4 Burst results for "Lauren Cordain"

"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

07:33 min | 6 months ago

"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Your point also, I think it's really interesting that the data we're seeing about circadian rhythm and hormones in that signaling mechanism you talked about and how food and light seemed to be very big needle move in that. And so if we can manipulate light and food effectively, even like you said, without losing weight or even reducing calories, we still get to see those benefits, which is one of the reasons for years I've been saying, you know, one of the easiest, most inexpensive things you can do for your health is go outside as soon as you can after waking up and get natural light. Yeah, and again, speaking to the importance of sleep and light. There was a study out just last week. And this was researchers from a study called predict. They showed that people who went to bed light or had disrupted sleep or didn't sleep for long enough actually had poor blood glucose control the next morning. So all of this stuff is tied in together. I think we for a long time there were kind of siloing out various aspects of our health. And I think this is an important reminder. Our food is one component. It's important. But the exercise we do, the light exposure we get, the sleep routine we have, all of this comes together, coalesces and actually influences how our body will utilize the nutrients in our food. Yeah, such a great point. And that would be another commonality I would say of all of these health experts I've ever talked to. Nobody has ever said, sleep is not important. That's a recurring across the board as sleep amount of sleep and quality matters a lot when it comes to health. And could actually be one of the more important factors to your point, people, we see people have blood glucose of a pre diabetic from one night of poor sleep. And there's also an area that if we're just looking at the data, we've seen a decline in sleep quality over the last few decades certainly. So I think and this has been a theme of our whole conversation thus far. It's never a single factor. It's multifaceted, and it's looking at all the variables in relation to each other. But finding those commonalities like sleep and diet quality that matter so much. And I don't want to end our conversation without going a little bit deeper on the plant based versus animal based and the role of those in a healthy diet because like I said in the beginning, I think you and I have come to very much similar conclusions but have a little bit different dietary approaches. And I think an important thing to really vocalize out loud is that there is a role for both of those. And I think when we have these kind of conversations, it can help people find their thing that's going to work for them. So I guess on a personal level, I'm a little curious, you mentioned that you aren't dogmatic as far as what everyone should eat and that you think there can be a role for animal products, ethically sourced ones in a good diet. I'm curious why you personally have gone completely based if you don't mind me getting a little personal. Sure, well firstly I have unconditional love for everyone no matter how they eat. And I can tell you that many of my friends and family members ate very differently to me. So I come at this from a place of no judgment. I think when we're looking at the science from a human health perspective, it's different to when we open up the aperture and look through the lens of planetary health and animal welfare as well. And so for me, personally, they shift to a diet that is plant exclusive that doesn't contain animal products is a decision that also considers the effects that our food choices have on the world around us. And I'm also acutely aware that I have the mains and living in an area to adopt this way of eating and do it in a way that is healthy and works with my budget and all that stuff. So that's the personal kind of decision that I've made and those are the various things that I've considered. I love that that's how you started out echo what you say. I have unconditional love for everyone no matter what their dietary choices or any choice is truly. I think that is a very important starting point. And just echo what you said, I agree. And I think diet quality is hugely important and often ignored in a lot of these studies to your point, they'll compare it to a really crappy diet to get the data they want. And that happens in both directions, certainly way more than it should. And I think these commonalities like sleep quality and food quality and timing and light in all of these factors are so important. And I think it's also important to do that end of one study for each of us on our own. To your point, you found a way to do this and you have the means to do this. And I take a very, I eat a lot of plant foods, but I also eat some ethically sourced animal foods and eat quite a bit of protein, actually, with my athletic goals. And that's been working for me. And my cardiovascular risk is very, very low. And my LDL is very, very low. But I think some of these points we've touched on are really important for everyone no matter what their dietary approach is. And I think you've given us a lot of great insight into how to know in your body, what to test. How to understand the data, because so often, we see all these studies coming out constantly. And it's both interpreting them and then applying them to your life. And you've talked about this as well. It's not just knowing what to do. It's actually doing it, that that seems to be the stumbling block. For most people, no matter what approach they take. Yeah, look, I think circling back to what I said at the start, animal products can absolutely be a part of a healthy diet. I would never argue against that. And even if you, if you go back and look at some of the literature written by the founders of the paleo diet, for example, Lauren cordain, who wrote the paleo book back in, I think it was the early 2000s. He's published a lot of literature talking about the fact that hunter gatherers and including tribes that are still around today actually have very low cholesterol levels. And so the main point that I always like to make when it comes to eating animal foods is that often the way the paleo diet is adopted today is actually very different to how people would have been eating tens of thousands of years ago when they were eating like woolly mammoth or deer, for example, these were very low saturated fat containing animal products very lean mates, and that were within the context of a diet that was usually quite rich in fiber. So I think it's important for us to distinguish between what is marketed as paleo today, which seems very far removed from what the data shows. That's a great point. Yes, and I think that biodiversity and the gut is a really important factor. And I think you're right all the earlier people talking about paleo, there was a really big emphasis on that. And it's kind of gotten confused and now we have all these paleo processed foods. And I think that's been a great theme of this conversation is getting back to focusing on quality and also looking at the sourcing of where these things are coming from and the timing. And not hyper focusing on a dietary dogma, but focusing on all of these other factors that really play out in the labs. And I know we're getting to the end of our time for people who want to keep learning from you. I know you have so much good evidence based research.

Lauren cordain hunter gatherers
"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:12 min | 8 months ago

"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"In itself because those people that are blaming polyunsaturated fats in seed oils are overlooking the fact that mate from the palaeolithic era was very rich in polyunsaturated fats. But overall, Lauren cordain, his recommendations is for a diet that's low in saturated fat. Even though he speaks about the inclusion of animal foods, he talks about that being more consistent with the type, the quality of meat that people were eating back then. And he talks about the importance of a very high fiber diet, in fact, he mentions that many of these people were eating over a hundred grams of fiber a day. So I think that's very important for people to understand that the paleo diet was not developed as this high saturated fat animal rich diet. Yeah, but the carnivore diet is something altogether different. It has its roots in this kind of ancestral ideology, I suppose. But part and parcel of the philosophy of the current of our diet is it not is that saturated fat is your friend. We talked about that. But also these high LDL markers are something that you should not concern yourself with. Because you see a lot of that because people are having these elevated numbers, including Shawn baker who shared it on rogue, et cetera. And in response, they just say, well, that high number isn't relevant in the traditional way that we've considered it in the past because I'm doing my diet in this way. It's somehow buffered or ameliorated by dint of the fact that I'm only eating meat. So help me understand at least if you were them like how you would articulate that. And then let's kind of deconstruct it. So I mentioned before that saturated fat, increasing LDL cholesterol, increasing risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease is the most substantiated relationship in science and nutrition science today. Without a doubt. And so much so that in 2017, cardiologists by the name of Brian ference, he co authored a paper, which very clearly states that LDL is causal. In the progression, the development and progression of atherosclerosis. There are some very interesting things in that paper that he walks through and let's quickly go through those. You know, there is some genetic mutations that see people with genetically high LDL cholesterol. Heterozygous, familial hypercholesterolemia and homozygous. And hetero if you inherit one of those genes from one parent and homo if you inherit both the ladder unfortunately leading to much more rapid development of disease. But if you have FH as it's called, in short, then particularly if it's a homozygous form. You know, if you're dealt that genetic card, and you have high LDL cholesterol from birth. You know, these are people that have LDL cholesterol between 500 and a thousand. Which is where we're seeing people in the carnival community. If you are literally 5 to ten to 15 times higher, I think pole Saladin is 700. 700 where coordinates, 50, 50, 70, right? And these people that inherent inherit this if they're not traded with statins. It's very, very common for them to develop cardiovascular disease in their teenage years and die in their 20s or 30s. And that's obviously very, very sad today with the progression of statins, you know, these people are living much longer. So that's the first thing that I think is interesting. The second is that there is a type of science we didn't discuss it before called Mendelian randomization. And this is science that really has become, I guess popular or more commonly used in the last 5 to ten years. And thanks to improvements in our understanding of genetics. Mendelian in the Gregor Mendel sense. I'm not sure of the orange, like the original guy doing plant hybrids and working in genetics. Well, it could well be. I'm not sure of the origin. But what it speaks to is these studies are like nature's randomized controlled trial. There are over 50 genetic mutations, which lower LDL cholesterol. And if you're dealt that card, and you have lower LDL cholesterol, you have significantly lower risk of developing coronary heart disease through your life. And because this is occurring. As you're being made by your mother, you know, it is nature's randomized controlled trial. And so we can see very clearly what's really interesting about this is that these single nucleotide polymorphisms is what they're called, right? There's 50 of these or more. Is that they all lower LDL cholesterol by different amounts. But if you are to standardize how much they lower LDL by, right? They all have the same order of effect on coronary heart disease, which means that it's highly likely that this is a causal link, right? We're talking about true cause and effect between elevated LDL and atherosclerosis. And it's a linear relationship. The lower you get LDL cholesterol down based on whichever genetic variant someone has, the lower their risk of coronary heart disease. Now, to add more evidence onto that, then we have lots and lots of statin trials. And there's some anti rhetoric out there, but it is, it's so clear in these studies that when you get when you lower LDL cholesterol through the use of either a statin, ezetimibe or PCSK 9 inhibitors, these are different drugs running on acting on different pathways that all lower LDL cholesterol. No matter which one you look.

Lauren cordain Shawn baker atherosclerosis Brian ference coronary heart disease Saladin Gregor Mendel cardiovascular disease
"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:09 min | 8 months ago

"lauren cordain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You know, these metabolites are lowering the risk of colorectal cancer. They're driving down inflammation throughout the body. And protecting us against things like neuro degenerative diseases. So there's a there's a bandaid solution here where you get this short term benefit. What I think is being overlooked is that chronic diseases have a long latency period. You know, they bubble away under the surface for for a while. And, you know, you might experience chronic disease in your 40s or 50s or 60s, but by and large, the lifestyle that you were leading ten, 20, 30 years ago was had a lot to do with the development of that chronic disease. You know, you spoke to the soldiers from the Korean War. They were young. They were laying down the pathology of atherosclerosis. So my fear is it is this sort of short term band aid solution. And my biggest fear with it is that it sends LDL cholesterol through the roof. I'm talking. I said before, a hundred milligrams per deciliter is like it's considered the kind of recommendation here in America and in Australia. But as I said, really, you got to get down to 60 or 70 milligrams per deciliter where you don't see atherosclerosis. And here's the really, really interesting thing rich. Lauren Corden, he wrote the paleo diet book. He also published a paper that goes into what is a healthy LDL cholesterol level. This is coming from the father of the paleo diet. And he went through and he looked at LDL cholesterol as a primates and of hunter gatherer tribes where there is low incidence of atherosclerosis. And his conclusion in this paper that he wrote, the father of the paleo diet was that human LDL cholesterol needs to be at 50 to 70 milligrams per deciliter in order to avoid atherosclerosis. So this is coming from him. And you might think, well, hang on. He's advocating for the paleo diet, then how can he be also saying that LDL cholesterol should be low? And a lot of this comes back down to what the paleo diet is versus how people are doing it. Yeah. And so it's a very good point. Yeah, because it's not exactly the way that it's been massively adopted. That's right. And the paleo diet if you look how Lauren cordain, what he recommends, you know, it's talking about mates that are very low in saturated fat. If you went back and looked in the Paleolithic era and you look at woolly mammoth or these types of mates that would have been eaten then there are more equivalent to venison and antelope, which are very low in saturated fat and higher in polyunsaturated fats..

atherosclerosis neuro degenerative diseases Lauren Corden colorectal cancer chronic disease Australia America Lauren cordain
"lauren cordain" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"lauren cordain" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"And I don't know where the term had gotten into my consciousness, but this term Paleolithic diet was somewhere rattling in my brain and I went into my house and turned on the computer waited for it to do all of its squirrels whizzing inside. And then the dial up and then there was this newfangled search engine called Google and into Google I put a little diet. And it wasn't a lot there, but there are two main people I found Lauren cordain and Arthur deanne, Lauren is pretty well credited with kind of being like The Godfather of starting the modern paleo diet movement. There's actually a physician boy Eaton who had written a book called the Paleolithic prescription in the late 80s, early 90s. And that was kind of the person who actually inspired Lauren to begin exploring down this track. But everything that it was reading, it was suggesting this evolutionary mismatch for some people, the carbohydrate load, the types of immunogenic compounds like gluten and different phytates and whatnot. We're really problematic for people, but what was interesting is the issues fell into late metabolic disease and autoimmune gut health. And I was like, dude, this autoimmune gut thing is like me in spades. I had some beginnings of RA. You can still kind of see it in my knuckles and stuff like that. And mind you, I was the ripe old age of like 26, 27 years old. So I was like, a very young but high mileage tire. At this point, you know the trend was being taken off at a rapid clip. So found this information. It seemed very compelling. But there were no books, there were no real how tos at this point. And ironically, my first foray into this stuff, the few forums that were around talking about low carbon paleo suggested an Atkins book. And so I went and picked up Atkins, new diet revolution. You know, it's fascinating about that. He talked about all these gut issues and GERD and autoimmune disease and on and on and on that Atkins did in the 70s and 80s, but it just kind of got lost in the general like weight loss, shuffle, which I think that there are a lot of different ways to address weight loss, potentially, but if we want to stack the deck and say, okay, we're going to have a competition, weight loss will be a feature, but we're also going to have complex gut not immune issues and you weigh and measure your food and make it pop tarts in Twinkies and whatever and we're going to do it our way. And we're going to kick the ass. It's some point food quality just ends up winning the day. It isn't the key feature to everything, but for these complex health issues, I think that that's really critical. So the long and short is that where I jumped into this and so I jumped in with a lower carb approach and it just felt amazing for the first time in my life. I could go 6, 8, ten hours without eating, not that I would necessarily do that all the time, but before I would suffer these hypoglycemic crashes and was non functional and it was relatively easy for me to stay lean, my sleep was better. And this would immediately on the heels of this, then I started thinking about all this stuff from evolutionary biology, perspective, and I have to give a ton of credit to Michael and Mary ease. They wrote the book, protein power and protein power life plan..

Lauren cordain Arthur deanne Lauren Google metabolic disease Atkins Eaton autoimmune disease Michael Mary