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"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Office space, or you're going to have to figure out a way to to have less people in the office. Basically and you know given the fact that a lot of people have been working very. Very successfully from home I. Think you're GonNa see companies just say well. Why don't we just keep doing that? And some companies have already said you know we're GONNA. Keep you know. Hey, the you know Joe Employees. You're going to keep working from home indefinitely right until we figure out what we're doing and so. I think it's a very open question. Right now is to what work is going to look like a year from now or two years from now. This is Houston matters on Craig. Cohen and we're talking with Energy Watcher Lauren Steffi about the goings on in the energy industry here in Houston across the country, and worldwide we welcome your questions and comments at talk at Houston, matters dot, org or seven, one, three, four, four, zero, eight, seventy Tom Rights and asks. Why are Houston energy company so slow to transfer their offshore oil and gas expertise to offshore wind power. Why should we let New Jersey become the Houston of American offshore wind? Yeah. I think that the the the short answer to that is the skills. Don't necessarily translate you know. Offshore oil production is a very very different thing than offshore wind production and and I don't know how the you know. The wind currents and the Gulf compared to the to the east coast. That may have a factor as well but I think that that the main answer is you know it's ver- skill. Set that you need that said we have seen major oil. Oil companies in particular buying into renewable energy, not just here in the United States, but around the world there's there's been a big shift and so I think you're going to see that. Continue a lot of companies that have the pockets that can make those investments are seeing an opportunity to buy up. You know renewable resources you know both here in the United States and around the world, and that's that's GonNa continue generally speaking are renewable energy companies benefiting or hurting these days. Well, you know they. They suffered too in the in the downturn in the lockdown. Obviously energy demand across the board dropped off, so they saw a bit of a drop in demand, and and you know some softness and pricing, but that's come back much more quickly. Electricity demand has actually come back much more quickly as you would expect, and so you know they've. They've managed to weather this. This they don't. They don't have the long term. Demand issues facing them that the that the oil industry does, and nor do they have the financing problems that the US industry is now facing because so much capitals dried up so there definitely in a better position, long-term I would say right now than than fossil fuel producers are. How do declines and commercial air travel factor into? Energy usage and demand overall. Yeah. That's another important part of the picture I mean we've talked about. We've talked about commuting but you know business travel is also a big driver of demand for jet fuel, and you know we have not seen a of much of a an increase in in business travel leisure travelers picked up a little bit, and of course the airlines have cut back on a lot of flights so. So flights are fuller but in terms of fuel usage. We have not seen fuel comeback, and you know. Most of the airlines are not predicting a big return or certainly not going to get back to load factors that they had pre pandemic anytime soon all right, so let's talk just briefly about trends here, looking out a year from now five years from now and thirty years from now. I know how hard I know I know I know, but what give me a general sense of what your expectations are in the short term medium term long term for the industry. Let's put it that way. And let me let me give my usual caveat that virtually every prediction about you know. Oil prices at oil markets has been wrong so. With that now I, think I think that in the in the short term you're going to see a bit of a return of demand. People are going to get back to driving. They're gonNA. They're gonNA. Start figuring out. You know what what they need to do to get back to work. And that kind of thing you know so you're gonNA see a bit of a return of demand and and probably gasoline prices. Prices will move up a little bit. They already have But I think as you start getting further and further out. This has also caused a lot of people to rethink the whole idea of fossil fuels. You've had you know a lot of policy initiatives to address climate change, certainly globally and I think those initiatives are going to ramp up I think there's going to be more momentum behind them and that combined. Combined with the fact that you know we haven't seen capital coming back into the industry, is going to make it a really tough next you know five years or so for for the oil and gas industry, and when you look out thirty years, I think most companies would would tell you they see they see oil demand dropping off. The renewables come into play. battery technology gets better. You know we may. May See a shift to cars and that kind of thing, and so you know over the long term I think that that that the industry is very aware of the fact that that you know the product that they produce will be declining demand over the long term, but exactly what those milestones are, and what else happen, that could change all of that you know those are those are always the the key questions. Lauren Steffi is.

Houston United States Lauren Steffi Gulf New Jersey Joe Employees
"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

08:13 min | 2 weeks ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

"There's sort of a a surge of cautious optimism We've seen prices. Come back a little bit. You know economies are starting to real people are starting to get out and move around a little more and that's kind of create some hope that things are going to get back on track, but I think long-term sugar is still there very uncertain and I think a caution is is the game here for at least the remainder of this year we've got a bad connection. What I want do is let's put you on. Hold for a moment. See If. Brenda producer can try get establish a better connection. Maybe call you back. I WanNa make sure we can hear you clearly again. We're talking with Lauren Steffi he's managing director for thirty points strategies a writer at large for Texas monthly's also a columnist for energy voice, Dot Com, and we're talking about developments in the energy industry as I mentioned the US Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee heard testimony. Actually there's a house committee that covers that same territory that her testimony last week, as well among the comments that we heard was from the E as acting deputy executive director David calling it Covid, nineteen, grading the biggest shock to global energy systems, since at least World War Two. So it's a tough sledding these days Let's see if we have lauren back on the line Lauren. Let's see how the connection is now not yet. We are still working on that. We're trying to transition from a cell phone landline a little bit more stable there so we are working on that. If you like we can take a brief pause and come back. I I think we're we're fine. If you want to give it just another minute here. I want to mention again. We're talking about the University of Houston's regional forecasting economists Bill Gilmer and he was noting just recently that we could see he. He was anticipating a net loss of eighty three thousand jobs or more this year in the the Houston region before the pandemic hit at the start of the year. He always does this annual forecasting, and he had indicated that we were on track for it wasn't GonNa be a huge game, but a net gain of somewhere around forty thousand or so jobs, and that gives a clear indication of just how far things have shifted not a big surprise. Mind you. As. We have followed the developments related to covert over the last few months, but it reinforces in Houston, where the energy industry is such a significant factor economically how important it is! To the region, while it may not be the ultra dominant sector that it once was, and we do have Lauren Steffi back online. Lorcy connection sounds now how you doing. I'm doing great Craig sorry. That's right. Yeah, you sound much much better. okay, so we were talking about the state of the energy industry worldwide. HOW ABOUT HERE IN HOUSTON? I think that I think that you know Houston being sort of the epicenter of of energy worldwide. you know you still have the sense of cautious optimism. I mean here. In the US oil prices have come up We're getting close to forty dollars a barrel and that makes people sort of hopeful that maybe more production can can come back online. We'll start to see you know a little bit more activity, but you know the problem is that the long term picture is still very very uncertain and I think when you start looking out, you know certainly beyond the end of the year very hard to say what's going to. To happen. A lot of a lot of things are changing in terms of people's driving habits and things like that, and it may not go back to the way it was before we just. We just don't know at this point. Yeah Brandon West Texas intermediate crude have been hovering around forty dollars a barrel in recent days, still far lower than healthy, but not as catastrophic as we saw when stay at home orders were in place, and no one was going anywhere. Do you anticipate the price of a barrel of crude oil will soon climb back into healthier territory, or is this where we should expect to see another for a while? I think it's GonNa Hover here for a while. Until we see what happens with demand, You know we've got a couple of big question marks out there one. Is that that the the OPEC agreement with Russia? You know they've extended it for a month, but you know we don't know how they're gonNA. Continue to extend the production cuts help keep prices up and we don't know if all the OPEC members are gonNA continue to go along with that, which is always a question when they when they do these kinds of deals, but then on the demand side. You know a lot more people working from home. Companies are finding. Finding that, hey, you know this isn't such a bad idea Maybe we'll keep doing this. There's even some oil companies that are saying. Maybe we'll have a lot of our people work from home permanently and so you know that's going to definitely affect the commuting picture and you know how much people are driving on a daily basis, and obviously that affects demand and prices and everything else so I think it's a very very open ended of question at this point, how well positioned is Houston's oil and gas industry specifically to weather this prolonged periods still at forty dollars a barrel if it continues to be the case. Well the good thing that Houston has going for it is that that there are companies that can make money at forty dollars, a barrel and Erin places like the Permian Basin where they can ramp up production very quickly, so they can respond to price fluctuations and try to get the most out of those. The other thing is that Houston also has a lot of natural gas producers and one thing we're seeing is because there's less oil production. There's less gas coming out of those oil wells as sort of a byproduct, so we're starting to see a little. Little more activity in places like the Hanes Ville Shale with primarily gas. We're starting to see more companies drilling specifically for gas to try to you know sell you know. Gas prices are also low, but at least that's that's an area of the market that can be exploited a little more and maybe provide some stability for some of these companies. You mentioned the fact that we have seen less people out on the roads driving. It does seem like lately. There is more traffic across Houston, but still nothing compared to what we were used to. Do you anticipate demand will rebound as more businesses opened up. I think that depends on how businesses open up. A lot of companies right now are trying to figure out that very question. Do we want to bring everybody back? Are there jobs that we can allow people to continue to do remotely? Do we bring people back on a staggered schedule You know if we bring people back, we we can't have you know. We can't have people sitting right on top. Top of each other and cubicles anymore. We need to have social distancing in the office. So is that going to affect the number of people that we that we bring back? Maybe we move some people to other locations. Maybe we let people work from home. You know there's just a the whole picture of what it constitutes of what constitutes going into work is really you know open for debate at? At this point and I think until companies start to figure out those questions. We aren't going to know what the picture is GonNa look like but I do think it's safe to say that there are a lot of people and companies who have really decided. They liked the idea of working from home and productivity for a lot of those people have actually gone up, so companies have an incentive to to. To consider it and I think you're GONNA see a shift, and and whether that affects us traffic in the long run or not I. Don't know but certainly I think we could see changing picture there. In terms of commuting traffic well, you mentioned cubicles and one of the trends. We were noticing long before covid nineteen came along. Was this continuing shift in particularly when it came to office space? Away from cubicles and more towards that that trendy open office setting. But really in the end that was always trendy for managers, because they can squeeze more people into that open space when you eliminate the cubicles, which is the exact opposite of what you'd want right now. And so if you're going to bring people back into those kind of open office environments, you're going to have to have them more spread out, which means you're going to need the same amount of space? Fewer people right so you're either going to have to add.

Houston Lauren Steffi Texas University of Houston OPEC producer US deputy executive director Hanes Ville Shale US Senate Craig Dot Com
"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

06:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Another. Is it your hope that with this new mask order that it will create some consistency across the board that everyone will say okay well. You know what this is. The. They're laying it down down the line here and this is the the appropriate process, so everybody mask up. Well Judge August order from. You mentioned that went into effect last night. Today's the first day. That absolutely is the reason as we want to remind, everybody is that we do not have a lot of tools here. Craig right so We don't have a vaccine It's not on the horizon. The therapeutics medications are really just in a limited fashion when somebody gets sick in the hospital, we do not have a lot to go by, so we have to go with physical distancing and the mask. Wearing is such a critical piece of this and I know. Know it's not comfortable and Gosh. Nobody wants to wear these masks, and and do all these things and we all want to get past this, but this is our only hope to get past this as quickly as possible and Craig I. Think you brought up something you might mention inconsistent. Let me flip that a little bit differently, which is my very big concern about inconsistency of both messaging and and really modeling. What's happening at the federal state and local level I think that's what's also driving this. We have inconsistencies at those levels. Levels, and what then happens is that the individual community member either gets complacent or confused, and says Gosh well if they're just saying one one part of government is saying this and other thing that I'm just not going to do I'm GonNa risk, and I'm gonNA. Chance for myself. My family unfortunately that puts that individual their family and our entire community at risk, so we know it's hard, but at the same time this is our only hope to really get past the and let's keep that in mind as well well, let's put. Put a finer point on that after Governor Abbott initially blocked Harris County's previous mask order, which applied to everyone. The county went some weeks without any such mandate in place and then last week, when bear county established a business mask order like the one going into effect today in Harris County, the governor said that was fine, and that it was always an option under his reopening plan, so is he not being honest about that or was every county in the state that wanted to for weeks missing an opportunity to establish this? Well you know that That's probably a question. I'm going to let you at. The state level, but I'm going to say is this. Is that this all has become so political, and it's been politicized crag and we know public health is inherently political. We get that, but. This is about health and medical. This is about saving lives, and really what concerns me is that we have politicized cove, nineteen response and prevention and everything else about this throughout not just the country, but the globe, and that has become very concerning because true, tried and true measures that can really help people save lives and prevent infection that they're going by the wayside, because people are having these discussions that are about. About left and right and red and blue, and all this other stuff and I get. That's all important, but what's really critical is that we get the message out that what really works and let's make sure our our community members are focusing on that, so they can protect themselves and their family members. That's the key message and unfortunately politics has gotten in the way all right, so what really works laid out? All right so. physical distancing social distancing more than six feed. You heard that from Lane right before you've got definitely. The face coverings caught facial coverings. don't work as well as the mass, but they certainly work well enough, so let's let's not make that an excuse. hand hygiene disinfection absolutely take your hand sanitizer with you. Don't have soap and water around and yeah. Absolutely, WE WANNA. Make sure that you get tested. Don't take the test right. Eight, three, two, nine, two, seven, seven, five, seven, five go to ready Harris Dot, or and finally if you're sick, we WANNA. WanNa. Make sure that you stay home Craig. This is also about the businesses right, so it's about individual responsibility for community members. We all have a place in this, but it's also about these establishments in acting the protocols. The health protocols so that once we are as we're moving this reopening face. It's not just about all of us taking individual responsibility, but it's group, responsibility and businesses say I'M GONNA put health protocols in place because I do not want to close down I want people to come into my business and I want my staff members to be safe. All right Dr Shaw thanks very much. It's rumor Shaw Executive Director of Harris County Public Health appreciate your time. Thanks for having me. Up Next we welcome your questions about the energy industry in Houston. Across the nation and worldwide, how covert nineteen lower demand and a supply glut continued to impact the industry. We check in with Energy Watcher Lauren Steffi and we welcome you to the conversation at talk at Houston Matters. Dot Org or seven, one, three, four, four, zero, eight hundred seventy stay with us is Houston matters continues. This is Houston. Matters I'm Craig Cohen lawmakers in Congress are contemplating how to help the energy industry late last week. The US Senate, energy and Natural Resources Committee heard testimony about how covid nineteen affecting the industry, the International Energy Agency's Acting Deputy Executive Director David. Turk said it's created the biggest shock to global energy systems, since at least World War, two rice stat energies analysis of us. US Bureau of Labor Statistics data suggests more than one hundred thousand oil and gas jobs have already been lost as a result of it and here in Houston UH regional forecasting economist Bill Gilmer says we could see a net loss of eighty three thousand jobs or more this year, overall before the pandemic. We were on track net gain in jobs, but you know all of this. What none of us really knows what's next for the energy industry? But if anyone can hazard an informed guests, it's probably Lawrence Steffi.

Houston Harris County Craig Craig Cohen Harris County Public Health Craig I. International Energy Agency Harris Dot US WanNa Lawrence Steffi Governor Abbott US Senate Acting Deputy Executive Direct Shaw Lauren Steffi Congress
"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

07:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Houston Matters

"With covid, nineteen cases and hospitalizations on the rise in the Houston area, and across the state, a new mask order for businesses takes effect today in Harris County I'm Craig Cohen! Today on Houston matters. We learned the latest on efforts to contain the corona virus from Harris. County Public Health Executive Director Dr Shaw also ahead. The latest developments in the energy. Industry Energy Watcher Lauren Steffi joins us to discuss what covid nineteen reduced demand and A. A glut of supply continued to do not just oil and gas that every sector in the energy industry. Then we'll feed your dog and cat care questions for veterinarian Dr Lori. Taylor she joins US every month to help you with the care and feeding of your four legged companions plus Pro Sports Leagues Try to get rolling. Jeff, Balki joins us with the latest on return to play Verts, these and other Houston matters. Follow this hours news. Good Morning. This is Houston matters I'm Craig. Cohen coming up with new mask order for businesses going into effect today and Corona virus cases up here and across the nation. We check in with Harris County public health. Dr Shaw also this hour. The latest developments in the Energy Industry Energy Watcher Lauren Steffi joins us, and we'll feed your dog and cat. Care Questions for veterinarian Dr Lori Teller Join our conversation this hour at talk. AT HOUSTON MATTERS DOT ORG or call us at seven, one, three, four, four, zero, eight, thousand, eight, hundred seventy. First up though news eight seven Davis Land is here with the latest on Cova? IMPACT ON GREATER HOUSTON. Good Morning Davis Good Morning Craig Yeah. The weekend has not gone well in terms of corona virus cases. We're seeing a surge in people testing positive on Saturday. The Texas Medical Center reported the Houston area, nearing two eight thousand cases. We heard from Houston Methodist CEO Mark Boom this morning. He tells NPR. This is not a testing issue meaning we're not. Not simply testing more people and finding more cases, because of that the percentage of people testing positive is going up. More people are getting this virus in response. We've seen some bar shutdown. In recent days by state officials, you may have seen some of these images of packed bars and restaurants. Authorities say they weren't operating safely Harris. County is also mandating businesses to require. Require customers to where face coverings or those businesses can face a fine that starts today. you know we also keep track of the Texas medical. Centers Early Warning System for several weeks. Now we've seen most of those indicators labeled no concern in green taxed, but now many of those have ticked up to the orange level of moderate concern. We've seen several days of. Of Positive Average Kaethe grow case growth, and as it has been for a while now. The TMC is warning that ICU base capacity could soon be exceeded, you know, of course we've heard it hundreds of times now, but the basic advice remains the same where face covering wash your hands frequently use sanitizer in stay six feet away from people that you don't live with. All right, thank you very much Davis. Absolutely. That's at eight seven. Davis, as he mentioned that new mask order is in effect in Harris County and many other counties across Texas. Applying to all businesses as the surge of cases of covid nineteen continues to rise the largest single-day increase of cases statewide was Saturday Dr Shaw's the Executive Director of Harris County public. Health Doctor Shaw Good Morning. Hey, greg good morning. Thanks for having me again. I hope you're well I'm well. I hope you are as as well. Reinforcing what David Just said, this is not just about the number of cases. There's been a surge in hospitalizations across Texas over the last week. A record number of them on Friday according to the Texas Health and Human Services. Data, it would seem again. This is not just about doing more testing, right? I would agree this Obviously we do have increased testing, which is good, but this is a far beyond that we have both from the community standpoint increase cases in what we're discovering from our health department standpoint, and that's the county health department of City Health Department, and then, in addition to that as you on the top of the hour, mentioned related to the indicators in the healthcare system? System Texas Medical Center set track data is all indicating increased hospitalizations increase ICU admissions, and and we're also frankly seeing things that Harris health system as you also heard over the weekend Dr Poor, said the Co for Harris Health is also been very concerned about the safety net hospital, so all the indicators unfortunately are going in the wrong direction, and this is very concerning for all of us. Yeah you mentioned Harris Health, and we've had Dr Portion on recently in. Talking then about the fact that they're kind of consistently at capacity. But then we were hearing for the longest time from Texas. Medical Center or hospital, saying well. You know we're. We're fine. We're doing okay. We're I'm wondering if we're now closing in on that point. Where even they're saying. You know what actually we're really closing in on capacity here. Yeah. We're starting to remember I've said this before Craig. That this is not just about seeing Cova nineteen hospitalizations in isolation in has to be taken into the context of cove, nineteen plus background, saturation of heart, attacks and car, accidents and everything else. That's that's putting an individual, a patient in a bad whether at a general bad or in the ICU. All of that together is what's the saturation and particularly in the ICU where those resources are constrained even more so than the general beds. That's where the concern comes in a since this all began. We've been trying to establish trends and understanding. How covert? Works I it seemed many hospitalizations a few months ago were older people or those with some compromised immune systems due to pre existing health conditions. Is that still the case? Well we certainly still do have older individuals and those with underlying health conditions that are in hospitals, and also those who are testing positive so that that trend still there we certainly don't want to minimize the the real concern for those with potential for complications, but we are seeing in the hospital setting especially, but also in terms of the testing in the community that it looks like the age range is trending down word and again I think this is the reminder to everyone that this is not a particular zip code. This is not a particular sector. This is not a particular demographic, and certainly not a particular age that whether your child whether you're a senior whether you're a young adult throughout this, this is about all of us being at risk, we're not superhuman, and if we do not wear masks, we do not physically distance we do not. Do all those things for hand, hygiene and disinfection, and obviously getting tested, and certainly making sure that we stay home. If we're sick, we can contribute to this problem, and that's really the message that all of us should take from this I have to say just in in my neighborhood. I'm out in. Katie and I've seen sort of inconsistency in WHO's hearing and heating? Heating, that message and you go from one restaurant or bar to another one business to.

HOUSTON Harris County Dr Shaw Harris Health Texas Harris Davis Craig Cohen Lauren Steffi Texas Medical Center Dr Lori Cova Executive Director Dr Lori Teller Texas Health and Human Service Houston Methodist Texas medical City Health Department
"lauren steffi" Discussed on Boomtown

Boomtown

06:31 min | 5 months ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Boomtown

"It's clear that George wanted to leave a legacy beyond being known as the father of fracking. But it's less clear what his legacy. The actually is in George's later years after his wife Cynthia died in two thousand nine. He left the woodland's moved back to his boyhood town of Galveston. He lived for a time in the tournament house a hotel that he and Cynthia had bought in the early eighties as part of the historic preservation. Program that your mom continued to operate eight is a working hotel. Even as George lived there you know they had reserved tables in the restaurant and in the lobby and he would come down from his sweet and just sort of sit there in the lobby and You know the time was their former governor mark white just happened to be coming through Galveston and came up and said hello to him and they chatted for a few minutes. That's Russell missile gold a senior energy reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Russell is the author of two books including the boom. How fracking ignited the American Energy Revolution? Shen and changed the world. Russell met George at the hotel a few years before George died he was kind of enjoying the the the sunset of his life Just Holding Court In in the lobby of tremont hotel in downtown Galveston and it wasn't just governors. You know anyone who came by he you would try to engage with them and talk with them and you sitting there and his He had a little Motorized wheelchair of sorts and remember it had a bumper sticker on it right Say Informing everyone that he was he was nagy. There were certain things he would engage with certain stories. You would love to tell but there were certain things when you really kind of tried to drill down and try to understand a little bit about what he thought of his legacy and unleashing so much new oil and gas drilling in the United States dates and elsewhere That he didn't want to engage with He my sense was he had closed the book on that and and didn't WanNa talk about it anymore. This is part part of what came to be known as the Mitchell Paradox. Here's Lauren Steffi Ya son Todd Actually dubbed at the Mitchell Paradox And while while nobody remembers George actually talking about it in fact even when he was asked about it he would just kind of wouldn't answer He had two parts of his life. He had the business part he had the Mitchell energy part where he was drilling gas and figuring out ways to draw gas and then he had this other part and it wasn't listen just it wasn't just in in oil and gas. I mean here's someone who was genuinely worried about overpopulation. And he had ten kids You know it it there were just complexities to life. That that at the end of the day you you just. You couldn't resolve George's daughter. Meredith remembers giving him a hard time when he'd Fred about the planet's growing population. Oh Yeah we always taste about that. So what are you talking about this dad. You had ten kids. He said Yeah I know. Now I'm not gonNA worry about that. He just said it's true Georgia's life is filled with all sorts of contradictions. Plenty of people have pointed and out that Georgia's pleased for more regulation and more corporate responsibility really only intensified after he'd sold his business and after after he'd made his billions and that that concern about the environment did not spill over into his company and he did not create a company Benny Alternately and oil and gas company that showed us a new way of both getting oil and gas out of the ground while being an environmental steward. He showed us a new way to get oil and gas out off the ground and it really is left to to the current generation into new people to figure out how to be an environmental steward at the same time. In the mid nineties Georgia's Georgia's own company was marred and lawsuits over questionable drilling practices and water contamination. At one point Mitchell Energy and development lost a lawsuit route. There would have cost the company over two hundred million dollars. The case was later appealed and thrown out by the Texas Supreme Court but Russell says that the state still oh found. The Mitchell energy had quote deliberately misreported the way the company was building their wells. It stain his reputation. I've a lot of admirations for George Mitchell His legacy is one of being a stubborn inventor and someone who was willing to keep trying to do something because he I just had a a deep seated belief that he be able to fear out how to open up these incredibly thick rocks. And you know that's that's an incredible legacy and maybe do you know. Is it fair to also ask him to to have a second legacy of of being an environmental steward and figuring out how to oil and gas Production in an environmentally Faithful way for the future generations. That might be too much to ask anyone person He certainly failed in that. But Lauren on the other hand believes Georgia's legacy was much bigger than fracking. So I think that that ultimately when you take all of these things you know fracking sustainability. You know the the big science stuff you know what you see. His real legacy is a celebration of big ideas you know. He was a primary funder early on the giant Magellan Telescope. which you know when it comes online in a few years you know might just attacked you know intelligent life often the universe which would be kind of an interesting way to kappa a really unusual Legacies here's George's granddaughter. Catherine literally had had ten times every time you for the last twenty year life. If you can't make the world work with six billion people how you make her with nine billion people and what are you GonNa do about it and he would like what are you about. George believed the world needed to eventually move away from oil. Instead his technology she has helped make America into the largest oil producing country in the world. Despite this Lawrence Steffi says George would have been undaunted if he were still around I think he he was always an undying optimism. I mean that's kind of what drove him forward. was you know he didn't believe in some sort of dystopia future. I mean he really believe. We're GONNA figure all this out and in fact no less than Stephen Hawking at his memorial service said you know not many people can say they changed the world but George Mitchell was one of them. So that's from a guy who knows right.

George Mitchell Georgia Russell Galveston Mitchell Energy Lauren Steffi Cynthia Texas Supreme Court Wall Street Journal Stephen Hawking mark white tremont hotel Shen United States nagy Lawrence Steffi
"lauren steffi" Discussed on Boomtown

Boomtown

11:00 min | 5 months ago

"lauren steffi" Discussed on Boomtown

"I'm Chris Wallace and this is boomtown a podcast about the historical soon playing out right now in the Permian Basin way back in episode three. We told you the story of how George Mitchell's company. Innovated fracking racking in the late. Nineteen nineties in this episode. We take a closer look at the life of George Mitchell. He's arguably one of the most important figures of the last century knoll man since John D. Rockefeller has had a greater in back. We consider what his legacy says about the future of energy and the plan. I was this week by reporter. Mitch borden one of our friends. MARFA public radio. You'll hear Mitch Voids timer to this is so so tin the Mitchell Paradox George. Mitchell wasn't your classic swaggering wildcatter. In fact at first first glance. He was kind of boring when I started doing the book. I wondered if if I was going to actually be able to have a book there you know this. Does this guy have enough of a personality to really carry carry it through. That's Lauren. Steffi a journalist who recently published a biography called George P Mitchell fracking sustainability in an unorthodox quest us to save the planet. You might remember hearing from Lauren back in episode three. Lauren says that George was straight laced compared to other Texas wildcatters but the more or Lauren learned about George the more he realized that. This bookish mild-mannered man was actually fascinating But when you start looking into into you know this. Intellectual curiosity had on so many fronts. It's really kind of captivating. I mean he found so many things interesting when he found something interesting he would just start you. You know putting resources towards it to see what he could do which is really kind of not something you see a lot these days In the business world he could have had a private jet if he wanted it he could have had a fancy. It's a yacht But instead he put his money into you know solving really big problems trying to stand really big issues and thinking fifty years down the road. What the world going to be you like? How are we going to? How are we going to solve the problem with with population growth on a planet of finite resources? Those are the things he spent his time thinking about. As opposed to you. Know How do I make my next million. That mindset grew in part from a difficult childhood. His parents Mike and Katina were Greek immigrants. Both were illiterate it before making their way to America Mike had been a goat herder in Greece Father it actually emigrated from Greece when when he was about. Nineteen years old and came into New York can actually went to work for the railroads. His name was Savar paraskevas apples and and so you wonder how did how did this. Greek family get you know today Mitchell. he was working on the railroad. There are several variations of the story. But the gist of it is he. He went to get his first paycheck. The paymaster asked his name and he said Savant Paris Capellas and the pay bathrooms like no. I can't say I can't spell it and if you don't do something I'm GonNa fire you. And so he said well what's your name and the guy said well. My Name's Mike Mitchell. He's like hey that's my name too. What a coincidence with his newly adopted name Mike and Katina Tina moved to Galveston Texas? The city is located on a barrier island in the Gulf coast about an hour south of Houston George was born there in nineteen nineteen. The same year prohibition was passed. He was the third of four kids at the time Galveston was still recovering from the great storm of nineteen hundred a hurricane. It remains the deadliest natural disaster in American history. It had also developed a reputation for being a rowdy port town. This was kind of the wild old. You know rough and tumble days of Galveston. It was known as the Free State of Galveston gambling. Prostitution and organized crime flourished in Fact Act Galveston was a lot like the old patch boom towns of that era during prohibition it became a haven for rum runners ships loaded with liquor from Caribbean. Caribbean ports would sneak into uncontrolled peers along Galveston Bay. Tusa Cillian brother's named Salmon Rodeo Moscow were among the most notorious mobsters lobsters of their time. They ran their listen empire from Galveston. They're infamous lounge. The BALANESE room attracted well heeled patrons like Frank Sinatra Entre Howard Hughes and plenty of old earns so the macy's were a couple of Sicilian immigrants who came to galveston early nineteen hundreds about the same time Mike dead and they started out Ah Barbers In fact they cut the Mitchell boys hair. Sam As you cut their hair at Murdoch's pier and they just Grew to a lot of influence. Let's say they ran Some nightclubs and eventually the valley's ballroom which is a famous Site is not there anymore wiped out in Hurricane Ike but if you're Z. Z.. Top Fan they wrote a song about it. The Moscow's were eventually busted by the Texas Rangers in the fifties but at the time they were community. Heroes Rose they donated money to build churches and passed out presence at Christmas. Mike Mitchell got to know the Moscow's well and he was a regular presence in their gambling parlors or lease though he was uneducated. Mike was resourceful in charismatic. He was really a character. I mean he kind of got by his wits Had never had any formal schooling schooling But he started closed pressing business and and you know kind of did little little businesses going here and there to make money he and he. He was very likable guy. And he knew a lot of people in town Including a Lotta lawyers and bankers still. The family was often barely scraping gaping. Bhai he was not well off. I mean you know they they sort of got by but it was. It was always a struggle and I I think that growing up as a child he was very aware of the financial national struggles with the family. I mean you know. He would oftentimes get up when his when he was eight or nine years old he would get up and go to the the seawall and catch some fish and bring them home. Give them to his mom And then she would you know that that would be dinner. And then he'd he'd go off to school and if you're catching fish for dinner Before you go to school you're probably pretty tuned into the fact that that you you know maybe in the French right. George wasn't like his gregarious father. He tended to keep to himself. The legend goes that he had read all the books in the city library by the time us fourteen but he also spent a lot of time outside exploring the islands lagoons and beaches and also when he who was a child. He told all of us that at one point he wanted to be an astronomer. He just would look up at the stars and wonder what is going on out there. That's meredith it. Drives the second oldest of Mitchell's tin children. She remembers her father as a loving but perplexing figure he was kind of like Mr Magoo round the house and one time really this crazy story but we were talking about dark energy and And some astronomy subjects My Dad why are you interested in dark energy and he said well if we can figure out what it is. We can harness it for energy. Oh my God Dad. You're just out you're out of your mind but that's the way he thought it was always like. Well what is this inlet safe. We use it. It can be an alternative to fossil fuels when George was thirteen tragedy struck. His mother passed away after suffering a sudden stroke so After his mother died You know the the two older boys John and Kristy world enough. They kind of fend for themselves but George and his sister Maria were still pretty young and Mike. You know wasn't really really prepared to to care for two little kids by himself. And he was also soon after he was hit by a car and broke his leg supposedly in twenty two places. Maybe not quite that many but but That's the way he tells the story. George went to live with an aunt uncle on the mainland in a tiny town outside of Houston called Dickinson. His younger sister Maria was sent away to live with relatives and San Antonio. Here's his daughter Meredith again and I think that affected them just terribly because the family was divided Vita that that point and he went to live with the knuckle and his younger sister. My Aunt Maria went live with another set of Aunts and uncles and it just really broke up the family at that point and I don't think he ever quite recovered from that that grief frankly in a letter to assist her Maria a few years later George wrote words cannot describe the feeling I have in me now I to fill the longing for mother someone I can go to some place second call home. Keeping family close would become a driving factor for the rest of Georgia's alive in even after the death of his mother. Her influence on George was profound. She wanted him to become a doctor so he he actually he graduated from high school early. he was sixteen years old and he applied to Rice Ace and got accepted But they told him you know you're you're too young you you need to take a year and grow up a little bit and then come back now that we're well past the start of the New Year it's easy to fall back into old habits and forget our resolutions especially when it comes to money as most most of us have found out the hard way getting into debt is easy and getting out of debt is hard especially if your credit score is great. UPSTART DOT COM is here to help. Health upstart is the revolutionary lending platform. The knows you're more than just your credit score. They offer smart interest rates. Help you pay off. High interest credit card debt upstart goes beyond the traditional credit score when evaluating your credit worthiness and they actually reward you based on other factors like your education and job history you in the form of a smarter interest rate plus they make it fast and easy to check your rate since it's a softball it won't affect your credit score for yourself so from the burden of high interest credit card debt by consolidating everything into one monthly payment with upstart. See why start is ranked number one in their category with over for three hundred businesses on trust pilot and hurried up start dot com slash boomtown to find out how low Europe start rate is checking your it only takes a few minutes. That's upstart dot com slash boomtown Andrew Aydin here host the brand new podcast from H. L. N. down the hill the Delphi murders. This is the story of teens. Abby Williams and Libby German in February two thousand seventeen they went for a hike in Delphi. Indiana and vanished nearly twenty four hours later. Their bodies are found also found lease phone which has video and audio of the killer who remains on the loose down the hill Delphi. Murders subscribe and listen now on Apple. PODCASTS.

George P Mitchell Mike Mitchell Mike Galveston Aunt Maria Galveston Bay Moscow John D. Rockefeller Chris Wallace Lauren Texas Mitch borden meredith reporter Houston MARFA Katina Tina Greece Permian Basin Europe