35 Burst results for "Lauren Frayer"

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Santa Monica College News, Music, CULTURE and NPR for Southern California. 66 degrees now in downtown L A Now NPR news live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise give Oniy in the Middle East on the sixth day of conflict between Israel and Hamas on the West Bank. Casualties continue to mount at in Gaza. Israeli rocket fire destroyed a 12 story building housing The Associated Press and Al Jazeera news offices. No injuries reported. The building was evacuated after one hour warning from Israel's military. The AP expressed shock and outrage AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt, a dozen 80 journalists and freelancers were inside the building. And thankfully, we were able to evacuate them in time. World will know less about what's going on in Gaza because of what happened today. White House press secretary Jen Psaki stated on Twitter this morning. That quote we've communicated directly to the Israelis. That ensuring the safety and security of journalists and independent media is a paramount responsibility. India today confirmed its lowest number of new Corona virus infections in nearly three weeks. But it's difficult to know was that the world's biggest cove in 19 wave has peaked there because testing has dropped to MPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. The outbreaks early epicenter Mumbai is now reporting less than 2000. New coronavirus cases a day compared to a peak of about 11,000 cases are down in Delhi, too. But nationwide, the drop has been far less dramatic and deaths remain near record highs. Prime Minister Narendra Modi says India's outbreak is now reaching rural areas with great speed. He says his government is on a war footing to try to contain it. Two thirds of Indians live in rural areas where they have less access to coronavirus tests and medical care less than 3% of people in India have received two doses. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai The British army is being deployed to help administer vaccines and parts of the UK that have become hot spots for the covert strain. First identified in India. Vicki Barker has details from London, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he still hopes to end most remaining lockdown restrictions on June 21st. But I have to level with you that This new variant could pose a serious disruption to our progress. British Scientific Advisors estimate the B 16172 mutation is 50% more transmissible than the B 117 variant. So the UK is now shortening the time gap for fully vaccinated over fifties to get their booster shots from 12 weeks to eight weeks. For NPR NEWS. I'm Vicki Barker in London. WalMart has announced it will not require vaccinated shoppers or workers to wear a mask in its U. S stores and food chain Trader Joe's is also dropping its mask mandate for the fully vaccinated..

WalMart Lauren Frayer Vicki Barker Louise June 21st 50% Gaza 66 degrees Washington Al Jazeera U. S Hamas Delhi 12 story two doses AP NPR Gary Pruitt Southern California Mumbai
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Israeli rocket fire destroyed a 12 story building housing The Associated Press and Al Jazeera news offices. No injuries reported. The building was evacuated after one hour warning from Israel's military. The AP expressed shock and outrage AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt a dozen AP journalists and freelancers were inside the building. And thankfully, we were able to evacuate them in time. The world will know less about what's going on in Gaza because of what happened today. White House press secretary Jen Psaki stated on Twitter this morning. That quote we've communicated directly to the Israelis. That ensuring the safety and security of journalists and independent media is a paramount responsibility. India today confirmed its lowest number of new Corona virus infections in nearly three weeks. But it's difficult to know was that the world's biggest cove in 19 wave has peaked there because testing has dropped to MPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. The outbreaks early epicenter Mumbai is now reporting less than 2000. New coronavirus cases a day compared to a peak of about 11,000 cases are down in Delhi, too. But nationwide, the drop has been far less dramatic and deaths remain near record highs. Prime Minister Narendra Modi says India's outbreak is now reaching rural areas with great speed. He says his government is on a war footing to try to contain it. Two thirds of Indians live in rural areas where they have less access to coronavirus tests and medical care less than 3% of people in India have received two doses. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai The British army is being deployed to help administer vaccines and parts of the UK that have become hot spots for the covert strain. First identified in India. Vicki Barker has details from London, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he still hopes to end most remaining lockdown restrictions on June 21st. But I have to level with you that This new variant could pose a serious disruption to our progress. British Scientific Advisors estimate the B 16172 mutation is 50% more transmissible than the B 117 variant. So the UK is now shortening the time gap for fully vaccinated over fifties to get their booster shots from 12 weeks to eight weeks. Or NPR NEWS. I'm Vicki Barker in London. WalMart has announced it will not require vaccinated shoppers or workers to wear a mask in its U. S stores and food chain Trader Joe's is also dropping its mask mandate for the fully vaccinated. This is NPR news. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York. Good afternoon on my own, Levinson. Police say three teenagers were arrested for allegedly attacking multiple subway riders early yesterday morning in Manhattan, and they're still looking for 1/4 subject suspect. Rather, the incident added fuel to the ongoing battle over the subways. Safety empty. A chairman Pat Foy, claims more police might have prevented the attacks is asking the city to send as many as 800 more police officers to patrol platforms and subway cars. City Hall cannot continue to bury its head in the sand any longer. Keep ignoring the reality of what our customers and employees face every day across the system. The city added 500 officers in February for a total of 3000 officers across the subway system last week. It also agreed to send volunteer officers in uniform. Overall subway crime is down this year compared to last year. Five people were injured in the attacks yesterday but remain in stable condition. Your city is providing supplies to India to help of the country Surgeon covert 19 cases where de Blasio said the city is sending 5000 ventilators and breathing machines, plus millions of test kits. Country. We feel very strong tie to in the city. So many Indian Americans here so New York City is going to step up and help the people of India through this crisis, Reuters reports the country recorded 4000 deaths from covert 19 yesterday for.

Lauren Frayer Vicki Barker WalMart Pat Foy de Blasio February 50% Manhattan June 21st New York Mumbai 4000 deaths 500 officers Delhi Reuters Gaza 12 story 3000 officers last year 12 weeks
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One man pleads with the other. Let's just not argue. Not here, Not now, not in this of all places, he says. But these arguments over the moody government's response to the world's biggest covert outbreak Are likely to persist here, possibly even until those elections in 2024, Lauren Frayer. NPR NEWS Mumbai Here in the United States. The FDA is expected soon to authorize the finds her vaccine for Children aged 12 to 15. They will be able to use it so long as their parents approve. David Liz are found evidence that that may be a concern. He is co director of the Covert States Project, which researches links between social behaviors and virus transmission. Good morning, sir. Good morning. So based on your research, our parents ready to take their kids to get vaccinated when there is an approved vaccine. Most parents are but there is a significant minority that is look there looking vaccine resistant. And is this just a mirror of what adults? Think about themselves? If you're mean is that it is your decision to get your kids vaccinated any different than decided to get yourself vaccinated. There is a relationship between between decision for yourself and the decision for your kids, but they're also some some distinct patterns like we see a big difference between Mothers and fathers in their inclination to vaccinate their Children. Oh, that's interesting. What is the difference between mothers and fathers s O? We find roughly a third, almost a third of mothers, actually younger mothers. Are saying that they're extremely unlucky among excuse to me extremely unlikely to get their Children vaccinated on bond for older mothers. That number's a bit lower around one in four For Father's. It's roughly 11% of fathers say they would not get their Children vaccinated. So it's Zapruder big difference between mothers and fathers. Okay, so we're getting into somebody's head in this next question, but take your best shot based on the evidence that you have. Why would mothers be so much more reluctant to get their kids vaccinated than fathers would be You know, we're still diving into the data. So I'm I want to be careful and what I say here, you know, it could be, um, for example, that there people are differently situated in terms of Theo information around vaccination that there may be greater instinct to be cautious. There's also perhaps a different role in the decision. Health decision making for Children. Mothers may have some greater role in that decision making then father's. It may also be that that younger mothers are more likely to be Uh, targets of of anti vaccine misinformation on Dat may also be playing a role is their partisan connection here, Justus. There has been with some people's attitudes about masking and some people's attitudes about getting vaccinated for themselves. Do you see some partisan correlation between people reluctant to vaccinate their kids and and not? Yes, we do see? Ah, very substantial difference between Democrats and Republicans s o. We see, um you know Aziz. Roughly, you know, 60 well, over 60% of Democrats, um, saying that they would get uh, that, um Actually, in this case, I'm looking at vaccine requirement requiring vaccine vaccination. In schools. But this tracks were both school vaccine requirements and forgetting vaccination that we see big differences. Democrats more supportive Both vaccinating their own Children, as well as requiring vaccination in schools. Oh, well. Now we're getting to a vital point because we can presume that they're going to be some school systems that will want to require vaccinations to let kids back in in the fall. Are you saying that is going to be a very divisive question? If it comes to that? It looks like it would be majorities do about parents and non parents support that school's mandate vaccines, but but there is a big difference between Democrats and Republicans. S O large majorities of Democrats.

Lauren Frayer David Liz United States Mumbai 11% Republicans Democrats 2024 FDA 60 NPR NEWS One man Both Aziz Justus Covert States Project four 15 over 60% one
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"U. S. Supreme Court wind today for immigrant advocates in a 6 to 3 decision that divided the high court's conservative majority. The justices overturned a lower court ruling that sought to prevent a Guatemalan immigrant from fighting to stay in the U. S. Where he lived for more than a decade. Ah High Court found the federal government failed to properly notify a goose Tony's Chavez to appear for removal hearing. The decision stands to affect hundreds of thousands of immigration cases. Conservative justices Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas and Amy Cockney bear join the court's three liberal justices. In today's ruling, President Biden's back in Georgia, the red turned blue state that elected him over Donald Trump and sent to Democrats to the U. S Senate to tip the scale in their party's favor. He's visiting privately with former President Jimmy Carter. Just days after Carter's vice president Walter Mondale died. Biden's also focused on publicly pitching the agenda he presented to a joint session of Congress last night. Prioritize climate change and infrastructure, overhaul job creation and paying for college Ambassador Susan Rice, who now heads the U. S Domestic Policy Council, spoke to NPR about Biden's pledges on education. We talked about not only two years of free community college, which is vitally important for skill building as well as providing a platform to four year colleges. But he also said that he would dramatically increase the amount of the Pell Grant, Ambassador Rice's mother, the late lowest Dixon, Rice's champion. The grants creation came to be known as the mother of the Pell Grant. US Food and Drug Administration is moving to ban Men Thal cigarettes popular with black smokers, NPR's Debbie Elliott reports. The action is in response, the legal pressure from public health and civil rights groups. The FDA is top tobacco regulator Mitch Zeller says banning menthol will help address disparities in tobacco's toll on black smokers 85% of whom smoked menthols or too long. Certain populations have been targeted and disproportionately impacted by two back, please. The mentee numbing effect of mental can make it harder to quit. Anti smoking groups that sued for a mental bands say it's overdue. Joel Lester is with the Public Health Law Center. This is the single biggest action the FDA could take to protect health. And reduce health disparities because black lives matter. A spokesman for cigarette maker Altria says criminalizing mental would have serious unintended consequences. Debbie Elliott NPR news New York City is preparing to fully reopened by July 1st. That is the date set by Mayor Bill de Blasio's for lifting covert 19 safety restrictions. However, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has said that since the start of the pandemic that he has the last say on when businesses and schools across the state will be ready to be fully reopened. Dow is up 252 points since the Open. This is NPR news. The U. S economy is on pace for its fastest growth in nearly 40 years was NPR's David Gora. In the first quarter, vaccines became more widely available, and millions of Americans received one time payments from the federal government, part of a $1.9 trillion spending bill that gave a big boost to the economy, which grew at an annual rate of 6.4%, according to the Commerce Department. Economists say the U. S. Could see its strongest annual growth since 1984. And last week the number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits for the first time fell slightly to 553,000. That's the smallest number since the start of the pandemic. David Gora. NPR NEWS NEW YORK Facebook is under fire in India today for temporarily blocking some post that criticized the Indian prime minister. NPR's Lauren Frayer has the latest from Mumbai for a few hours overnight here, Facebook blocked posts with the Hashtag resigned MODY that's a reference to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Some Facebook users have been venting anger over Moti's cove in 19 response and calling for his resignation. Cody had held huge political rallies while India's infections skyrocketed. Ah, Facebook spokesman says those hashtags were taken down by mistake and that the company wasn't acting on orders from the Indian government. But in recent days, Modi's government has asked Twitter and Facebook to censor content that's critical of him and Twitter has complied. This is only the latest round between social media companies that say they want to uphold free speech and some governments that want to put limits on that. Lauren Frayer..

Donald Trump Amy Cockney Mitch Zeller Debbie Elliott Neil Gorsuch David Gora Clarence Thomas Joel Lester U. S Domestic Policy Council July 1st Public Health Law Center Georgia 6.4% NPR Lauren Frayer Facebook 6 85% Twitter Modi
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Cute. What he's seven film the jazz singer. There's a whole nexus of meanings, overlapping desires expression within black culture, black music and Jewish music that's being explored in the felt plaques. It conversation with the renowned photographer Herb Smith, Sir. His jazz memoir exhibit is on view now with the Bremen Museum. First the news. Live from NPR news encore of a Coleman president Biden will deliver his first address to a joint session of Congress tonight. NPR's Cory Turner says bye and is expected to promote his American families plan calling for a massive investment in Children and their education. In a call with reporters, senior administration officials laid out a handful of proposals so ambitious and expensive that in previous years, any one of them would have turned heads. For example, the plan calls for $225 billion to help low and middle income families pay for child care for the nation's three and four year olds. The plan calls for a $200 billion investment to help provide free universal preschool. And that the other end of the learning curve. The plan calls for two years of free community College for all Americans, as well as a big bump in the Pell Grant award, which low income students can use to pay for college. Cory Turner NPR News Police in Northern California have released body Cam video of an arrest. A man died after being pinned to the ground for more than five minutes after scuffling with officers. It happened at last week at a park in Alameda after police responded to a call about someone being drunk or disoriented. NPR's Jacqueline Diaz says the man who died was identified as 26 year old Mario consolidates. The video shows police attempting to handcuff Gonzales several minutes after first arriving on scene Officers struggled to restrain him. Eventually they get him face down on the ground, using arms and knees to keep him down. Gonzalez convey heard yelling. I didn't do anything wrong at times as he lays there. Five minutes later, Gonzales suddenly goes quiet and his unresponsive police can be seen rolling him over and performing CPR. Didn't Alice was later pronounced dead at a hospital. Gonzalez. His family has accused Alameda police of using excessive force and murder. The cause of his death is still under investigation, as are the events leading up to his death. Jacqueline Dia's NPR News. India's total death toll from Cupid 19 has crossed the 200,000 mark today. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from them by the country is also setting world records for daily infections. India today confirmed more than 360,000 new infections, but the real number maybe many times that. Test kids have run out in many areas, so his medical oxygen India also confirmed nearly 3300 deaths. Today. It's the first time that daily toll has crossed the 3000 mark, even though that, too is likely an undercount. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting In the U. S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people who have been vaccinated against Cove in 19 don't need to wear masks outdoors unless they're in crowded areas, The CDC says. That includes places such a shopping malls or houses of worship that air filled On Wall Street. The Dow was down about 100 points at 33,083. This is NPR news. European lawmakers have approved the final ratification of a trade deal between the European Union and the United Kingdom. The UK pulled out of the EU, a trading bloc in the process called Brexit. The deal has already been ratified by lawmakers in the UK President of Somalia is seemingly walking back his effort to extend his term for two years. NPR's Ater Peralta reports. His decision was met with popular protests and an armed confrontation from the opposition, with fighters loyal to the opposition, forcefully taking control of parts of the capital. Mogadishu. President Mohamed Abdullahi Formaggio came on national TV late last night. 100 tonight. He said he is still committed to implementing timely and peaceful elections in Somalia, and he called on the opposition to begin negotiating on what those elections would look like. Last year's Somalia was supposed to have its first elections with universal suffrage since the late sixties. Instead, they were delayed and the opposition now accuses president from a Joe of turning into a dictator. Now, even the capital is under siege. It's one of the few places the federal government once maintained, full control it a Peralta NPR NEWS Nairobi The State Department is reducing the number of staffers who will work in the U. S embassy in Kabul. People who can complete work outside the embassy will leave the Afghan capital. The agency says. It's preparing for the time when U. S military forces will leave Afghanistan. President Biden has announced an unconditional withdrawal of U. S forces from Afghanistan by September, 11th. Encore for Coleman. NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

Jacqueline Diaz Lauren Frayer $200 billion Cory Turner Herb Smith Ater Peralta Jacqueline Dia September, 11th 200,000 $225 billion Gonzalez European Union Alameda 33,083 Northern California Alice Last year Today NPR U. S
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WBUR

"Financial burden. Lost income means many can't pay the bills that feel like we're writing a firing squad, and we've been that way for the whole year. And we just haven't been joy yet on the Latino healthcare exact on how embracing his heritage led to corporate success after years of trying to fit in Good amount of my early career. I spend thinking about how not to even speak up. My Spanish accent would not sound right. The news is first. Lie from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying the State Department's downsizing the U. S. Embassy in the Afghan capital. Speaking on background, U. S. Officials say the bite administration's ordering a small number of non essential personnel to leave Kabul over concerns for their safety. You say the departures will not affect the embassy's ability to continue working with the Afghan government. Washington's preparing to withdraw all remaining US troops by September. 11th. The 20th anniversary of the terror attacks that led to the U. S is longest war. People in the United States continue receiving covert 19 vaccinations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to release updated guidelines for wearing masks outdoors. As NPR's Allison Aubrey. The risk of viral spread is much lower outdoors than indoors. And already, the CDC says masks may not be needed when you're outside away from others, or with people you live with now, the guidance is said to be relaxed further as more than half of the adult population has been vaccinated with at least one dose. Allison Aubrey reporting. The U. S and other nations air sending in help to India it has seen the world's worst coronavirus spike in prize Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. He was challenged for officials is fixing supply chains and speeding the 82 patients in need in India. Ventilators from the UK oxygen generators from France raw materials for vaccines from the United States. It's all finally flowing into India, where hospitals, air rationing, medical oxygen and some of run out completely. Special Oxygen Express train pulled into the capital New Delhi today from southern India. India has been confirming more than 300,000 new covert 19 infections per day over the past week, and it's collapsing the health system. Government is widening vaccination eligibility to anyone 18 and over starting this weekend, but already several states have said they've run out of vaccine supplies to Lauren Frayer. NPR NEWS Mumbai The first results from the once a decade national headcount reveal the second slowest rate of population growth ever recorded in the U. S. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang says state and local governments are waiting for more numbers to be released from the 2020 census, which effects, congressional representation and federal funding. The U. S. Census Bureau is still running quality checks on population numbers for county cities and other smaller areas, plus data breakdowns by race, ethnicity, age and sex. That information is needed to reach all voting districts and is expected out by mid August. Former Census Bureau director John Thompson says he's also watching for a June report by researchers with the American Statistical Association on the Accuracy of the census results. No sense. This is perfect, right? And so every senses I've been where it has a certain level of undercounts and overcomes the beer, we said to release its estimates of under and over accounting for the census starting in December. Lindsay Lo Wang. NPR NEWS New York You're listening to NPR news. This is not the 0.9 W beat you arm I'm Jack Left ers in Boston, The state will move the next phase of its economic reopening plan next month. Starting May 10th venues including Fenway Park and TD Garden will be allowed to increase capacity from 12% to 25%. Amusement and theme parks will be allowed to reopen at half capacity and road races will be allowed with safety plans approved by state health officials and staggered start times. The easing of restrictions comes his pandemic. Health metrics trend in a positive direction, state health data show. There are little under 30,000 active coronavirus cases in Massachusetts, 812 for reported yesterday. That's lowest daily total in more than five months. New U. S census figures mean Massachusetts and other New England states will keep all of their congressional seats. Now comes the process of redrawing District borders as Deputy wars, Callum Borchers reports. Redistricting in Massachusetts should be easier this time. Then after the previous census when the state lost a seat, But Secretary of State Bill Galvin says challenges remain, including balancing the populations of nine congressional district. We also have to make sure we preserve the minority majority district that's located in eastern Massachusetts. There was constructed in.

Allison Aubrey Lindsay Lo Wang Lauren Frayer Hansi Lo Wang December American Statistical Associati New Delhi United States 82 patients June Boston September. 11th Massachusetts Mumbai U. S. Census Bureau New England mid August Fenway Park May 10th 12%
How India Is Confronting Disinformation on Social Media

All Things Considered

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How India Is Confronting Disinformation on Social Media

"Are holding elections this month. The party of Prime Minister Narendra Moody is trying to win control of some of the last bastions of opposition role to do that it is doubling down on social media betting the voters these days maybe influenced more by what's on their smartphones, then by the reality on the ground, but Social media is also where politics can sometimes cross over into disinformation as part of our series on fighting disinformation around the world. NPR's Lauren Frayer has spent the last year looking into how Indians are confronting it. Hard Mama Mama. At an election rally last month in West Bengal, eastern India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi bragged about the crowd. He dream, the man helicopter said. They're riding by helicopter. I couldn't see any free space. MODY, exclaimed. Officials from the prime minister's Barty, a janitor party, BJP. Tweeted out photos of massive crowds. The problem is that the photos were from an opposing party's rally in 2019 and the real footage. Promoters event actually did show some free space and a slightly smaller crowd, and all we had to do is just run. It was miss such that traced it back Swastika. Chatterjee is a fact Checker at Boom in Indian website The debunks fake news. Within hours. She traced the rally photos and tweeted out the correct once. But the damage was done. News outlets as far away as France were running reports of Modi's huge crowd Nice, Barris, fasting and troops. Troop comes crawling after so that's our problem. Debunking disinformation like this can sometimes feel like a drop in the bucket too little too late. The fact checkers don't have as many followers, his political parties and no politician in the world has a many followers is Moti his party invested in the digital world two decades ago before most Indians wherever online the BJP has always

Prime Minister Narendra Moody Lauren Frayer Prime Minister Narendra Modi Mody Barty West Bengal NPR BJP Chatterjee India Barris Modi France Moti
How India Is Confronting Disinformation on Social Media Ahead of Elections

All Things Considered

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How India Is Confronting Disinformation on Social Media Ahead of Elections

"Are holding elections this month. The party of Prime Minister Narendra Moody is trying to win control of some of the last bastions of opposition role to do that it is doubling down on social media betting the voters these days maybe influenced more by what's on their smartphones, then by the reality on the ground, But social media is also where politics can Sometimes cross over into disinformation as part of our series on fighting disinformation around the world. NPR's Lauren Frayer has spent the last year looking into how Indians are confronting it. Hard my body's heart of my money. At an election rally last month in West Bengal, eastern India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi bragged about the crowd, he dream man. Helicopter said they're Karaha to arriving by helicopter. I couldn't see any free space, MODY exclaimed. Officials from the prime minister's Barty, a janitor party, or BJP tweeted out photos of massive crowds. The problem is that the photos were from an opposing party's rally in 2019 and the real footage. Promoters event actually did show some free space and a slightly smaller crowd, and all we had to do is just run. Every was amiss such that traced it back Swastika. Chatterjee is a fact checker at Boom in Indian website The debunks fake news. Within hours. She traced the rally photos and tweeted out the correct ones. But the damage was done. News outlets as far away as France were running reports of Modi's huge crowd lice. Paris fast in Angel's drug comes crawling after so that's our problem. Debunking disinformation like this can sometimes feel like a drop in the bucket too little too late. Fact, checkers don't have as many followers, his political parties and no politician in the world has a many followers is Moti, his party invested in the digital world two decades ago before most Indians wherever online the BJP has

Prime Minister Narendra Moody Lauren Frayer Prime Minister Narendra Modi Karaha Mody Barty West Bengal NPR BJP Chatterjee India Modi France Paris Angel Moti
India Reports More Than 145,000 New COVID-19 Cases in One Day

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:05 min | 1 year ago

India Reports More Than 145,000 New COVID-19 Cases in One Day

"Among those countries seeing a surge confirming a record number of new Corona virus infections more than 145,000 new cases in one day. Mumbai has been put under lockdown as NPR's Lauren Frayer reports here in Mumbai where cases are among the highest. A curfew is in place and you're only allowed to go out for essentials, food and medicine. But factories are still open and Busses and trains are still running. In other parts of India state elections are underway and voters are crowding into polling stations. India is now where the corona virus is spreading. Fastest hospital ICUs are filling up. But authorities are trying to avoid the economic pain and even starvation. That happened under total lockdown last spring, India's the world's biggest vaccine producer, But even it has shortages now, and some vaccination centers have closed. India has administered nearly 100 million shots so far. But that's still a tiny fraction of the country's 1.4 billion people. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai The

Lauren Frayer Mumbai India NPR
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 2 years ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement movement in India. in India. It has drawn the It interest has drawn of pop the interest stars of pop and stars climate and activists climate activists and sent people and sent into the people streets into for the streets a cause. for a cause. What's fascinating What's fascinating about the cause about they're the cause fighting for, they're fighting for, is how is unfasten how unfasten ating ating it initially it seems, initially seems, farmers are protesting farmers are protesting over new rules over new for rules wholesale for wholesale markets. markets. One of those rules One matter of those rules so much. matter so much. The answer reveals The answer something reveals about something a giant about nation, a giant its nation, past its past and its possible and its future. possible future. NPR's Lauren NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like all day. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're being market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops in auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. It did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Copper supplies water. Not there. That's right. That's water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot off problem is that the production costs off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prizes are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. But Sanjay Cohade is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. He says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat, another man interrupts. We have brought up Narendra Modi's. You will be the King of World nine innings, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country, but that didn what model? Is it? Me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean about me, but not for my tomatoes. Sun up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the man on I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. The last Shin Dae is the founder. Market is ready to pay me back better place then I should capture that market is rapper Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes here's yes. Yes, grandfather and then grape farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove. It Actually long known there was opportunity. So he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who've gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Abby Shake says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been pro testing even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it when I'm just out to get the amulet and the mighty by it guys out the causal Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer NPR Lord Howe Sanjay Cohade Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi Western India American West Indian Government Narendra Modi Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Abby Shake Abby
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

Lauren Frayer western India One NPR one those
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 2 years ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer Lord Howe Jake Ohad Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi NPR Western India American West Indian Government Niners Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Roper Bobby Shake
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Two dozen people have been killed more than 150 are missing. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. One local resident said. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. Video shows a torrent of rocks, water and debris surging down a ravine below the Nanda Devi glacier. Ah hydro electric dam snaps in half and washes away. Many of those missing are construction workers trapped in a tunnel underground. Soldiers and police are spending a second night trying to dig them out. This man was one of the lucky ones pulled out alive. You know me, Charlie. We'd lost all hope. We thought we would die, he says, describing how he clung to the tunnel's roof as water gushed in This is an area of India's Wuterich on state where mighty rivers pour down from the Himalayas. But environmental experts have long warned against building dams and power plants there because it's ecologically fragile and so prone to floods and landslides in 2013 about 6000 people died in flooding there were started. To see some of the impacts of climate change. Increased numbers of landslides that you really large landslides in the high mountains. Geoscientists Dan Sugar is on the other side of the world at the University of Calgary, poring over satellite images of this disaster. What's a little odd about this one? Is you know what happened in February when the ground ought to be frozen. Indian authorities have described this as a glacial break part of the Nanda Debbie Glacier cleaving off. But Sugar says it looks to him more like a landslide, he says It'll take weeks or months to investigate. Meanwhile, the Indian military is airlifting in Maurico Whip mint, the people trapped underground. They have only hours. Lauren Frayer. NPR NEWS Mumbai You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. You're listening to KCRW. Now, let's take it to the next level. Discover viper treatment, curated invitations and special access to your favorite shows the benefits of membership just keep growing, so don't wait, go to.

Dan Sugar NPR Nanda Devi glacier Lauren Frayer Mumbai Nanda Debbie Glacier Charlie Himalayas University of Calgary India
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Resident said. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. Video shows a torrent of rocks, water and debris surging down a ravine below the Nanda Devi glacier. Ah hydro electric dam snaps in half and washes away. Many of those missing are construction workers trapped in a tunnel underground. Soldiers and police are spending a second night trying to dig them out. This man was one of the lucky ones pulled out alive, No majority. We'd lost all hope. We thought we would die, he says, describing how he clung to the tunnel's roof as water gushed in This is an area of India's Wuterich on state where mighty rivers pour down from the Himalayas. But environmental experts have long warned against building dams and power plants there. Because it's ecologically fragile and so prone to floods and landslides in 2013 about 6000 people died in flooding there. We're starting to see some of the impacts of climate change increased numbers of landslides that you really large landslides in the high mountains. Geoscientists Dan Sugar is on the other side of the world at the University of Calgary, poring over satellite images of this disaster. What's a little odd about this one? Is you know what happened in February when the ground ought to be frozen. Indian authorities have described this as a glacial break part of the Nanda Debbie Glacier cleaving off. But Sugar says it looks to him more like a landslide, he says It'll take weeks or months to investigate. Meanwhile, the Indian military is airlifting in Maurico Whip mint, the people trapped underground. They have only hours. Lauren Frayer. NPR NEWS Mumbai It's double u N Y C. You're listening to all things considered. Stay with us. Just ahead. After the break, the Biden administration announced its plans to rejoin the U. N Human Rights Council three years after the U. S. Withdrew from the organization. Also rob Master sees his domain registrar company epic as a counter to Big tech. He welcomes views Band on most other parts of the Internet and, Yeah, that includes those who espouse or allow far right extremist content. We'll hear from him just ahead after the break stated W N. Y. C is supported by optimum business your way offering 300 megabits per second secure Internet for one year when bundled with voice and customizable services with smart WiFi.

Dan Sugar Nanda Devi glacier Nanda Debbie Glacier rob Master Biden administration India Himalayas U. N Human Rights Council Lauren Frayer University of Calgary NPR Big tech Mumbai
"lauren frayer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"No time to alert anyone. Video shows a torrent of rocks, water and debris surging down a ravine below the Nanda Devi glacier. Hydro electric dam snaps in half and washes away. Many of those missing are construction workers trapped in a tunnel underground. Soldiers and police are spending a second night trying to dig them out. This man was one of the lucky ones pulled out alive come, no majority. We'd lost all hope we thought we would die, he says. Describing how he clung to the tunnel's roof as water gushed in This is an area of India's Wuterich on state where mighty rivers pour down from the Himalayas. But environmental experts have long warned against building dams and power plants there because it's ecologically fragile and so prone to floods and landslides in 2013 about 6000 people died in flooding there were starting To see some of the impacts of climate change. Increased numbers of landslides that you really large landslides in the high mountains. Geoscientists Dan Sugar is on the other side of the world at the University of Calgary, poring over satellite images of this disaster. What's a little odd about this one? Is you know what happened in February when the ground ought to be frozen. Indian authorities have described this as a glacial break part of Ananda Debbie Glacier cleaving off. But Sugar says it looks to him more like a landslide, he says It'll take weeks or months to investigate. Meanwhile, the Indian military is airlifting in Maurico Whip mint, the people trapped underground. They have only hours. Lauren Frayer. NPR NEWS Mumbai You are listening to all things considered from NPR news. Oh, Good afternoon. It's all things considered on 90.3. K. Easy you in traffic. We have the hazard, Santa Cruz Area East Cliff Drive and 41st Avenue. A hit and run no injuries. One of one South It's sand, Martin Martin and a collision earlier on old Stage Road and Zaballa Road..

Dan Sugar Nanda Devi glacier Ananda Debbie Glacier Martin Martin NPR Himalayas India Santa Cruz Lauren Frayer University of Calgary Mumbai
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are missing. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Mumbai. One local resident said. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone with that video shows a torrent of rocks, water and debris surging down a ravine below the Nanda Devi glacier. Hydro electric dam snaps in half and washes away. Many of those missing are construction workers trapped in a tunnel underground. Soldiers and police are spending a second night trying to dig them out. This man was one of the lucky ones pulled out alive. You know, mutual easy. We'd lost all hope we thought we would die, he says. Describing how he clung to the tunnel's roof as water gushed in This is an area of India's Wuterich on state where mighty rivers pour down from the Himalayas. But environmental experts have long warned against building dams and power plants there because it's ecologically fragile and so prone to floods and landslides in 2013 about 6000 people died in flooding there were starting To see some of the impacts of climate change. Increased numbers of landslides that you really large landslides in the high mountains. Geoscientists Dan Sugar is on the other side of the world at the University of Calgary, poring over satellite images of this disaster. What's a little odd about this one is you know what happened? In February. When you know the ground ought to be frozen. Indian authorities have described this as a glacial break part of the Nanda Debbie Glacier cleaving off, but sugar says it looks to him more like a landslide. He says it'll take weeks or months to investigate. Meanwhile, the Indian military is airlifting in more equipment. The people trapped underground may have only hours. Lauren Frayer NPR NEWS Mumbai It's double the one my safe. You're listening to all things considered stick around just ahead right After a short break, the Biden administration announced its plans to rejoin the U. N Human Rights Council. Three years after the U. S. Withdrew from that organization. Also, Rob Monster sees his dough name registrar Company epic as a counter to Big tech. He welcomes views Band on most other parts of the Internet, including those whose spouse or allow far right extremist content. We'll hear from him just ahead, Stay tuned. Support for W N Y. C comes from flat are in books. The moment of Lift How empowering Women changes The world by Melinda Gates In this book, Melinda Gates shares stories of women who are leading the way in the fight for equality available in paperback. For the first time in history. The Senate will try of.

Dan Sugar Lauren Frayer Nanda Devi glacier Melinda Gates Nanda Debbie Glacier Mumbai NPR Rob Monster Senate India University of Calgary Himalayas Biden administration U. N Human Rights Council registrar Company Big tech
Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

Reveal

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

"Massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of a Himalayan mountain glacier broke off and triggered landslides and flooding. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of the Nanda Davey Glacier broke off. Blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Tera con state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that Damn, one local resident says. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that he's praying for everyone's safety. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and

Himalayan Mountain Glacier Lauren Frayer Nanda Davey Glacier India NPR Prime Minister Narendra Modi Himalayas
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KCRW

"News You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. To India now where two months of peaceful protests turned violent farmers are locked in a standoff with the Indian government over agriculture reforms, and today it came to blows in the streets of the capital as NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. It started like every annual republic Day holiday in India with a military parade in the capital, But everyone knew what was coming tens of thousands of farmers on tractors Have been protesting on the city's outskirts for months, their anger percolating they obtained police permits to enter the city today. They were supposed to wait until after the military parade was over, but some broke through barricades early and veered off the agreed upon route. Locals cheered them on and threw flowers. But then police fired tear gas from highway overpasses and beet farmers with bamboo rods. Farmers stormed the 17th century red fort, a tourist attraction and symbol of power in the heart of Delhi. He waved flags from the ramparts and rallies spread across the country day. Hundreds gathered on the cricket field in downtown Mumbai, including Mega Molik V gave me Mama support because they're not getting What they want. What they want is the repeal of three farm laws that deregulate produce markets. Farmers fear they'll lose price guarantees, though the government insists they will not. It's a dispute over quite technical pricing rules, but it's become a rallying cry for people who want to honor India's agrarian roots. Up to two thirds of Indians still work in agriculture, mostly on small farms. Their profits are already meager and Cove it has plunged India into a recession. Economists are Rama Kumar says. Farmers fear the government is putting big corporations ahead of them. This is a fight for democracy. This is a fight for people not to set off oligarchs or a set of multinational companies. Others say Indian agriculture desperately needs some kind of reform seem a battler is another economist. She supports the government's laws. These laws will give farmers the choice or you can say the freedom to farmers to sell beer. Ever they wish to sell. The problem, she says, is that the government botched the rollout. It didn't explain these laws well to the people whose lives they affect most, and so farmers fears have taken over, she says. Last week, the government offered a compromise an 18 month suspension of the laws, but farm unions refused..

India Indian government NPR Lauren Frayer Mumbai Rama Kumar Delhi
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Responded by moving single adults who shared rooms with others out of congregate shelters and into hotels, which were largely empty of tourists. Neighborhood opposition to some of these homeless hotels complicated those efforts. W My sees more alive. Iraq recently interviewed at the city Social Services Commissioner Steven Banks about this issue and more she started by asking him to assess his strategy, successes and failures. The challenges that we were confronted with Herculean we could not have anticipated in February what we will confront in March. On literally overnight, we created a system to isolate clients relocate them out of their car, good shelters into commercial hotels. I think that perspective was that the shelter system was a ticking time bomb, and we defuse that by taking the steps that we did in the car in shelters since the summer, Only two people have to weigh which is two too many, But it shows you the steps that we took in order to stop the spread. While the strategy has allowed you to prevent the spread of Copan, 19 and shelters Group in some neighborhoods did not want almost people are nearby hotels on the Upper West Side mandible as you decided to move around 200 homeless men out of the Lucerne Hotel. Many people said he was caving to the pressure of a wealthy community. What did you think of the mayor's decision? Look, we moved. 10,000 people out. Shit car shelter it weaker the time. And over the last number of months we've been reevaluating where some of those relocations took place, for example, most recently in House Kitchen The community board and local elected officials asked us to relocate a shelter one of the hotels on on 36 Street to another location within the community board. We did that. And we've been open to input that we've been getting from communities and a new elected officials all around the city to make adjustments where we can Ultimately, we're gonna continue to be in hotels and we will keep keep proceeding with our after to reduce the number of hotels, But we're going to be guided by the science and by advice from the Health department, But it has been reported that you were opposed to the mayor's decision on the Lucerne. Is that true? I'm just not going to get involved with gossip about what people say in City Hall. I'm going to focus on the work that we're doing. But the mayor's critics say his set a bad precedent. So what do you plan to tell residents that oppose shelters in their neighborhoods when they bring up the looser and example since the summer was sighted a large number of shelters throughout the city in some communities, there has been tremendous support. In other communities. There is opposition. And then once we set up a community advisory board for the shelter on Do we work with the community? Uh, there is the concerns dissipate. And we'll continue to do that. So I know you've said you're going to be guided by science. Can you say anything? A little bit more specific about When you expect to start moving people back from hotels into shelters. Would that happen when all of them are vaccinated? I think we have to be guided by what the situation. The city overall is our initiative to move. People out of shelter was part to help the clients but also the part to prevent community spread. Same with the vaccine initiatives that are going on in the city. Over all, the key focus is to address community spread, and when that is address, then we can focus on when it is time to return to carve it shelters. So when I ask you a little bit more about vaccines homeless, New Yorkers became eligible for covert 19 vaccines on January 11th. Can you tell us a little bit more about your plans to get them and shelters that vaccinated? Well, we have been doing everything we can to encourage staff and now clients to take advantage of the availability of the vaccination. Sites that the city has set up. We began our first supplemental site for the selfish system and we have more planned, but the key issue now His availability of the vaccine. The city's literally out of vaccine and that is the main focus that we all have our ability to continue to stand up new sites within the shelter system. Is going to be limited by the inability to provide the vaccines. That was social services Commissioner Steven Banks. Speaking with W M I c reporter Morella. I've rack to India now where two months of peaceful protests turned violent. Farmers are locked in a standoff with the Indian government over agriculture reforms. And today it came to blows in the streets of the capital as NPR's Lauren Frayer reports it started like every annual Republic Day holiday in India with a military parade in the capital. But everyone knew what was coming tens of thousands of farmers on tractors they've been protesting on the city's outskirts for months, their anger percolating they obtained police permits to enter the city today. They were supposed to wait until after the military parade was over, but some broke through barricades early and veered off the agreed upon route. Locals cheered them on and threw flowers. But then police fired tear gas from highway overpasses and beet farmers with bamboo rods. Farmers stormed the 17th century red fort, a.

Steven Banks Commissioner India city Social Services City Hall Lucerne Hotel Iraq Copan Indian government Lucerne advisory board NPR Lauren Frayer Health department reporter
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sound muffled. Police could pull us over and give me a ticket a ₹200 fine for riding without a mask. They, Steve O typically were known to break the rules. You see traffic rules being broken. But in this particular case, the police monitoring enforcement that was ramped up every time they find a person ₹200. They also give them a master, where health policy expert Genevieve Fernandez says Mask mandates are one of the things that may have helped reduce India's coach. 19 caseload Whenever you make a phone call here instead of a ring tone Coronas calculus. Rudy and human groups are gonna you hear recordings like this one from Bollywood legend Amitabh Bachan, urging you to wash your hands and wear a mask. There's also the heat and humidity. There is some evidence they may reduce the virus is spread. Doctor Doc Sha Sha is a government epidemiologist. The temperature, of course, is in the favor. We do not have too much gold garment over your He's so the many of the viruses they alone to multiply more in the colder regions. In addition, in Helen's humility, toe so many infections already exist in the population. Malaria, typhoid, dengue fever are all endemic in India. People with robust immune systems are more likely to survive here in the first place, Shaw says. Plus more than half of the population is under age 25. They're less likely to die of covert and more likely to get it a symptomatically. But India's climate and demographics have not changed during the pandemic, and the drop in cases here has been recent. In September, India was reporting nearly 100,000 new infections a day. This month, There was a day with just 10,000. This is in a country of nearly 1.4 billion people. It's not that India's testing lass or things are going under reported and it's been rising, rising. And now suddenly it's vanished. That in the hospital, I see you. Utilization has gone down. Every indicator says the numbers aren't out. Health economist Jewish New Dust says the numbers went down exactly when we thought they would spike in October, when people gathered for the Hindu festival of Duvally Shaw, the epidemiologist, wonders if just like a more infectious variant was discovered in the UK Maybe a less infectious variant has mutated in India. Maybe some processes must have happened. This is an evolution of the virus itself. We need to lose some more or deeper evidence and deeper studies. The truth is that scientists don't yet know Here's dust, the health economist again. Three options. One is it's gone because of the way people behaved, so we need to continue that behavior right? It's gone because it's gone and it's never going to come back. Great. Or it's gone. We don't know why it's gone, and it may come back. So for now, Indians they're kind of holding their breath. Just doing what they're doing until they get vaccinated. Lauren Frayer NPR NEWS Mumbai It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Noel King. Coming up next. The marketplace morning report first, though, business Peter.

India Doctor Doc Sha Sha Duvally Shaw Steve O Steve Inskeep Amitabh Bachan Genevieve Fernandez NPR Noel King Rudy Malaria Lauren Frayer Helen Peter typhoid UK Mumbai
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kind of holding their breath. Just doing what they're doing until they get vaccinated. Lauren Frayer NPR NEWS Mumbai It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Noel King. Them Sandy Althouse, and he's Peter Finch. He's got traffic. What's the latest Peter? We're going to the ultimate path, Sandy something we usually see this time of the morning traffic. It starts westbound 205 before Mountain House Parkway and continues to North Flynn Road. Westbound 5 80. It is raining imparts the Bay area right now, And we've already seen a couple solo spin outs. You may want to Head out a little early this morning to give yourself plenty of time. I'm Peter Finch for KQED. Alright, thanks, Peter. Traffic support comes from or support for KQED actually comes from Geico celebrating over 75 years of providing auto insurance for drivers across America. For information on the auto insurance available at Geico dot com. Are we alone out here in the universe? Harvard astrophysicist Avi Loeb wants to convince you that the answer is no. And that the strange interstellar passer by Omura mullahs back in 2017 was evident. I don't regard this system speculation that we're not alone. In fact, I don't think that we're the smartest kid on the block. That convinced you have to listen on science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. The second hour of Science Friday can be heard tonight at eight o'clock, and it's followed by one A Russia jails, its fiercest critic and two nuclear neighbors, or brought closer by an amazing game of cricket. I'm Jenn white. All that and more on the Friday news round up next time on one, eh? Again. That's tonight at nine o'clock showers Likely and a possible thunderstorm or two later on in the morning temperatures today in the mid fifties and.

Sandy Althouse Peter KQED Geico Steve Inskeep NPR Lauren Frayer Noel King Avi Loeb Jenn white Mountain House Parkway Mumbai Harvard North Flynn Road cricket Russia the Bay America
"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Were known to break the rules. You see traffic who's being broken? But in this particular case, the police monitoring enforcement that was ramped up every time they find a person ₹200. They also give them a masked where health policy expert Genevieve Fernandez says Mask mandates are one of the things that may have helped reduce India's covert 19 caseload. Whenever you make a phone call here instead of a ring tone, but almost calculus. Rudy and Emma troops are gonna you hear recordings like this one from Bollywood legend Amitabh Bachan, urging you to wash your hands and wear a mask. There's also the heat and humidity. There is some evidence they may reduce. The virus is spread. Doctor Doc Sha Shaw is a government epidemiologist. The temperature, of course, is in the favor. We do not have too much cold government over your is so the many of the viruses they alone to multiply more in the polar regions. In addition, inherent ability toe so many infections already exists in the population. Malaria, typhoid, dengue fever are all endemic in India. People with robust immune systems are more likely to survive here in the first place, Shaw says. Plus more than half of the population is under age 25. They're less likely to die of covert and more likely to get it a symptomatically. But India's climate and demographics have not changed during the pandemic, and the drop in cases here has been recent. In September, India was reporting nearly 100,000 new infections a day. This month, there was a day with just 10,000. This is in a country of nearly 1.4 billion people. It's not that India's testing lass or things are going under reported and it's been rising, rising and now suddenly, it's vanished. Having the hospital ICU utilization has gone down. Every indicator, says the numbers. Adult health economist Jewish New. Das says the numbers went down exactly when we thought they would spike in October when people gathered for the Hindu festival of Duvally Shaw, the epidemiologist wonders if just like a more infectious variant was discovered in the UK maybe a less infectious variant has mutated in India. Maybe some processes must have happened. This is an evolution of the white is, it says, we need a little some more deeper evidence and deeper studies. The truth is that scientists don't yet know. Here's dos, the health economist again. Three options. One is it's gone because of the way people behaved, so we need to continue that behavior right? It's gone because it's gone and it's never going to come back. Great. Or it's gone. We don't know why it's gone, and it may come back. So for now, Indians they're kind of holding their breath. Just doing what they're doing until they get vaccinated. Lauren Frayer NPR NEWS Mumbai.

India Doctor Doc Sha Shaw Genevieve Fernandez Amitabh Bachan Mumbai Lauren Frayer Malaria Rudy typhoid Das UK Emma
India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | 2 years ago

India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

"The world's biggest national vaccination campaign is now underway. Not in the U. S. But India today's the first day that Indians congrats the Corona virus vaccine and the Indian government aims to inoculate 300 million people by July. NPR's Lauren Frayer is in Mumbai. Lauren. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott 300 million people is almost the entire population of the United States and they're going to vaccinate them all in less than six months. How do they plan to do it? Yes, So, of course, it's only about 20% of this country, and that's just the first batch. It'll take a couple years to vaccinate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. But India is doing this in much the same way it organizes elections, which is spread out over weeks. Here, they're using voter rolls to identify people and just like poll workers carry Elektronik voting machines up to mountaintop monasteries and villages in the jungle. They have these mobile medical teams to bring vaccines on ice to the remote ist places in India. Now, most of the vaccines centers that open today are in hospitals in big cities like in Mumbai, where I am and we know today's the first day. What's the scene? Like in Mumbai? There's an atmosphere of excitement. It's frontline and health workers. Some of these air sanitation workers who are among the first one's getting vaccinated. Some of them got flowers from well wishers. Government ministers are crowding in everybody's trying to take Photos here is the dean of a medical school in Chennai. Her name is our Jayanti and truly a very privileged beneficially today. And I'm feeling absolutely fine. It's almost more than five minutes inside of the news. I'm feeling great. Now she's in the first group of 30 Million Frontline workers. Next in line is anyone over 50 or with a pre existing condition and which vaccine or vaccines? Is India using? Yes, so there are two in use here, one developed by Oxford University and the big pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca. The other is from an Indian company called Bharat Biotech. Both are being manufactured inside India. India is the world's biggest vaccine maker. And so a lot of the covert vaccines being used around the world will actually be mass manufactured right here in people choose. No, they can't and that is a bit of a controversy because most Indians will get the AstraZeneca won. The local manufacturer here is turning out about 100 million doses a month. Now half of those are for export. The other vaccine. Indian one is still in phase three clinical trials in data isn't yet out. Here is one of the critics. Deena's talk or is a public health activist. It may very well be a good vaccine. It's just that we don't know enough about except fricassee. Concerned absence off the efficacy data. I mean, people are asking the question talking. Why? Why did you do that? Why did the government approved this vaccine is what he's asking. And what does the government say? Well, the drug regulator says it wanted to have more than one vaccine available for Indians, the company behind the vaccine. Bharat Biotech, says its formula is 200% safe. There's really some speculation that the government just approved this out of pride really that it wanted to approve an Indian maid vaccine alongside one from a big multinational company like AstraZeneca. We've done stories here, of course, about hesitancy among some Americans about taking the vaccine. I wonder if that's reflected in India, too. It's much less of a thing in India. Actually, India managed to eradicate polio and lots of other diseases through big vaccine drives like this. India also has the second highest Covad caseload in the world behind the U. S. The viruses Devastated the Indian economy. And so there's a hope that you know this. This vaccination campaign allows India to return to normalcy.

India Mumbai Lauren Frayer Bharat Biotech Astrazeneca Indian Government U. NPR Lauren Scott Chennai United States Oxford University Deena Polio
India Covid Vaccine Campaign Begins

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:51 min | 2 years ago

India Covid Vaccine Campaign Begins

"Vaccination campaign is now underway and not in the U. S. But India today's the first day that Indians congrats the Corona virus vaccine and the Indian government aims to inoculate 300 million people. By July. NPR's Lauren Frayer is in Mumbai. Lauren. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott 300 million people is almost the entire population of the United States, and they're going to vaccinate them all in less than six months. How did they plan to do it? Yes, So, of course, it's only about 20% of this country, and that's just the first batch. It'll take a couple years to vaccinate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. But India is doing this in much the same way it organizes elections, which is spread out over weeks. Here, they're using voter rolls to identify people. And just like poll workers carry Elektronik voting machines up to mountaintop monasteries and villages in the jungle. They have these mobile medical teams to bring vaccines on ice to the remote ist places in India. Now most of the vaccines Centers that opened today are in hospitals and big cities like in Mumbai, where I am and we know today's the first day. What's the scene? Like in Mumbai? There's an atmosphere of excitement. It's frontline and health workers. Some of these air sanitation workers who are among the first one's getting vaccinated. Some of them got flowers from well wishers. Government ministers are crowding in everybody's trying to take Photos here is the dean of a medical school in Chennai. Her name is our Jayanti. I'm truly a very privileged beneficially today. And I'm feeling absolutely fine. It's almost more than five minutes inside of the news. I'm feeling great. Now she's in the first group of 30 Million Frontline workers. Next in line is anyone over 50 or with a pre existing condition and which

Lauren Frayer Mumbai India Indian Government U. NPR Lauren Scott United States Chennai
"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"lauren frayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In some states, school workers have already begun to get their shots. Surveys show a minority of teachers expressing some vaccine hesitation. But most feel like Cheryl Coker and like John Brown, who drives a school bus in the Chicago suburbs, Yeah, become with the vaccine soon as I change. That's because of a funny thing, he says, happens as soon as students board his bus is a strange thing that happened when she's got a busted lip committed to that top step, and he always called This was even before the pen, dammit in states like Utah and Texas educators have been intense discussions with state leaders over vaccine priority. In Utah. Heidi Matthews is president of the state's largest teacher union, which fought to get teachers moved up the list. I mean, we can't keep our desks six inches apart, much less doing any sort of social distancing most schools in Utah, or at least partly open and with big average class size is many of our teachers feel like they have been forced in. Too. You know that proverbial lion's den, and they don't feel safe. Our classrooms so dangerous when it comes to Corona virus. Well, that's the subject of two new studies. Both found schools can operate safely with precautions as long as community spread is not too high. But in most places in the United States Cove, it is surging out of control. And that means mixed feelings at this moment for educators, especially where school buildings are open, and I think it's still gonna be horrible between now and spring break. But now I see a lot of things of the tunnel and is not afraid train. When I reached Dr Michael in a host to the superintendent of Dallas public schools, he had just found out his staff could be getting shots as soon as next week. I feel I feel great. I feel that we've finally been listened to during this whole pandemic. We've been the Last voice out there. Educators who have yet to go back to work in person had different ideas about the vaccine. Clarisse browsers teaches Humanities online in the Philadelphia public High School. Rather says she'll be happy to get the vaccine. But she'll still be worried about her students spreading the virus, including on public transportation. I work in a really small high school, but we've already had several students who have either lost parents or whose parents have been hospitalized. Lot of our students live with their grand parents. No vaccine has yet been approved for Children under 16 and younger people are at the back of the line, according to CDC guidelines. Public health experts say that vaccinating teachers will mitigate risk but masks, hand washing, social distancing and ventilation are here to stay, at least for the rest of this school year. Anya Kamenetz NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. India has nearly 1.4 billion people, and it faces the gargantuan task of vaccinating all of them against the coronavirus shots could start getting distributed as early as next week and for details on how such a huge campaign is being organized. We're joined now by NPR. India correspondent Lauren Frayer in Mumbai. Hey, Lauren! Hi, there. Okay, so this sounds like an absolutely massive undertaking. How exactly is this going to unfold? So India's following roughly the same planet uses for its elections? Indian elections are the biggest exercise of democracy in the world. Poll Workers hall electronic voting machines up mountains into tiny villages in the jungle will now India is overseeing what may be the biggest vaccination campaign in the world, and it's using those voter rolls to identify people. Most of the vaccination sites will be hospitals and clinics. But they've also got these mobile vaccination teams to reach patients in far flung areas, and I also understand that there's sort of these like practice runs happening. What have those been like? Yes, so even before we had a proven vaccine, India has been doing these training sessions. It was a big national rehearsal last weekend. There's another one tomorrow. And I talked to one of the organizer's Dr Mangle ago. Mari is the executive health officer for Mumbai. What? Oh, they're blind, dry runs increase enters will have cold storage facilities at all The places on do we really, really examine? There. There are any chart Cummings or gaps into this procedure, and tomorrow she's actually going to stand there with a stopwatch timing how long it takes to administer the vaccine per person, so she could then calculate how many people they can take per day. So when does the government think that everyone in India is actually going to get vaccinated? Well, it's going to take a couple years for all 1.4 billion people to get this and of course it's it's voluntary, so not everybody might choose to get vaccinated. But the first shots are shipping out right now, and we're looking at people getting them mid next week. The plans were ambitious. India aims to inoculate at least 300 million people by July, so that's almost the entire population of United States and that timeline is way faster than countries with more money and less people. And where exactly is India getting more than a billion doses right here at home. India is the world's biggest vaccine maker. It supplies a huge bulk of the medicines and vaccines needed in much of the world, particularly the developing world. There's a company called the Serum Institute and its factories, a couple hours drive inland from where I live here in Mumbai, and it's a family business. They signed a big deal to mass produce the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, and by next month they expect to be churning out 100 million doses per month. Now half of that will go to the domestic population in India. There are other vaccines being produced in India. But the AstraZeneca formula is really the one that India and most of the developing world actually will rely on in many parts of the world, including here in the U. S. There are people who are fearful of getting the vaccine are they're similar fears you're seeing in India. Not really. I mean, India has successfully eradicated polio and many other diseases through vaccination campaign, So there's quite little vaccine hesitancy here. I mean, India has the second highest Covad caseload in the world behind the U. S infections. Airway lower per capita, of course, and the numbers have dropped significantly in recent months. But you know, this vaccine is very much needed and being celebrated here. That is MPR's Lauren Frayer in Moon by Thank you, Lauren. You're welcome. It's double. Um,.

India Mumbai Lauren Frayer Utah Heidi Matthews Philadelphia public High Schoo NPR United States Cove Anya Kamenetz Cheryl Coker CDC polio president John Brown Texas Chicago Covad
U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | 2 years ago

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
Hathras gang rape: India victim cremated 'without family's consent'

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Hathras gang rape: India victim cremated 'without family's consent'

"Protests have erupted across India over the gang rape and death of a woman from the most marginalized community in the country's ancient caste system. We have details from NPR's Lauren Frayer. Down with caste discrimination down with rape. Protesters chanted in Delhi, The victim was a doll it the most oppressed cast in India for dominant caste men have been arrested for allegedly gang raping her and leaving her body in a field. A 19 year old died in a hospital Two weeks later. Her family says authorities cremated her body last night against their wishes. Marital rape or raped by family members is more common in India, but brutal gang rapes and murders get wall wall to to wall wall coverage coverage in in local local media. media. Some Some of of the the protests protests sparked sparked by by this this one one have have been been led led by by the the BIM BIM Army, Army, a a political political party, party, the the champions champions the the rights rights of of Dalits. Dalits. Lauren Frayer. NPR

Rape Bim Bim Army India Lauren Frayer NPR Delhi
Taj Mahal Reopens In India For 1st Time In 6 Months

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Taj Mahal Reopens In India For 1st Time In 6 Months

"In India, The Taj Mahal reopened today, along with some high schools across the country. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports They closed more than six months ago. When the pandemic began. The Taj Mahal reopened it sunrise with visitors capped at 5000 Day. Everyone has to wear masks, and you're not allowed to touch the monuments, glittering white marble. India imposed a lock down in March but then lifted it to try to revive the economy. Now Corona virus infections are soaring. Second only to the U. S. Is total caseload. NPR's Lauren Frayer

Taj Mahal Lauren Frayer NPR India
Facebook India grilled over hate speech, alleged bias

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Facebook India grilled over hate speech, alleged bias

"Investigating allegations of bias at the company over removing hate speech online. Here's Lauren Frayer has more atop Facebook executive and supporter of India's Hindu nationalist government is accused of intervening to stop the removal of hate speech online by Hindu nationalist politicians. She allegedly prioritized relations with the government over removing anti Muslim posts that could incite violence. Facebook, a financial supporter of NPR, denies any bias, and India's minister says the bias goes the other way that Facebook actually sensors more right wing accounts. NPR's Lauren Frayer reporting. And you're listening to NPR news live from Cape

Facebook Lauren Frayer NPR India Executive Cape
Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

Forum

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

"Millions of women and girls globally have lost access to contraceptives and abortion services because of the pandemic. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports the global health charity Marie Stopes International finds at India maybe most severely affected In India lockdowns and supply chain disruptions mean fewer women have been able to prevent unintended pregnancies or get pre Natal care. Marie Stopes International surveyed 37 countries and found nearly two million fewer women received contraceptives or abortion services in the first half of this year. The NGO predicts 900,000 unintended pregnancies worldwide, along with a million and a half unsafe abortions and more than 3000 maternal deaths.

Marie Stopes International India Lauren Frayer NGO NPR
Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

Hidden Brain

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

"India is reporting another record spiking Corona virus cases. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Among those newly infected is one of the country's most famous Bollywood film stars. The legendary Indian actor Amitabh Bachan, who is 77 years old, has tested positive for covert 19. So his his son, they announced it on Twitter. They've both been hospitalized with only mild

Amitabh Bachan Lauren Frayer Twitter NPR India
TikTok Tackles India App Ban, Vowing It's No Tool for Beijing

Marketplace

03:19 min | 2 years ago

TikTok Tackles India App Ban, Vowing It's No Tool for Beijing

"Tensions have spiked between the world's two most populous nations. That would be China and India. The two countries share a border that extends for more than 2000 miles, and it was along that border that violence broke out. Last month, 20 Indian troops were killed. Now India has banned dozens of Chinese APS, including the social video APP. TIC tac. India has been tic Tac's biggest foreign market. NPR's Lauren Frayer has been talking with some of the Indians obsessed with it. When the Corona virus hit India, Sumit Jane was forced to shut the clothing shop he runs in his hometown in western India. Under lock down. He was bored and worried. Looking long thought intelligent. That damned ignominy. Tic tac is how I stayed. Sane says I posted videos every day, Good Tic Tac clip Jane lip synchs lyrics about the Corona virus. To the tune of a popular Bollywood song. Jane is a skinny 28 year old with a curly mop of hair, gold earrings and nearly four million followers on Tic Tac social video APP has made him famous. He starred in a music video and even got offers to be on TV that Ah, licking a musical gave a small town in hands like me used to have to move to the big city to get noticed, he says. Tic Tac lets us do that from home. Up to 1/3 of TIC Tac users are believed to be in India. They're the biggest group outside China. Some Indians have even monetized it selling English lessons on tick talk, for example. But this week, the Indian government banned Tic Tac, along with 58 other Chinese made APS amid tensions with Beijing. We the people of India, standing behind the government have the ability to hit China where it hurts. India's nationalist TV anchors applauded the move. Many Indians are outraged over China's killing last month of Indian troops. Some are calling for a boycott of all Chinese goods. The government is trying to tap into the national sentiment in sweeping India right now. Akil Berry with the think tank Eurasia Group, says the Indian government is concerned about data privacy on Chinese APS. It also wants Indians to develop Indian APS rather than using Chinese ones. But India's own tech start ups get a lot of Chinese investment, Barry says. When you take a look at India's unicorns startups that a valued at over $1 billion about 18 off the 30 of them have Chinese investment. So if Beijing retaliates and pulls Chinese investment That could hurt India even more, he says. Tic Tac says it's following Indian privacy laws and is asking the Indian government to reconsider. Meanwhile, in a small town in northern India, housewife Anita Meena has been posting videos to tic tac of herself doing folk dances and have gone viral. She gets recognized when she goes to her local market, she says. Tick. Tuck is banned. Mina says she'll focus on YouTube Instead, it's unclear how many of India's roughly 200 million TIC tac users will do the same if Lauren Frayer NPR

Tic Tac India Indian Government China Sumit Jane Lauren Frayer Beijing NPR Anita Meena Tuck Youtube Akil Berry Tank Eurasia Group Mina Barry
India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

Morning Edition

05:43 min | 2 years ago

India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

"Why did Chinese and Indian troops fight in a remote valley along their shared border this happened high up in the Himalayas with thousands of troops from both countries have been stationed for decades at least twenty Indian troops died in the fighting and China won't disclose how many casualties it suffered for some explanation we've got NPR's Emily Feng in Beijing and NPR's India correspondent Lauren Frayer on the line learn this is a very specific part of the world the very remote part of the world what's this place like and what does India say happens there right so no well this is at fourteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas subzero temperatures there's almost no civilian population there and so that we have to rely on the two militaries to tell us what happened and they have different versions of the story both say the other started it we do know it was hand to hand combat with stones and wooden clubs because they have this agreement not to carry guns in that borders on an Indian Army colonel is among the dead India has been building a road in the area that could be used to deploy a future troops more quickly China may see that as a provocation both sides have been pouring in more troops and building more infrastructure there recently and so that's led to some scuffles in recent weeks have also been some high level military talks as recently as last weekend actually to try to defuse tensions but you know the opposite appears to have happened okay so that's from India's perspective Emily you're in Beijing what is China saying about what happened China says it bears no responsibility for what happened and it says it was Indian soldiers who first crossed into this no-man's land that separates the troops stationed in this valley yesterday night China's military put out a statement in which they accused Indian troops of cloak deliberately launching a provocative attack and big knowledge that tensions have been simmering for a while I spoke to retired colonel and and China's army his name is you have gone about why he thinks this clash happened here sure I'm not sure sure sure gallantry you know it's also one of them he said it was inevitable given tensions that people were going to die in a border clash between India and China and he put the blame on Indian prime minister Modi's who as a leader he said taking a more aggressive expansionary approach colonel yeah believes like many people in China that India provoked this clash so they could score points with more nationalistic voters in India and as Lawrence of we don't have that many details about what actually happened unlike India China's been very real to to share any information I asked the foreign ministry today white they can't give us casualty numbers and they said verbatim they didn't need to why is this so sensitive in China most likely it's because Chinese soldiers were killed in the clash and that's an embarrassing and very rare occurrence China's military last night admitted that there were casualties in general stemming from this clash but they didn't say which side in which they occurred China also says they're not releasing casualty numbers because they don't want to infuriate their own citizens and much of the escalate learn I want to ask you about what is at stake for India here because we're talking about the world's two most populous countries and both of them have nuclear weapons it is worried about its own territorial integrity I mean it doesn't want to lose land on this border to China China has been pretty aggressive in India's backyard of China is a close friend an investor in Pakistan which is India's arch rival next door China's building ports and infrastructure in places nearby like Sri Lanka Nepal across Southeast Asia and even farther afield India is the world's largest democracy Washington sees it as a buffer to China's influence in the region and if India suffers a stinging defeat at the hands of the Chinese military really challenges that idea so what is the Indian government saying so prime minister narendramodi had a coronavirus meeting today and at the start he observed a moment of silence for the slain soldiers he also made his first public comments about this clash hi from the doctor he said India wants peace but that if provoked India is capable of giving a fitting reply and he said India would never compromise its integrity and sovereignty so that sounds pretty tough but it may be aimed more at his domestic audience actually because here's what it sounds like when you turn on the TV in India today he was DVS China devious China has broken the peace after forty five years the consequences our great so that's a TV news anchor sounding pretty angry there's a hashtag trending today trying to get out so there's a lot of emotion in India right now the Indian Army however has been very measured urging commented actually noted that it was the cold that killed the majority of these troops that were wounded in battle but then they succumbed to subzero temperatures is what the army said to technically not killed by this Chinese soldiers the army made that distinction and so seems to be trying to de escalate here okay so in India at least at the government level and attempt to de escalate Emily what is China's government saying what are they telegraphing China is trying to de escalate as fast as possible first of all the average Chinese person is not paying attention to this clash it simply is not a story in China there's been no coverage in state media beyond this military statement and second China's foreign ministry said today that Beijing is maintaining close communications with India and that they both agree dialogue as the way

Himalayas
Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

"India's army says three of its troops have been killed in a confrontation with Chinese forces present P. R.'s Lauren Frayer the Indian Army says it was a violent standoff and that there are casualties on both sides tensions have been high in recent weeks with scuffles between Indian and Chinese troops but this is the first deadly incident there in decades the India China border is the world's longest unmarked frontier stretching about twenty five hundred

India P. R. Lauren Frayer Indian Army India China
Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Indian army: 3 Indian soldiers killed in standoff with Chinese troops along disputed frontier, casualties on both sides

"India's army says three of its troops have been killed in a confrontation with Chinese forces and Chinese military forces also suffered casualties NPR's Lauren Frayer reports this happened on the country's shared border high in the Himalayas the Indian Army says it was a violent standoff and that there are casualties on both sides tensions have been high in recent weeks with scuffles between Indian and Chinese troops but this is the first deadly incident there in decades the India China border is the world's longest on marked frontier stretching about twenty five hundred

India NPR Lauren Frayer Indian Army India China