35 Burst results for "Lauren Bogle"

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:49 min | 2 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by VMware. You're doing business at an app driven multi cloud world. You want to build and run your apps on your choice of clouds. And you need to manage all those clouds as easily as one. With VMware cross cloud services, we've got options. That's because VMware delivers the multi cloud choice, security, and control you need to accelerate innovation, deliver great apps and drive business forward. VMware, the smarter way to cloud. Learn more at VMware dot com slash welcome. This episode is brought to you by palm wonderful. Palm wonderful a 100% pomegranate juice is whole pressed, with no added sugar, preservatives, or fillers. And per 8 ounce serving, it contains 700 milligrams of polyphenol antioxidants, which are compounds that can help protect against free radicals in our bodies, unstable molecules that can cause damage over time. Plus, it's tasty. Defined delicious recipes and learn more about antioxidant goodness of palm wonderful. Please go to palm wonderful dot com. Are you ready to have your holiday boosted with the holiday shopping spree and your wardrobe boosted with limited edition jingle ball swag? Of course you are. iHeartRadio jingle ball VIP X lets you interact and experience jingle ball like never before. Register now to boost your jingle ball experience. Go to iHeartRadio dot com slash VIPS. iHeartRadio jingle ball VIP X jingle ball boosted Pfizer and BioNTech are proud sponsors of iHeartRadio jingle ball and VIP X experience. Updated COVID-19 boosters designed for recent omicron variants are now available for those eligible. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. After its first two launch attempts were scrubbed, NASA's Artemis one mission finally lifted off from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39 B in the early hours of November 16th, 2022. The last time that NASA astronauts walked on the lunar surface was nearly half a century ago. Those Apollo missions to the moon were named after the Greek God of the sun. In a way, it makes far more sense for these new moon missions to be named after Artemis. Greek goddess of the moon and Apollo's twin sister. The missions will also land the first woman and the first person of color on the moon. Artemis one is essentially an uncrewed rehearsal for crude flight that will journey to the moon and land somewhere in its southern polar region. It's the first integrated test of the Orion spacecraft, the space launch system, or SLS rocket, and the ground systems at Kennedy. The SLS is the most powerful rocket ever developed, and the Orion spacecraft has ventured farther than any vehicle designed for humans has ever flown, traveling 280,000 miles. That's 450,000 kilometers from earth to a location beyond the far side of the moon. As of this recording, it's on its way home, scheduled to return to earth on Sunday, December 11th. It will have been in space for 42 days, longer than any human spacecraft that hasn't been docked to a space station. After coming within about 80 miles or a 130 kilometers of the moon's surface, and traveling a total of 1.3 million miles, that's 2.1 million kilometers. Artemis ones Orion spacecraft will have a targeted splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, somewhere off the coast of San Diego. One of the main objectives is to test Orion's heat shield when it reenters Earth's atmosphere. But this mission's goal is to demonstrate complete operational capabilities during all of its phases. For the article this episode is based on, has tough works spoke with Craig hardgrove and associate professor at Arizona state university's school of earth and space exploration. And he was born in 1981, making him too young to remember the last time that astronauts walked on the moon. He said, I'm hopeful that this is the start of a new future for people in space. Hard grove has another reason to be excited about the mission. He's the principal investigator for the Luna hmap CubeSat. One of ten different shoebox sized miniature space probes that rode into space on Artemis one with the intention of being left in lunar orbit. Its science mission is to measure neutrons that are being leaked by the moon in an effort to identify how much water ice is there, and where it's located around the moon's South Pole. A balloon to hmap, unfortunately, encountered some propulsion problems during the trip, and we've yet to see how its mission will play out. But mapping those water deposits someday could provide NASA with the ingredients to make rocket fuel, enabling a future in which spacecraft could be lighter and cheaper because they wouldn't have to haul fuel from earth's surface. The ability to refuel at a lunar base could also enable NASA to venture farther and deeper into space than ever before. The Artemis one mission will perform other scientific research as well. Instead of human astronauts, the Orion spacecraft contains two mannequin like devices that are designed to measure potential radiation exposure to astronauts, and particularly female astronauts during the trip. That research is especially crucial, because the female bodies have greater sensitivity to the effects of space radiation. And 9 of the 18 Artemis astronauts are women. The project is meant to gather data about which parts of our anatomy are most at risk from space radiation. And thus to help design future systems to protect space travelers. A house stuff works also spoke with Matt siegler, a research scientist at southern methodist university, and the planetary science institute, who isn't involved in Artemis one, but has participated in research on other NASA missions. He explained, like Apollo, before we strap our best and brightest astronauts to the top of a rocket, we need to test it. So this launch will carry no people, but it will carry exact copies of all the systems we will need when they do go. And instruments to make sure all is functioning as planned. Siegler is also excited about scientists having greater access to the moon, which he describes as, quote, a treasure trove of the history of the solar system, because things change so slowly there. After Artemis one, NASA will proceed ahead to Artemis two, possibly in the spring of 2024. That flight will be crude by human astronauts, paving the way for Artemis three in 2025 at the earliest, which will include a piloted landing on the moon's surface. A NASA has announced 13 potential landing spots on the moon near its South Pole. Each one containing multiple landing sites for Artemis three. All 13 will have areas with continuous access to sunlight during the time period that NASA plans for astronauts to be on the lunar surface. Sunlight is critical for long-term stays on the moon, because it's the source of power for solar cells, and because it keeps temperatures more steady. The Orion spacecraft's reentry into the Earth's atmosphere will provide an important test of Artemis one safety. It will enter the atmosphere to speed of about 25,000 miles an hour. That's 40,000 kilometers an hour. And slow to about 1% of that speed as it descends. In the process, the friction will create temperatures of approximately 5000°F, or 2800°C. After deploying its parachutes, the spacecraft will slow to less than 20 miles an hour, or 32 kilometers an hour before splashdown. And in addition to the aforementioned mannequins, Artemis one has two additional passengers, stuffed toys, of Snoopy, wearing an orange NASA space flight suit, and Shaun the sheep representing the European space agency in a blue flight suit of his own.

VMware NASA Artemis Lauren bogle Craig hardgrove school of earth and space expl Kennedy Space Center Pfizer Matt siegler Arizona state university
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:39 min | 2 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey brain stuff, I'm Lauren bogle bomb, and this is another classic episode. But when you release a helium balloon, it's freedom is temporary. Eventually, it must fall back to earth. But when? And how? I'll let former Lauren explain. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren vogelbaum, and today we're talking about balloons. Helium balloons that have escaped the clutches of their human captors to float far beyond the mortal realms straight up into the infinity of the stars. Well, not really. I hate to burst your, well, balloon. But that's not what balloons do when they are released. They burst, blame the composition of our atmosphere. Helium balloons float because their buoyant in the air like a beach ball is buoyant in water. Blooms don't fly, the air around them sinks, pushing them upward. That's because helium weighs just 0.18 grams per liter. Nitrogen and oxygen, which together make up about 99% of the air we breathe, weigh 1.25 grams, and 1.43 grams per liter, respectively. And okay, most helium balloons these days aren't filled with 100% pure helium. Depending on the company selling it, about 20% may be regular old air to help keep costs down and preserve the global helium supply. But as long as the weight of the balloon plus the helium mixture inside of it equals less than the weight of the air around it, it'll keep on moving up. However, nitrogen and oxygen aren't distributed evenly from sea level to outer space. Earth's gravity holds air close to the surface. The higher up you go, the thinner, AKA less massive, the air gets. Just 5 miles up, there are only one third as many nitrogen and oxygen atoms around you. Ten miles up, there are only one tenth as many. So a helium mixture balloon wouldn't keep floating up forever, because eventually it would be heavier than the air around it. It'll stop when it hits a point of equilibrium. However, however, as evidenced by the lack of a thick layer of party balloons up in the sky, that's not how the story ends for free to balloon. Enter atmospheric pressure. Since the elements that make up our air supply hug the surface and thin out at increasing altitudes, the pressure that the air exerts on objects also drops and increasing altitudes. Lower atmospheric pressure outside means the gases inside a balloon will want to expand. How much that balloon can expand depends on what the balloon is made of. A latex rubber is pretty common and can stretch a lot. Mylar, which is a trade name for a type of stretched polyester that's strengthened with a film of evaporated metal, does not stretch. So how long the balloon lasts before bursting depends on the material and how much helium mixture is in there. A half full balloon will last longer. Also, since latex is porous, a bit of helium mixture will constantly seep out through the balloon's walls, possibly giving it a little bit more time. And finally, how the balloon pops will depend on the temperature of the air around it. That temperature will decrease as the balloon rises through the troposphere. This is the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere, extending four to 12 miles above the surface. At the top of the troposphere, temperatures reach negative 60°F, that's about negative 51 Celsius. Latex and mylar both become brittle around negative 40°F or Celsius, so if they make it up that far, they'll lose their ability to expand, and they won't pop. They'll shatter. So, when and how balloons burst depends on three things, what the balloon is made of, how much gas is.

Lauren bogle Lauren vogelbaum Lauren
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by VMware. You're doing business at an app driven multi cloud world. You want to build and run your apps on your choice of clouds. And you need to manage all those clouds as easily as one. With VMware cross cloud services, we've got options. That's because VMware delivers the multi cloud choice, security, and control you need to accelerate innovation, deliver great apps and drive business forward. VMware, the smarter way to cloud. Learn more at VMware dot com slash welcome. Lisa, you look great. I feel great. I got a personal loan from happy money and now my credit card debt is gone. Have you looked good on you? Personal loans with low fixed rates and your best interests at heart. Apply today at happy money dot com. Happy money. Fund your happy. MLS ID number one three 9 6 8 zero 5, not all applicants may qualify. Loans are not offered in Massachusetts at Nevada. Happy money works with Lenny partners who originate the loans. Additional terms, conditions and eligibility requirements may apply. Hey, there's a better way to fly. Instead of being stuck in endless lines and packed onto planes, try simplifying your travel with surf air, save an average of two hours on every trip and avoid crowded airports with a new way to fly private, with surf air, you'll fly from smaller airports closer to your home. There are no lines, no waiting, and no stress. Surf air dot com, the best alternative to commercial air travel that makes flying easy. Get a free quote on your next flight at surf air dot com. There's a better way to fly private. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:41 min | 4 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Ready for an upgrade to your home entertainment? Look no further than vizio's new M series collection of soundbars. From simple solutions that upgrade a TV's built in audio to cinematic sound to something extra special like the award winning M series elevates soundbar with Dolby atmos, which delivers the ultimate immersive home theater experience. There really is a vizio soundbar for everyone. It's the ultimate way to stream your favorite music and podcasts on iHeartRadio. Check out America's number one soundbars over at vizio dot com. With the new season comes new savings, this autumn, cozy up to one of Casper's award winning mattresses to help you catch your best Z's, unprecedented times call for an unprecedented price, so we've upgraded our popular element mattress with its air scape breathable foam, responsive comfort and long-lasting support. All for just 9 95 for a queen, discover the Casper difference. Now, at Casper dot com and use promo code iHeart 100 for $100 off, select mattresses, exclusion supply Casper dot com for more details. And I'm a major comic book fan. I'm Eli. Gatekeeper of all things, film, animation. It's just a joy popcorn, your local friendly neighborhood, hood. And I'm Tony, when I'm not gaming, I'm working in my VR character. And we are so excited to welcome you to. Brought to you by Intel. Nar podcast we discuss all things gaming, comic book sci-fi sports, current events, you name it. And we're now here to nerd out with you. Come hang with us on Thursday, September 29th, at 7 p.m. eastern. In our heartland. See you there. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. Everyone has the occasional nightmare, a roughly 5% of the general population has at least one bad dream per week. And for some people, the intensity or frequency of these dreams can have a negative effect on waking life. But why do our sleeping brains and flick this with upsetting images and scenarios? Today, let's talk about what we know and don't know about nightmares. And how to prevent them. For the article this episode is based on, has to work spoke via email with clinical psychologist and sleep expert, doctor Michael Bruce. He explained, nightmares typically happen during REM sleep. During the middle and later portions of the night, because of where nightmares tend to fall in the sleep cycle, and because of the intensity of their imagery and emotions, nightmares will result in some degree of awakening. You may bolt upright in bed and have trouble returning to sleep, thanks to a nightmare. We don't know exactly why nightmares happen, but Bruce says it's possible that they help the brain quote practice prepare and even anticipate difficult or dangerous experiences in waking life. Sometimes such issues need attention in daylight hours. Maybe if you're dreaming about car accidents, that's an anxiety about driving that may be lessened by getting work you've been putting off, done on your car. Or by talking to a therapist about your fears. A Bruce said, of course, it's possible that nightmares like dreams in general don't have a primary function that there are byproduct of other activities in the body. But most sleep scientists think that dreams and nightmares exist for some purpose. A certain circumstances and characteristics may make some people more prone to nightmares than others. Folklore often attributes nightmares to eating too much rich food before bedtime, but the jury is still out on whether this is true. A one study from 2015 did find a link between eating dairy or spicy foods before bedtime and having disturbing dreams. But the study authors noted that this couldn't be proven conclusively, because the data were self reported, and there were a lot of other variables to consider. For instance, some of the participants were binge eaters, a practiced intermittent fasting, or may have had undiagnosed reactions to certain foods. Physical and mental health issues are more reliably linked to having nightmares. How stuff works also spoke, the doctor Barry craco, a Savannah, Georgia based internist, and sleep medicine specialist. He explained that people who have been traumatized are at higher risk of nightmares, offering examples like war veterans, those who have suffered sexual or criminal assault, or those who have been in a life threatening accident. And bad dreams are more common in people who experience anxiety or depression or who misuse alcohol or other drugs. And research in recent decades has shown that people who experience sleep disorders are also more likely to have nightmares. A specifically, people with undiagnosed or untreated sleep apnea are at higher risk. People with sleep apnea stop and then start breathing again, hundreds of times throughout the night. Although it's largely associated with snoring, a person doesn't have to snore, to have sleep apnea. A people with sleep apnea are often very tired during the day. Even when they've supposedly slept all through the night. When other symptoms are gasping for air while sleeping, dry mouth or headache in the morning, problems staying asleep and irritability and attention issues. According to craco, the many misconceptions regarding sleep apnea make it tough for a person to get diagnosed. And this is a big deal because in addition to nightmares, sleep apnea is associated with greater risk of diabetes, brain dysfunction, heart disease, and other disorders. He said, so many children have sleep apnea, and they don't get diagnosed until they're 50 years old. There are so many deaths caused over the course of time by oxygen not getting to the brain. Quaco practice helps treat mental health patients who have sleep disorders, including nightmares. He said, so many of these have undiagnosed sleep apnea. The vast majority report reducing sleep apnea by using a CPAP machine, which then appeared to decrease nightmares. A CPAP is continuous positive airway pressure therapy. A standard treatment for people with obstructive sleep apnea. The problem is that many mental health professionals, whom people typically approach for help of nightmares, aren't aware of the link. Quake Ho said, some people go into psychotherapy for years for PTSD, and the nightmares don't go away. But if sleep apnea isn't the root cause of nightmares, other treatment options are available. One endorsed by the American sleep academy is image rehearsal therapy or IRT. A quaco explained how it works. Quote, you teach somebody how to picture a new version of your dream in your mind's eye while you're awake. And that has a very powerful impact over your dreams. By picturing new images, they seem to be activating and imaging system that sets into motion the process of decreasing disturbing dreams. He noted that it only takes a couple of weeks to see clear cut decreases in nightmares. A study he helped publish back in 2001 showed dramatic results. In the group that received the IRT treatment, the 65% of patients had their post traumatic stress symptoms decrease by at least one level of clinical severity. In the control group, meanwhile, the 69% of patients experienced their symptoms either not changing or worsening. Quaco notes that IRT is just as powerful as somebody using a PTSD medication. And he notes that for many people, it's not even necessary to visit a professional to engage in IRT. You can

apnea Dolby atmos Lauren bogle Michael Bruce vizio Casper Bruce Barry craco Eli sleep apnea Intel Tony brain dysfunction Quaco America Savannah airway pressure Georgia
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 5 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"In Chinese American restaurants. The laughing, Buddha. Hey brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. You've probably seen him seated next to the cash register at your local Chinese American restaurant. A shiny bronze statue of a bald pot bellied man with a laughing grin on his face. The same jolly fella immortalized in key chains and other trinkets sold in Chinatown tourist shops all across the U.S.. That's not the Buddha. But it's in the right religious ballpark. He's called the laughing Buddha, and the story behind him is complicated. We spoke with Denise leidy, currently the curator of Asian art at the Yale University Art Gallery. She held the same position at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 22 years, and is no stranger to westerners confusion over the laughing Buddha statue. She said, in Christianity, there's this one guy, so when people see this fun guy, they think that's the Buddha. But it's not. The Buddha in the singular is to start the Goldman. But the Buddhist religion over time has added multiple layers of deities. Many of whom have multiple avatars. And so it's gotten mind bogglingly complicated. Buddha, the story goes, was a man named sadaka Goldman, who lived around the 6th century BCE in India. Born a wealthy prince he chose to live an ascetic lifestyle in search of the meaning of existence, which he found while meditating for 40 days under a fig tree. After achieving Nirvana, which is the escape from the endless cycle of suffering death and rebirth, he became the Buddha, or the awakened one. Over the centuries, his teachings spread throughout India into China across Asia and eventually around the world. Today, there are an estimated 376 million followers of Buddhism worldwide. But so who is the laughing Buddha? Buddhism has expanded over the millennia to include a Pantheon of deities in addition to goat ma Buddha. Those include numerous bodhisattva, the term four sage like individuals who work for the enlightenment of all sentient beings. Buddhism, practiced mainly in Southeast Asia, got is only the most recent of 28 buddhas described in holy texts, and then there are avatars, humans believed to be incarnations of deities. The laughing Buddha was one such avatar, a tenth century Chinese monk named budai. According to accounts written centuries later, budai was a gregarious pot bellied monk who wandered from village to village, carrying a large sack over his shoulder, but I, meaning cloth sack. He was beloved by children and the poor to whom he would give rice and sweets from his sack. On his deathbed, budai penned a poem in which he revealed himself as the avatar of maitreya, a deity also known as the future Buddha. Lydie explains, in our lifetime, this great cosmic era you and I are sharing, there's a teaching Buddha named Siddhartha Gautama. The world will ultimately destroy itself. I don't know when, but when the world is reborn, metra will come back as the teaching Buddha of that era. Over time, but I became the subject of popular devotion in zen Buddhism, both in China and Japan. His large belly and sack are believed to represent abundance, and he's included among these 7 lucky gods of Japan as a harbinger of abundance and good health. At some point, he also became the patron deity of restaurants and bartenders, hence his prized location next to the cash register. Lydie isn't sure of the exact historical Providence of today's laughing Buddha statues, but she believes the bodi imagery in Chinese art and sculpture started popping up in the 15th century. She said, as global trade begins to expand in the late 16th and 17th century and porcelain is totally transforming global ceramics, there's probably some imagery of this guy that snuck in. It got picked up in the west, turned into the laughing Buddha, and made into this kitschy thing that you can buy anywhere. Although rubbing the belly for good luck is not Buddhist teaching and generally considered impolite, devotees of Buddhism don't seem to have a problem with the spread of the icon. Barbara O'Brien, a journalist and zen Buddhism student, wrote, it is indicative of Buddhism's broad tolerance of diversity that this laughing Buddha of folklore is accepted into the official practice. For Buddhists, inequality that represents Buddha nature is to be encouraged, and the folklore of the kind laughing Buddha is not regarded as any kind of sacrilege, even though people may unwittingly confuse him with got my Buddha. Today's episode is based on the article, that fat jolly fella isn't Buddha on how stuff works dot com, written by Dave Bruce. Brainstorm is production by heart radio, in partnership with house to forks dot com, and is produced by Tyler clang. For more podcasts, my heart radio visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Dragons are coming to Xfinity flax, a new ring begins with a premiere of the ferocious Game of Thrones prequel House of the dragon. August 21st. Check out the best of the Targaryens with our collection packed with free episodes of Game of Thrones to prepare for the premiere of a house of the dragon. And if that's not enough, dragons for you. Check out the official Game of Thrones podcast on iHeartRadio. We've got all things Westeros on Xfinity flex. Say dragons are coming into your Xfinity voice remote. The iHeartRadio stations you love are playing now on zumo. Don't just hear it, see it. With visually enhanced graphics to bring the artists and music you love to life. With sumo stream free live and on demand entertainment, including thousands of hit movies and TV shows across 200 plus premium channels. And now discover your favorite music on the iHeartRadio music channels. Zumo is always free, no logins, no signups, no accounts, no hassle. To start streaming, go to zumo TV. 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budai Lauren bogle Lydie Denise leidy sadaka Goldman Yale University Art Gallery Siddhartha Gautama Metropolitan Museum of Art India Chinatown Goldman Nirvana China confusion Barbara O'Brien Southeast Asia Japan U.S. Asia Born
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:03 min | 5 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"And if that's not enough, dragons for you. Check out the official Game of Thrones podcast on iHeartRadio. We've got all things Westeros on Xfinity flex. Say dragons are coming into your Xfinity voice remote. The thrill of forging your own path is powerful. Nissan is bringing that thrill to our community in collaboration with the black effect podcast network to create the thrill of possibility, a community impact program and summit, curated to support HBCU students and science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics, or steam, and introduce them to exclusive opportunities. Nissan is committed to creating opportunity for the whole community and ensuring that black excellence is a part of the new future of automotive. For more information about this program and how to apply, visit black effect dot com slash Nissan. In the 1980s and 90s, a psychopath terrorized the country of Belgium. A serial killer in kidnapper was abducting children in the bright light of day. From tenderfoot TV and iHeartRadio, this is le monstra. A story of abomination and conspiracy. The story about the man who simply become known as. Le Mans. Listen for free on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. In September of 2020, lifestyle blogger, DaVita leader Lee, candidly chronicled a devastating event, she says she never saw coming. The discovery that her first pregnancy was ectopic. Literally wrote on her blog, the healthy Maven, quote, if you don't know anything about an ectopic pregnancy, it's basically a pregnancy that develops outside of your uterus. A healthy and viable pregnancy can only develop in your uterus. If it develops elsewhere, it is not a viable pregnancy. A 2% of all pregnancies are ectopic, very rare, and 98% of them happen in a fallopian tube. At this point I was in the 2% of the 2% in that my ectopic could not be found. But it was time to start making decisions and moving forward. Despite people like laterly, increasing the number of Frank and comprehensive conversations around pregnancy loss and ectopic pregnancies in particular, many people are still unaware of what this condition is really all about. So today, let's talk about it. For the article, this episode is based on how stuff works spoke with Katherine white, MD, MPH, assistant Professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Boston University. As she said, an ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that's growing in a place other than the womb or uterus. The most common place for ectopic to be is in one of the fallopian tubes. But in ectopic can also be in the cervix. On an old cesarean section scar in the corner of the uterus or on the ovary. According to the American college of obstetricians and gynecologists or acog, almost all ectopic pregnancies, over 90%, occur in a fallopian tube. This can have serious and even deadly consequences, because as the pregnancy progresses, it can cause the tube to burst, which may lead to major internal bleeding, a potentially life threatening emergency that requires immediate surgery. So what are the risk factors? This is actually a complicated question to answer, because research has offered conflicting findings on the matter. And because every person and every pregnancy is unique. There's no guarantee that an ectopic can be traced back to one specific issue. Lots of different conditions and factors can increase the risk, like previous ectopic pregnancy, fallopian tube, pelvic, or abdominal surgery, a pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, a certain sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, like chlamydia, a cigarette smoking, age above 35 years, a history of infertility, and or the use of assisted reproductive technology, like in vitro fertilization, or IVF. But even with all of these potential risks, about half of all ectopic pregnancies occur without any of them. The Mayo Clinic also indicates that people who use intrauterine devices or IUDs should be aware of the risks when it comes to ectopics. A getting pregnant while using an IUD is extremely rare, but if a pregnancy does occur with an IUD in place, it's more likely to be a topic. A white said, I wish people knew that ectopic pregnancies are common, and that there's nothing you can do to cause it or to prevent it from happening. We also can't move the pregnancy from the abnormal location into the uterus. Patients ask me that all the time. Because ectopic pregnancies can not be saved and can endanger the life of the pregnant person, it's important for anyone who can get pregnant to be aware of the early signs and symptoms. They include vaginal bleeding or spotting after your period has ended. A lower belly cramping and or intense constant pain. As leader Lee wrote on her blog, a week after my period should have been finished, I was still spotting and cramping. I found this unusual and thought odd just connect with my o-b-gyn to be safe. We chatted pandemic style over the phone, and she suggested I come in for some testing, and that if I had a pregnancy test at home, I should use it. The test confirmed that later Lee was, in fact, pregnant, and as she wrote, we were so happy, but also knew that things weren't adding up. So we shouldn't get too excited. Literally went in for blood work and an ultrasound that afternoon, and the tests confirmed that something was off. Her blood tests indicated the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin, or HCG, a which, as we've talked about in previous episodes, is a hormone that's released during pregnancy. But there was no sign of a pregnancy on the ultrasound. Although her HCG levels continued to rise over the next two days, and she began experiencing the symptoms of early pregnancy, like extreme bloating, achy legs, painful breasts, et cetera the ultrasound was still mysteriously clear. She wrote, I was officially diagnosed with a pregnancy of unknown location. It will likely be the strangest diagnosis I will ever receive in my life. It turns out I was pregnant. They just couldn't find out where. Ectopic pregnancies aren't just concerning and confusing. Again, they can be life threatening. A white said, the biggest risk with an ectopic pregnancy is that the site of the ectopic will rupture. Your fallopian tubes and those other non uterus locations were not designed to allow a pregnancy to grow safely. When rupture occurs, you can bleed so much that you can need blood transfusions. And sometimes a patient bleeds so much that they die. So it's critical to treat an ectopic pregnancy when it's found. Either by surgery to remove the pregnancy or by medication to dissolve it. Because it's so serious, let's talk about those emergency symptoms. If a rupture of an ectopic pregnancy does occur, the symptoms may include severe abdominal or pelvic pain, along with vaginal bleeding, extreme dizziness, or fainting, and pain in the shoulder. Unfortunately, literally experienced these for herself. After she felt a sharp jab following early treatment for her ectopic, she was rushed to the emergency room and underwent surgery, which resulted in the loss of her left fallopian tube. Although all ectopic pregnancies inevitably end in pregnancy loss, and most people who experience ectopics can go on to have healthy pregnancies later on. People who have had one ectopic pregnancy are, however, at higher risk of having another. So it's important to stay alert for those signs and symptoms that we discussed earlier.

Nissan iHeartRadio Lauren bogle Katherine white DaVita Lee American college of obstetrici acog Belgium Boston University pelvic inflammatory disease chlamydia Apple Frank MD Mayo Clinic white
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:24 min | 6 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Most TVs are smart nowadays, but with busy home screens and remotes with too many or too few buttons, smart shouldn't mean complicated. That's why Roku TV is the smart TV made easy. The customizable home screen puts your inputs, streaming favorites like I heart and free live TV all in one place. From simple settings, anyone can understand, automatic updates with the latest features, and much more, Roku TV is more than a smart TV. It's a better TV. Learn more today at Roku dot com. Happy streaming. You wanted to see me miss swinton? Have you been hearing about the new government modernization efforts? AI, RPA's data science, things are changing at this agency, and people will need new skills. I'd like you to get some training. Look at this management concept catalog. Wow. Over 275 courses. That's right. And local classrooms or instructor led online classes. We still have budget in this fiscal year, so sign up online. Advance your career with courses for management concepts, get a catalog at management concepts dot com or call 8 three three 5 7 8 84 66. This episode is brought to you by the restless ones. Available now from iHeart, returning for season three is the restless ones, and original podcast presented by T mobile for business and iHeartRadio. And join host Jonathan Strickland, as he sits down for in depth discussions with the people at the intersection of technology and business. You'll learn how each of these leaders is building a bridge to what's next and leveraging transformative technologies like 5G to create a more connected and meaningful future today. The restless ones is now available on the iHeartRadio app, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. Science fiction has populated our galaxy with countless extraterrestrial civilizations and interplanetary conflicts. In the real world, however, we have yet to encounter even the most basic form of microscopic alien life, a much less a technologically advanced and conveniently human shaped one. So why is this? One possibility is that habitable planets are rare, and that intelligent life itself is an anomaly. In other words, we might truly be alone. It's also conceivable that other technically advanced civilizations are simply too far away for either party to know of the other. But what if alien life is widespread through the galactic neighborhood, and we've been intentionally excluded from the block party? Behold, the zoo hypothesis. The essential idea behind the zoo hypothesis has been the subject of scientific and science fictional cosmology for decades. For example, see fiction from authors like Olaf stapledon in the 1930s and Arthur C. Clarke in the 1950s. But MIT radio astronomer John ball is often credited with laying it out in 1973. In essence, the zoo hypothesis serves as a possible solution to the Fermi paradox. Named for scientist Enrico Fermi, the Fermi paradox refers to the contradiction between the high likelihood of system spanning intelligent life, according to some interpretations of the Drake equation, which is used to estimate the potential number of communicating civilizations in our galaxy. And the lack of evidence for such intelligent life. The aliens might be there, this hypothesis suggests, and they might be intentionally hiding from us. As the name implies, one way to imagine such a scenario is that earth could have been set aside as a sort of zoo, or nature reserve. Perhaps the aliens just prefer to observe life in a closed system, or they could have ethical reasons for not interfering in our technological and cultural progress. Akin to the prime directive from Star Trek. A potentially more sinister interpretation can be found in balls, laboratory hypothesis. The aliens don't talk to us because we're part of an experiment they're conducting. As astrophysicists, William L Newman and Carl Sagan explained in their 1978 paper, galactic civilizations, population dynamics, and interstellar diffusion, it's ultimately impossible to predict the aims and beliefs of a hypothetical advanced civilization. However, they stressed that such ideas are worthwhile in that they help us imagine, quote, less apparent, social impediments, to extensive interstellar colonization. In other words, if we're putting all ideas on the table, concerning the possibility of advanced alien life, then the zoo hypothesis has a place on the cosmological lazy Susan. But we have to be careful about avoiding anthropocentrism. The tendency to assume that human beings are at the center of cosmic concerns. Before the article this episode is based on, has stuff work spoke with particle physicist Daniel whiteson. He said, I think that's pretty unlikely. I don't like that the zoo hypothesis puts us at the center of things. And it also seems implausible because it requires a vast galactic conspiracy. When was the last time anybody worked together to keep a secret? The best argument against having secret aliens visiting the earth is just that governments are not capable of maintaining secrecy like that, especially over decades. You might be tempted to argue that, well, we're talking about alien governments here, not human governments. But our contemplation of possible alien life is largely based on the only existing model we have. Us. If we can't maintain vast conspiracies, then what chance to aliens have? A whiteson said, I think it's very unlikely that aliens are somehow capable of that. Though perhaps they are, I like that the zoo hypothesis tries to answer this question in a whimsical creative way. It's fun for telling a story, but it puts a lot of human motivations in the minds of these unknown aliens. However, as Newman and Sagan pointed out, the idea is an entirely untestable. If we could one day detect alien communications, the zoo hypothesis would be falsifiable. And the nonprofit group messaging extraterrestrial intelligence, or Mehdi, advocates the creation and transmission of interstellar messages that could, in theory, let any cosmic zookeepers out there. Know that we would like to see beyond, our

iHeartRadio Jonathan Strickland Lauren bogle Olaf stapledon RPA swinton William L Newman John ball Enrico Fermi Arthur C. Clarke MIT Daniel whiteson Carl Sagan Akin whiteson Susan Sagan Newman Us Mehdi
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:56 min | 7 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Merchandiser can serve up jalapeno, sesame, and chocolate covered goodness with real-time data driven precision. Let's create supply chains that have an appetite for performance. IBM, let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com slash consulting. Want to get away, but still listen to your favorite radio stations and podcasts, then listen up. iHeartRadio is now the onboard music partner on select Southwest flights. That means you can jam out to your favorite local radio station, even if you're flying coast to coast. Check out expertly curated stations that are perfect for kids and adults, available on most domestic Southwest flights and perfect for a full nonstop or those pesky minutes between a movie ending and your plane touching down. So grab your headphones, raise your tray table and relax with iHeartRadio and Southwest Airlines. This episode is brought to you by the restless ones. Available now from iHeart, returning for season three is the restless ones, and original podcast presented by T mobile for business and iHeartRadio. And join host Jonathan Strickland, as he sits down for in depth discussions with the people at the intersection of technology and business. You'll learn how each of these leaders is building a bridge to what's next and leveraging transformative technologies like 5G to create a more connected and meaningful future today. The restless ones is now available on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey brain stuff, I'm Lauren bogle bomb, and today's episode is another classic from our archives. During this pandemic, we've all been focused more on health and wellness. And for many of us, that's included taking a look at our relationship with alcohol. As with anything we consume, portion size matters. So it was really interesting to revisit this episode, which deals with the finding that wine glasses have doubled in size over the past 20 years or so. Hi, brain stuffed Lauren Vogel bomb here. Those of us who imbibe have all said it. I'll just have one glass of wine. But even if you stick to that, you might want to consider how you're supposed single serving actually measures up. That's because, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge, wine glasses of modern day Brits are now 7 times the size of their imbibing predecessors 300 years ago. And those glass sizes have increased the most in the last two decades, accompanying the rise in vino consumption. Until the second half of the 20th century, beer and spirits dominated the British booze scene. But the drinking of wine nearly quadrupled between 1980 and 2004, likely due to its affordability, availability, accessibility, and all those successful marketing tactics. The study authors suggest that when it comes to how much we're drinking, our glass size probably does matter. For the study, the researchers examined wine glass capacity over time to illuminate weather changes in size may have contributed to that steep rise in wine drinking over the past few decades. By scouring online info and talking with antiques glassware experts and museum curators, the researchers were able to obtain the measurements of 411 glasses from 1700 to the modern day. What they found might be a bit disheartening to anyone who leans heavily on that just one glass line. Wine glass capacity skyrocketed from a mere 66 mL or two ounces in the 1700s to 417 mL. That's 14 ounces in the 2000s, with the average size of a wine glass in 2016 to 2017, falling around a 449 mL, or 15 ounces. For reference, the size of a standard drink does vary from culture to culture around the world, but is commonly around ten grams of pure alcohol per beverage. For wine, having an average of about 12% alcohol by volume that accounts for just slightly over four ounces or a 125 mL. Study authors zoop in set in the press release for the most part, this increase was gradual, but since the 1990s, the size has increased rapidly, whether this led to the rise in wine consumption in England, we can't say for certain, but a wine glass 300 years ago would have only held about half of today's small measure. There are lots of reasons those glasses may have gotten roomier, more affordable glass prices, innovations and technology, a healthier economy, and an increased societal appreciation for wine. But it could be the people behind the bar who have demanded bigger glassware to accommodate the increasingly normalized megaport. Despite a 2010 regulatory requirement in England to make customers aware that the more modest a 125 mL glasses are available, most establishments opt to serve 250 mL at a time, or about one third of a wine bottle. And if your response to all this is that you have no problem moderating your intake in the face of such generous glassware, know that researchers have also found that the strength of wine has increased over the years. In the UK at least. But regardless of where you.

iHeartRadio Jonathan Strickland IBM Lauren bogle Lauren Vogel Southwest Airlines University of Cambridge England UK
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here..

Lauren bogle
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:30 min | 8 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Management that requires less management. Let's create something that changes everything. IBM let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com. This episode is brought to you by the restless ones. Available now from iHeart, returning for season three is the restless ones, and original podcast presented by T mobile for business and iHeartRadio. And join host Jonathan Strickland, as he sits down for in depth discussions with the people at the intersection of technology and business. You'll learn how each of these leaders is building a bridge to what's next and leveraging transformative technologies like 5G to create a more connected and meaningful future today. The restless ones is now available on the iHeartRadio app, or wherever you listen to podcasts. It's never been easier to communicate with people. But it's never been harder to know which platform you're supposed to communicate on. Here's a simpler solution. With call, meet and message all in one app, RingCentral makes communication easy. With all that connectivity in the palm of your hand, you can work from anywhere. With anyone at any time and never miss a beat. Because when it comes to communication, simple is better. Learn more at RingCentral dot com. RingCentral, simpler, communications. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff Lauren bogle bomb here. If you traveled back in time, 8 million years to visit what's now the state of Florida, you might see saber toothed cats, some small, ancient horses, and maybe even a giant beaver. But one animal would look exactly the same as it does today. The alligator. And this was news to scientists as of just a few years ago. In 2016, the university of Florida put out a press release about a former student, one Evan Whiting, who was at that point a doctoral student at the university of Minnesota. That summer, Whiting had had a couple pertinent papers published in the journal of herpetology and the journal paleo geography, paleoclimatology, paleoecology, which I'm fascinated about the existence of. He said, in the press release. Even 30 million years ago, alligators didn't look much different. We were surprised to find fossil alligators from this deep in time that actually belonged to the living species rather than an extinct one. The modern American alligator, a taxonomical name alligator, misses Abbie ensis, is a member of the order crocodilia, an ancient group of animals that's hung in there for more than 84 million years. Whiting and his co authors reexamined an 8 million year old alligator skull found in Marion county, Florida. Originally thought to belong to an extinct species. The closer they looked, the more sure they became that the skull belonged to the modern American alligator, which scientists have up until now, thought evolved into a separate species around just 2 million years ago. Their analysis means the species has remained virtually untouched by evolution for 6 million years longer than previously thought. This is interesting in and of itself, but the researchers believe it also sheds some light on why the American alligator keeps two freshwater habitats. In a place that's surrounded by rich saltwater ecosystems. If the American alligator is as old as these researchers believe it to be, it probably once shared the Florida shores with a species of marine crocodile that grew to 25 feet that's 7 meters long, and when extinct around 5 million years ago, it's possible that the smaller species at the time, the American alligator evolved to prefer freshwater habitats to avoid becoming a food source for these crocodilian behemoths. Study co authored David stedman, the ornithology curator at the Florida museum of natural history at the university of Florida, said in that press release, Evans research shows alligators didn't evolve in a vacuum with no other crocodilians around. The Gators we see today do not really compete with anything. But millions of years ago, it was not only competing with another type of crocodilian. It was competing with a much larger one. Though it remained entirely unchanged over millions of years, the American alligator was nearly hunted to extinction in the mid 20th century, when alligator leather goods became all the rage. It was listed as an endangered species in 1967. But after two decades of.

iHeartRadio Jonathan Strickland IBM Lauren bogle Evan Whiting journal of herpetology Whiting Abbie ensis Florida university of Florida university of Minnesota Marion county David stedman Florida museum of natural hist Gators Evans
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:42 min | 9 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Music live dot com slash I heart country. This episode is brought to you by Star Trek strange new worlds. The final frontiers waiting. Star Trek strange new worlds is premiering may 5th, exclusively on paramount plus. Strange new worlds is a series for everyone, whether you've been a Star Trek fan since the original series, or this is your very first adventure with starfleet. Get a glimpse of life on the enterprise before the days of captain Kirk. Anson mount leads the starship as captain pike with Spock number one and the rest of the crew in tow encounter new species in new worlds with hope, excitement and optimism for the future in new episodes every week, starring Anson mount, Ethan peck, and Rebecca remain. Make first contact with Star Trek, strange new worlds, premiering may 5th on paramount plus. This episode is brought to you by animal behavior college. Are you a lover of marine life? What if you could start a whole new career as an Aquarius or an aquarium maintenance professional in just 8 months? If you teach a person about fish, they'll have a career forever. Animal behavior college is proud to present their aquarium maintenance program. Learn about fresh and saltwater fish, aquarium maintenance, fishkeeping, and more. With their flexible online schedules, study from home in the U.S. or Canada. They offer flexible tuition payment plans with no credit checks. Enroll at animal behavior college dot com. That's animal behavior college dot com. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. Imagine you're a person living about a thousand years ago and what's now the state of Ohio. Your job is mostly growing corn, and otherwise hanging out in and around your village, providing all the necessities of life for yourself and your community. Making pottery to cook in, maintaining your home and the other buildings in the village, and working to procure food other than corn. A growing squash and beans, banting deer and turkeys, and so on. But one day you're talking with some friends and you decide, let's make a snake sculpture on the edge of this meteorite crater over here. And, so you do. And you make it 1376 feet long. That's 419 meters. Located in southwestern Ohio, serpent mound is a giant earthen mound, and the largest serpent effigy in the world, a thought to have been constructed by the fort ancient people around 900 years ago. Although some argue that the site is much older, and that the four ancient people didn't build it, but actually refurbished it. Although no human remains or artifacts have been found in this Inuit grassy hillock that is serpent mound, some graves and burial mounds stand nearby. Probably built by the people of the adena culture. The fort ancients predecessors in the area, about 600 years, even earlier. Regardless, serpent mound belongs to a class of structures called effigy mounds, a which were commonly built in the shape of animals, like bears, lynx, bison, or birds, and often served as burial sites for ancient peoples. Serpent mound sits on the edge of a meteorite impact crater, and The Serpent itself ranges between 19 and 25 feet wide. That's 6 two 7 and a half meters. And it rises around three feet or one meter from the surrounding landscape, with its head formed by a rock cliff overhanging a nearby creek. Although it's difficult to know what its purpose was, since it wasn't used for burials, it does act as a calendar. The sunset on the summer solstice lines up with The Serpent's head. The eastern face and curves of the snake's body line up with the sunrise on the equinoxes, and The Serpent's tail coils align with the winter solstice. In the year 2008, serpent mound and 8 other Ohio American Indian earthworks were chosen by the United States Department of the Interior for inclusion on the United States tentative list of sites to be submitted to UNESCO for inclusion on the prestigious World Heritage Sites list. UNESCO is the United Nations educational scientific and cultural organization. If serpent mound is eventually inscribed on the list, possibly in 2023, according to Ohio history connections World Heritage director Jennifer Altman, it would be among the likes of Egypt's pyramids, the Great Wall of China, Pompeii, Stonehenge, and the Taj Mahal. A serpent mound is located within The Serpent mound state memorial. Designated a national historical landmark in people's Ohio, maintained by the Ohio history connection. From the site is open seasonally from April through November, with visitor hours every day except Mondays and some holidays. The site boasts an observation tower that was built in 1908, following increasing interest from European colonists that started in 1847, when the mound was sketched and surveyed. Though the tower is currently closed for the season for needed repairs. And archeological investigation continues. As of 2014, new radiocarbon dating suggested that the effigy may be from as early as 300 BCE. Today's episode is based on the article, Ohio serpent mound is an archeological mystery on how stuff works dot com. Written by Justin shields, brain stuff is production of iHeartRadio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and is produced by Tyler clang. Four more podcasts from my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This episode is brought to you by animal behavior college. For the love of dogs, your future can only get better. Study to become a professional dog trainer at animal behavior college. They're on campus dog trainer program provides a fully immersive experience with both in person instructors and dogs. Get ABC certified in just 5 months. Learn all about canines, body posturing, training techniques, and more, including the business skills to be your own boss. Their next session starts soon. To learn more, including schedule and tuition options, visit animal behavior college dot com. This episode is brought to you by square. What if your business could sell anywhere at any time and open to more customers all by making one simple choice? Square has everything a business needs to open online on social media in store and on whatever new sales channels might come next, with powerful commerce tools that set up in minutes. So if your business is open to new opportunities, square can help you open everywhere they are. Go to square dot com slash commerce to learn what's possible..

Anson mount animal behavior college Ethan peck Animal behavior college Ohio Lauren bogle UNESCO captain Kirk Spock Ohio American Indian earthwork United States Department of th Rebecca Ohio history connections World Jennifer Altman U.S. Serpent mound state memorial
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hello parents and teachers I want to invite your kids to our new podcast biology squad. We are a team of spies who specialize in science as doctor stinky breath and the purple ninjas are trying to take over the world through science, and it is up to us to stop them before it is too late. Search for mister Jim or biology squad. On the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. At save farm, they're focused on the belief that diversity makes safer, stronger, smarter neighborhoods, where everyone is welcome. Safe farm does believe to make a better world for our future generations we need to amplify and celebrate, but more importantly, empower black creators today. So this is why I am telling you, State Farm is committed to providing services, platforms, and long-standing actions to help build strong neighborhoods for the black community. Stay farm knows that being a good neighbor means uplifting communities wherever their customers find themselves, no matter where you are. It's not about a policy. It's about being a partner. Because with over 19,000 State Farm agents, they reflect the diversity of America. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. With prices soaring at the pump, discover has your back, with cash back, used discover to earn 5% cash back at gas stations and target. Now through June on up to $1500 in purchases when you activate, limitations apply. Learn more at discover dot com slash rewards. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. Let's talk today about Bugs Bunny. Although a bug's esque character appeared in a cartoon in 1938. Bugs as we'd recognize him today first appeared on July 27th of 1940, in a cartoon titled a wild hare. His character was well received by children and adults alike. This and the fact that his debut coincided with America's golden age of animation helped secure his spot as one of Warner Brothers, main cartoon characters. During World War II, bugs got another boost. The several air force troops, including the 380th bombardment group, chose bugs as their mascot, and the Marine Corps designated him an honorary master sergeant. He starred in propaganda cartoons, made specifically for American soldiers, stationed in Europe, as well as government advertisements for wartime bonds. Bugs Bunny went on to star in a 150 films, appear as the first animated character on a postage stamp, receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and be ranked number one on a list of the 50 greatest cartoon characters compiled by TV guide. Although many have attempted to identify what sets Bugs Bunny apart from the cartoon crowd, perhaps the late Chuck Jones, the longtime writer and producer of Bugs Bunny, described it best. His daughter, Linda Jones clough, told Smithsonian magazine, and my father's attitude was that bugs already existed, and they were just writing about him. He would come home in the evening and say to my mother, you won't believe what Bugs Bunny said today. What do you mean she would say? You wrote it. No, I discovered under the circumstances that this is what he would say. Whether Bugs Bunny was conceived as a rabbit or a hare isn't clear. Although the word bunny is part of his name, many of his cartoons had hair in the title, including Bill of hair, and fallen hair. Of course, that could be wordplay rather than scientific nomenclature. Before we hop to the wrong conclusion, let's take a look at some of the characteristic differences between rabbits and hares. Although rabbits and hares are all from the Laporte family, they're classified under 9 different genera, 8 for rabbits and one for hairs, and 53 species, 21 for rabbits, and 32 for hairs. And they start life in markedly different ways. Hairs are pregnant for about 42 days and deliver fully developed newborns called leverets. Well, bunnies have a 30 day gestational period, and give birth to kids that don't yet have fur or the ability to regulate their body temperature. Hairs also have jointed skulls, unlike those of any other mammal, this gives them cranial kinesis, which means that their skull bones can move relative to each other. In ways that humans, for example, can't. Our jaw is our only movable skull joint. Hairs have an intracranial one that researchers think helps them distribute the impact of long running leaps. Hairs have longer ears and longer legs than rabbits, which seems to tip the scale in favor of Bugs Bunny being a hair. Hairs look lanky in ways that rabbits with their shorter ears and shorter legs just don't. Also, hairs are more likely to be gray in color. Though hairs and rabbits both come in a range of colors and patterns, from white to brown to black, with lots of gradients in between. The hairs are also less social than bunnies. Hairs don't hang out with their families, and by all accounts, neither does bugs. But hairs live completely above ground, whereas Bugs Bunny lives in a burrow, like a rabbit. At most bunnies, create burrows or warrens in which they live and hide their young. There is one thing that could clear all this up. DNA analysis, a rabbits have 44 chromosomes, while members of the hair genus have 48. So, analysis of Bugs Bunny genetic material would wrap this up once and for all. Except that he's not real. So maybe, instead of splitting hairs over taxonomy, we should all just relax with a carrot or three, and enjoy some classic cartoons. Today's episode is based on the article, is Bugs Bunny, a rabbit, or a hair, on house stuff works dot com, written by L'oreal dove. Brain stuff is production of iHeartRadio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and is produced by Tyler clang. A four more podcasts, my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. My shiro always goes the extra mile, stretches every dollar, puts others first, but now it's your time, mom. Get free tips to help boost your retirement savings now at Easter retirement dot org. Brought to you by AARP and the ad council. Welcome to Heidi world, the Heidi flight story, a new podcast coming to iHeart radio, put it this way. The person Heidi that people talk about in the history of time, no one did what she did in one year. No one. In the 1990s, LA girl Heidi fleiss became one of the most famous people in the world. Her trial threatened to expose LA's deepest secrets, listen to Heidi world on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts..

mister Jim Lauren bogle Linda Jones clough Smithsonian magazine State Farm America Chuck Jones Warner Brothers Apple Bugs Bunny Marine Corps Bunny Hollywood Europe Tyler clang Heidi ad council AARP
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:12 min | 10 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. More than 50 years ago, a determined young woman stepped up and created the iconic slogan, cipher, a which is Spanish for yes, we can. That would lift up the voices of the voiceless and change the state of labor as we know it in the United States. That woman, civil rights activist Dolores huerta would go on to cofound the national farm workers association with Caesar Chavez in the 1960s. During her nearly 40 years of work with that organization, huerta helped launch the first farm workers strike in the country, which kick started the fight for union rights and labor organizing in the agricultural sector in the U.S. and changed the lives of farm workers forever. Huerta was born on April 10th of 1930 in the town of Dawson, New Mexico. As she was one of three children and their parents were activists. Her family had been in the U.S. for 5 generations, and her great grandfather fought in the Civil War. Her father was a minor, farm worker, and union leader, who later went into state politics. After her parents divorce, horta moved with her mother to Stockton, California, where they lived in a community of Mexican Filipino and Japanese Americans. According to the book, Dolores huerta get to know the voice of migrant workers, quarto was a talkative inquisitive young girl, and her grandfather, nicknamed her see it lingua, a Spanish four 7 tongues. For the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke via email with Mario Garcia, author of a Dolores huerta reader. He said, when her family moved from New Mexico to Stockton, California, her brothers had to work in the fields, and huerta as a teenager also wanted to join them. However, her mother forbade this because she did not want her daughter to work in the fields. Where does mother did permit her daughter to work in industrial packing sheds, aware the working conditions weren't much better? A Garcia said, I think this early exposure to the harsh working conditions of farm workers provided a context for Dolores later working to organize these workers to do away with the more exploitative aspects of farm labor. After graduating, hort the married, had two children and began teaching elementary school. Many of the students were the children of impoverished farm workers, and came to school hungry, or missing essential items like shoes. It has tough works also spoke via email with Sarah Warren, author of the book Dolores huerta, a hero to migrant workers. She said that puerta, quote, was driven to do more for the children she planned to serve when she found out how their families were being abused. At age 25, huerta became immersed in activism, joining a local group run by Fred Ross, and learning how to become a labor organizer. Garcia said, as a young adult, she became involved with the community service organization or CSO, which was an organization mobilizing Mexican Americans in civil rights work and voter registration in the 1950s. At the CSO, huerta met cisar Chavez, who would go on to become one of the most widely recognized Mexican American labor leaders in U.S. history. Porta and Chavez began to work together for improved working conditions and wages for farm workers, who earned as little as 70 cents an hour at the time. A Garcia said, Cesaro recognized Dolores talents as an organizer. Plus her own personal strength. And so when he began to organize in the fields by 1962, he recruited Dolores to work with him. And together, Chavez and huerta founded the national farm workers association in 1962, which later became the united farm workers union. Huerta remained vice president of the united farm workers until 1999. Chavez and huerta had a complex relationship, according to scholars. From one point of view, they were comrades in the fields, working for better conditions for the most marginalized workers in society. How stuff works also spoke via email with Monica Brown. Author of side by side, the story of Dolores huerta and Cesar Chavez. She said, as Dolores once told me, they were comrades. They spoke to farm workers on the backs of flatbed trucks. Garcia said, Dolores saw herself as equal to Cesar, and he accepted this. Cesar didn't always agree with Dolores, but he learned from her. As she was one of the few persons in the union, who was not afraid to criticize the Tsar, which he appreciated. Weka and Chavez became most well known for organizing the 1965 Delano grape strike in boycott, a striking Filipino grape farm workers sought the help of the emerging national farm workers association, which largely represented Latino workers at the time. Huerta marched along with Chavez for workers rights, and brought together the Filipino and Latino workers on the picket line and led a nationwide boycott of non union table grapes. In 1970, their steadfast organizing paid off, resulting in union contracts, as well as better wages and working conditions for the grape workers. Host of works also spoke with Stacy sours, author of C, a puede, the rhetorical legacy of Dolores huerta and the united farm workers. She said, Dolores huerta played a big role in getting farm workers to participate in union activities to boycott grapes and other produce to pick at farms and become members of the union. In 2012, president Barack Obama awarded huerta, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, recognizing her, not Chavez, as the original source of the phrase, C seque. Obama famously appropriated the slogan for his own presidential campaign. But huerta's rallying cry had been used for years to organize farm workers and inspire advocacy for other civil rights issues. A Brown said, Dolores huerta first spoke, the famous words, see se puede, while speaking to a group of workers who kept saying, we can't organize the workers here. We can't. Dolores responded, C, se puede. Yes, you can. Huerta became an iconic activist and a source of pride from Mexican Americans and others within the Latin American community. Her organizing helped bring about the 1986 immigration reform and control act, which granted Amnesty to 1.3 million undocumented workers. Huerta is approaching her 92nd birthday, this April of 2022, and remains active on the front lines as a civil rights advocate and labor organizer. She holds media events and hosts ted-talks on how to speak out and become empowered through activism. Sour said, her legacy today is that she's become a social movement icon. As she's demonstrated how one moves from individual action and concern for community to working with other people on those issues, to creating an entire social movement. Also founded the Dolores hurt the foundation in 2003. The nonprofit focuses on empowering and training grassroots organizers in lower income and disenfranchised communities in California, including work on LGBTQIA issues. Although farm workers have more collective bargaining opportunities as a result of huerta's work, they still experience widespread exploitation, harsh working conditions and wage theft. In recent years, huerta has been vocal in pushing for immigration reform to provide a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, who constitute a large share of farm workers in the United States. A moreover, huerta continues to boost the civic power of the Latin American community, specifically through efforts to turn out the vote. The community played an important role in the 2020 election, turning out in record numbers. Soured said she's been very active in registering people to vote and getting people to the polls. Her foundation works to get people more involved beyond voting, such as organizing voters to vote. But also to participate more fully on social justice issues in their communities. A Garcia said, her legacy of taking on issues of social justice, not only in the fields, but in the fight for women's rights, civil rights, voting rights, and for world peace are all part of her legacy..

Dolores huerta huerta national farm workers associat Dolores Huerta Chavez Garcia Lauren bogle United States united farm Caesar Chavez Mario Garcia Stockton Sarah Warren CSO New Mexico Fred Ross cisar Chavez Cesaro
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:48 min | 11 months ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Let's adapt. Let's create something that changes everything. IBM let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com. Today, what business needs most is creativity. So let's create new possibilities from intelligent automation to cloud management that requires less management. Let's create something that changes everything. IBM let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com. Today, what business needs most is creativity. So let's create AI with integrity, not bias. Cloud management that requires less management. And new ways for business to do business. Let's create at scale right now together. Let's prototype. Let's tweak, let's test, let's adapt. Let's create something that changes everything. IBM let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. On February 21st of 2022, Russian president Vladimir Putin gave an hour long speech where he not only recognized the independence of two Russia backed territories in eastern Ukraine, but also de legitimized the sovereignty of Ukraine itself. A Putin expanded the idea that Ukraine's borders were drawn up by the Soviet Union's founder, Vladimir Lenin, and still exist only because of the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. After the speech, Putin ordered troops into those eastern territories under the guise of them being peacemakers. Many experts in global geopolitics were concerned if not horrified by these speech and invasion. Suggesting it was Putin's way of rewriting history, as well as of providing a reason to launch what could become the largest war in Europe since the end of World War II. The speech came after Putin had spent months building up Russian military forces surrounding Ukraine. He's also demanded Ukraine not be allowed to join NATO, the defense of alliance that currently includes 30 countries. So how is the world responding? The NATO Ukraine commission met in Brussels on Tuesday, February 22nd of 2022 to address the situation. NATO secretary Jens Stoltenberg said it will stand by Ukrainian sovereignty with force, if necessary. But hoped Russia would still choose diplomacy. So, aside from a full on war, what else are world leaders doing to deter Putin from invading Ukraine? They're imposing sanctions. So today, let's talk about what sanctions are and how they're imposed, and also what sanctions are supposed to accomplish and how they work. Very basically, sanctions are sort of economic versions of weaponry, designed to turn up the pressure on another country and its regime's leaders by hitting them in their wallets. For the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke with Ellen Leipzig back in 2020. She's the director of the masters in international security degree program and the center for security policy studies at George Mason university's char school of policy and government. And a former vice chair of the U.S. government's national intelligence council. As she explained, a sanctions are any penalty or disruption in the normal economic relations between two countries. Usually, sanctions are supposed to target a particular bad behavior or send a signal to an unfriendly country. Sanctions often involve freezing any of the target's assets such as real estate or funds and bank accounts that happen to be inside the U.S. and threatening to punish any financial institution inside or outside the U.S. that does transactions for the adversary or helps in some other way. But sanctions also can take a variety of other forms as well, from interrupting international trade to closing a border to suspending arms sales. Sanctions can even be tailored to hit a specific industry or part of another nation's economy. At any rate, it's a form of what's called coercive diplomacy. Sanctions come down to this. How do you get their attention so their feeling some pain? And give themselves incentives to change their behavior. Here in the U.S., the president has sweeping authority to impose sanctions on other countries and leaders under the international emergency economic powers act of 1977, which allows him or her to impose them to deal with any unusual and extraordinary threat. Congress has the power to hit other nations and people with sanctions as well. Back in 2012, for example, legislators passed the magnitsky act to impose sanctions against Russia. The law is named after a corruption exposing lawyer who died in a Russian prison cell in 2009. A Congress imposed additional sanctions against Russia for an invasion of Ukraine in 2014. Given the current Russia Ukraine crisis, president Joe Biden announced on February 22nd that the U.S. would impose sanctions that extend further than those implemented in 2014, including sanctions that will prohibit American financial institutions from processing transactions for large Russian banks. This will effectively inhibit those banks from transactions involving U.S. dollars. Leaps and explained that Congress often resorts to sanctions to avoid having tensions with another country explode into armed conflict. She said, Congress often believes, let's go carefully at the escalatory ladder. Let's express our disapproval in a resolution. If they don't pay attention, we'll then threaten sanctions. If they still don't pay attention, we'll impose those sanctions, and then we'll impose more sanctions. It's a longer continuum from peace to war. Either way, once sanctions are imposed, the Treasury Department's office of foreign asset control enforces the restrictions. Of course, other countries can impose sanctions as well, though according to Leipzig, nobody utilizes the economic weapon as frequently as the U.S. does. Instead, most only want to participate in multinational sanctions, such as those imposed by the UN Security Council, which have included economic and trade sanctions, as well as arms embargoes and travel bans. Since 1966, the UN has used such measures 30 times. Punishing regimes ranging from apartheid era South Africa to North Korea. Okay, but so do sanctions actually work. Leipzig said, there's always this range of opinion about whether sanctions work or not. It depends on what your intentions were. If your intention was to punish, then just measuring the economic pain on another country is a way of saying the sanctions are working. If your intention is to truly change the behavior of the other country, you have to use a very different metric. And in that case, most sanctions fail, and because countries become resistant, they're willing to absorb the pain for a nationalistic reasons. They don't want to concede to a more powerful country. Instead of giving in, for example, a targeted nation may find another more powerful nation to act as its patron. For example, after the U.S. imposed a sweeping embargo on the communist regime of Fidel Castro in Cuba in 1960, the island nation relied upon trade with the Soviet Union, which for years bought Cuban sugar at 5 to 6 times the world market price as.

Ukraine IBM Putin Russia Lauren bogle defense of alliance Soviet Union NATO Ukraine commission U.S. NATO Ellen Leipzig center for security policy stu char school of policy and gove Vladimir Lenin Jens Stoltenberg Vladimir Putin Congress national intelligence council magnitsky president Joe Biden
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Offer deadline on oak street mile three. Welcome to the housing market, I'm with Redfin, and I'm here to help. I need to sell my house. Great. Rhett's in charge is a 1% listing fee when you buy and sell with us, which is more than half off the usual fee and saves you an average of $8400. Oh, wow, is that all? Yep. I'm kidding. You had me at 1%. Want to win? So with bread fin, it's real estate done right. Did he warrant the offers counter in 5 minutes? Average savings has Redfin refund plus 1% listing fee. Subject to minimums, not available in all areas. Learn more, Redfin dot com. Hi, I'm Gloria Adam, host of well read black girl. Each week we journey together through the cultural moment, where art, culture, and literature collide, and pay homage to the women whose books we grew up reading. It's the literary kickback you never knew you needed. Listen to well read black girl. On the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Being a real estate agent isn't about listing houses. It's about connecting to people. I need to find new buyers every day. So I promote my listings using radio commercials from ihar ad builder dot com. Now every time I have an open house, it's a full house. A custom radio ad from iHeart ad builder is the fast affordable way to drive customers to your business. Put the power of radio to work for you. Get started now at iHeart ad builder dot com. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bogle bomb here. Entrepreneurs like Kim Kardashian and Rihanna, whose beauty brands have made hundreds of millions of dollars are following a trail blazed by one madam, CJ walker, a century ago. Some reports claim walker was the first black woman to build a $1 million fortune, but Guinness World Records lists walker as the first self made woman millionaire period. For the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke with A'Lelia bundles, walker's great great granddaughter, and biographer. She said, for a woman in business and who launched her product before women had the right to vote, is pretty extraordinary. Walker was the daughter of sharecroppers, yet still built a national brand, empowered hundreds of women, and became a philanthropist and civil rights activist. The Netflix miniseries self made, starring Octavia Spencer, is loosely based on her life story. So, who was she? The woman we know as Madame C.J. Walker was born, Sarah breedlove, Anna Louisiana cotton plantation, in 1867. The 5th child of Owen and Minerva breed love, who once had been enslaved, Sarah was the first of her siblings to be born free her early years in Louisiana were full of struggle, and Sarah was an orphan by the age of 7, so she went to live with her older sister and her husband. In 1877, the family moved to vicksburg Mississippi, where young Sarah picked cotton and did domestic work. At age 14, she married Moses mcwilliams to escape the hard labor and her brother in law, who mistreated her. Her only child, lilia, who later changed her name to A'Lelia walker, was born in June of 1885. But when her husband died in 1887, she moved to St. Louis, where her brothers were working as barbers. She started doing laundry, earning a dollar 50 a day, which allowed walker and her daughter to attend school. By the 1890s, her hair started falling out due to a scalp condition. There were very few hair care products designed for women of African descent at the time, and hair loss was a big problem bundle says. So walker searched for a way to cure her hair loss. She tried the pearl hair care line, made by another black woman entrepreneur, and it helped. She sold pearl for 18 months while experimenting with her own hair growing formula. In 1906, she we D Charles Joseph CJ walker, a sales and advertising man in Denver. He helped her with marketing strategies and business ideas, and both these and his name were useful. That same year she changed her name from Sarah breedlove to Madame C.J. Walker and launched Madame C.J. Walker's wonderful hair grower. Bundle said, she was one of the women who was a pioneer in a multi-million dollar cosmetics and hair care industry. In 1906, when she founded her company, there was no national distribution for hair care and cosmetics, like when women, like Elizabeth Arden, created her brand. To promote their products, she and CJ traveled the south for 18 months, selling door to door and doing demonstrations, mostly in churches. Convinced by walkers before and after photos, women snapped up tins of her hair grower for 50 cents apiece. By 1908, walker was earning the equivalent of a $150,000 a year in today's money. And she liked to say there would be no hair growing industry if I hadn't invented it. The exact recipe is lost to time, but the original formula included coconut oil, beeswax, petrolatum, which is similar to petroleum jelly, copper sulfate, precipitated sulfur, and a violet scent. A coconut oil is a favorite in hair care today. But the key ingredient was likely sulfur, which had been used in scalp and hair preparations for years. A 2019 study found that an oral form of sulfur known as MSM supported the growth of healthy hair and fingernails, likely because it boosts the development of keratin, a protein necessary for growing hair skin and nails. But back to madam walker, her walker system included a vegetable based shampoo and glossy, which helped smooth hair pressed with her newly designed hot comb. By 1911, walker incorporated, then recruited and trained black women agents who she called beauty culturists in major cities. However, as walker's success grew, her marriage deteriorated. After she caught CJ in an affair, she divorced him in 1912. By this time she lived in Indianapolis, a Midwestern hub of transit and black American life. She hobnobbed with newspaper publishers, and eventually became allied with influential politicians and activists, including Ida B wells, WEB Dubois, Mary McLeod Bethune, and Booker T. Washington, who was one of the most influential black men in the country at that time. In 1916, she settled in New York's Harlem. Then the epicenter of black American culture. She and her daughter, Ben allele walker Robinson, opened a posh salon featuring sweeping columns, velvet seating, parquet floors, and a grand piano in the lobby. In 1917, walker hosted her first national convention for beauty culturists in Philadelphia. And besides inspiring her agents to sell more, she encouraged them to support charitable causes through the Madame C.J. Walker benevolent association. Walker donated money to black colleges and gave to the NAACP's anti lynching fund. Bundle said, she visited The White House in 1917 with a group to try to persuade president Woodrow Wilson to support legislation to make lynching a federal crime. In the early 20th century, there were hundreds and hundreds of lynchings and African American men were targeted. In 1918, walker moved into the villa lewaro, a mansion she had built in irvington on Hudson, about 45 minutes north of Manhattan. With some 20,000 ft² that's about 1900 m², spread over 34 rooms and expansive views of the Hudson River, the home, designed by African American architect Werner Woodson Tandy senior, was a marvel. Sadly, she didn't get to enjoy it for long. Walker died in 1919 at just 52 years old. In her obituary, WEB Dubois wrote, it is given to few persons to transform a people in a generation. Yet this was done by the late Madame C.J. Walker. Her daughter A'Lelia went on to be the most prominent socialite in the Harlem renaissance, facilitating art and culture in her villa lewaro, and beyond. Though the mansion fell out of the family after allele's death, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976, and has largely been restored by ambassador Harold E Dolly junior and his wife, who lived there from 1993 to 2018. Dolly, a retired investment banker, and the first African American to own his own seat in the New York Stock Exchange had a toy model.

CJ walker walker Gloria Adam Lauren bogle Lelia bundles Sarah Anna Louisiana Moses mcwilliams Lelia walker Redfin Rhett Charles Joseph CJ walker Octavia Spencer Guinness World Records Kim Kardashian
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by discover spending more on groceries this past year. A wanting to order some weekday takeout. Whether you're spending on the essentials like groceries or even splurging on dinner from your favorite local restaurant do so with your discover credit card because only discover automatically matches all the cash. Back you've earned at the end of your first year and it's so easy to earn cashback since discover card is accepted at ninety nine percent of places in the us that take credit cards when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash match limitations. Apply twenty neilson report. This episode is brought to you by honey nut cheerios. This is one of the breakfast cereals that i grew up with. I loved the sweet honey almond flavor and that irresistible crunch and honey nut. Cheerios is made with whole grain. Oats diets that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol but include three grams of soluble fiber daily from whole grain. Oat foods may reduce the risk of heart disease in honey nut cheerios. Cereal provides a quarter of that per serving. learn more about hunting nut. Cheerios by up a box. Wherever you shop for cereal this episode is brought to you by discover spending more on groceries this past year. A wanting to order some weekday takeout. Whether you're spending on the essentials like groceries or even splurging on dinner from your favorite local restaurant do so with your discover credit card because only discover automatically matches all the cash. Back you've earned at the end of your first year and it's so easy to earn cashback since discover card is accepted at ninety nine percent of places in the us that take credit cards when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash match limitations. Apply twenty neilson report. Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here. When the covered nineteen vaccine became available. Perry night of fort. Lauderdale florida gotten in line as soon as he was eligible. Hit already done battle with the virus and wasn't interested in going there again. A for the article does episodes based on how stuff works spoke with him by email. He said i first tested positive in august of twenty twenty and spent two in the hospital. Because i was having a hell of a time. Just catching my breath. It had to be up. There is one of the worst experiences of my life. It's like being underwater and about to come up for fresh air and halfway through drawing that fresh air a tightness interrupts at night got both doses of the pfizer vaccine in may of twenty twenty one and despite that he wasn't too surprised when he tested positive again in july he said i was more of having a feeling like. Wow i should just play the lottery because this luck is incredible. If you know what i mean. I was mentally preparing to go back into the hospital for another horrible couple days. Fortunately his second go round would covered. Nineteen was nothing like the first. His symptoms were mild. And short lived. And experienced that is only strengthened. His appreciation for the vaccine might said after seeing firsthand my experience with vid with and without the vaccine. It's given me enough faith in the medical system that vaccinations are doing their part to protect us. It's not a shield one hundred percent preventing the virus from getting to us but it's a relentless warrior who really keeps the worst of it at bay. Still it upsets a lot of people that covert nineteen is possible at all post vaccine. How does that even happen. How stuff works also spoke by. Email was three banerjee a faculty member in walden universities. Phd in public health program. He explained when a person gets cove in nineteen even after being fully vaccinated. This is known as a breakthrough infection since it breaks through the developed. Immune response this type of covert breakthrough. Infection is not unusual indeed. It's actually to be expected given the viruses. Recent mutations how stuff works also spoke with dr airing glatt a representative for the infectious diseases. Society of america and chair of medicine at mount sinai southnassau in oceanside new york he said with the delta variant. It is certainly more common. These variants have higher transmissibility than the earlier strains they also have higher viral loads. So they're more transmissible even to people who are vaccinated. So this is a concern. A breakthrough infections in general are nothing new. The medical community sees them every single year with influenza. However many people mistakenly believed that vaccines provide complete and total protection. But the truth is that as with flu. Vaccines the covered. Nineteen vaccines won't prevent you from being infected. And they're meant to increase your body's ability to fight the virus effectively vaccines don't prevent all infections. They just make them less likely and prevent serious complications and death when those infections do occur. A pharmaceutical companies for their part have been straightforward from the get go about vaccine efficacy both pfizer and no reported efficacy rates of ninety to ninety five percent for the original strain advisors drops to eighty eight percent when faced with the newer more contagious delta mutation and madonna is believed to perform about the same but breakthrough infections of covert nineteen are typically so mild the centers for disease control and prevention or cdc stopped tracking them. Starting on may first of twenty twenty one in such cases results in hospitalization or death so four. Cdc tracking purposes a mild case of cove in nineteen after vaccination is not currently considered a breakthrough infection banerjee said nationally forty six us states and territories voluntarily reported and thousand two hundred sixty two breakthrough infections to the cdc between january first and april thirtieth of two thousand twenty one. A by comparison. There were eleven point eight million covered nineteen diagnoses in total during the same period. A through july nineteenth. Twenty twenty one. There were five thousand nine hundred and fourteen patients with cove in nineteen vaccine richter infections. Who were hospitalized or die the us out of more than one hundred and fifty nine million people fully vaccinated nationwide and to do the math and put it another way. According to this data fewer than one tenth of one percent of the reported cases of cove in nineteen from january through april occurred in people who were already vaccinated. So let's say you cut a penny ten pieces and for every hundred cases of cove in nineteen. You have every dollars worth just one of those slivers of a penny represents how many vaccinated people got cove in nineteen and furthermore according to this data through the middle of july fewer than three hundreds of one percent of people who were vaccinated wound up either in the hospital or dying from a breakthrough case cove in nineteen. So take one of those slivers of a penny and cut it into ten. Even smaller hair fines livers then count out three of those. That's how many vaccinated people got seriously.

neilson Bogle Society of america mount sinai southnassau Cdc us heart disease Lauderdale lauren influenza Perry glatt fort walden florida
"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"lauren bogle" Discussed on BrainStuff

"On your pets are indoor home cameras and more new g. brand sank experienced life in sync. Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren bogle bomb here with another classic episode. From the archives of this one is about an interesting corner of behavior and psychology. And i don't want to bury the lead. So i'm gonna let former lauren take it away. Pay brain stuff lauren. Vocal bomb here. You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food..

Lauren bogle lauren saharan africa
How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

BrainStuff

05:23 min | 3 years ago

How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

"Brain. GRAINSTUFF Lauren Bogle bomb here in January of Twenty Twenty bestselling novelist Stephen King and Don winslow took to twitter to make a surprising pledge. They offered to donate two hundred thousand dollars to charity. If Stephanie Grisham the Press Secretary for President Donald Trump agreed to take questions from the full White House. Press Corps for one hour. You're in the White House. Press briefing room. The offer reportedly was rejected by Grisham. WHO's since taking the job in June of two thousand nineteen has yet to hold even one former former White House press briefing? Her views expressed an interview with these sinclair. Broadcast Group is that the briefings are unnecessary because reporters get opportunities to put questions to trump himself sometimes over the roar of the presidential helicopter on the White House lawn for the time being at least the trump administration has abandoned what had been in an important part of White House. Press Corps is routine dating back to the late eighteen hundreds before the official position of White House. Press Secretary even existed. That's when President William McKinley. Kenley set up a workspace in the White House for reporters and sent his first personal secretary. John Addison Porter to give the correspondence what the White House Historical Association notes. where I'm I more or less regular briefings? The White House press briefing gradually evolved into a formal event from the time of president. Herbert Hoover in the late nineteen twenties and early thirties. He's to Linden Johnson's tenure in the mid to late sixties White House press secretary's held twice a day briefing sessions in their own offices according to Martha Joint Kumar Book managing the president's message the White House Communications Operation Richard Nixon though no fan of the press still thought the briefings were important enough that he had a swimming pool torn out so that he could convert the space into a meeting room for briefings. That area is now known as the James S. Brady press briefing room in honor of president. Ronald Reagan's press secretary who was seriously wounded during the attempt. On Reagan's life in Nineteen eighty-one during Bill Clinton's time in the White House in the nineteen nineties. Press Secretary Mike. McCurry decided to allow the daily press briefings to be televised that practice continued until the trump white house began barring cameras from briefings in two thousand seventeen before discontinuing them altogether. Oh we spoke by email but former C. N. N. White House correspondent Dan Lowthian who spent five years covering the Bush and Obama administrations. He said I think the briefings were useful full for a number of reasons. First of all it was an opportunity to get the White House response or thinking on an issue on camera rather than a written statement it allowed us to gang up on them around a question they might have been trying to avoid showing them dodge. An answer is sometimes the news briefings also put statements on the record for later. Comparison finally finally every now and then there would be breaking news and as happened after Osama bin Laden was caught lots of great details even if some turned out not to be true. Lowthian Dan who went on to found little park media and to become a visiting scholar at the School of Journalism at Northeastern University recalls that the format for the briefings was fairly constant. He said there was a certain order to who got called on briefings always started with the Associated Press and ended with a thank you from the Associated Press once in a while the press secretary would mix it up a bit but it usually happened around the same time each day and questions from the first two rows came in order. We also spoke by email with Tom. Tom Jones a senior media writer for the POYNTER Institute. A journalism education organization. He said while it's true that the president and his representatives often make themselves available bowl in informal settings such as the White House lawn. It's not the same as press. Briefings the format of shouting out questions under the sound of a whirling helicopter is not conducive to asking complicated policy questions nor pertinent. Follow up questions. The frenzied free for all of these much too brief informal interviews make it much harder to get into the topics. What's that require nuance and specifics? It's so much easier for the president to brush aside or ignore questions. He doesn't like when he's walking along the White House grounds when he or one of his representatives representatives are standing behind a podium a controlled setting they must face the questions that require long substantive answers as opposed to the one or two short sentences that suffice in those informal formal settings let view essentially is shared by a group of thirteen former White House press secretary and Foreign Service and military officials who published an opinion in peace on. CNN's website in January of twenty twenty calling for trump to restore the regular briefings in their view. Having to prepare for briefings helps the government to run better letter. They wrote the sharing of information known. As official guidance among government officials and agencies helps ensure that an administration speaks with one voice telling one story however compelling it might be Lowthian also sees the apparent end the briefings as unfortunate. He said it's a valid criticism that some reporters others use briefings to showboat. However I think when covering the White House briefings aren't important function that allow the public and reporters to maintain daily connections? Sometimes it's routine information other times. An odd question from the back of the room can turn into the story of the day even so Lowthian says journalists who cover the the administration will find a way to get stories he said this new normal might be unfortunate but not paralyzing. Reporters are in the business of getting information whether it comes from the mouth of his spokesperson or sources all across the beltway.

White House Press Secretary President Trump White House Historical Associa Press Corps C. N. N. White House Dan Lowthian Associated Press Stephanie Grisham Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Secretary Official Osama Bin Laden Lauren Bogle Twitter Herbert Hoover
What's the Best Kind of Dog Leash?

BrainStuff

03:56 min | 3 years ago

What's the Best Kind of Dog Leash?

"Relationships and discovers the transformative power of music. Theory and rocker comes from double. Elvis productions is created and hosted by Mitchelson Elson and executive produced by Jay. Brennan of disgraced land listened to dear young rocker on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. took him to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here when you adopt a puppy or an older dog. There's a lot to look forward to a fun. Days of playing with her and taking walks feeding her teaching her tricks taking walks cuddling on the couch with her and yes taking more walks. Dogs require walks. The obvious reason is that they have to go out to do their business meaning urinate and defecate. The frequency depends on the breed. But if you live in an apartment or a house without a fenced yard where they can roam freely to take care of the call of nature as the adult in the room you are responsible for taking them out to a designated area where they can go and you can clean up after them but there's more to it than that dogs need lots of exercise. They need to burn off energy and socialized dogs. Hello Dog Park. Walks are an important part of your dogs. Daily routine and that means you're pups leash is a crucial canine accessory. But there are a dizzying number of options. So we he talked to an expert about her favourite leash and why she recommends it Susie. Aga- is a nationally recognized dog trainer an expert in dog behavior modification and the founder of Atlanta dog trainer. She has decades of dog training experience and has clear preferences about leashes for starters. She never recommends a retractable leash. She explained they're very popular leashes but everyone hates them. It's irritating for the dogs on the leash. They've got constant tension on them and it's irritating for humans in the community most pet owners. Don't ruin their dogs. They just let them wrap up. Whoever's walking by retractable leashes are dangerous? Dogs and humans. How many times have you been strolling along in the park minding your business? When suddenly there's a Doberman Pinscher staring at you a good twenty to thirty feet or six to nine meters away from its owner also retractable? Leads can hurt you the dog Walker. Should you attempt to grab it in case of an emergency it could give you a rope. Burn and be leashes are infamous for snapping due to strain or mechanical mechanical failure and whipping back with high force toward the walkers body and face Aga- also doesn't recommend the slip lead which is basically a slipknot allowing knowing you to slip your dog's head through the loop and poll to tighten Think of those leashes you get at the vet but they can be very dangerous. She said I don't like them. Because it puts that's a lot of pressure on the dogs. Trachea can cause a lot of damage. Aga's leash recommendation is a basic six foot or approximately two meter braided leather leash with brass fittings the clips onto the dog's collar or harness. Whichever the dog wears when walking Aga- says six feet is plenty long for every breed of dog to get away to use the bathroom the only time she doesn't recommend the brass fittings is for small dogs because the brass can be too heavy for those smaller dogs try stainless steel or aluminum fittings fittings instead ag- explained a leather leashes last a really long time? I've got one leash. That's fifteen years old. Most leashes available in the market are made of reinforced. Nylon or cloth webbing some even have carbon-fiber with an into them others are made of nylon rope. Aga- says those are fine but to be prepared hard to keep buying them she said nylon leashes even the ones that are sturdy. webbing are fine but they don't last. As long as leather dogs can chew through them and then the owners

AGA Dog Park Mitchelson Elson Brennan Bogle Apple JAY Lauren Executive Susie Walker Atlanta Founder AG
Are Pringles Really Potato Chips?

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 3 years ago

Are Pringles Really Potato Chips?

"Express look into brain stuff production of iheartmedia. Hey brain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here. Chances are you probably haven't given much thought to any given can of pringles other than wondering. How do we get the last few potato chips out of the tube as it turns out out this salty? Snack has quite a story. It once was in the middle of a massive controversy that questioned the ingredients and whether the chips were actually potato chips at all from two thousand seven to two thousand nine the makers of the once you pop you can't stop. Chips stood in front of three different levels of the British judiciary trying to defend and the decision. That pringles chips were not by definition potato chips or in British parlance potato crisps. Here's how this comically complicated. Located problems started in the mid twentieth century attacks was born by way of France and England called the value added tax. This consumption tax started off as a a ten percent tax on all goods bought from a business. More than twenty percent of the world's tax revenue comes from the value added tax. Making it a pretty big deal. In Britain most foods are exempt from the value added tax except for potato chips or similar products made from potato or from potato flour. This led to a long arduous journey to figure out whether or not pringles which by the way we're once touted as the newfangled potato chip where actually potato chips if they were ruled as chips pringles parent company. At the time proctor and gamble would be subject to a seventeen point. Five percent value added tax. proctoring drink gambles initial argument. was that no pringles. Were not potato chips. Because they didn't quote contain enough potato to have the quality of potato nece they also argued pringles didn't resemble the shape of a potato chip and were therefore instead a savory snack in two thousand and eight a lower British court agreed and ruled the pringles were in fact not potato chips mainly because they contain only forty two percent potato and had a quote shape not found in nature The rest of pringles by

Pringles Lauren Bogle France Gamble Britain England
How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

BrainStuff

05:50 min | 3 years ago

How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

"Lauren Bogle bomb here sometimes. Good Science Science can happen just by looking at a map of the world and letting your mind wander for instance observe how Africa and South America seemed to have been very recently cuddled together even though there are currently a couple of thousand miles of ocean between them similarly Madagascar fits perfectly into a little nick in the eastern edge of Africa and the Middle East seems seems to be pulling away from the top of Africa like a corner being pulled off of a hot cookie with a reasonably good representation of the shape and arrangement of the world's continents in front of them. Anyone could easily assess the earth's land masses have definitely been speaking around the name for the southern landmass that once was is Gondwanaland and also known as Gondwana but it wasn't just the shape of the continents that clued researchers into its former existence. They've also looked at similarities. Among plants and animals that live across the modern separate continents from those clues. Gondwana was an idea long before anybody figured out how or why. It worked the secret of course being plate. tectonics and idea that didn't really start gaining steam. Until the mid twentieth century but a nineteenth century Austrian geologist named Edward Seuss put a name to the concept of the supercontinent in his book. The face of the earth the first volume of which was published in eighteen eighty. Three SEUSS didn't come up with many completely novel ideas ideas. But he did a great job of synthesizing. A bunch of the research of the day to conclude that the southern continents and landmasses we now know as South America Africa Arabia India via Sri Lanka and Madagascar had at one point in time been connected because one well just look at them and two. They contained the same rocks and the same fossil's from an extinct feathery leafed tree called gloss of terrace Austria and in Arctic. Oh would be added theory. Thirty years later Gondwana on what was named for a densely forested region of central India where the first fossil evidence of the supercontinent was found in the nineteenth century. WanNa is a word for forest in Sanskrit and the guns are tribe that European explorers. I found living in the region. Even though we now know a lot about the mechanism by which Gondwana China was formed. It's extremely complicated and still being investigated. There's at least one. Peer Reviewed Scientific Journal devoted entirely to the study of the supercontinent. It's it's called appropriately Gondwana research however. There are a few things that we're pretty certain of I got Wada wasn't built in a day. The the making of Gondwana was a long process. Most likely through three major mountain building events driven by the movement of Earth's tectonic plates we spoke spoke via email with Joseph Merit professor in the Department of Geological Sciences. At the University of Florida he explained during the interval from about six hundred fifty to five hundred in fifty million years ago. Various pieces of Africa and South America collided along an ancient mountain chain called the Brazilian belt slightly older but overlapping with the Brazilian. Oh seven seven hundred and fifty to six hundred and fifty million years. AGO is the east African Oregon or Mozambique Belt that resulted from the collision between East Africa and Madagascar India Tree Lanka and parts of East Antarctica. The final collision was along the Kouanga Oregon between all those assembled pieces and the rest of Antarctica and Australia between five five hundred eighty and five hundred and thirty million years ago so it was a couple hundred million years of extremely slow continental car wrecks the created this Beta Ada version of Gondwana. But it wasn't done yet later about three hundred million years ago other landmasses join forces with it to form the giant ball of land. We now no no as Panja. But one continent rule them all couldn't last and sometime between two hundred eighty and two hundred million years ago. Hingis started started disintegrating as magma began pushing up from beneath the mega supercontinent creating rifts in the land that would later become seafloor as Penn.. Jia cracked the top part was pushed to the north creating the continent Laura Asia and Gondwana headed south back when Gondwana was just a baby supercontinent between five hundred and fifty and four hundred eighty five million years ago it hosted some of the very first complex life forms like trial abides bracket pods but since it continued to exist I didn't the drastic period lots of plant and animal. Evolution went down there merit said Gondwana contains evidence for evolutionary changes in the very first complex complex animals. The very first fish amphibians and reptiles the most famous fossils are the gun doina flora such as the loss of terrace fern a freshwater reptile called. Messo Soroush Soroush in a land. Reptile called Lyster Soroush Gondwana existed as a single landmass for more than three hundred million years because of its humongous assize by covered an area of one hundred billion square kilometers or about thirty nine billion square miles and because the continents moved a lot during that time Gondwana experienced many different climates said during the Cambridge. When Gondwana I formed the earth and Gondwana were in a greenhouse state in the late order vision? Four four hundred fifty million years ago gun was moving over. The South Pole and the climate was very cold. Gondwana continued to move through variety of latitudes and depending on where you are located hated. The climate might have been quite warm or more temperate. The continent was so large. That one part of Gondwana might be located at the quarter while another might be located at the poll. It's true it would have been cool to see Gondwana in its prime and although you won't personally get to see its victorious return. That doesn't mean that it's not possible. Possible the continents are always moving and scientists have a lot of ideas about what our next supercontinent is going to look like.

Gondwana Gondwana China Lyster Soroush Gondwana Africa Madagascar Edward Seuss Messo Soroush Soroush India Lauren Bogle Middle East South America Gondwanaland Madagascar India Tree Lanka Terrace Austria Joseph Merit Professor East Africa Geologist Scientific Journal
How Can a Hen Turn into a Rooster?

BrainStuff

05:07 min | 3 years ago

How Can a Hen Turn into a Rooster?

"Brain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here Miss Lucille. It was a sweet poet which is a term for a young man who had found a cozy home in a backyard? Chicken coop in powder springs Georgia. Initially things appear to be status quo with with the young Exchequer Leghorn Cross after observing her for a time however her owner who wished to remain anonymous noticed Miss Lucille was growing a comb. Although both sets of the breed can have them. Her owners. Instincts told her that. Perhaps something wasn't quite standard. So she sought the help of a local farmer the owner recalls the farmer did all the checks to confirm Miss Lucille was a miss. She had no saddle feathers which are pointing feathers at the base of the tail. No aggression didn't jump a react in the presence of other hens or roosters and when she was laid back in the farmer's hand she stuck her legs straight out and just layed their all our old timers tricks to identifying roosters since. There's no definitive way to tell until they mount another chicken or crow aside from lab testing so Miss Lucille had failed the rooster test. However later on the owner arrived home to a mess of feathers in the backyard and unusual event because hens don't usually moult until around eighteen months of age the owner said and she began acting more temperamental but I- attributed that to her molting as it can be quite uncomfortable for chickens? I was worried about her health. Although strange things were certainly only a foot in Miss Lucille's world none of them were health-threatening when her feathers grew back they were saddle feathers like those found on roosters her hackles tailfeathers had also undergone undergone major changes. Her owner said. She went from being your typical hen to a rooster with beautiful long tail feathers and pointy hackles. Her Gate Changed Changed and she was definitely at the top of the pecking order. Further consultation advised a wait and see approach one farmer told the owner just because she she now looks like a rooster didn't mean he was one. I needed to wait until she crowed or amounted. One of the hands. Miss Lucille's comb continued growing but she also became more mellow unfriendly her owner said for every indicator that she might still be a she. There was another for her being a he. Finally irrefutable proof came at around around five months of age. The rooster literally crowed. Her owner said every day. The crow grew louder and stronger. It was official. That Miss Lucille was now Mr Mr Lucille. And to his credit he assumed the role wonderfully if the girls were low on water hid crow would let me know to get it on. Hit lead the charge up to roost. At night. He had wake up with his song early each morning. So how does a hin become a rooster spontaneous sex reversal. Such as in the case of Mr Lucille seal is extremely rare. A study at a Bengladeshi found that only twenty eight three thousand hens monitored underwent reversal. The jury's still out on exactly why this this phenomenon occurs but there are some prevailing theories according to Drew Benson Assistant Professor of poultry science at the University of Georgia Benson said by email. All current evidence shows that sexual differentiation. Birds is a mix of direct genetic and hormonal mechanisms. The right ovary and over duct regrets during embryonic development element leaving the hen with only one functional ovary. The left one should the left ovary be removed or become dysfunctional due to disease. The regressed right ovary may form in Texas. He explained but let's break that down a little most instances of spontaneous sex reversal in birds. Such as Mr Lucille's are believed leads to be connected to alterations in sex steroid hormone action such as estrogen. The hypothesis is that estrogen activity suppresses development of the right Gona but when the over fails discreet estrogen. The tissue in the undeveloped right donut is then changed an tests which is a test is like structure that will we'll begin to secrete Andrew Johns and give the female bird. More physical characteristics usually seen in males Benson noted that the lack of estrogen will change the bird's plumage image and the increased testosterone causes the crowing and growth of head ornaments like the waddle and comb. Scientists aren't sure why this happens. Benson Hansen said that. It's pretty common for ovarian disease to cause dysfunction of the ovaries yet spontaneous sex reversal is much less common. He said you couldn't simply remove Ovary from a hen and generate spontaneous sex reversal the exact mechanism underlying avian sex determination has yet to be resolved. So what's a hen. Intern roosters owner to do Benson said embrace the fact that you have a rare chicken. The newly changed chicken is no longer going to produce eggs. So you would need to get a new hen if you wanted wanted EG production are anonymous owner wound up having to farm Mr Lucille out to another rooster lover. Once the crowing got out of control she said we have outta subdivision behind our house and although we are fortunate enough to be able to have roosters on our property we didn't feel it was the neighbor leading to do while. I miss him. I don't miss the early early morning. WAKEUP call and I'm happy where he can do. His thing freely.

Miss Lucille Mr Mr Lucille Lucille Benson Hansen Mr Lucille Seal Exchequer Leghorn Cross Drew Benson Assistant Professo Powder Springs Lauren Bogle Ovarian Disease Georgia Andrew Johns Bengladeshi Official University Of Georgia Testosterone Texas Intern Eighteen Months
What's the Science Behind Applause?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 3 years ago

What's the Science Behind Applause?

"The TV plus different. They have the ability to Jason. He plotted to start watching now. Subscription required hurt them to bring stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here audiences around the world break out in applause at the conclusion of a stage. Play or a musical concert or when they're favored presidential candidates. Step to the podium. Humans have been applauding and approval approval. Since ancient times the customers mentioned in the Old Testament which depicts the Israelites. Clapping their hands and shouting God. Save the king for a young heir to the throne. But how does a group of people start applauding and what determines how many other people join and how long the accolades last. Those aren't easy questions to answer sir. Applause isn't a subject. Researchers have studied extensively and there seemed to be only a handful pardon the pun of studies in the scientific literature as is a paper from two thousand and three explains one theory. Is that audience. Applause is triggered by a few individuals who have a lower threshold of embarrassment than the rest of the crowd. These brave enthusiasts clapping lowers. The embarrassment cost for others but whether they actually join in the researchers concluded had to do with whether the performance instead witnessed crossed a threshold for impressiveness. That is whether the massive people was sufficiently pleased by what they'd seen heard. They found the People's liking for performance correlated to how long the audience kept clapping as the effort of clapping began to exceed their enthusiasm. Some individuals stopped clapping. Raising the embarrassment embarrassment cost for the remainder and giving them an incentive to stop the researchers also found that large audiences tended to applaud more predictably than smaller groups loops. We spoke by email with paper. Co Author Gary Lukin and associate professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He said imagine that five percent of people applauded everything. A smaller audience has a larger probability of not having any such person that would be a tough crowd as an audience grows larger. The probability converges to five percent in other words to larger audiences are more likely to behave more similarly to one another than to small audiences for the same reason that if you flip a coin one hundred times you're more likely to get closer to half heads and tails and if you flip a coin. Ten Times more recently a study published in two thousand thirteen in the Journal of the Royal Society Details University of Leeds Mathematician Richard Pieman colleagues filmed groups of between thirteen to twenty college. Students watching or presentations. They found that there was relatively little connection between how much people liked what they saw. And the duration of their ovation instead they discovered that applause was a sort of social contagion that started with a single person in the audience who typically begin clapping about two point one seconds after after the speaker finished the clothing din spread rapidly through the groups over the next two point nine three seconds at five point five six seconds the I applaud typically stopped and by two point six seconds later on average. The rest of the audience was no longer putting their hands together as well. The researchers also came to another surprising conclusion. It wasn't physical proximity to another person. Clapping that triggered applause. Instead as man explained a National Public Radio interview it was the loudness. Nisa the applause. The got audience members join in. He said as soon as people can hear that other people in the audience are clapping. They begin to clap themselves so often. When you are feeling social pressure from audience members you couldn't directly see as you've probably noticed long ovation's tend to vary in the speed of clapping and go up and down down in loudness and at times. The audience may seem to be clapping in unison. In a study published in the journal Nature in the year two thousand Romanian researchers recorded applause from theater and opera performances by placing a microphone on the ceiling of the hall. They discovered the people who are plotting often started out clapping rapidly and chaotically but after a few seconds their class began to slow and synchronize into a distinctive rhythm which added to the intensity of the noise the urge to synchronize the claps they noted had seemed quote to reflect the desire of the audience to express Buddhism by increasing the average noise intensity paradoxically though ask people strive to make an even louder ovation to show their enthusiasm. They begin to clap more rapidly. That tends to disperse their clapping and destroy the cumulative synchronization. It's only when they slow their collapse. The applause becomes thunderous again. Today's episode it was written by Patrick j tiger and produced Tyler Clang. Breen stuff is the production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this and lots of applause worthy topics we hope. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. visit the iheartradio. APP Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows how do our food stories change change during wartime Johnny strick Private First Class. Our veterans share where they fought who they said they ain't and what they missed. The move had powdered the next and I hated those politics. My name is Jacqueline. Were Pozzo and I welcome you to service. Stories of hunger. War A new iheartradio. PODCAST aguing Veterans Day. I November eleventh on the Iheartradio APP and everywhere. You find your favorite podcasts restore. That's the first thing we did join us.

Iheartradio Lauren Bogle Jason Gary Lukin Ten Times Pozzo Associate Professor Of Psychol Jacqueline Nisa University Of Wisconsin Madiso University Of Leeds Johnny Strick Richard Pieman Breen Private First Class Patrick J Tyler Clang Journal Of The Royal Society D Five Percent
Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

BrainStuff

06:53 min | 3 years ago

Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines they're inspired by Dole that's why Lexus asks different questions better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and the answers are as inspiring as you are which allowing the police to take guns away from people who judge finds dangerous that included ninety four percent of Democrats eighty five percents Republicans and eighty two percent of independent unspoiled this August even President Donald Trump who otherwise mostly has been an opponent of gun control indicated his support for Red Flag laws traumatic end not permanent so far red flag laws have been enacted by seventeen states plus the district Columbia in Florida where a red flag laws medicine is an example of what many advocate as a way to prevent the mass shootings that have increasingly plagued the United States red flag laws are designed to get mental illness or other factors that might show up in the federal instant background check system and prevent the person from buying a gun from a dealer in the first place the problem is that loopholes it as potentially being a threat to themselves or other people police and courts would have the authority to remove firearms according to Flannery Red Flag Laws on people who have felony criminal record or mental health record those rules are too narrow and too broad they identify lots of people because they had an involuntary commitment. We spoke with Jeffrey Swanson a professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine he said we focused all his attention on the point of sale on the other side the National Rifle Association's website criticizes existing Red Flag Laws as violating gun owners Second Amendment Rights Civil Rights and second described scary situation an employee allegedly had confided to a CO worker that if he was fired from his job he would shoot supervisor and other employees though he would warn the eighty five years ago and wouldn't hurt anybody in the also failed to identify people who do pose a risk we also spoke with Daniel J flannery director of the having to charge the employees with the crime the cops obtained a court order and the next day seized five firearms the Court subsequently issued another order allowing authorities introduction of iheartradio hey brain stuff lauren bogle bomb here in California the manager of a car dealership contacted police and worker in advance so the CO worker could escape thanks to the red flag law the California enacted in two thousand fourteen the police could take action in this case right away without on emissions in state records submitted to the background check system have often enabled people who went onto become mass shooters to obtain guns even when they should have been disqualified begun center for Violence Prevention Research and education at Case Western Reserve University he said this is about putting protocols in place so that when an individual is identify them having guns poses a risk and the person has an opportunity to get the weapons back at some point a flannery said there's due process to that so that it's not authorities away to intervene and take guns away from a person who's perceived as a possible threat they can do that even if the person doesn't have a criminal record or a history of being institutionalized destroy a middle ground between protecting public safety and individual rights a person who's flagged isn't arrested or charged with a crime and authorities have to be able to convince a judge that did some strong public support a Washington Post and ABC News poll conducted in early of September two thousand nineteen for example found that eighty six percent of Americans supported enacted in two thousand eighteen in the weight of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting authorities have utilized it to take guns away for more than two thousand people red flag laws have attract to hold onto the weapons for a year that case described an article by University of California Davis researchers that was published in August of two thousand nineteen in the journal Ause of internal Edmund advocates that are against red flag laws say the seizures of these individuals weapons is a violation of the constitutions guaranteed due process which means the people should have the right to argue their case in court before their guns are taken not after and whether or not red flag laws do much to prevent mass shootings is difficult question to answer the study we mentioned that the of this episode conducted by the UC Davis researchers cited twenty-one cases in California in which a court issued an order to seize guns quote after the subject of the order had made a clear declaration of intent to commit a bash shooting or had exhibited behavior suggesting such an intent but it's not really possible all to prove conclusively that any of the individuals actually would have committed such an act Swanson wrote in Washington Post opinion piece that red flag laws aren't necessary early going to prevent killings by mass shooters except in instances in which alerts citizen notices that an angry young man is amassing an arsenal nevertheless Swanson's imports such laws because he and other researchers have found strong evidence that they reduce another sort of gun violence the cumulatively Inflicts Much Higher Death Poll Suicide by firearm in two thousand seventeen he colleagues calculated that for every twenty guns seized through Red Flag Law one suicide is prevented preventing people with the missile to develop suicidal idealization from getting guns does save lives because research shows that people who attempt suicide by other methods and up surviving eighty to ninety percent of the time but with a gun they're effective at killing themselves almost all of the time Swanson said from the picture of public health that's good enough reason for red flag laws today's episode was written by Patrick Jake Hager and produced by Tyler Clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's has it shows works for more on this and lots of other topics visit our home planet how stuff works dot Com and for more podcast my heart radio visit radio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your hello this is Julie Rieger author of the goes talker and Co host of insider's guide to the other side and I'm Brenda I may not have written a book but I mean Julie's book and you are the most gifted on the planet on insiders they leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next discover the answers Lexus dot com slash curiosity? We'll come to brainstorm due to the other side launches on October sixteen in every Wednesday after that listen to insiders guide to the other side on the iheartradio

Lexus Jeffrey Swanson President Donald Trump Duke University School Of Medi United States Columbia Florida Flannery Dole Professor Of Psychiatry And Be Democrats Republicans Ninety Four Percent Eighty Six Percent Eighty Two Percent Eighty Five Years Ninety Percent
Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

BrainStuff

06:21 min | 3 years ago

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. IBM A. B. M. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren bogle Bam here although these days wearing shoes with high heels mostly coated feminine the original Wears High High heels were men so what's the history here when where and why did people I begin wearing shoes with elevated heels we spoke by email email with Elizabeth Mohawk senior curator Toronto's Batta Shoe Museum who says she has yet to unravel this mystery. The exact origin of high heels remains needs to be discovered. What's clear however is it. High heels. Were not a European invention heeled footwear only emerged in western Europe around the turn of the seventeenth century but had been warn for hundreds of years prior throughout Western Asia Similar Hawk said evidence for early Western Asian heels as far back as Tenth Century Persia suggests a strong relationship to horseback riding and may have been connected to the innovation of the stirrup the store profoundly changed horseback riding and in particular made military campaigns on horseback more effective as as an enabled riders to steady themselves in dramatically improved the effectiveness of weapons such as the Lance and Bowen Aero. He'll seems to have been a further development of this technology as it allowed the wearer to hook his feet in the stirrups better angering him to his steed eventually heeled footwear for men spread to Europe likely three political networks works and trade but the exact evolution is complicated so why did heels only become of interest to Europeans around the beginning of the sixteen hundreds civil heck said the answer lies and things it's complex European world exploration and the destablizing the textile trade to the rise of Persia under the reign shot a bus the first from fifteen eighty the eight to sixteen twenty nine and both Persian and European concerns about the increasingly powerful Ottoman Empire in particular it was the power of Shah boasts the First Mountain Military Terry who wore heeled footwear that may have made heels appealing I to European men and ultimately to women as the he'll entered into upper class men's fashion and there was a concurrent trend in women's fashion to adopt certain aspects of men's attire some hawks said that the women who played with this trend were often quote the butt of ridicule the end there numerous offenses included their adoption of men's military inspired fashion including broadbrimmed hats ornamented with plumes doublets carrying weapons and wearing heels in the heels that both men and women wore in the early years of the seventeenth century were very low but they would rise for both sexes as the century progressed the the majority of powerful and privileged men wore heels through the seventeenth century and into the early eighteenth century in France during the reign of Louis the fourteenth from sixteen forty three to seventeen in fifteen wearing red high heels was a principal signifier of political privilege limited to the king and his courtiers beyond France red heels for men were at first associated associated with French sophistication but by the end of the seventeenth century they were increasingly seen as effeminate especially in England similar. Hawk said fueled. Oh by nascent enlightenment thinking and increasing nationalisms men's dress began to undergo a radical transformation at the end of the seventeenth century. It was in the early eighteenth century that men abandoned abandoned the he'll to women's fashions and the he'll became a signifier femininity. Those shifts included a heightened division between men's and women's tire as as well as March differences between French English men's dress some will hawk said since the Seventeenth Century Western culture has shown extreme sensitivity to men in heels especially if it's deemed that the heels are being used to increase height she notes that this negative view only increased Darwinian ideas of survival of the fittest became came translated into racist and sexist notions of natural male physical and mental superiority but heels for man made a brief comeback in the middle of the twentieth any of century SIMILAC explained the he'll began rising in men's fashion in the nineteen sixties and in the early nineteen seventies reached unprecedented heights in direct response. I feel wheel to the burgeoning women's movement the heels and men's fashion however we're not borrowed from the female wardrobe they were block and high like Louie the fourteenth and were touted as a way increasing one stature masculinity and confidence in no way did they reference the Longstanding Feminine High and Thin Heal these days however however heels on men can be construed to emphasize a lack of height rather than compensating for it which means quote that heels on men function like a bad to pay they reveal insecurity and that in our current culture is deemed unappealing iconic footwear designer Christian Lubaton concurred to a news publication a man and heals. That's a prosthesis but I sympathize. The men need help but a man and heals is ridiculous clearly. Mr Lubaton doesn't watch the cowboy channel those BRONC and bull riders look pretty good or as someone hack puts it cowboys continue to own their heels and wear them with confidence today's episode certain Kerry Tatra and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous and lots of other topics our home planet has networks dot com in or podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Hello I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Goose did and in Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan listened to bear in a banner on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast.

IBM Hawk Iheartradio Europe Christian Lubaton France Lauren Bogle Bam Persia Batta Shoe Museum Dennis Quaid Shah Bob Dylan T-Bone Burnett Senior Curator First Mountain Military A. B. M. Toronto Elizabeth Mohawk Bowen Aero England
What Is the U.S. Presidential Seal?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 3 years ago

What Is the U.S. Presidential Seal?

"SMART is open open is smart. IBM is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential essential. Let's put smart to work learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartmedia. Hey brain stuff lauren bogle Bam here over the years you've probably noticed the emblem emblazoned on the side of Air Force One. It's also attached to the podium from which the US President gives speeches and appears on official White House stationary and invitations a railroad locomotive painted to honor president didn't George H W Bush is decorated with it. It's the seal of the president of the United States of America the presidential seal look similar with slight differences to the great seal of the United States the official symbol. That's impressed upon official documents such as treaties and commissions the precise design of the presidential seal was detailed an executive order ninety-six forty-six issued in October of Nineteen forty-five by President Harry S Truman. It's specified that the seal depict an American Eagle that's holding ending an olive branch in its right Talon and a bundle of thirteen arrows to symbolize the original thirteen states and it's left while clutching in it's big a white scroll inscribed with the motto Eh Pluribus Unum Latin for out of many one behind and above the Eagle. There's a background of radiating glory depiction of rays rays of light crossed by an arc of thirteen cloud puffs below which there's a constellation of mullet sergeant which are five pointed compass stars that image is surrounded by a ring of white stars symbolizing the current fifty United States and around that another circle with lettering seal of the president of the United States though the presidential seals precise origins are unclear it was clearly inspired by the great seal that national symbol was adopted by the continental congress in in seventeen eighty two after secretary of the Continental Congress Charles Thompson merged ideas from several committees into a sketch that subsequently was modified by Herald Thomas the spartan that's according to the State Department's Nineteen seventy-six official history of the great seal written by Richard S Patterson and Richardson Dougal but at some point. US presidents decided that like the British monarch. They needed their own personal coat of arms as well. We spoke by email with Matthew Castello senior historian for the White House Historical Association. He said that the great seal quote was the official symbol of the United States federal government not the office of the Presidency Eh as such some president simply used the great seal while others thought that the president should have their own distinct seal. Castilla explains at least several throw presidents in the eighteen hundreds created their own seals incorporating. Whatever flourishes appeal to them James K polk for example used his own seal on the proclamation of war against against Mexico in eighteen forty six Millard fillmore came up with his own slightly different version which he sent to Maryland Postmaster engraver Edward Stabler to make in eighteen fifty Lincoln used a personalized seal as well. A presidential seal didn't actually appear on an invitation to an event until eighteen seventy seven Kevin according to Authors Patterson and Dougal President Rutherford B Hayes who was hosting a dinner honoring Russian Grand Duke Alexis Alexandrovich made the invites look fancier zero by placing them with a seal that featured an arc of clouds raise and stars between the Eagles wingtips but the Haze Eagle was thinner in scrawny than today's robust looking eagle and its head turned toward the bundle of arrows rather than toward the olive branch in Nineteen to President Theodore Roosevelt ordered yet another other presidential seal to be installed on the floor of the White House entrance hall. He commissioned a french-american Sculptor Philip Martigny to create a new one Martigny drew on the Hayes design fine but added a few changes including engraving the phrase the seal of the President of the United States in that circular border Truman who didn't like Martin. He's work had removed emplaced elsewhere in the White House during World War Two President Franklin Roosevelt who was fascinated with insignia asked experts to redesign the presidential seal they came up with the idea of adding ring of stars to represent. All the states and having Eagle Face the olive branches rather than the Arrows to emphasize the desire for peace rather rather than war that design was the one that Truman approved in nineteen forty five and it's been used ever since in nineteen fifty nine and nineteen sixty President Dwight Eisenhower and how updated it by adding stars for Alaska and Hawaii. Today's episode was written by Patrick Jake Jake Hydra and produced by Tyler Clang Breen stuff. It's production and I heart radio. How stuff works for more this and lots of other official topics that our home planet has stuff works dot com and for for more podcasts from iheartradio. I heart radio APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the Montgomery County Maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people soon as I heard the details. I knew my dad was involved right away instantly associate Lawrence but at the time of the murders Lawrence Horn was clear across the country. I'm Jasmine Morris from iheartradio radio and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at Apple podcasts on the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to podcasts.

President Trump United States President Harry S Truman Official White House IBM President Theodore Roosevelt Dougal President Rutherford B Red Hat White House Historical Associa Eh Pluribus Unum Latin Lawrence Horn Richard S Patterson Lauren Bogle White House Entrance Hall George H W Bush Patrick Jake Jake Hydra Iheartradio Radio James K Polk
How Are Animal and Plant Cells Different?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 3 years ago

How Are Animal and Plant Cells Different?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Look into brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren bogle bomb here from the outside plant. Seem pretty different from animals for instance plants can't walk around and catch food like we do they give off oxygen instead of carbon dioxide and they don't have the same sensory organs help us get out of the way of a fire or sniff out and hunt down a potential meal but plants and animals are more similar than they might seem from the outside hide under a microscope plant cell an animal cell might seem so similar that in some cases. You'd really have to know what you're looking at. Tell the difference between them. This is because plants and animals both belong to the domain ucare iota organisms with cells that are basically sealed baggies full of fluid suspending little factories called org anals which which have different jobs in the cell depending on the needs of the organism plants animals fungi and protests are all you carry. It's these organisms are made up of one or more cells with the variety of membrane bound or anals including the nucleus the big boss organiz that contains all the d._n._a. Instructions for making that particular bear or ringworm ringworm or fakest tree or fruit fly or human being even though a blueberry bush and a corgi don't seem to have much in common on the spectrum of things things their cells are way more similar to each other than they are to those of bacteria for example which are procreates single celled organisms that are generally smaller than a single eukaryotic karaoke excel that contain only a few types of rudimentary or anals and that lack a nucleus to hold their d._n._a. The word you carry out means true colonel referring into that important nucleus. It's kind of a mess inside a precarious excel whereas eukaryotic cells are highly structured but at the end of the day you kerio are ya impropriety have more in common with each other than they do with a rock so there's that if plan animals are so similar on a cellular level wife. Why did they seem so different. When you take a couple steps back well. It's because plants animals have different goals. Each of their eukaryotic cells is customized to make them. I'm great at being what they are for instance. It's a planned job to take carbon dioxide out of the air which we animals just leave lying around every time we exhale or drive. A car and plants can simply add a little sunlight and water to that c._o. Two in order to make literally everything they need to survive animals on the other hand require oxygen in may by plants to breath but we can't make our own food like plans to so we've got to go russell up our own grab this requires movement which made it necessary for animals to golf all kinds of crazy specialized cell types tissues and organs. That plant can't make because they simply don't need them. Survival is based on getting basic needs met an an outsourced requirements of an animal far surpass those of plants even though their cells are constructed similarly plants and animals have different cellular settings things a really obvious difference is in the outer shell of the cell in addition to the cell membrane plants have cell walls made of tough compounds called cellulose and lignin which makes them rigid and tough useful for keeping trees from collapsing into gladness piles animal cells on the other hand are contained within a thin cell membrane a affleck's book container a lot like a semi permeable sandwich bag it provides nothing in the way of structure but it can regulate what comes in and out of the cell and it can keep all the organisms contained within it animals have all kinds of fancy organized help them form some pretty mind blowing structures like bones muscles and nerves. These organs are what allow animals to to build empires honestly but one canal animals don't have is the chloroplast which allows plans to photosynthesis or make sunlight into glucose compounds so any green you see on a plan to leave the stem in the peel of an unripe banana all comes from the chloroplast in their selves turning light into food and try try that animals one important difference between plant and animal cells can be found in another organization called evacuate. Some animal cells contain backyards but in a plant cell. They're really large and have an important job. Keeping the plant from wilting vacuoles are basically intracellular water balloons that keep the cell plumped bumped from the inside by creating <unk> pressure pushing the cell membrane against the cell wall and helping the plant keep its shape if you've ever seen a pitiful carrot at the bottom of your crisper drawer all floppy and unappetizing. It's the loss of turbo pressure in its factuals ultimately landed at in the compost bin and that's about all separately not for a planet. Today's episode was written justin shields and produced by tyler clang brain. Stuff is a production adoption of i heart radio is how stuff works for more on this amounts of other highly specialized topics because at our home planet how stuff works dot com and for more podcast from iheartradio i heart radio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows i money vertical of it and i'm jason pfeiffer editor in chief of entrepreneur magazine and what we know is is this if you're not talking about money. You're never going to be getting a bit in our podcast hush money. We debate the uncomfortable questions about money in life like do you give your friend alone wound who pays on the first date and how do you ask for a raise. Then a celebrity judge joins us to decide who's right. Listen and subscribe to hush money on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Apple Lauren Bogle Entrepreneur Magazine Affleck Russell Editor In Chief Justin Shields Jason Pfeiffer
What Is the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon?

BrainStuff

04:11 min | 3 years ago

What Is the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you could use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels nls rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. N._A. Look into brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren bogle bomb here. Let's pretend you have saved forty thousand dollars to spare and you're out shopping for a shiny new ride. You've never really cared about cars that much before minus minus perhaps a cerebral hate for the car commercials you see every seven seconds during televised sporting event but now you're invested and when someone mentions a certain kind of if car one you've never heard of before but maybe that gets high ratings on a consumer review site. You're interested suddenly. That car is everywhere. It's On Your Street your boss's husband has one you see two of them next to traffic on your way home from work the cars even popping up in those ubiquitous commercials during the game and you swear up and down. They came out of nowhere. So what exactly is happening here to this car suddenly come to dominate the cultural consciousness or is your consciousness playing tricks on you. Welcome to the batter main phenomenon otherwise known as the frequency illusion or recency allusion. This phenomenon occurs when Jonathan you've just noticed experienced or been told about suddenly crops up constantly. It gives you the feeling that out of nowhere pretty much. The whole world is talking about this subject or that. It's swiftly surrounding. You and you're not crazy. You are totally seeing it more but the thing is of course that's because you're noticing it more. A couple of things happen when the batter main hall phenomenon kicks in one. Your brain seems to be excited by the fact that you've learned something new and selective attention. Occurs Your brain subconsciously. Thanks hey that's awesome. I'm going to look for that thing without you needing to actually think about it so now that your senses are on alert shirt for it you find it to make it all. The more powerful confirmation bias occurs after seeing it even once or twice confirmation bias is essentially our desire correct. It's the psychological trait where we're inclined to notice and remember information that supports our pre existing views and to ignore or disregard information that refutes what we already believe to be true in other words you start agreeing with yourself that Yep. You're definitely seeing this thing more than you ever have. Before Strangely Ainsley though the batter main hut phenomenon isn't named for to researchers who studied it as things like this often are nope. It's named for a militant West German terrorist group that was active in the nineteen seventies. A nineteen nineties online comment board was unlikely source of the name in Nineteen ninety-four a commenter on the Saint Paul Minnesota. Soda Pioneer pressboard dubbed the frequency illusion. The batter main have phenomenon after they randomly heard to references to batter Meinhof within twenty four hours. He's the phenomenon has nothing to do with the gang in other words but don't be surprised if the name starts popping up everywhere you turn today's episode was written by Kate Kirschner produced by Tyler Clang Brain. Stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics topics oddly influenced by the nineteen nineties visit our home planet how stuff works dot Com and for more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows breath today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host Mark Murphy celebrity chef and restaurant tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty sixty look at the world of food history science and culture tune into food three sixty with new episodes every Friday. You could listen and subscribe on Apple podcasts iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Meinhof Lauren Bogle Jonathan Saint Paul Minnesota Ainsley Kate Kirschner Mark Murphy Tyler Clang Forty Thousand Dollars Twenty Four Hours Seven Seconds
Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

BrainStuff

06:15 min | 3 years ago

Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

"Brain stuff lauren Bogle bomb here in two thousand ten. A woolly mammoth carcass was discovered in Siberia near the coast of the laptev sea nicknamed Yuka. This specimen of the long extinct beast died around twenty eight thousand years ago yet her body was astonishingly well preserved complete with patches of reddened for brain that was largely intact and nucleus like cell structures so how did her body lasts so long without rotting away the short answer is Yuka was frozen but not inside some glacier iceberg after death you can became encased in a layer of what's known as permafrost. Let's break down what that is as we know. Water freezes at thirty two degrees Fahrenheit four zero degrees Celsius permafrost is any ground materials such as soil sediment and rock that remains at or below freezing temperatures for at least two consecutive years. It's about twenty five percent of all the land area in the Northern Hemisphere is known to contain permafrost. It was American paleontologist Simone W Mueller who originally coined the term permafrost appointment two of the words permanent and frost despite that name permafrost doesn't last forever thanks to climate change. It's been been thawing in large quantities. This has serious ramifications for the environment and the economy generally speaking permafrost tends to occur in places where The average air temperature is zero degree Celsius or lower every year. According to the national snow and Ice Data Center most of the Northern Hemisphere's permafrost sits between the high high latitudes of sixty and sixty degrees north Siberia Canada Alaska and parts of Scandinavia are loaded with this frigid turf further south permafrost tends to be found in high elevation areas like the Tibetan Plateau and this was elps permafrost isn't as widespread below the equator but it does underlie parts of New Zealand the Andes Mountains and Arctic adjust as its locations vary so does its composition. It's not uniform. Some sections are ice-free while others are made up of more than thirty percent ice likewise the depth age and extent of permafrost. Ken Vary widely oftentimes permafrost permafrost sits beneath an active layer of ground that is a layer that thaws and re freezes seasonally. The permafrost itself can measure anywhere from less than three feet. That's one meter thick to more than five thousand feet or fifteen hundred meters thick and it can get Patchy Northern Alaska occupies a continuous permafrost zone that means permafrost underlies more than ninety percent of the local terrain but at lower latitudes. It's a different story pretty much everything south of the Brooks mountain range sits discontinuance tenuous permafrost zone here permafrost resides under a smaller percentage of the land surface. That's partially because as counter intuitive as it may sound snow. Snow is a really good insulator so when thick blankets of snow stick around all year long they might keep the ground too warm for permafrost likewise in spots. That's where permafrost already exists insulating layers of surface level snow are liable to heat it up but while snows and impediment. Pete is a boon widespread in and around the southern Arctic. Pete is a kind of ground material. That's made up partially decayed organic matter like mosses or swamp plants by and large the. Ground beneath it is kept cool shielded from solar heat this pete safeguards permafrost evergreen forests lend a helping hand to their thickly thickly needled branches pine trees limit the amount of sunlight and snow that hits the surface in the process the evergreens help keep permafrost thawing so permafrost is common below the clustered pines and high elevation high altitude areas the arrangement is mutually beneficial since liquid water can't sleep through hard permafrost. I it acts like a drainage barrier unfrozen water. That's absorbed into the active layer gets trapped. They're barred from travelling deeper into the earth. This water sustained some of the plants that live at the surface although not all permafrost sticks around more than a couple of years some is quite old at minimum. The permafrost in prudhoe Bay Alaska is thought thought to be five hundred thousand years of age and some of the permafrost beneath the Canadians Yukon territory could be more than seven hundred thousand years old inside the ladder scientists. It is found in ancient horse leg complete d._N._A.. Samples Permafrost can keep all kinds of organic matter preserved over long periods of time in two thousand twelve Russian scientists is regenerated live plants from ice age fruits that have been encased in permafrost for about thirty thousand years unfortunately as permafrost thaws the trapped organic organic material decomposes releasing carbon and methane into the atmosphere those gases exacerbate climate change and the bad news is according to a twenty nineteen can study published in nature communications various permafrost deposits around the world have warmed up by a couple of degrees between the years two thousand seven and two thousand sixteen right now approximately one point seven billion tons of carbon is trapped in permafrost scientists. Don't know how much of this will be released into the atmosphere. If current trends continue continue or how quickly it will In the city of New Orleans gresh alone more than one hundred residential buildings have been damaged because the one solid permafrost beneath them is softening the warming permafrost has has also triggered landslides drained lakes and torn roads apart. It's yet another reason to be concerned about our contributions to climate change but to end on a positive note remember the woolly mammoth Yuga found in Siberian permafrost in two thousand ten. She was so well preserved that an early twenty nineteen scientists were able to extract eighty eight eight nucleus like structures from her cells an attempt to coax them back to life. The team injected the nuclei into mouse ovarian cells and while the cells never fully divided divided they did complete the process called spindle assembly which is a step where chromosomes attached to spindle structures before the parent cell breaks into two daughter cells. Perhaps as genetics progresses will be able to help the process

Northern Hemisphere Yuka Pete Lauren Bogle Siberia New Orleans Northern Alaska Alaska Simone W Mueller Ice Data Center Prudhoe Bay Alaska Andes Mountains Brooks Mountain KEN Siberia Canada Tibetan Plateau Scandinavia New Zealand Thirty Two Degrees Fahrenheit
What Is a Swedish Death Clean?

BrainStuff

06:57 min | 3 years ago

What Is a Swedish Death Clean?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Oregon. You know, when something goes wrong at home, and you just freak out, I have definitely had my moments especially when it comes to pests ants in the mirror. Nara, cockroaches hanging out around your bubble bath and uninvited rat, a your daughter's birthday party. Don't let pests ruin the moment, get an organ tech out to your house tomorrow. Bill, protect your time and your temper. Visit organ dot com slash brain to save fifty dollars on your first general pest service with the promo code pod. Fifty. That's P, O, D, five zero Orkan home is where the bugs aren't. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here, cleaning, the home of a loved one who has recently died or entered a nursing home is something most people dread, especially if they have no idea what to do with all the items. Their loved one has cumulated enter the Swedish death clean it may sound morbid, but it could actually lighten the burden of grieving loved ones popularized in the book, the gentle art of Swedish death cleaning by eighty something artists Margarita Magnusson Swedish death cleaning is basically decluttering in your later years. So that someone else doesn't have to do it for you madness own herself Swedish, but lived all over the world. Her book was an immediate sensation in Sweden and garnered series interest in the US. Once it was published here in two thousand eighteen in the book, Magnusson explains at the Swedes, call it, though, standing a combination of the words for death and cleaning, though. It's a relatively recent concept. We spoke by Email with an Charlotte, gavel Adams, professor emeritus of sweeter, studies at the university of Washington. She explained that the word isn't. Sted in any Swedish Academy dictionaries, and that she, I heard of the concept, ten years ago from a man in his seventies who clearing out his artworks and books, so that his sons wouldn't have to do it when he passed away. She said he's still alive, though. He used the word in a humorous tone. I think the Swedes or is uncomfortable, discussing death as Americans and of course, we're not alone in that according to a survey by the academy of Medical Sciences, in England, six out of ten people know little to nothing about those last hours of life. In fact, one third of participants declined to answer the questions leading researchers to surmise that they're uncomfortable or unwilling to talk about death. Even so the concept is clearly struck a nerve Boston-based, professional organizer Reeb. Becker added Swedish death cleaning to her list of services after reading magazines book. She said by Email, I've worked with so many relatives of people who never streamlined. Their belongings, only to leave a massive amount of stuff to the unfortunate next generation. Author and motivational speaker, BJ Gallagher has been on the receiving end of this accumulated stuff, not once or twice, but three times in the last eight years. One of those homes was her mother's residence where she lived for four decades Gallagher said by Email along the way, I decided I wanted to start liquidating my own estate before I become elderly and, or incapacitated, because I don't want my son to have the same headache dealing with my household at the end of my life. I decided that the greatest gift, I can give my son is the gift of no burden. So that's what I've been doing the past couple of years long before I ever heard the term Swedish death cleaning. First on the chopping block was her art clothes jewellery because they all have significant value aren't simple curbside donations. She said, I've used EBay and social media to sell these items with great success. I mean thirty thousand dollars last year selling my clothes, jewelry, and art, and it feels so great to lighten up and clear out space, my closets. And in the rooms of my house. Although it might seem like an awkward conversation to have the irony is that streamlining personal belongings? During those golden years, actually improves the quality of life. Beker said some people feel squeamish about the idea that they're essentially preparing their personal environment for their eventual death. But it makes so much sense. And once completed the person who chooses to do Swedish death cleaning could enjoy a simpler life surrounded only by the things they truly need or love. Still, it can be a difficult topic to broach with a loved one as no one wants to imply that grandma or mom has one foot in the grave. So if you think the person in question might be somewhat rightfully put off by the phrase death cleaning take a different approach. We also spoke by Email with Julie best Trie a Chattanooga, Tennessee based professional organizer. She said when people contact me about their parents wanting to suggest downsizing for them. I always encourage them to position it from the perspective of how old prove their parents lives now rather than their families or children's lives later accent. How a less cluttered environment means, there are fewer things to dust vacuum or make space to store, perhaps bench and a friend, whose parent had excess and fell breaking a hip and recuperating at home wasn't possible, because the cluttered spaces left little room to move about with a Walker. Once your loved ones are on board with a full house declutter you can offer to lend a hand on a gradual basis or use the services of a professional organizer. Then start slowly Beker said my client chooses the room that's bugging them the most we handle every item while the client makes decisions. And then we move onto the next room this process may sound time consuming, but we can often complete an entire room in two to four hours. Here are a few other tips for successful death cleaning from professional organizers, I dispose of anything that could be hurtful or embarrassing, I can say from personal experience cleaning out family members homes, that finding a loved one sex aids is awkward, then bring other friends or relatives in on the action. Ask them, what items of value, they want and write it down or note it in the will this will limit hurt feelings and fighting after your loved one is passed on. They may even decide to distribute the items before, passing and finally consider packing throwaway box items that can't be parted with four sentimental reasons, but that no one else will how to use for. When all of a sudden done few people are likely to feel that they've lost anything other than a cloud hanging over their head Beker, said, clients are always relieved to have thinned, the heard they actually feel a lightness that they may have never experienced before as I like to say it's only stuff. This episode was written by Aaliyah, white and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other neat topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheart radio is iheartradio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi, I'm Chelsea handler. And I'm launching a brand new podcast with iheartradio called life will be the death of me. And I'm gonna talk to all these different people, my BFF Mary McCormack. That's what we should call. My book tour the apology for great idea. Sorry. Everyone on this whole podcast should be called. It should be called with the orange because of the orange theme of the book Archie. Glad I went to therapy. Life will be the death of me with. Chelsea handler listening subscribe at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Email Beker Iheartradio Margarita Magnusson Bj Gallagher Bill Chelsea Oregon Apple Sweden Lauren Bogle Orkan Ebay United States Mary Mccormack Academy Of Medical Sciences Becker Aaliyah Archie
What Is an Oligarchy (and Are We One)?

BrainStuff

06:07 min | 3 years ago

What Is an Oligarchy (and Are We One)?

"Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, who, again is running for the democratic nomination for president proclaimed an two thousand nineteen speech to sixteen thousand supporters in San Francisco, we say no to oligarchy. Sanders, who warns billionaires are buying elections, and exerting too much power over the government refers to oligarchy is frequently, but he's not the only one around the web, you'll see places ranging from Russia, China and Saudi Arabia to Brazil, and even Hong Kong described as oligarchies 2017, salon article even warned of the growing power of a global Uber. Oligarchy comprised of wealthy super powerful figures ranging from financiers to Rockstars, and the concept isn't just owned by the left either President Donald Trump may not have used the same terminology, but the billionaire businessman rose to power in part by railing against the elites that he accused of disenfranchising ordinary Americans. If you're not a political science, major, you may be wondering, what exactly is an oligarchy anyway. And do we really have one in the United States, we spoke with Bron forms? Sannoh the William T, Brian chair of American history and professor emeritus of history at the university of Kentucky. He's written a couple books on the subject American oligarchy the permanent political class. And plutocracy in America. How increasing inequality destroys the middle class and exploits the poor form, Asano explained an oligarchy is a combination of wealth, and power, and often tends to close off access to its ranks pulling up the ladder oligarchy from the ancient Greek word, meaning few is a concept that goes back to the Greek philosopher, Aristotle, who used it to describe society governed by select few wealthy, or aristocratic people as opposed to rule by a single monarch, or democracy in which the great mass of people of humble means holds control. Aristotle actually didn't favor either all ARCHE or democracy. He preferred sort of hefty CAF Cup of Joe in which a middle group of moderately wealthy citizens controlled the rains and the early nineteen hundreds philosopher Rubert Michelle's came up the iron law of oligarchy it holds the, any organization or society. Even when the two spouses democratic ideals of popular rule, inevitably will devolve into oligarchy rule in which a few people take most of the power in part because rank and file members tend to want. Someone to tell them, what to do in America Sanders, isn't the first politician to be concerned about oligarchy fear that an entrenched elite would seize power dates back to the era when the nation was founded John Adams, who became the second US president, in particular saw, as a potential menace. We spoke with Luke maye Ville, author of the book, John Adams, and the fear of American oligarchy. He said are popular history. Paints, a revolutionary society that overthrew monarchy, but revolution era, America was also full of animosity towards anything resembling, formal nobility or Hristo credit privilege. This animosity made its way into the US constitution in the form of the nobility clause of article one which prohibits the federal government from granting titles of nobility, what made Adams unique was a systematic manner in which he theorized about oligarchy undocumented the threat that oligarchy had posed throughout history. Mayvale continued relatively early in his life Adams was struck by the disproportionate influence enjoyed by men of wealth, and lustrous lineage, but the record shows that he became much more fearful of oligarchy during his long sojourn as diplomat in Europe, in the late seventeen seventy s and early seventeen eighty s in the old world, he became a careful observer of the power that went hand in hand with family lineage, physical, beauty, and especially wealth, when he compared these observations at the old world to conditions in the new world, he saw more similarities than differences. But Adams, didn't exactly see the world the same way as does Sanders for example, or Senator, Elizabeth, Warren and other presidential candidate who is concerned about the concentration of wealth and power, because Adams, worried about rule by ordinary citizens as well almost as much as he worried about oligarchy, he thought that giving everyone the right to vote would inevitably lead to all currently held private property being divvied up and redistributed. He believed in a balance between the power of the wealthy few and the organized power of the lower classes, something. Perhaps it can to Aristotle's concept of a mixed ruling class. Oligarchy is can develop in societies for several reasons in a country with a monarchy or dictatorship. If a leader becomes too weak or incompetent rule the strata of powerful people under the leader may start to siphon away his authority, and ultimately may replace them with a puppet or else one of their own members. It's also possible for an elite say, for example, superwealthy business moguls to take control of society because they're good at getting things done. Whether or not, those things are in the best interests of everybody else. And there's also oligarchy by default in which democracy, essentially withers because ordinary people allow an elite take over because it's easier than staying informed and grappling with complexities of governing. The question of whether the US is turning into an oligarchy, or perhaps already is one has become a subject of heated debate back in two thousand fourteen and analysis out of Princeton, and Northwestern University said, one thousand seven hundred seventy nine different policy issues and concluded that economic elites and groups representing business interests had a lot of influence upon US, government policy, while ordinary citizens at interest groups, representing them held little sway. They didn't actually use the term oligarchy, though, news. Media headlines summarizing their work did. But several other scholars published rebuttals arguing that either the masses and the elites didn't really disagree that much about policy choices or that when they did, the masses usually prevailed. Public opinion, though, suggests that most people think of the US as allegoric, even if they don't, call it that in two thousand seventeen poll seventy five percent of Americans said the people like them have too little influence in Washington and eighty two percent believed that wealthy people had too much power over the government here in the US form. Misano said, it's not a matter of restrictions. But more closing of opportunity, and diminishing chances for the middle and lower classes, even some billionaires worry that the nation's rising income inequality is unsustainable and may endanger capitalism's future, even if they're not quite ready to give up all their influence.

United States John Adams Senator Bernie Sanders Aristotle America Sanders President Trump America President Donald Trump Lauren Bogle Vermont Asano San Francisco Luke Maye Ville Rubert Michelle Hong Kong Brazil University Of Kentucky Bron Misano Hristo
How Hazardous Is Peeing in the Pool?

BrainStuff

03:52 min | 4 years ago

How Hazardous Is Peeing in the Pool?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brainstorm a production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here with summer fast approaching here in the United States. We need to talk about swimming pools, and the dirty secret of swimmers peeing in the pool. It's not just gross, according to the American Chemical Society, it's bad for our health research has shown that there are about thirty two eighty milliliters of urine per person in public pools. That's about one to three ounces or about a shot glass full per person to counteract the urine, and other stuff that winds up in the water like sweat Slava dirt, end, traces of fecal matter. We add chemical disinfectants to keep pools clear and clean and keep us from picking up bugs like salmonella and E clai and those disinfectants are doing their job. But unfortunately that's not all they're doing those disinfectants can react with urine, sweat hair, and body care products and other organic matter that winds up in pools and create what researchers call disinfection byproducts or db peas these byproducts can cause serious. Health concerns, especially for professional swimmers, and people who work around pools, chronic inhalation of db peas can cause respiratory problems, such as asthma, and are the main reason for the red burning eyes, you may experience in the pool. And the number one culprit is you guessed it urine, which causes half of the db peas found in pools in the air around them. Urine contains Iria a chemical that reacts with chlorine to form. Trichloride mean the compound that makes a pool smell, like a pool. You'll never enjoy that smell again, it's also the one to blame for I burn and respiratory issues a real problem for competitive swimmers who spent so much time in the water, but cutting down on db peas tough since you're getting in the pool is something almost everyone does. It's just easier than getting out to take a leak and people mistakenly think the chlorine will just take care of it even Olympic swimmer, Michael, Phelps, and Ryan locked e joke about their pool ping, Ernest Blatch Lee, and environmental engineer at Purdue University said in an article in chemical and engineering news. High profile. Swimmers have a real opportunity to take position of leadership. And responsibility, the best thing that swimmers could do to improve the swimming environment for themselves. And for everybody else who uses the pool is to practice. Commonsense hygiene, that means I taking a shower before getting into the pool to rinse off much of the dirt sweat, and lotion, our bodies carry around and second, but most important, don't pee in the pool. But what about the ocean fish p there? So why not humans right? Well, you're in luck. It's absolutely okay to swim and p with the fishes. Today's episode was written by Karen, Kirkpatrick, and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other sort of gross, but important topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts, my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi, I'm Chelsea handler. And I'm launching a brand new podcast with iheartradio called life will be the death of me. And I'm gonna talk to all these different people, my BFF Mary McCormack. That's what we should call. My book tour the apology, or great idea. Sorry. Everyone on this whole podcast should be called. It should be called with the orange because of the orange theme of the book Archie. Glad I went to therapy. Life will be the death of me with Chelsea handler. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Chelsea Archie American Chemical Society Lauren Bogle Salmonella United States Mary Mccormack Iria Ernest Blatch Lee Asthma Trichloride Purdue University Engineer Michael Tyler Karen Ryan Kirkpatrick
Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

BrainStuff

05:51 min | 4 years ago

Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. Dark matter. Sounds a little mysterious because it is it stuff. We can't see with any existing telescopes but that math and physics tells us must exist based on the way that normal matter the stuff we can see babes. And there's a lot of dark matter out there astrophysicists think the twenty-seven percent of the universe is made up of dark matter. Compared with only five percent normal matter, meaning that the term normal probably isn't the most accurate dark matter is the bedrock that all galaxies are anchored to you can't get one without the other. Or so we thought until strana mors found ghostly galaxy. The doesn't appear contain any dark matter. It's as if the universe is planning trick on us by flipping the laws of physics on their head dark matter should be there. But isn't it's a game changer galaxy astronomers are saying, and it's like nothing we've ever seen before we may not be able to spot dark matter. But astronomers can measure its gravitational effects acting on normal matter. For example, they can look at how fast stars cruise around galaxy when dark matters. Isn't that galaxies gravity will be bulked up causing it starts to move faster than if just normal matter were present? But in the case of N, G C one, oh, five two dash d f to an ultra diffuse. Galaxy located sixty five million light years away. Astronomers found that it stars are moving in exactly the way that would be predicted if only the total mass of all the visible stuff is considered. In other words, dark matter doesn't seem to be exerting its gravity on normal matter in that galaxy. And that's weird. Peter von doco of Yale University, sudden statement finding a galaxy without dark matter is unexpected because this invisible mysterious substance is the most dominant aspect of any galaxy for decades without the galaxy start their lives as blobs of dark matter after that everything else, happens guests falls into the dark matter halos, the gas turns into stars. They slowly build up, then you end up with galaxies, like the Milky Way this galaxy challenges the standard ideas of how we think galaxies form ultra diffuse galaxies auditees in their own. Right. Having only been discovered in two thousand fifteen as they are very difficult to detect. However, it appears that this class of galaxy is common but none are like the one in question. The galaxy was discovered using the Dragonfly telephoto array telescope in New Mexico. That's custom made to seek out these allusive targets. Then using a set of twin ten meter optical and infrared telescopes in Hawaii, the Stromer signaled out ten bright, globular clusters, which are large combat groups of stars orbiting the galaxy's core. They let us spectra. Data to measure their motions these clusters were found to be plotting along more slowly than expected. Meaning there's far less mass in that galaxy then would be predicted. In fact, there's so little mass that the researchers have come to the astonishing conclusion that there's little if any dark matter their follow up observations were made with Gemini north telescope. Also in Hawaii. So the galaxy structure could be studied with geminis help the researchers ruled out interactions with other galaxies, as being the cause of it's weird dark matter deficit. Ben dot com said in the press. Release, if there's any dark matter at all. It's very little the stars in the galaxy can account for all of a mass, and there doesn't seem to be any room for dark matter. This finding seems to suggest the dark matter has quote its own separate existence apart from other components of galaxies, he added and this makes the very existence of this galaxy of mystery if it has no dark matter how did even Volve into a galaxy in their study published in March in the journal nature then doco teams speculates that some cataclysmic event in the galaxy. He may have cleared out all the dark matter and blasted away all the star forming gases alternatively a nearby massive, elliptical galaxy may have played a role in the current galaxies lack of dark matter, billions of years ago when it was undergoing, it's early and violent stages of evolution. Now, the researchers are pouring over Hubble space telescopes observations of similar galaxies, to perhaps find more that lack dark matter, if they find more than alternative fuels and faint galaxies might be the norm when dark matter isn't present, and that's a fascinating development in our understanding of how galaxies evolve. Then dot com concluded every galaxy we do about before has dark matter. And they all fall in familiar categories like spiral or elliptical galaxies. But what would you get if there's no dark matter at all? Maybe this is what you would get. Today's episode was written by Dr Ian O'Neill, and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other dark topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts for my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth. Minniap- in DC.

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What Is Agnosticism?

BrainStuff

06:30 min | 4 years ago

What Is Agnosticism?

"Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here. It's called the rise of the nuns, the rapid increase in the number of Americans who claim to have no religious beliefs that has taken place in the last decade, or so when pews religious landscape study came out in two thousand fifteen it showed that the percentage of atheists in America had doubled from one point six two thousand seven to three point one in two thousand fourteen. Meanwhile, the percentage of agnostics had just about doubled from two point four to four point. Oh, but these terms agnostic an atheist are often confused. Let's unpack them people choose to identify as religiously agnostic for a variety of personal reasons philosophical, psychological, theological or even political, but it's not that agnostics are spiritual fence sitters unwilling to state whether they believe in God or don't true it necessarily. It turns out has nothing to do with belief at all. The term agnostic system was first coined by English biologist Thomas, Henry Huxley who lived in the mid to late eighteen hundreds. He was a fierce defender of Charles Darwin against religious critics who accused him of denying God's role in creation as a scientist Huxley didn't concern himself with beliefs he sought after facts, and the fact of any proposition, for example, that God created the vast diversity of nature or that evolved from natural selection. Could only be proven by the evidence Huxley stated that narcissism itself wasn't a creed or set of beliefs, but a principle namely, quote that it is wrong for man to say he is certain of the objective truth of a proposition unless he can produce evidence which logically justifies that certainty. The word itself was a combination of the prefix a meaning against or opposite and NAS Decem which comes from a Greek word meaning knowledge necessary. I'm was a religious movement that flourished in the first and second centuries, CE and held that among other things the spirit world was good and the material world was evil. And although the principle of agnostic system doesn't exclusively apply to the question of God's existence. You can be agnostic about any proposition. It's been wrapped up in religion. Since the beginning Huxley wrote, a friend in eighteen sixty I neither affirm nor deny that immortality of men. I see no reason for believing it. But on the other hand, I have no means of disproving it gives me such evidence. As would justify me in believing anything else, and I will believe that. So that's awesome. But what about atheism, atheism? According to its classical definition is the lack of belief in God or that God is the biblical Judeo Christian God or some other higher power is separate issue. The opposite of atheism is theism the belief that God exists, atheism. And theism are thus both metaphysical claims because they assert an answer to a question about the nature of reality. Agnostic system on the other hand doesn't take a position on whether God exists. Instead, it takes a position on whether or not we can know if God exists. This is thus a physical or pissed him logical question this democracy being these study of knowledge at NAS to some claims that we cannot know if God does or does not exist because there's no compelling evidence that either proposition is true. At least not yet. You might think that agnostics as them is nothing more than a handy way to dodge the question of whether you believe in God instead of saying, yes, or no the agnostic chooses a third position neither. But this is where things can get Harry. We spoke with Paul Draper, a professor at Purdue University who specializes in the philosophy of religion. He's witnessed his fair share of arguments between atheists agnostics he said people get so angry about this. The eighth will say you call yourself at agnostic, but you're really an atheist and you can see the eighth yeasts point at face value. It seems there's a razor thin line between saying. I don't see any evidence that got exists. And I don't believe the God exists. But the difference is that you can be an agnostic and atheist just as you can be an agnostic to believe in Christian or Buddhist or Muslim that's because agnostic schism at its core is separate and unrelated to questions of faith. Let's explain agnostics are nearly always lumped together with atheists as a type of non believer the Pew Research Center defined religious nuns as being either atheists agnostics or not affiliated with any particular religion. But it must isn't itself. A belief system. One could believe on face the God exists, but still ascribed the agnostic position that God's existence cannot be proven by physical evidence or rational arguments such a person would be an agnostic theorist. There's even a school of theology called apathetic theology. The claims that God is inherently unknowable. Thomas Aquinas, the thirteenth century philosopher and the Logan wrote. Now, we cannot know what God is. But only what God is not we must therefore consider the ways in which God does not exist rather than the ways in which God does according to seventy two percent of religious nuns. The group that does include easiest and agnostics do believe in a higher power. However, while it's technically true that you can be both an agnostic and faithful believer, it's perhaps more common for agnostics to doubt the existence of God is such Bertrand. Russell the British floss for it mathematician wrote a treatise on Augusta schism in which he explained why the agnostic and atheist positions often overlap. He said the agnostic suspends judgment saying that there are not sufficient grounds either for African nation or for denial at the same time at agnostic may hold the existence of God, though, not impossible is very improbable. He may even hold it. So improbable that it's not worth considering in practice in that case he is not far removed from atheism. His attitude. Maybe that would careful philosopher would have towards the gods of agent, Greece. If I were asked to prove that Zeus Poseidon inherit and the rest of the Olympics, do not exist. I should be at a loss to find conclusive arguments. An agnostic may think the Christian God as improbable as the Olympia ins in that case, he is for practical purposes at one with atheists. As we said at the beginning. The reasons for identifying as agnostic are myriad and different for every person Draper who has participated in high profile debates with Christian philosophers calls himself, a local eighth easiest and global agnostic. He explained I'm an atheist about the all powerful all knowing all good God, I'm agnostic about God. In a broader sense. Is there some being the qualifies for the title? God. There could be such a

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What Can Marsquakes Teach Us?

BrainStuff

04:16 min | 4 years ago

What Can Marsquakes Teach Us?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here ever since Nasr's insight mission placed it's dome-shaped seismometers onto the dusty Martian surface in December hopes were high that the robotic Lander would quickly detect its first Martian, quake or Mars quake. Well, the wait is finally over the mission seismic experiment for interior structure or size confirmed its first eight rumble coming from the inside of the red planet on April sixth confirming that Mars is seismically active size team lead. Phillip Longman said in an acid statement. We've been waiting for months for its signal like this. It's so exciting to finally have proof. That Mars is still seismically active. We're looking forward to sharing detailed results once we've had a chance to analyze them. Nasa hopes to use seismic signals like these to give Mars up health check of sorts like a doctor placing a stethoscope on their patients chest inside is doing something similar. It's trying to hear what makes the planet tick unearth, the cacophony of seismic signals bouncing around. Our planet's interior become distorted as they encounter regions of different densities by measuring these seismic waves, we've learned about the different unreachable layers deep inside our planet. Marzieh's interior is something of an enigma. The planet doesn't have a global magnetic field for reasons we have yet to fully understand and its volcanic activity was extinguished hundreds of billions of years ago, if the planet is geologically or more accurate area logically dead. How can it produce Moore's quakes at all? It's thought that as the planet continues to cool. It's shrinking and crack leg was small quakes that echo throughout the Martian interior mission. Scientists also want to listen out for meteorite impacts that will produce their own mini trembles perhaps turning insight into a real time meteorite detector. Until now Mars quicks were theoretical possibility. But now that we know that they're they're they can be used by insight to understand what lies beneath the planet's surface, according to mission, scientists this first Mars quake is a pip squeak nothing like the tremors, you're used to if you've ever lived in southern California on Mars, however this week quake stands out in the comparative. Silence of Mars is quiet. Innards other weaker seismic signals have also been heard over the past month or so, but their origins are more ambiguous. Although the April sixth vent was too weak to be used gain much information about the Martian interior. Scientists are excited as we've seen something like it before on the moon during the Apollo program, astronauts placed five seismometers on the lunar surface which detected thousands of mooncakes between nineteen sixty nine and nineteen seventy seven these seismic waves helped scientists learn about the lunar interior and even helped model it's formation. Although inside this just one seismometers on Mars, scientists hope that it will give us a window into the mysterious Martian interior that we know so little about. Today's episode was written by Neil and produced by Tyler clang, brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this unless of other earthshaking, topics. Visit our home planet has to dot com. And for more podcasts from iheartradio iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T and it can wait eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone while they're driving. We're all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it. And it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text a like, a selfie, whatever it is when you're driving. It can wait. So the next time you see a friend family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something distracted driving's, reckless speak up. It can wait. A message from AT and T.

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