of plastic. Yeah I think people are seeing a lot more containers. People are also seen masks and plastic gloves kind of thrown on the grounds. The pandemic is affecting our efforts to reduce plastic. Waste for example California. Just put a sixty day pause on. Its plastic bag ban. And that's out of concern for frontline workers right. They're the ones that are handling people's reusable grocery bags when they bring them into the store. Starbucks also is is not refilling those reusable coffee mugs for that same reason. It's about reducing exposure environmental groups. They've been largely supportive of these temporary measures because people's lives are on the line but I think they're keeping a close eye to make sure that these are actually just temporary measures and these larger initiatives to reduce plastic waste comeback at some point

Lauren United States California Paris NPR Raleigh North Carolina Starbucks North Carolina Los Angeles Iowa Walker
How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

Environment: NPR

07:50 min | 1 year ago

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

"Since the pandemic hit air travel in the. Us is down ninety five percent the morning rush hour. Traffic report has become a necessary. Many of you are asking what impact all this is having on the environment. So Lauren summer is with us. She covers climate change for NPR. And it's good to have you back. Lauren Hi Ari. Let's start with a question that a lot of listeners have asked this one comes from Walker in Ames Iowa the oil consumption due to know car travel and almost no air travel must be much less. Is this lack of carbon dioxide production low enough to meet the goals of the Paris accord is more than enough just to remind listeners? The goals of the Paris accord that was to keep global temperatures from going up two degrees Celsius with an aim of less than one point five degrees Celsius What's the impact of this slowdown of the global economy? Lorne yes so as you might expect. It is having effect on global carbon emissions largely because demand for oil and coal has really fallen. And this is all over not just a US right. I mean so. Scientists are starting to put out studies projecting. What would this look like by the end of the year? If activity continues you know we all stay locked down a little bit and they're coming up with maybe an eight percent drop in carbon emissions For this year now okay. That would actually be unprecedented. I know it sounds like a small number. That's bigger than the drops during the last recession or World War Two But here's the thing that is about the level scientists save. The world needs to be cutting emissions every year until twenty thirty to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. That's you know that one point five degrees Celsius that you mentioned and I think scientists are also pointing out you know shutting down. The economy is not the way to kind of reach. Those long-term emission cuts right right. These bigger and missions changes like switch to renewable energy. Okay we got a lot of questions. Also about some of the short-term environmental impacts of the pandemic. This one comes from Lois in Raleigh North Carolina. This is the most beautiful spring filled with crystal clear low humidity days here in. North Carolina is having fewer cars on the road or the factories closed affect the weather brought about the global shut down factories. Might that be affecting the weather here. I've heard a lot of people wondering about this actually clearer. It is yes in a lot of cities it's gotten cleaner you know. People are driving less in some cities. I mean car. Traffic is down. Forty fifty percents. Planes are not flying either. So that's actually helped improve local air quality But it is very important to say. The weather plays a huge role in your local air pollution. So if it rains you know it clears the air and the spring typically is not like the summer. It's not our worst season for air pollution. Other places actually though haven't really seen much of a drop because there are things like factories and refineries that are still emitting and you know trucks are still on the roads. Goods are still being delivered to stores. Right I understand you've been talking with some scientists who are studying the effect of having so few cars on the road and the well. What are they trying to understand? Exactly yeah I mean. This is a particular interest in cities that have really problematic air and in those cities you know. They have to try to figure out. What can we change to improve air quality? I mean this is actually kind of just a real world test of that one. Scientists told me that you know this would be like if in Los Angeles for example. A third of the cars on the road were switched to all electric cars. Don't burn gasoline. They get electricity and in California. A lot of that comes from solar and renewable. So it's cleaner. We have one listener. Who wants to know whether this pandemic environmental damage? Here's Valerie in Arizona. We hear a lot about the air pollution being reduced but not much about the increase fiction styrofoam especially in food service. What about the possible? Negative effects on the environment from Corona virus. That's a good point. All these restaurants that have switched to delivery or takeout. That's a lot of plastic. Yeah I think people are seeing a lot more containers. People are also seeing masks and plastic gloves kind of thrown on the grounds. I think the pandemic is affecting our efforts to reduce plastic waste For Example California. Just put a sixty day pause on its plastic bag ban and that's out of concern for frontline workers right. They're the ones that are handling people's reusable grocery bags when they bring them into the store. Starbucks also is is not refilling those reusable coffee mugs for that same reason. It's about reducing exposure and are groups. You know they've been largely supportive of these temporary measures because people's lives are on the line but I think they're keeping a close eye to make sure that these are actually temporary measures. Right and these larger initiatives to reduce plastic waste kind of comeback at some point if you have a question for NPR's Lawrence Somerset to us at NPR dot org slash national conversation or on twitter use the HASHTAG NPR conversation and our next listener question comes from Laura Intel Keaton Alaska. What effect is this virus having on? Wildlife? I'm thinking of the fact that there's less people out and about and that means there's more room for wildlife I've seen some photos of a Lotta ducks resting in a parking lot while bores and sheep walking down the street. There's a lot of this on social media. Is it just that were home more? So we see the animals more or the animals actually coming out in places that they didn't ordinarily yeah. I mean that's hard to tell right. A lot of us are kind of just looking out the window. Maybe seeing things we didn't see before but some of it is a hoax. Right on social media you know. Maybe you saw those dolphins that were. They weren't actually there. Yeah I'm sorry about that but this they're actually real effects. Scientists are trying to study. You know I spoke to one wildlife rescue center in California. That said you know right now. It's seal and sea lion pumping season. You know every year some pups are concerned because of human interference like people or maybe dogs getting too close and so they're kind of that this year they merely a reprieve for them because some beaches are closed Another really good example is Wales. There's just less shipping traffic right now. And so. The oceans are less and wheels are very sensitive to sound. It's actually Something scientists after nine eleven because there was also a drop in shipping traffic and scientists could actually measure that stress hormones in right. Whales went down during that time period. Interesting we got a question about what's happening to environmental regulations during the pandemic Mike in Portland writes to the EPA suspended environmental rules so companies. Don't have to follow them any longer. Lauren Bizarre Policy Change while everyone was focused on the disease. Yeah in in March the EPA announced that it would not be finding companies if they failed to report their pollution data during the pandemic so an example of this might be that a refinery is reporting. It's air emissions to make sure that they're complying with Federal Clean Air Laws. The agency said that this needed to happen. Because the pandemic is making it harder for staff to collect the safety data and and do social distancing at the same time environmental groups really push back quite strongly. They felt this was too broad. It sent a message to industries. That maybe they would have the freedom to break environmental laws if no one was really checking during this time period just on our final moments so many of the changes were talking about depend on social distancing when the economy returns to something like normal are the gains. We've seen going to be reversed right so we all are starting to get back in our cars and fly. Go back to work industries ramping. Up You expect these of short-term Games are going to go away. I think there's some hope that the behavioral change though like maybe we'll all work from home it's possible. Npr Science correspondent Lawrence Summer. Thanks for answering these questions tonight. Thanks

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China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

Environment: NPR

03:07 min | 1 year ago

China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Leads To Less Air Pollution

"China's efforts to control the corona virus have meant many residents stayed at home in factories. Just shut down. That had an unintended effect. Less air pollution cleaner air can improve public health. Maybe even save lives joining me to explain why that isn't so simple. In China right now is NPR climate correspondent Lawrence Summer. Hi Laurin I Rachel. All right first off just explain. How big the drop was in air pollution. In China it was significant. It was down a quarter two third in some places compared to the same time period last year. And that's because people have been driving less but the big thing is coal consumption because power plants and industry has ramped down. We're starting to see an uptick. As China's activity is increasing. And that hasn't been true everywhere. Beijing actually saw an air pollution spike outdoors and February. Because there was a weather pattern trapping the pollution there okay so if power plants factories were running less that also means carbon emissions dropped. That's right about a quarter now. That's a tiny fraction of China's yearly emissions but it still substantial because China is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world so even that Short period of time in China equals would a state like Illinois or Ohio emits an entire year. Wow so even though. It's only a little bit over a month that we're talking about for these improvements. It's substantial enough to make a difference in people's lives. Yeah even a short term drop in something like air. Pollution can actually have benefits and a good example of that is the two thousand eight summer Olympics in Beijing to improve air quality during the Games government officials limited car traffic and they shut down factories and researchers actually tracked people during that time period and they saw improvements in cardiovascular health and lung health. They found that babies whose mothers spent their third trimester during the Olympic Games. Were born with heavier verse weights. Okay so that was years ago our people in China right now. Seeing those benefits yeah. It's a good question because the potential is really big here. You know. It's estimated that air pollution is linked to more than a million deaths per year in China. So I put that question to Jill. Baumgartner she's an environmental epidemiologist at McGill University. It would be a mischaracterization to say that the crow virus was beneficial to health because of these air pollution reductions in addition to tens of thousands of people who were impacted by the virus in China place stress on people's lives and on the healthcare system and lots of other sectors. She says that people with health conditions other than cove in nineteen may have not been getting the healthcare. They really needed during this time. Period and people may have spent more time indoors so they would have been exposed to more secondhand smoke potentially or indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves which are used in some parts of rural China. Presumably though as the corona virus is contained in China. This drop we've seen in emissions is going to be a race by the fact that the factories the power plants. They're going to go back online and return to normal right. Yea and of course. There's an incredible human toll here associated with this reduction in emissions and there's also a high likelihood that it's going to be canceled out as China tries to make up for its economic losses and really starts ramping up power plants and factories in the near term. Npr climate correspondent. Lauren summer. Thank you

China Beijing NPR Lauren Summer Laurin Lawrence Summer Olympics Jill Mcgill University Baumgartner Games Government Illinois Ohio
Climate change: Loss of bumblebees driven by 'climate chaos'

NPR News Now

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Climate change: Loss of bumblebees driven by 'climate chaos'

"A new study says climate change is causing a sharp decline in the population of bumblebees across North America and Europe. NPR's Lauren summer says the the findings are published in the journal Nature. Bumblebees are different than honeybees. They're bigger fuzzier and help pollinate plants that honeybees can't researchers editors at the University of Ottawa. Found they're struggling to cope with climate change looking at a century of Bumblebee records. They found that. Extreme temperatures are causing local extinctions agents. That's on top of other problems. LIKE HABITAT loss their results show in North America today. You're only about half as likely to see a Bumblebee. In a place that used to live there are ways to help researchers say if you can plant native flowers and leave logs and leaves on the ground to provide shelter from the

North America Lauren Summer University Of Ottawa NPR Europe
Julia Rose, Lauren Summer banned indefinitely after flashing Gerrit Cole at World Series

The Adam Carolla Show

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Julia Rose, Lauren Summer banned indefinitely after flashing Gerrit Cole at World Series

"A little bit of a world series news to women have been banned for League Baseball after flashing the it's a world they were they were flashing the sports world as a badly written sentence during game five of the World series tonight seated behind home plate and you'll see him just in the top left hand corner orange to orange shirts fat chick with an ache up on on something called Shag Mag they call themselves the new flavors cee millennium so during the seventh inning on the of the he astros win over the nationals two women they were seated on the first base side of home plate they flashed it didn't do anything because they called a timeout right after that so I don't know if they were trying to destroy act him or just get on camera but they have been they got a letter and it was tweeted that they are no longer allowed in any MLB

Baseball MLB
"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KCRW

"Cheese really into soil. Let's my weirdo thing. All right. So you're starting to hit the mineral soil. This is where the carbon is stored. She says plants soak up the carbon dioxide from the air when a plant dies its roots and leaves get broken down by microbes and fungi that's all the carbon from the air gets into the soil in the deeper. You can get it in the soil like, especially below the plow layer, the more stable and secure. It's going to be that's important to lock the carbon up, which is what California wants the state has a goal to become carbon neutral by twenty forty five. We have very ambitious climate goals in without natural working lands. California. Simply won't get their genie Merrill is with the California climate agriculture network a coalition of agroup. She says farmers should be part of California's climate effort because they're already facing its impacts like more, extreme weather. Some are willing to say that it's climate change. Others are unsure. Sure. But I think many know that things have are changing and they need different tools. Farmers are interested in the climate programs. If only because it can help them cope with extended droughts hundreds have signed up, but stay climate officials say the soil program needs to be five times larger to have a real impact. And that will be up to state lawmakers as a sort out California's budget in the coming weeks for NPR news. I'm Lauren summer. This is NPR.

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"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"lauren summer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Shutdown fell to her like bad strategy a standoff in Washington that hurt regular people way out here in rural America just seems like there's other ways of doing it. Then, you know, putting people out of work, and, you know, wanting their income, then just seems like there's gotta be a better way. But I don't know what that way would be white says she to still backs the president and still wants his wall built full show. The overwhelming majority of conservative voters still trust is leadership. But her doubts about the wisdom of the shadow. Down are reflected in polls that show Trump losing ground in recent weeks nationwide. Even with some of his core. Supporters white men without college degrees evangelical and registered Republicans. Brian man, NPR news, New York. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Nearly all the lettuce in this country has grown with water from the Colorado river, which means a nineteen year drought along the river has far reaching implications. Neighboring states are still trying to come up with a deal by Thursday to avert a crisis. Lauren summer of member station, K Q, E D And energy and environment. Team reports the Colorado river touches seven states goes through the Grand Canyon and reaches the faucets. A forty million people from Denver to Los Angeles. But it starts as just a trickle high in the Colorado Rockies. One of the cool things about a snow melt is it's really efficient. Tens of getting the river. Brad Udal is a climate scientist at Colorado state university and a few summers ago, we are at the very spot that run off becomes a river. No question. The nineteen year drought. Here has been bad. But climate change is making things worse. You heat up the climate. You're gonna get fundamental impacts of water cycle. We've known this for almost fifty years now a warmer atmosphere. Sucks up water drying, it out of plants and soils Udal says.

Colorado river Colorado Rockies Brad Udal NPR Colorado state university white Washington Brian man America Trump E D And president Lauren summer Denver New York Grand Canyon Los Angeles scientist
Saudis admit to death of Khashoggi

Weekend Edition Saturday

05:51 min | 3 years ago

Saudis admit to death of Khashoggi

"Officials are warning that foreign adversaries have already targeted next month's midterm elections. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports a Russian accountant is the first to face federal charges. Federal prosecutors say Elena Kucinich conspired to defraud the United States. Authorities say she managed a budget of more than thirty five million dollars aimed at targeting elections here and in other countries the methods from Russians balk domain names and Facebook ads to sow division on issues such as race relations and immigration their messages targeted people, including former President Barack Obama and late Arizona Senator John McCain may also mentioned special counsel, Robert Muller the man leading the investigation. Into Russian interference in two thousand sixteen. Intelligence officials say the Russians are still on the attack. But they say there's no evidence foreign adversaries have been able to prevent Americans from voting or to change vote counts. Carrie Johnson NPR news, Washington. The Trump administration's trying to fast track and environmental review of projects that deliver. Federally subsidized water to farmers out. West NPR's, Kirk siegler reports a new presidential. Memorandum is designed to loosen environmental restrictions in west coast states, Republicans going back to the George W Bush administration have tried to increase water deliveries to farmers and California's massive central valley project where water from snow fed reservoirs gets pumped south to arid farmland. But those deliveries are perennially cut back due to attempts to protect endangered fish and drought. The president's order would speed up a current review of this as well as two other projects in Oregon and Washington, if environmental restrictions are loosened there will likely be. Prolonged legal battle one of the biggest champions of this latest plan is deputy interior secretary. David Bernhardt used to lobby for the Fresno based Westlands water district one of the largest and most influential water agencies in the west Kirk siegler, NPR news. This is NPR firm cake news, I'm Tiffany Cam. High. President Trump wants to see more water go to central valley farmers so much. So that he signed a memorandum saying that yesterday science reporter Lauren summer is here to explain all of this to us and Lauren the federal government has put states in charge of their own water. Does this memo tried to chip away at those states rights, and if not what does it do? Yeah. I mean, the reality is California is in charge of most of the decisions around water within our state borders, and that's based on a lot that goes back more than a century. There is one area though. And this is where it's. Get particularly messy where the federal government controls things and that has to do with them endangered species protections for salmon and delta smelt these two fish that are kind of caught up in these California water wars. So the federal government is now rewriting those protections. The memorandum from Trump basically said to speed up that process, and if that actually weakens protections for these endangered species it sets up a really big fight potentially. And that's because the state has its own endangered species acts of estate will want to see tough protections for these species. Even if the federal government weakens them. So the president was surrounded by a lot of Republican congress members from the central valley when he signed this a few of them are in races. That are tighter than expected. Is it a coincidence that this is coming so close to the election? There's a lot of speculation that no it was not a coincidence. I mean, you have people like Representative Jeff Denham from turlock his race is a lot tighter than maybe he expected. And a lot of them. Got this great photo op with the president signing something and they can go back to their constituents. Mostly farmers saying look what we did for you. Even though really this. Memorandum will probably have very little immediate impact for those farmers in terms of getting water that was Lauren summer, and I'm

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