35 Burst results for "Lauren Freyer"

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 3 d ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement movement in India. in India. It has drawn the It interest has drawn of pop the interest stars of pop and stars climate and activists climate activists and sent people and sent into the people streets into for the streets a cause. for a cause. What's fascinating What's fascinating about the cause about they're the cause fighting for, they're fighting for, is how is unfasten how unfasten ating ating it initially it seems, initially seems, farmers are protesting farmers are protesting over new rules over new for rules wholesale for wholesale markets. markets. One of those rules One matter of those rules so much. matter so much. The answer reveals The answer something reveals about something a giant about nation, a giant its nation, past its past and its possible and its future. possible future. NPR's Lauren NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like all day. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're being market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops in auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. It did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Copper supplies water. Not there. That's right. That's water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot off problem is that the production costs off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prizes are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. But Sanjay Cohade is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. He says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat, another man interrupts. We have brought up Narendra Modi's. You will be the King of World nine innings, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country, but that didn what model? Is it? Me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean about me, but not for my tomatoes. Sun up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the man on I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. The last Shin Dae is the founder. Market is ready to pay me back better place then I should capture that market is rapper Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes here's yes. Yes, grandfather and then grape farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove. It Actually long known there was opportunity. So he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who've gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Abby Shake says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been pro testing even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it when I'm just out to get the amulet and the mighty by it guys out the causal Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer NPR Lord Howe Sanjay Cohade Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi Western India American West Indian Government Narendra Modi Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Abby Shake Abby
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:54 min | 3 d ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

Lauren Frayer western India One NPR one those
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 3 d ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer Lord Howe Jake Ohad Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi NPR Western India American West Indian Government Niners Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Roper Bobby Shake
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are missing. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. One local resident said. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone with that video shows a torrent of rocks, water and debris surging down a ravine below the Nanda Devi glacier. Hydro electric dam snaps in half and washes away. Many of those missing are construction workers trapped in a tunnel underground. Soldiers and police are spending a second night trying to dig them out. This man was one of the lucky ones pulled out alive. You know, mutual easy. We'd lost all hope we thought we would die, he says. Describing how he clung to the tunnel's roof as water gushed in This is an area of India's Wuterich on state where mighty rivers pour down from the Himalayas. But environmental experts have long warned against building dams and power plants there because it's ecologically fragile and so prone to floods and landslides in 2013 about 6000 people died in flooding there were starting To see some of the impacts of climate change. Increased numbers of landslides that you really large landslides in the high mountains. Geoscientists Dan Sugar is on the other side of the world at the University of Calgary, poring over satellite images of this disaster. What's a little odd about this one is you know what happened? In February. When you know the ground ought to be frozen. Indian authorities have described this as a glacial break part of the Nanda Debbie Glacier cleaving off, but sugar says it looks to him more like a landslide. He says it'll take weeks or months to investigate. Meanwhile, the Indian military is airlifting in more equipment. The people trapped underground may have only hours. Lauren Frayer NPR NEWS Mumbai It's double the one my safe. You're listening to all things considered stick around just ahead right After a short break, the Biden administration announced its plans to rejoin the U. N Human Rights Council. Three years after the U. S. Withdrew from that organization. Also, Rob Monster sees his dough name registrar Company epic as a counter to Big tech. He welcomes views Band on most other parts of the Internet, including those whose spouse or allow far right extremist content. We'll hear from him just ahead, Stay tuned. Support for W N Y. C comes from flat are in books. The moment of Lift How empowering Women changes The world by Melinda Gates In this book, Melinda Gates shares stories of women who are leading the way in the fight for equality available in paperback. For the first time in history. The Senate will try of.

Dan Sugar Lauren Frayer Nanda Devi glacier Melinda Gates Nanda Debbie Glacier Mumbai NPR Rob Monster Senate India University of Calgary Himalayas Biden administration U. N Human Rights Council registrar Company Big tech
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR. A massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of the whole Himalayan mountain glacier broke off, triggering landslides and flooding. MPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of Ananda Davey Glacier broke off blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Wuterich on state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that. Damn, one local resident says it happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and power plants because it's so prone to floods and landslides. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai One of the deadliest avalanches in Utah history had a popular back country skiing area this weekend. Officials say. Four skiers were killed for others were also buried in the snow slide, but officials say they were able to dig themselves out. The skiers were from two different groups and all it prepared for potential avalanche conditions, according to authorities. The avalanche was in Utah's Millcreek Canyon, and authorities say it was triggered by skiing. And recent weeks, others have lost their lives in avalanches, one there. Anchorage, Alaska, Others in Colorado experts have been concerned that to avoid crowds, people might venture out into unstable snow conditions. I'm Louise Schiavone. NPR NEWS Washington Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Kauffman Foundation, working together with communities to break down barriers and prepare all people for success in their jobs and careers as employees or entrepreneurs more online at Kauffman.

Lauren Frayer NPR India Ananda Davey Glacier Himalayan mountain glacier Kauffman Foundation Utah Others Louise Schiavone Kauffman Himalayas Millcreek Canyon Mumbai NPR. Anchorage Alaska Colorado
Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

Reveal

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

"Massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of a Himalayan mountain glacier broke off and triggered landslides and flooding. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of the Nanda Davey Glacier broke off. Blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Tera con state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that Damn, one local resident says. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that he's praying for everyone's safety. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and

Himalayan Mountain Glacier Lauren Frayer Nanda Davey Glacier India NPR Prime Minister Narendra Modi Himalayas
India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | Last month

India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

"The world's biggest national vaccination campaign is now underway. Not in the U. S. But India today's the first day that Indians congrats the Corona virus vaccine and the Indian government aims to inoculate 300 million people by July. NPR's Lauren Frayer is in Mumbai. Lauren. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott 300 million people is almost the entire population of the United States and they're going to vaccinate them all in less than six months. How do they plan to do it? Yes, So, of course, it's only about 20% of this country, and that's just the first batch. It'll take a couple years to vaccinate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. But India is doing this in much the same way it organizes elections, which is spread out over weeks. Here, they're using voter rolls to identify people and just like poll workers carry Elektronik voting machines up to mountaintop monasteries and villages in the jungle. They have these mobile medical teams to bring vaccines on ice to the remote ist places in India. Now, most of the vaccines centers that open today are in hospitals in big cities like in Mumbai, where I am and we know today's the first day. What's the scene? Like in Mumbai? There's an atmosphere of excitement. It's frontline and health workers. Some of these air sanitation workers who are among the first one's getting vaccinated. Some of them got flowers from well wishers. Government ministers are crowding in everybody's trying to take Photos here is the dean of a medical school in Chennai. Her name is our Jayanti and truly a very privileged beneficially today. And I'm feeling absolutely fine. It's almost more than five minutes inside of the news. I'm feeling great. Now she's in the first group of 30 Million Frontline workers. Next in line is anyone over 50 or with a pre existing condition and which vaccine or vaccines? Is India using? Yes, so there are two in use here, one developed by Oxford University and the big pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca. The other is from an Indian company called Bharat Biotech. Both are being manufactured inside India. India is the world's biggest vaccine maker. And so a lot of the covert vaccines being used around the world will actually be mass manufactured right here in people choose. No, they can't and that is a bit of a controversy because most Indians will get the AstraZeneca won. The local manufacturer here is turning out about 100 million doses a month. Now half of those are for export. The other vaccine. Indian one is still in phase three clinical trials in data isn't yet out. Here is one of the critics. Deena's talk or is a public health activist. It may very well be a good vaccine. It's just that we don't know enough about except fricassee. Concerned absence off the efficacy data. I mean, people are asking the question talking. Why? Why did you do that? Why did the government approved this vaccine is what he's asking. And what does the government say? Well, the drug regulator says it wanted to have more than one vaccine available for Indians, the company behind the vaccine. Bharat Biotech, says its formula is 200% safe. There's really some speculation that the government just approved this out of pride really that it wanted to approve an Indian maid vaccine alongside one from a big multinational company like AstraZeneca. We've done stories here, of course, about hesitancy among some Americans about taking the vaccine. I wonder if that's reflected in India, too. It's much less of a thing in India. Actually, India managed to eradicate polio and lots of other diseases through big vaccine drives like this. India also has the second highest Covad caseload in the world behind the U. S. The viruses Devastated the Indian economy. And so there's a hope that you know this. This vaccination campaign allows India to return to normalcy.

India Mumbai Lauren Frayer Bharat Biotech Astrazeneca Indian Government U. NPR Lauren Scott Chennai United States Oxford University Deena Polio
India Covid Vaccine Campaign Begins

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:51 min | Last month

India Covid Vaccine Campaign Begins

"Vaccination campaign is now underway and not in the U. S. But India today's the first day that Indians congrats the Corona virus vaccine and the Indian government aims to inoculate 300 million people. By July. NPR's Lauren Frayer is in Mumbai. Lauren. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott 300 million people is almost the entire population of the United States, and they're going to vaccinate them all in less than six months. How did they plan to do it? Yes, So, of course, it's only about 20% of this country, and that's just the first batch. It'll take a couple years to vaccinate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. But India is doing this in much the same way it organizes elections, which is spread out over weeks. Here, they're using voter rolls to identify people. And just like poll workers carry Elektronik voting machines up to mountaintop monasteries and villages in the jungle. They have these mobile medical teams to bring vaccines on ice to the remote ist places in India. Now most of the vaccines Centers that opened today are in hospitals and big cities like in Mumbai, where I am and we know today's the first day. What's the scene? Like in Mumbai? There's an atmosphere of excitement. It's frontline and health workers. Some of these air sanitation workers who are among the first one's getting vaccinated. Some of them got flowers from well wishers. Government ministers are crowding in everybody's trying to take Photos here is the dean of a medical school in Chennai. Her name is our Jayanti. I'm truly a very privileged beneficially today. And I'm feeling absolutely fine. It's almost more than five minutes inside of the news. I'm feeling great. Now she's in the first group of 30 Million Frontline workers. Next in line is anyone over 50 or with a pre existing condition and which

Lauren Frayer Mumbai India Indian Government U. NPR Lauren Scott United States Chennai
U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | 4 months ago

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:43 min | 4 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well, Michelle, their new country wide lockdowns Iraq as one of the highest infection rates in the region, and if you go around a little bit, you can see why there's very little social distancing. There are very few people wearing masks, hugging and kissing are still very much the done thing. We were near mostly yesterday, where we passed a funeral procession where there were crowds of people walking shoulder to shoulder behind an ambulance carrying the body of a man in his forties who had died of cove in and at the police station. I ask the police why no one was marrying mass in the village. And he said Well, we survived Isis. We can survive this. But as you can see from the death toll on people haven't survived. There's corruption and neglect and the hospitals or shambles orderly is haven't been paid in three months. I spoke to one Iraqi who had to find and transport oxygen canisters himself to his father's hospital bed every few hours for days before his dad finally died of Cove it and that's the case for thousands of relatives of patients. And you recently traveled to Iraq from Jordan, which is also seeing a spike in cases. What's the situation there? Well. It started off with one of the strictest lockdowns in the world. Small country and Jordan kept the contagion rate very low that way, but it's also a poor country and it threw a lot of people already struggling out of work. So Jordan re opened businesses and restaurants and the infection rates of sword. Their solution now is to have complete lockdowns on weekends. People not allowed to leave their homes on those days where a lot of people were going to the mosque or gathering with extended family. But there's still a major source of transmission through funerals and even secret weddings, which are very hard to crack down on. Before we let you go. Can I just go back to Iraq for a second? I was just struck by what you said with the police officer, the security guard saying, Hey, we survived Isis. We can survive this. Is that the mood there? I mean, is there just a sense of resignation that this can't be fought, or how would how would you describe it? It's really interesting, You know, I don't think it's just Iraq. I think it's pretty much everywhere that I see in the Middle East, where it's probably a combination of resignation, and we're leaving this to God's will and a little bit of we don't believe this is really a pandemic or a danger thrown into it. You know, there's a region where people don't trust their government. So if the government is telling you to wear a mask, and there's a pandemic A lot of people aren't going to believe it. That was NPR's Jane Arraf in northern Iraq. And we also heard from NPR's Lauren Frayer who covers India. And some Eleanor Beardsley in Paris. Thank you all so much for joining us. Thank you, Michelle. Thank you. Thanks, Michelle. It's all things considered here on W. N. Y C. 93.9 FM and AM 20 and later this hour will learn aboutthe writing on the wall in art installation project that projects the problems and other writings by incarcerated people on the outsides of buildings across the US to raise awareness that's coming up on all things considered. Good evening on Mayan Levinson. We do a partly cloudy skies expected for tonight with low of around 54 Partly sunny for Monday with a high near 68 governor, Cuomo was urging New Yorkers who like to ski to stick close to home instead of going to Colorado and Utah Richer on New York's travel restriction list. If you ski in New York. Not only do you have the best skiing in the United States, but you don't have to quarantine when you come back as of November. 6 Cuomo skiing Cuomo's allowing ski resorts to open it half their indoor capacity. We have covert restrictions, like wearing masks, gondolas and list will be limited to members of the same.

Iraq Michelle Jordan Isis Cuomo United States NPR Jordan re New York Middle East Eleanor Beardsley ski Jane Arraf officer India Lauren Frayer Colorado Utah Paris
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Men from a dominant cast are under arrest. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Down with caste discrimination down with rape protesters chant in the Indian capital. The victim in this rape case was from the doll. It community, the most oppressed group in India's caste system. She was attacked in a field allegedly by dominant caste men from her same village near New Delhi. Just give out Beiste article 50 statement via. The local police chief says the victim named her attacker's four of them before she died in the hospital last night. The men are under arrest. Most rape in India is believed to be within families and to go unreported. But every few months, there's a gang rape seemingly more horrific than the last one. Police caution against hysteria. But Lord details dominate headlines on in tragic news Coming in a 19 year old college girl gang raped, tortured and the streets again are filling with protesters. Each time something happens, people demand hang the rapists, you know, have a stronger law, etcetera. They forget that the system is not working. Author and activist Copan A. Sharma says the system especially fails, oppressed cast women. What's most alarming about this case, she says, is that rape appears to have been used as a weapon against a whole community, but they will rape the women. You tell this family and this community where did stands so girls picked on by these alpacas? We teach the law. Acosta listen, and she is mutilated to the point where she There's no chance of survival. If she dies, police are still investigating. Meanwhile, TV crews have flooded the family's.

rape India Lauren Frayer Acosta New Delhi Copan A. Sharma NPR
Hathras gang rape: India victim cremated 'without family's consent'

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Hathras gang rape: India victim cremated 'without family's consent'

"Protests have erupted across India over the gang rape and death of a woman from the most marginalized community in the country's ancient caste system. We have details from NPR's Lauren Frayer. Down with caste discrimination down with rape. Protesters chanted in Delhi, The victim was a doll it the most oppressed cast in India for dominant caste men have been arrested for allegedly gang raping her and leaving her body in a field. A 19 year old died in a hospital Two weeks later. Her family says authorities cremated her body last night against their wishes. Marital rape or raped by family members is more common in India, but brutal gang rapes and murders get wall wall to to wall wall coverage coverage in in local local media. media. Some Some of of the the protests protests sparked sparked by by this this one one have have been been led led by by the the BIM BIM Army, Army, a a political political party, party, the the champions champions the the rights rights of of Dalits. Dalits. Lauren Frayer. NPR

Rape Bim Bim Army India Lauren Frayer NPR Delhi
Taj Mahal Reopens In India For 1st Time In 6 Months

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Taj Mahal Reopens In India For 1st Time In 6 Months

"In India, The Taj Mahal reopened today, along with some high schools across the country. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports They closed more than six months ago. When the pandemic began. The Taj Mahal reopened it sunrise with visitors capped at 5000 Day. Everyone has to wear masks, and you're not allowed to touch the monuments, glittering white marble. India imposed a lock down in March but then lifted it to try to revive the economy. Now Corona virus infections are soaring. Second only to the U. S. Is total caseload. NPR's Lauren Frayer

Taj Mahal Lauren Frayer NPR India
Facebook India grilled over hate speech, alleged bias

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Facebook India grilled over hate speech, alleged bias

"Investigating allegations of bias at the company over removing hate speech online. Here's Lauren Frayer has more atop Facebook executive and supporter of India's Hindu nationalist government is accused of intervening to stop the removal of hate speech online by Hindu nationalist politicians. She allegedly prioritized relations with the government over removing anti Muslim posts that could incite violence. Facebook, a financial supporter of NPR, denies any bias, and India's minister says the bias goes the other way that Facebook actually sensors more right wing accounts. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting. And you're listening to NPR news live from Cape

Facebook Lauren Frayer NPR India Executive Cape
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"The army and local police have issued alerts for 23 year old sergeant Elder Fernandez. His mother, Alina Fernandez says he was last seen Monday. I don't know what it is that by now I don't know what he's feeling. I don't know if he's hurt. I don't know what's going on. Fernandez is among several Fort Hood soldiers to go missing in the past year. His family says he claimed he'd been sexually harassed, and the military confirms an open investigation into the allegation. The International Atomic Energy Agency says Director General Rafael Mariano girl See will travel to Iran Monday to discuss questions related to safeguards. Of particular concern is the nuclear watchdogs access to Tehran's nuclear sites. This is NPR. The CDC says more than 173,000. People in the U. S have now died from the Corona virus confirmed infections. Top 5.5 million India confirmed another record number of new Corona virus cases today, NPR's Lauren Frayer reports, India now has the world's third highest caseload behind the U. S and Brazil. With nearly 70,000 new infections in a single day. India's total caseload is approaching three million. But testing remains low and the really numbers are likely hire antibody tests show more than one in four Indians may have already been exposed to the virus cases have plateau Odin, India's megacity Mumbai, an initial hot spot. But infections are multiplying in rural areas where healthcare resource is are already stretched. A nationwide lock down was eased earlier this summer and the virus is spread is accelerating. Experts say it's weeks or months from its peak in India. Authorities are under pressure to curb big gatherings. Head of major religious festivals in the coming weeks. Lauren Frayer NPR news The World Health Organization's chief Ted Rose. Gabrielle says he's hopeful the Corona virus pandemic will be over in less than two years. He says current advances in technology, Khun stop it with the help of national unity and Global solidarity. The first new movie since the pandemic erupted, is now in theaters across the country. The road rage movie unhinged stars Russell Crowe. I'm Barbara Klein. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the estate.

Elder Fernandez NPR India Lauren Frayer International Atomic Energy Ag Director General Rafael Marian army CDC Ted Rose Russell Crowe Fort Hood Barbara Klein Tehran Mumbai World Health Organization Iran Khun Global solidarity
Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

Forum

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

"Millions of women and girls globally have lost access to contraceptives and abortion services because of the pandemic. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports the global health charity Marie Stopes International finds at India maybe most severely affected In India lockdowns and supply chain disruptions mean fewer women have been able to prevent unintended pregnancies or get pre Natal care. Marie Stopes International surveyed 37 countries and found nearly two million fewer women received contraceptives or abortion services in the first half of this year. The NGO predicts 900,000 unintended pregnancies worldwide, along with a million and a half unsafe abortions and more than 3000 maternal deaths.

Marie Stopes International India Lauren Frayer NGO NPR
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:00 min | 7 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News in Washington. I'm Laurie, London presumptive Democratic nominee. Joe Biden and California Senator Kamala Harris will make their first appearance together as running mates later today in Wilmington, Delaware. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The event follows yesterday's long awaited announcement about who will join Biden on the Democratic Democratic ticket in the November election. Her selection comes months after Biden committed to picking a woman as a running mate. Harris was elected to the Senate in 2016 after serving as San Francisco district attorney and California attorney general. She later run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, but dropped out of the race in December. In a tweet on Tuesday night, Harris said she was honored to join Biden on the Democratic ticket. Widens decision comes less than a week before the Democratic National Convention, which kicks off on Monday. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington Kamila Harris's mother was born in India and some Indians are celebrating that connection today. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Harris is the first woman of color On a major US presidential ticket and also the first person of Indian descent as well. Kamala Harris, his mother was a Hindu originally from Tamil Nadu in southern India and moved to California for grad school before Harris was born, a Tamil politician today tweeted that Harris's nomination is a moment of pride. The U. S senator has spoken and written about her memories of strolling on Tamil Nadu speeches with her grandfather. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting, staffers from the U. S. Census Bureau are knocking door to door this week, trying to interview households nationwide that have yet to fill out a 2020 census form. NPR's Hansi long reports, Many fear and new end date for counting will mean people of color immigrants and other historically undercounted groups. Are at a high risk of being left out. Census Bureau workers are wearing face coverings and carrying smartphones to try to reach around 56 million homes that have not yet participated in the constitutionally mandated head count. Each administration has directed the beer to move up the end a for counting by a month that could lead to a massive undercount, according to more than a dozen current and former employees of the bureau's local offices interviewed by NPR. Numbers are used to help determine each community share federal tax dollars from Medicare, Medicaid and other public services. There is still collecting responses by mail over the phone and at my 2020 cents is dot gov. How's the long NPR NEWS NEW YORK The Labor Department reports. US. Consumer prices jumped six point or 6.0.6 percent in July, matching the rise in June. It was about twice as much as economists had expected. This is NPR. New Zealand is scrambling to find the source of a new Corona virus outbreak, the first cases of local transmission in more than three months. The discovery put the nation's largest city of Auckland. Back into lock down. And as NPR's Julie McCarthy reports, it's also raising questions about whether a general election will go ahead as planned next month, Authorities have found four cases of covert 19 in one Auckland household and conducted contact tracing of some 200 more people. The cluster came as an unpleasant surprise for New Zealanders. The country had been Corona virus free for 102 days after following one of the world's strictest lockdowns. The director general of Health, said one of the people who tested positive works at a food cold storage facility in Auckland and that it was being swapped to check it as a possible source of the infections with renewed lock down measures in Auckland, non essential workers are required to stay home while bars, restaurants and most businesses will be closed. Julie McCarthy. NPR news Emergency teams in the Indian Ocean island nation of Mauritius say they've pumped out nearly all of the remaining oil from an oil tanker there that ran aground. About 1000 tons of oil have spilled into the ocean on Mauritius, East coast. The area where the oil spill happened is famous for snorkeling, kite surfing sailing. And dolphin watching at last check the Dow up 263 points. This is NPR news. comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include UMA Ah Cloud based phone service for a small businesses with an automated virtual receptionist and mobility features to run their businesses from anywhere. More at om a dot com You are eyeing a new set.

NPR Senator Kamala Harris Joe Biden U. S. Census Bureau California Windsor Johnston Auckland Washington Lauren Frayer Julie McCarthy India Mauritius Laurie Delaware
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 7 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"First. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Laurie, London presumptive Democratic nominee. Joe Biden and California Senator Kamala Harris will make their first appearance together as running mates later today in Wilmington, Delaware. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The event follows yesterday's long awaited announcement about who will join Biden on the Democratic Democratic ticket in the November election. Her selection comes months after Biden committed to picking a woman as a running mate. Harris was elected to the Senate in 2016 after serving as San Francisco district attorney and California attorney general. She made a run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination but dropped out of the race in December. In a tweet on Tuesday night, Harris said she was honored to join Biden on the Democratic ticket. Widens decision comes less than a week before the Democratic National Convention, which kicks off on Monday. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington Carmela Harris's mother was born in India and some Indians are celebrating that connection today. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Harris is the first woman of color On a major US presidential ticket and also the first person of Indian descent as well. Kamala Harris, his mother was a Hindu originally from Tamil Nadu in southern India and moved to California for grad school before Harris was born, a Tamil politician today tweeted that Harris's nomination is a moment of pride. The U. S senator has spoken and written about her memories of strolling on Talon ADO speeches with her grandfather. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting, staffers from the U. S. Census Bureau are knocking door to door this week, trying to interview households nationwide that have yet to fill out a 2020 census form. NPR's Hansi long reports, Many fear and new end date for counting will mean people of color immigrants and other historically undercounted groups. Are at a high risk of being left out. Census Bureau workers are wearing face coverings and carrying smartphones to try to reach around 56 million homes that have not yet participated in the constitutionally mandated head count. The administration has directed the beer to move up the end a for counting by a month that could lead to a.

Washington Carmela Harris NPR Joe Biden U. S. Census Bureau Windsor Johnston California Lauren Frayer India Washington Laurie senator London Senate Delaware San Francisco
Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

Hidden Brain

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

"India is reporting another record spiking Corona virus cases. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Among those newly infected is one of the country's most famous Bollywood film stars. The legendary Indian actor Amitabh Bachan, who is 77 years old, has tested positive for covert 19. So his his son, they announced it on Twitter. They've both been hospitalized with only mild

Amitabh Bachan Lauren Frayer Twitter NPR India
TikTok Tackles India App Ban, Vowing It's No Tool for Beijing

Marketplace

03:19 min | 8 months ago

TikTok Tackles India App Ban, Vowing It's No Tool for Beijing

"Tensions have spiked between the world's two most populous nations. That would be China and India. The two countries share a border that extends for more than 2000 miles, and it was along that border that violence broke out. Last month, 20 Indian troops were killed. Now India has banned dozens of Chinese APS, including the social video APP. TIC tac. India has been tic Tac's biggest foreign market. NPR's Lauren Frayer has been talking with some of the Indians obsessed with it. When the Corona virus hit India, Sumit Jane was forced to shut the clothing shop he runs in his hometown in western India. Under lock down. He was bored and worried. Looking long thought intelligent. That damned ignominy. Tic tac is how I stayed. Sane says I posted videos every day, Good Tic Tac clip Jane lip synchs lyrics about the Corona virus. To the tune of a popular Bollywood song. Jane is a skinny 28 year old with a curly mop of hair, gold earrings and nearly four million followers on Tic Tac social video APP has made him famous. He starred in a music video and even got offers to be on TV that Ah, licking a musical gave a small town in hands like me used to have to move to the big city to get noticed, he says. Tic Tac lets us do that from home. Up to 1/3 of TIC Tac users are believed to be in India. They're the biggest group outside China. Some Indians have even monetized it selling English lessons on tick talk, for example. But this week, the Indian government banned Tic Tac, along with 58 other Chinese made APS amid tensions with Beijing. We the people of India, standing behind the government have the ability to hit China where it hurts. India's nationalist TV anchors applauded the move. Many Indians are outraged over China's killing last month of Indian troops. Some are calling for a boycott of all Chinese goods. The government is trying to tap into the national sentiment in sweeping India right now. Akil Berry with the think tank Eurasia Group, says the Indian government is concerned about data privacy on Chinese APS. It also wants Indians to develop Indian APS rather than using Chinese ones. But India's own tech start ups get a lot of Chinese investment, Barry says. When you take a look at India's unicorns startups that a valued at over $1 billion about 18 off the 30 of them have Chinese investment. So if Beijing retaliates and pulls Chinese investment That could hurt India even more, he says. Tic Tac says it's following Indian privacy laws and is asking the Indian government to reconsider. Meanwhile, in a small town in northern India, housewife Anita Meena has been posting videos to tic tac of herself doing folk dances and have gone viral. She gets recognized when she goes to her local market, she says. Tick. Tuck is banned. Mina says she'll focus on YouTube Instead, it's unclear how many of India's roughly 200 million TIC tac users will do the same if Lauren Frayer NPR

Tic Tac India Indian Government China Sumit Jane Lauren Frayer Beijing NPR Anita Meena Tuck Youtube Akil Berry Tank Eurasia Group Mina Barry
India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

Morning Edition

05:43 min | 9 months ago

India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

"Why did Chinese and Indian troops fight in a remote valley along their shared border this happened high up in the Himalayas with thousands of troops from both countries have been stationed for decades at least twenty Indian troops died in the fighting and China won't disclose how many casualties it suffered for some explanation we've got NPR's Emily Feng in Beijing and NPR's India correspondent Lauren Frayer on the line learn this is a very specific part of the world the very remote part of the world what's this place like and what does India say happens there right so no well this is at fourteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas subzero temperatures there's almost no civilian population there and so that we have to rely on the two militaries to tell us what happened and they have different versions of the story both say the other started it we do know it was hand to hand combat with stones and wooden clubs because they have this agreement not to carry guns in that borders on an Indian Army colonel is among the dead India has been building a road in the area that could be used to deploy a future troops more quickly China may see that as a provocation both sides have been pouring in more troops and building more infrastructure there recently and so that's led to some scuffles in recent weeks have also been some high level military talks as recently as last weekend actually to try to defuse tensions but you know the opposite appears to have happened okay so that's from India's perspective Emily you're in Beijing what is China saying about what happened China says it bears no responsibility for what happened and it says it was Indian soldiers who first crossed into this no-man's land that separates the troops stationed in this valley yesterday night China's military put out a statement in which they accused Indian troops of cloak deliberately launching a provocative attack and big knowledge that tensions have been simmering for a while I spoke to retired colonel and and China's army his name is you have gone about why he thinks this clash happened here sure I'm not sure sure sure gallantry you know it's also one of them he said it was inevitable given tensions that people were going to die in a border clash between India and China and he put the blame on Indian prime minister Modi's who as a leader he said taking a more aggressive expansionary approach colonel yeah believes like many people in China that India provoked this clash so they could score points with more nationalistic voters in India and as Lawrence of we don't have that many details about what actually happened unlike India China's been very real to to share any information I asked the foreign ministry today white they can't give us casualty numbers and they said verbatim they didn't need to why is this so sensitive in China most likely it's because Chinese soldiers were killed in the clash and that's an embarrassing and very rare occurrence China's military last night admitted that there were casualties in general stemming from this clash but they didn't say which side in which they occurred China also says they're not releasing casualty numbers because they don't want to infuriate their own citizens and much of the escalate learn I want to ask you about what is at stake for India here because we're talking about the world's two most populous countries and both of them have nuclear weapons it is worried about its own territorial integrity I mean it doesn't want to lose land on this border to China China has been pretty aggressive in India's backyard of China is a close friend an investor in Pakistan which is India's arch rival next door China's building ports and infrastructure in places nearby like Sri Lanka Nepal across Southeast Asia and even farther afield India is the world's largest democracy Washington sees it as a buffer to China's influence in the region and if India suffers a stinging defeat at the hands of the Chinese military really challenges that idea so what is the Indian government saying so prime minister narendramodi had a coronavirus meeting today and at the start he observed a moment of silence for the slain soldiers he also made his first public comments about this clash hi from the doctor he said India wants peace but that if provoked India is capable of giving a fitting reply and he said India would never compromise its integrity and sovereignty so that sounds pretty tough but it may be aimed more at his domestic audience actually because here's what it sounds like when you turn on the TV in India today he was DVS China devious China has broken the peace after forty five years the consequences our great so that's a TV news anchor sounding pretty angry there's a hashtag trending today trying to get out so there's a lot of emotion in India right now the Indian Army however has been very measured urging commented actually noted that it was the cold that killed the majority of these troops that were wounded in battle but then they succumbed to subzero temperatures is what the army said to technically not killed by this Chinese soldiers the army made that distinction and so seems to be trying to de escalate here okay so in India at least at the government level and attempt to de escalate Emily what is China's government saying what are they telegraphing China is trying to de escalate as fast as possible first of all the average Chinese person is not paying attention to this clash it simply is not a story in China there's been no coverage in state media beyond this military statement and second China's foreign ministry said today that Beijing is maintaining close communications with India and that they both agree dialogue as the way

Himalayas
Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

"India's army says three of its troops have been killed in a confrontation with Chinese forces present P. R.'s Lauren Frayer the Indian Army says it was a violent standoff and that there are casualties on both sides tensions have been high in recent weeks with scuffles between Indian and Chinese troops but this is the first deadly incident there in decades the India China border is the world's longest unmarked frontier stretching about twenty five hundred

India P. R. Lauren Frayer Indian Army India China
Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 9 months ago

Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

"India's army says three of its troops have been killed in a confrontation with Chinese forces and Chinese military forces also suffered casualties NPR's Lauren Frayer reports this happened on the country's shared border high in the Himalayas the Indian Army says it was a violent standoff and that there are casualties on both sides tensions have been high in recent weeks with scuffles between Indian and Chinese troops but this is the first deadly incident there in decades the India China border is the world's longest on marked frontier stretching about twenty five hundred

India NPR Lauren Frayer Indian Army India China
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Interviewing now there's been unrest in Louisville over the police shooting of emergency medical technician Brianna Taylor firefighters north of Richland Washington are battling a lightning sparked wildfire at the Hanford nuclear cleanup site Anna king of the northwest news network reports there's a massive fire burning outside of Richland on the Hanford site it's burning on a place called cable mountain which is a very sacred site to native Americans it's an up lift mountain that was created by the Yakama faults but it's a place that is very near some of the most sensitive structures at Hanford including the tank farms Anna king of the north west news network Dow futures are up fifty points this is NPR news in Washington India saw a record spike in new coronavirus infections today even as its economy reopens NPR's Lauren Frayer has more it's another daily record for India nearly eighty four hundred new coronavirus cases in the past twenty four hours India is now the seventh worst affected country in the world overtaking France and Germany speaking by video to a medical school prime minister Narendra Modi praised frontline workers for fighting a quote invisible enemy doctors and medical records are nice soul yes India has had about fifty four hundred deaths from covert nineteen in a population of nearly one point four billion but the lockdown left tens of millions out of work in desperate starting today Indian Railways will run two hundred more passenger trains to ferry unemployed migrants from cities to their home villages Lauren Frayer NPR news coronavirus cases are climbing in South Korea with densely populated Seoul registering almost three dozen new cases as of today's update officials there are pushing to require entertainment venues to register their customers with smartphones Q. R. codes so they can be easily located when needed the data would be collected in a trial run before the requirement expands local governments can expand the court codes on high risk facilities I'm Louise.

Germany prime minister NPR Brianna Taylor technician Seoul South Korea Indian Railways Narendra Modi Louisville France Lauren Frayer Washington India Hanford cable mountain Richland Anna king
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 9 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Launch astronauts to the international space station aboard an American rock joined now by NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel Jeff thanks so much for being with us good morning Scott remind us like I happen to be there for the last time that Americans launched into orbit from U. S. soil right well if you were there thing you remember it was the space shuttle Atlantis and that was way back in twenty eleven now almost a decade ago the shuttle was retired that year and since then American astronauts began to space but they've been doing it on Russian rockets they've been launching from Kazakhstan on Soyuz rocket so this is going to be a big change and this launches is different than the shuttle is not yeah it looks completely different said this is a spacecraft called dragon unlike the shuttle it's really small it's got sort of this white shiny exterior and the interior there's touchscreen controls and stuff but it it actually also looks kind of like a throwback it's like this bell shaped capsule kind of like the Apollo era and it's it's way up on top of the rocket rather than being strapped to the side the way the shuttle was in this really marks a return to that older kind of safer way to get to space the shuttle was big it was below its fuel tanks which could cause the wings to get damaged and it used both solid and liquid fueled rockets it was this really complicated design and this is hopefully simpler and safer measures to keep a close eye on the weather today isn't it yeah I mean Florida whether it's always a problem for NASA they were all set to go actually on Wednesday the astronauts were strapped in and they waited through thunderstorms even a tornado warning but in the end they have to stand down because the weather look just a little too dangerous and it's not just the weather at the launch site if anything goes wrong on the way out the astronaut capsule actually object from the top of the rocket in land in the ocean so they have to have good conditions in the Atlantic along most of the flight path so that they could be rescued safely mother nature is actually gonna be the deciding factor on whether we see a launch later today Jeff has the pandemic change anything about the script well NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley have been in quarantine but that's not unusual astronauts always going to quarantine a few weeks before so based on but there are some really big differences on the ground it was really clear how things have changed during the run up to that aborted launch on Wednesday the ground crew were all wearing masks even E. long musk the billionaire who started SpaceX he's been really skeptical of the whole cove in nineteen pandemic but he was wearing a mask and there's other changes too they're using multiple control rooms to spread out the ground crews are making sure emission control everyone's ten feet apart in short they're trying to make this a safe work place on earth Jeff how can people see the launch well NASA is asking people to stay away they don't want crowds gathering because they're obviously worried about the possibility the corona virus could spread but the whole thing is going to be streamed online for NASA's website and on YouTube so you can watch their the launch scheduled to happen at three twenty two PM on the dot today and if it doesn't happen today because whether they'll try again tomorrow and here's your from field thanks so much thank you Scott India has been hit by a cyclone and a heat wave this month that's all on top of the pandemic which of course has the country under lockdown the country's economy has also taken a hit with one hundred million Indians having lost their jobs and now they're beset with another problem NPR's Lauren Frayer reports they violated the coronavirus locked down and landed in deserted streets this week in India's pink city the tourist hub of Jaipur but these were unwelcome visitors and they.

Scott NPR Geoff Brumfiel Jeff
Workers At Garment Factories In Bangladesh Face Harsh Conditions During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:37 min | 10 months ago

Workers At Garment Factories In Bangladesh Face Harsh Conditions During The Pandemic

"To Bangladesh which is under a coronavirus locked down except for garment factories the garment industry is critical to Bangladesh's economy and to the livelihoods of millions of mostly female workers there NPR's Lauren Frayer reports shampoo actor works twelve hours a day at a factory in Bangladesh's capital she sews denim jeans destined for the US and Europe earning ninety five dollars a month she's been able to support her disabled brother or sister and their parents that is until late March when her factory closed because of the corona virus Bangladesh's had about five hundred code nineteen deaths in a population of a hundred and sixty million you take my facts she was shut for six weeks I fell behind on rent I couldn't be my brother's medical evidence I'm very scared and one it's not only me one of my coral because I'm in the same position some relief came in early may when her factory re opened her manager gathered all the sewing machine operators together with I'm in my sixty percent of our salaries for the days you missed but he also said global orders have basically stopped and he doesn't know how long you'll be able to keep being listed on in Bangladesh where there are no unemployment benefits any pay cut or furlough can literally be to starvation milled up no money starving hunger not as much achter no relation to Shamba is a former child labor and now president of one of the largest union federations in Bangladesh the last time she saw such desperation was seven years ago when a garment factory called Rana plaza caught fire and collapsed killing more than a thousand people love that well not many days sector the worst knows many survivors were left with nothing but back then big fashion brands stepped up the pay compensation for wages and implemented new safety standards doctor says that's not happening now global brands are obsessed with their own pain they're canceling orders in Bangladesh where they typically don't have to pay until they take the goods and now close are piling up in warehouses gap has yet to pay a penny for back orders JCPenney Kohl's mother care hi Lisa Barron blot in California is an activist behind the hash tag Hey up campaign which is petitioning big fashion brands to pay for whatever they ordered before the pandemic broke out NPR contacted those brands gap and Kohl's did not respond J. C. Penney has declared bankruptcy and says it hopes to make some vendor payments mother Kerr says it's working very closely with manufacturing partners but didn't respond when asked for specifics bear in blood says that's not enough these are mothers sisters wives who kept these brands profitable for decades and it is not the time in a global pandemic for these brands to turn their backs on the women who make our clothes she says some brands including H. and M. adidas and Nike have agreed to pay K. for seven point five billion dollars in backorders factories are re opening to fill those with some help from government loans well I actually talked to since her factory gave her mask and installed a hand washing station at the door but her sewing machine is just inches from the next one no social distancing and that is the least of her worries she just hopes the factory stays open I need to work she says all die of hunger before I die of this

Bangladesh
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 10 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next live from NPR news I'm korva Coleman there's been a passenger plane crash in Pakistan officials say a jet belonging to the state run Pakistan international airlines went down in a residential neighborhood in the southern port city of Karachi there were at least one hundred people aboard but the city's mayor says no one survived the plane had left Pakistan second largest city Lahore and was headed for Karachi's airport when it went down the White House is considering extending a tax break for investments in low income communities known as opportunity zones in the wake of the pandemic NPR's I Usha Roscoe reports the administration says this is an option to help minority communities hard hit by the outbreak opportunities on allow investors to lower their capital gains taxes if they invest their profits into designated neighborhoods White House adviser Deron Smith says the trump administration wants to see if more can be done with the program it's a tool and there's a number of other tool to want to leverage but we wanna hold a sickly figure out how we can be younger federal partners Smith did not say when extension might look like the program has been a centerpiece of White House outreach to black and Latino voters but critics have charged that the tax breaks that benefit wealthy investors more than local residents ice Roscoe NPR news China's legislature is set to authorize a group of influential lawmakers who will draft and pass a national security law for Hong Kong the law is the most aggressive attempt yet by Beijing to control semi autonomous Hong Kong and peers Emily Feng reports a brief outline for what the proposed national security laws contain shows that Beijing was looking to criminalize four broad types of activities secession subversion foreign interference and terrorism on Thursday China's legislature needs to pass a resolution allowing drafting of the actual law which will almost certainly be passed Hong Kong could challenge the law for being unconstitutional but Beijing has the ultimate power to decide constitutionality the national security law what if actively and the legal and judicial independence Hong Kong as promised for the first fifty years of Chinese rules so until twenty forty seven but Beijing says it needs a new mechanism for dealing with quote hostile foreign forces and those looking to sabotage China I'm leaving NPR news Beijing India's prime minister has pledged one hundred thirty million dollars in emergency aid to victims of cyclone on pond the storm is killed more than ninety people and left millions of others displaced in India and Bangladesh and peers Lauren Frayer prepared this report Indian prime minister Narendra Modi's didn't aerial tour of flattened homes and flooded farms he said the cleanup has been complicated by social distancing during the pandemic police are using drones to assess damage in Kolkata a city of about fifteen million it's now strewn with felled trees and downed power lines NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting you're listening to NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian white good morning Santa Clara county officials are calling for one thousand volunteers to work is contact tracers to help track down and contain the coronavirus KQED's health correspondent April Dembosky explains between fifteen and thirty people test positive for the corona virus every day in Santa Clara county each of those people is in regular contact with four or five other people that they may have infected contact tracers help those four or five people isolate themselves so they don't spread the virus further assistant health officer Dr Sarah Brightman says the county has enough of those tracers for right now we expect at a shelter in place is less and people are going to have more contacts and that's why we need to be able to have a larger work force to reach those folks as well Roman says they're looking for volunteers who are good at having sensitive conversations in talking about health information there especially in need of people who speak Spanish and Vietnamese I'm April Dembosky KQED news in Hayward firefighters in the city manager are giving up plan to pay raises the mayor and city councilor reducing their salaries by two percent and the city is planning to cut travel and other expenses all to deal with the financial hit Hey we're just taking from the corona virus city officials say the coded nineteen crisis could deplete Hey words thirty six million dollar general fund reserves in one year they say that's unless spending slows.

NPR korva Coleman Pakistan
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 10 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Members of KQED public radio I'm Dave Freeman good morning the time now seven twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep cleanup has begun in coastal India and Bangladesh after a cyclone that killed more than eighty people winds hit one hundred fifteen miles per hour here's NPR's Lauren Frayer Indians and Bangladeshis posted video to social media of winds toppling trucks on a highway and cheering metal roofs off buildings six and yellow taxis with floodwaters up to their windows most of the deaths have been from falling trees collapsing walls were drowning in land in one of India's biggest cities Kolkata a man posted video recorded from the balcony of downed power lines sparking explosions in a water logged streets below Feb at least a million homes have lost power a runway at Kolkata's airport is under water and a hanger in shreds the chief minister of India's hardest hit state West Bengal called the storm dance of fury and a catastrophe worse than the corona virus she says whole islands have been cut off from the mainland including communities in the Sundarbans one of the largest mangrove forests in the world in Bangladesh Walter washed so with the aid group care says the storm surge broke through protective embankments flooding hundreds of coastal villages and potentially contaminating drinking water storms are some crops will be lost but I'd still must save we feel that the country was better prepared this time past cyclones in this low lying area of river deltas have killed thousands but this time authorities succeeded in evacuating millions of people just before the storm hit for many it was their first time leaving home in nearly two months because of a lock down due to the corona virus once this is the fear now is that evacuees might catch the virus inside storm shelters the biggest issue I've been we also do something are the government Medicare what's the trend right going back to school sometimes out but even in those stats yeah right right and it may not be cleaned or disinfected and get something done I'll be on he says it could be as long as two weeks before any evacuees develop symptoms revealing the true extent of the harm this storm may have caused Lauren Frayer NPR news it's obvious that the pandemic is affecting many children's mental health schools are closed many routines of daily life for on hold kids face more worry.

India Bangladesh NPR Kolkata West Bengal Sundarbans Walter KQED Dave Freeman Steve Inskeep Lauren Frayer
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:39 min | 10 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king cleanup has started in coastal India and Bangladesh after a powerful cyclone at least twenty four people were killed the winds hit one hundred and fifteen miles an hour and then got weaker overnight and the storm has now been downgraded to a depression here's NPR's Lauren Frayer Indians and Bangladeshis posted video to social media of winds toppling trucks on a highway and shearing metal roofs off buildings if yelling taxis with floodwaters up to their windows most of the deaths have been from falling trees collapsing walls were drowning in landed one of India's biggest cities Kolkata a man posted video recorded from the balcony of downed power lines sparking explosions in a water logged streets below for at least a million homes have lost power a runway at Kolkata's airport is under water and a hanger in shreds the chief minister of India's hardest hit state West Bengal called the storm a dance of fury and a catastrophe worse than the corona virus she says whole islands have been cut off from the mainland including communities in the Sundarbans one of the largest mangrove forests in the world in Bangladesh Walter washed so with the aid group care says the storm surge broke through protective embankments flooding hundreds of coastal villages and potentially contaminating drinking water storms are some crops will be lost but I'd still must save we feel that the country was better prepared this time past cyclones in this low lying area of river deltas have killed thousands but this time authorities succeeded in evacuating millions of people just before the storm hit for many it was their first time leaving home in nearly two months because of a lock down due to the corona virus what's this is the fear now is that evacuees might catch the virus inside storm shelters the biggest this year I've been D. social the government Medicare what's the trend right must be conducted schools include Sir Tom Selleck but even he knows that said possibly right right and they may not be cleaned or disinfected okay that'll be on he says it could be as long as two weeks before any evacuees develop symptoms revealing the true extent of the harm this storm may have caused Lauren Frayer NPR news.

Steve Inskeep India Bangladesh depression NPR Kolkata West Bengal Sundarbans Walter Sir Tom Selleck Lauren Frayer
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 10 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PC version a video support tool learn more at remote PC dot com it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king cleanup has started in coastal India and Bangladesh after a powerful cyclone at least twenty four people were killed the winds hit one hundred and fifteen miles an hour and then got weaker overnight and the storm has now been downgraded to a depression here's NPR's Lauren Frayer Indians and Bangladeshis posted video to social media of winds toppling trucks on a highway and shearing metal roofs off buildings six indeed yellow taxis with floodwaters up to their windows most of the deaths have been from falling trees collapsing walls were drowning in land in one of India's biggest cities Kolkata a man posted video recorded from a balcony of downed power lines sparking explosions in a water logged streets below for at least a million homes have lost power a runway at Kolkata's airport is under water and a hanger in shreds the chief minister of India's hardest hit state West Bengal called the storm a dance of fury and a catastrophe worse than the corona virus she says whole islands have been cut off from the mainland including communities in the Sundarbans one of the largest mangrove forests in the world in Bangladesh Walter washed so with the aid group care says the storm surge broke through protective embankments flooding hundreds of coastal villages and potentially contaminating drinking water storms are some crops will be lost but I'd still must save we feel that the country was better prepared this time past cyclones in this low lying area of river deltas have killed thousands but this time authorities succeeded in evacuating millions of people just before the storm hit for many it was their first time leaving home in nearly two months because of a lock down due to the corona virus once this is the fear now is that evacuees might catch the virus inside storm shelters the biggest issue have been D. social are the government Medicare what's the trend right going back to school sometime so but even he knows that said right right and they may not be cleaned or disinfected okay I'll be on he says it could be as long as two weeks before any evacuees develop symptoms revealing the true extent of the harm this storm may have caused Lauren Frayer NPR news it's obvious that the pandemic is affecting many children's mental health schools are closed many routines of daily life for on hold kids face more worry.

Steve Inskeep India Bangladesh depression NPR Kolkata West Bengal Sundarbans Walter Lauren Frayer
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:32 min | 10 months ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Already in Bangladesh is a majority Muslim country people aren't eating or drinking during daylight hours there are worries that this storm surge could bust through levies and and poison the water supply now very worrying NPR's Lauren Frayer thanks for following this you're welcome more than seventy people recently died of covert nineteen at a veterans home in New Jersey this is just the latest example of why many older veterans seek care at home as a safer option there is a VA program to financially help care givers at home which began for post nine eleven veterans and it's since been expanded to older vets but as NPR's quil Lawrence reports help is still months away for decades family members usually wives have taken care of America's disabled veterans the care they give is often better than outside help and it costs the government nothing but across the care givers a lot I gave up my job my pension Donna Joyner has been taking care of her husband Dennis for years a land mine in Vietnam cost him his legs and left arm by two thousand eight Donna finally had to quit her job and take care of him full time it's just everything that snowballed from that like I sent tension social security I've lost that and you know you take on a lot when you're a caregiver I might be getting older but I do you probably more than I've ever done for genesis he got excited in two thousand eighteen when Congress voted to expand the caregiver program to include vets like him they passed that the president signed it I'm thinking well I'm ready to go file then the joiners waited we'll talk about you know taking the wind out of your sale which means but then a couple years the rules of the program finally came out for public comment in early March to a mixed reception the V. says it's growing the program opening it to vets with not just injuries but illness like Vietnam vets with cancer from Agent Orange but there's the fine print Bob Kerrey does veterans advocacy with the independence fund this looks to me like a significant restriction of eligibility for the program Kerry says under the rules vets qualify if they need help with one basic activity like eating or bathing but only if they need help every single time and the care giver has to be doing all the vets care Kerry says he's afraid rules like that will keep thousands of deserving vets out we have been pushing for a long time for some fundamental reforms to the caregiver program and it appears that really none of those were dressed veterans groups also want a transparent system for appeals one of that gets denied or removed that's been a big problem in the past which means VA isn't starting with a lot of built up trust and VA keeps announcing delays with its new I. T. system for the program delays for vets who've been waiting for help since Vietnam a Dennis Joyner what is the thought process the longer we wait out you know the more die often unless we have to pay god forbid that would be a thought process that was real but you know for instance sometimes we really thank the visas the wait will be over by late summer or early fall it's taking time to create one comprehensive system for vets from Iraq all the way back to Korea says Meg Cabot the former director of the caregiver program the current program has had a lot of challenges with really defining who is eligible and when you go ahead and expanded the population to really a very different populations that challenges just grow exponentially but the need to support caregivers has never been clearer she says that's echoed by Robert Greer who takes care of his father who might otherwise be a veterans home it's definitely scary especially now after Kobe nineteen Greer's father Robert senior served in Korea and Vietnam now he needs constant help he's also a cancer survivor just blessed to have a great team at the VA during his care for that but that still is kind of in a pre existing condition that can you know that's not good for covert Greer wants to keep taking care of his dad these open by the fall the VA will help them Cuellar to NPR news.

Bangladesh
Irrfan Khan Dies; Indian Actor Appeared In Crossover Hit 'Slumdog Millionaire'

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Irrfan Khan Dies; Indian Actor Appeared In Crossover Hit 'Slumdog Millionaire'

"Award winning actor Irrfan Khan known for roles in blockbuster movies such as Slumdog millionaire has died not believed to be related to covert nineteen Khan was fifty four years old and peers Lauren Frayer has more on Khan's contributions to the film industry both Bollywood and Hollywood your phone conclave the police inspector in Slumdog millionaire at two thousand eight film about a teenager from Mumbai's slums who appears on the Indian version of who wants to be a millionaire Khan also starred in life of pi Jurassic world and the amazing spider man he's long been a star of Hindi language cinema in India he made his film debut in the nineteen eighty eight drama Salaam Bombay a that Mumbai's street children Khan died in a Mumbai hospital where he had been admitted for a colon infection he also undergone treatment for a rare neuro endocrine cancer a statement from his team says he was a strong soul who fought till the

Irrfan Khan Lauren Frayer Bollywood Hollywood Mumbai India Colon Infection Slumdog
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Set to Bollywood music and a slogan if you don't mind feel free to if you don't mind waiting me too I'm with a tab on thought the video was hilarious that was level models in a meeting I was I was so I I love to read because some of the people at its own game I think it might yeah my as long as fistfights don't break out among motorists blaming each other for prolonging the red lights police tell NPR this was a stock to raise awareness the decibel meters were only up for a few minutes to record the video he went viral and all of a sudden all these other cities are enquiring about it Mumbai says it's now looking to bring back the decibel meters and what started as a spoof please come reality Lauren Frayer you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news it's six eighteen we're going to take a second head out to one that creek Julie definitions traffic they're trying to clear idea to vehicle wreck here south and six eighty after South Main street to work like you know a couple lanes should be the center divide now but to expect that back up to Olympic Boulevard it's a three car pileup Santa Rosa and south one of one before highway twelve they did make it to the right hand shoulder and because of an earlier crash a lots of problems on the Nimitz south bend eight eighty is still pretty jammed from Broadway down the fruit fail truly devilish forty to eighty thank you Julie and traffic support comes from glossy baby support for KQED comes from jumpstart M. D. a medically supervised customized one on one weight loss program developed by Stanford.

NPR Mumbai Lauren Frayer Santa Rosa Julie KQED M. D. Stanford Nimitz
Why the huge problem of rape in India isn’t going away anytime soon

All Things Considered

02:34 min | 1 year ago

Why the huge problem of rape in India isn’t going away anytime soon

"Can be a struggle for women and girls to stay safe in India the horrific case of a gang rape on a bus led to increase prison terms and fast track trials for rapists but in the past month there had been a new similarly brutal attacks in Indians are worrying if anything has actually improved a warning their art graphic details in this story we're gonna hear now from NPR's Lauren Frayer from Mumbai our top story a young woman was allegedly gang raped in a moving bus seven years ago the fatal gang rape of a college student on a New Delhi bus jolted Indians into panic over sexual violence in their country you know everybody was asking who would do such a horrendous crime might do my top handy tried to answer that question by interviewing a hundred and twenty two convicted rapists behind bars her findings became her PhD in criminology she now lectures at university in England panty says the men were mostly uneducated but polite they expressed respect for women in their own families they could say things like my mother is like a goddess she means the world to me and in the same breath they could say things about the victim like she provoked me or she asked for it she was someone who was character less they showed little remorse and no understanding of consent to panty sets when I asked her if any of the men had had sex ed in school she said well Laurin I never received sex education I don't know why this such a taboo around sex in our country and I sex ed is still banned in many Indian states four years ago sexual harassment education became mandatory in all colleges so you've got nineteen and twenty year old starting with the very basics water boy it is the **** the end is going to be to made it one of the instructors leading this new training is all time Oscar he works for a group called men against violence and abuse which specializes in teaching boys not just about anatomy what about patriarchal values that run deep in India and may fuel sexual violence it's a spectrum of violence so you begin with god calling you see films but in it's okay you too but US of a man and you will see eventually the man falls in love with the man you know because this whole idea of the dominance you being the protected all someone if you see women as so precious that they need protecting you probably don't see them as equals but Khan says he sees progress boys come

India Rape NPR Lauren Frayer Mumbai England Laurin Oscar Khan New Delhi Harassment
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The moon roughly four point forty kilometers of a from the landing site it's all going right. a mile above the lunar surface the signal drop. I get nothing from the lander was lost the mission had failed or so everyone thought prime minister Narendra Modi's consoled tearful scientists at mission control that learning is run through David made us stronger and then about thirty six hours later the orbiter that had released the lander managed to take a thermal image of it on the moon it got there but in what condition nobody knows yeah it's quite exciting it's not needed like that also mission and everybody's hoping and praying that the landowner is in good health astro chemists Chaitanya Geary says if scientists can regain contact with the lander and if it's still functional and those are big yes it could theoretically continue its mission it was supposed to release a rover to take photos and measurements of ice deposits at the lunar South Pole it's unclear whether any of that will be possible but for now Indians are celebrating how their lander was once lost and is now found Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai. this is NPR news and this is KQED public radio good morning the time is three nineteen coming up on morning edition research.

Narendra Modi Chaitanya Geary NPR prime minister KQED Lauren Frayer David Mumbai. forty kilometers thirty six hours