5 Burst results for "Lauren Boga"

"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by T mobile for business. Available now from iHeart comes season two of the restless bonds presented by T mobile for business. Join host Jonathan Strickland as he explores the ever changing rapidly developing technologies that are changing industries overnight. From advancements in cloud and edge computing, SaaS, IoT and 5G once again, Jonathan sits down with the world's most unconventional thinkers, the leaders at the intersection of technology and business to understand how they continue to thrive in a world of complex organizations and lightning fast technology. The restless ones is now available on the iHeart radio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren boga bomb here. It's possible you've heard of a mink, and it's also possible that the thing that pops into your head when you hear that word is a fur coat. But of course, a natural fur coat is made of animal skins. In the parlance of our times, a mink is a coat, and astronomically expensive one at that. Made of the pelts of a type of weasel also called a mink, which is captured or raised in captivity for the purpose of providing rich people with cozy outerwear. But what makes mink first, such a desirable material for glamorous jackets. And why we've been trapping and wearing minks since at least the 11th century, is also what helps a mink survive in the wild. A two species of mink exist on the Planet Earth today. The third, the sea mink is now extinct due to a couple of centuries of persecution by fur trappers. Both surviving species have thick, soft, water repellent fur. Nas did the extinct bank. Both the American mink and the critically endangered European mank are semi aquatic, meaning they stick close to waterways, streams, rivers, wetlands, lakes, et cetera, aware they can find all the foods they like to eat best. Frogs, birds, clams, eggs, aquatic insects, and small animals, like rabbits and mice. They love slinking around rocky riverbanks in the early morning and evening. And during the heat of the day, repairing to their luxurious multi chambered burrows lined with grass fur and feathers. They're extremely tricky to trap because they're smart and suspicious. But we humans are, if nothing else, great devising ingenious ways of killing stuff. So we've managed to put mink in a precarious position. The American mink is doing pretty well in the wild. They can be found in parts of every state in the United States except Arizona, and aren't uncommon throughout their natural range. In fact, they're also not uncommon in other places in the world, including the traditional range of the European mink, which is native to Europe and Eurasia. American men were brought to Europe in the early 20th century, in order to satisfy the European passion for fur garments. And by the 1950s, at least 400 registered mink fur farms existed in the UK alone, all stocked with American mink, the species of choice for the fur industry, since their larger body than the European species, and their coats are a bit longer and denser. But it's perhaps predictably difficult to hold a weasel captive, and the American mink that had spent a few generations on European farms escaped and became naturalized citizens of Europe. And it turns out they were very aggressive toward the locals. A feral farm raised mink and their offspring began killing European mink and their kids. Before the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke with doctor inigo's bergia, a researcher in the department of environmental studies at Icarus in Lauren yo Spain. He said, it is important to consider that feral American mink is not the same as Native American mink in North America. A feral American mink is like a new species created by humans after decades of breeding in captivity. They do not behave in the same way as wild American mink in their native range. An example of altered behavior in Ferrell American mink in Europe has to do a territory. A wild male animals of both species are normally very territorial, and don't put up with other males sharing their area. Feral American mink, on the other hand, don't seem to mind sharing space with each other. Zerbo goitia said, in this way, in rivers where it was once possible to find one European mink male and between three and four females, you can now find as many as 30 American mink. The predation pressure in the area is extremely strong. As a result of this ecological debacle, the European mink is one of the most endangered animals in Europe. The population has plummeted by over 50% in the past decade, and although competition from the American mink certainly isn't helping matters, European mank are also hunted by humans, and have long been the victims of human driven habitat loss. Activists and researchers are working against the clock to save the species. Meanwhile, mink farms flourish worldwide, mink accounts for 85% of the global fur trade, and fur is still a popular material in oak tour. As recently as 2016, two thirds of major fall fashion week shows worldwide included fur. The mink for industry in the United States grosses around $300 million a year. There are farms in 23 states, but a few European countries outstrip America's farmed for production. Meanwhile, the mink for business is booming in China, a country with a lot of newly wealthy citizens in the market for luxury items. Coupled with very few animal welfare regulations. But anti fur activists take note, simply releasing farmed mink into the wild, won't do them any favors. In 2017, two animal rights activists released between 30,040 thousand mink from a fur farm in Minnesota. Most of the mink that immediately due to heat or killed each other when recollected in different social groupings. As with many issues, focusing on educating the public and contacting your governmental representatives to.

Jonathan Strickland Lauren boga Europe inigo's bergia department of environmental st Lauren yo Jonathan Eurasia Zerbo goitia America Arizona UK North America Spain China Minnesota
"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

"The restless ones is now available on the iHeart radio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren boga bomb here. Anglerfish have got an angle all right, but it's probably not to win anyone over with their intensely toothy looks. But rather, their endgame is to attract their prey using a form of fishing known as angling. Where an angle, which is a sort of bony hook protrusion, is used to lure in and catch an unsuspecting fish. That's right, just like a fisherman sitting with a pole in hand, anglerfish do indeed fish. Except they do it from the ocean floor. No tackle box or bait needed. The carnivorous female anglerfish wait patiently in the depths of the sparsely populated deep sea to literally lower in their next meal. They wiggle and angle a rod like extension of their dorsal spine that protrudes from their head and emits light. But once their prey comes close, the female strikes and stags them using her large pointy teeth to chomp them up, even if they're up to twice her size. And in 2018, scientists captured images of a female with numerous thin filaments, extending from her body. In addition to her main dorsal appendage. These filaments also emit light, creating a bioluminescent web of whiskers to attract and surround their prey. Some species of anglerfish live in more shallow, tropical waters, but the ones that pique the interest of scientists are those that live in the deep, murky depths of the ocean. Some as deep as 16,000 feet or 5000 meters. Before the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke via email with Ted pike, a professor at the school of aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington, and author of oceanic anglerfishes, extraordinary diversity in the deep sea, and whose name I hope I pronounced correctly. He's been studying the elusive anglerfish almost his entire career. He said, there are about a 166 species so far, but new ones are still coming up. They live so deep that we don't really have a good idea of how big they actually get. We send nets down to collect them and the deeper we go, the larger specimens come up. But how do they manage to stay so close to the ocean floor at such depths? Pike shares that most anglerfish, along with some other deep sea fish, don't have a swim bladder. And that's the gas filled sack that helps many fish stay afloat without the need to constantly swim. The lack of a swim bladder not only helps anglerfish stay near the bottom, it also conserves energy, energy that's at a premium given the difficulty of finding a meal so far down. Female anglerfish are definitely running the deep sea shell. Piech explained, most females aren't much larger than your fist. But other species are close to four feet, that's 1.2 meters long. A male anglerfish on the other hand is usually an inch, two and a half centimeters or so long. In the most extreme cases, the female is 60 times the length, and about half a million times as heavy as the male. The male, who has no way to feed itself, must rely completely on the female for survival. A male will actually merge with a female, not because they're in love. A page said, they the males have tiny, pincer like teeth on the tip of their snout, and they bite onto the female. The blood flow from the female to the male provides the nutrients. If they don't find a female, their toast. Scientists believe the female emits alluring pheromones that the male can sniff out with his proportionately large nostrils. Their relationship really is quite unique. A pike said, these are the only animals in the world that attach permanently and exchange fluid. Scientists note that the size difference is a survival mechanism that allows them to thrive on the limited deep sea menu. If they were both large, it would take a whole lot more food and energy to keep them alive and keep their unique reproductive cycle going. While the female has to carry the little guy around and keep him fed, she's also getting a pretty good deal out of it too. There's no need to put herself out there to attract a loyal partner. She's got a sperm bank, or two, or three, or even 6, available 24/7 to fertilize her eggs. Luckily for anglerfish and the ecosystem, you won't find them making an appearance on anyone's dinner plate. And it's not just because they're elusive and scary to look at. Pike says they're fatty and oily composition wouldn't make for a very tasty meal. Well, that is, unless you're talking to a sperm whale. Anglerfish remains have been found in whale stomachs, and they seem to be the main predator of the larger anglerfish species. A while it's extremely challenging to find anglerfish, and there's still somewhat of a mystery. Scientists are entering a new realm of studying their behavior. And while they're scary looking teeth and dismaying face may not look appealing to most of us humans, they continue to light up the deep sea, attracting an oh so lucky male anglerfish, right along, with their next deep sea dinner. Today's episode is based on the article, the deep ocean.

Lauren boga Ted pike school of aquatic and fishery Piech University of Washington Pike pike
"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren boga bomb here. Words can become fossils in their own right. A triceratops means three horned face, and philosopher translates to speedy plunderer. About genus names, fit the dinosaurs, they belong to. We know triceratops had a trio of horns on its skull, while velociraptor was a lightly built carnivore. The case of stegosaurus isn't so straightforward. Eroded in Greek, this Jurassic plant gobbler's name means roofed lizard, which made a lot more sense when the animal was first discovered over a 140 years ago. But let's back up a little. A stegosaurus belonged to a sub order of dinosaurs called what else, the stegosaurs. Found in North America, Europe, Asia and mainland Africa, the stegosaurus walked on four legs and had long beak tipped skulls. But it's the ornaments that really grab your attention. A spikes worse stegosaur mainstay, adorning the tails of every known species. Many of these creatures, like Africa's kentrosaurus. Also rocked big old spikes on the shoulders and lower back. And where are the back spikes came to an end, a much weirder feature took over. A stegosaurus and its kin are characterized by the vertical plates above their spines. Paleontologist othniel Charles marsh named stegosaurus in 1877. He chose this name, which again means roofed lizard because he figured the plates were sheets of armor that laid flat against the animal's backside. Instead, later discoveries proved the objects stood upright, leaving the flanks on these dinosaurs exposed. We may never know how these things functioned, and because the plates contained blood vessels, experts used to think that they helped stegosaurus chill out. Heat would supposedly dissipate from blood as it entered the tall fan like structures. When the chilled blood circulated elsewhere, it would stay cool for a little while, lowering the overall body temperature. This hypothesis is no longer popular. According to a study published in 2005, in the journal paleobiology, the blood carrying networks and stegosaurus plates were there to promote healthy bone growth, but they played no role in dissipating body heat. Or maybe stegosaurus and its kin were just showing off. A maid of bone and encased in horny sheaths, the plates could have made these dinos look bigger and more intimidating. A capable of hitting over 29 feet, that's 9 meters in length, and weighing about 5 tons or four and a half metric tons, a stegosaurus would loom large over today's land mammals. Even by stegosaurus standards, it was a biggie, and most of the dinosaurs in that group were only 13 to 23 feet long. That's about four to 7 meters. Yet in the late Jurassic when these species lived, a stegosaurus was in the shadows of behemoths. Sauropods, or long necked dinosaurs, like these 60 foot or 18 meter camarasaurus, and the 80 foot or 24 meter diplodocus, where some of the creatures neighbors. But the Tyrannosaurus Rex wasn't. And despite movies like fantasia and the camp classic planet of dinosaurs, showing stegosaurus duking it out with the T. Rex. Those two dinos never crossed paths in real life. In tyrannosaurus had a fairly short reign that lasted from 68 to 65 and a half million years ago. A stegosaurus came and went much much earlier. The oldest specimens on record are around a 155 million years of age, while the youngest for fossilized a 150 million years before the present. So, the mighty T. Rex actually lived closer to the dawn of mankind than it did to the stegosaurus heyday. The Jurassic period, which lasted from a 199.6 million to a 145.5 million years ago, was drawing to a close, when stegosaurus roamed the earth. Although its range included modern day Portugal, the beast is mainly known from fossil sites in western North America. And while stegosaurus didn't have to worry about T. Rex, a rogue's gallery of Jurassic predators stalked its ecosystem. Allosaurus was especially common, measuring up to 28 feet, that's 8 and a half meters long. This carnivore had serrated teeth and jaws that could open wide and a terrifying 79° angle. Good things stegosaurus had four tail spikes at its disposal. And we know they saw action once in a while, too. A study published in 2001 in the armored dinosaurs by the Indiana University press, found clear evidence of trauma on 10% of the 51 tail spikes that they studied. And apparently the roofed lizard hit below the belt. One allosaurus pubic bone shows a deep wound that would have been made by a stegosaurus tail spike. The stegosaurus had another line of defense. The underside of its throat was covered in tiny pebble shaped chunks of bone. Called gullar armor, it helped protect the dinosaur when allosaurus and other carnivores went for the jugular. Paleontologists think stegosaurus roused on low lying vegetation. A 2016 computer simulation found that the animals bite force would have rivaled that of a sheep or cow. But however it processed its food, this dinosaur didn't need much gray matter. A stegosaurus had a brain cavity that was long, narrow, and tiny. And tipping the scales at 20 ounces, that's 80 grams or so. The actual brain only made up about 0.001% of the creature's total body weight. And note that we said brain, not brains. As absurd as it might sound, there was a rumor that stegosaurus had a second brain located where the sun don't shine. A writing in 1881 marsh drew attention to the enlarged cavity that we find in the backbones above this dinosaur's hip region. Then he went and called it a posterior brain case. No one knows for sure what this opening was for. Though some researchers think it stored glycogen, a sugar that provides cells with energy. Regardless, there is no reason to think that stegosaurus or any dinosaur had multiple brains. A stegosaurus did have some pretty cool bragging rights, though. Not only is the Jurassic herbivore, Colorado's official state fossil, but it was also the inspiration for Godzilla's dorsal.

Lauren boga mainland Africa Paleontologist othniel Charles T. Rex dinos North America Tyrannosaurus Rex Asia
"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boga" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by discover. It's time to rediscover all your favorite things. Not just because things are getting back to normal, but because discover is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that accept credit cards. And you'll be earning cash back on every purchase. That's right. And discover automatically matches all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year. So go ahead. Make a reservation at that one restaurant you love or book a tea time at your happy place. You do you and let discover do the rest. Learn more at discover dot com slash match, limitations apply, 2021, Nelson report. This episode is brought to you by discover. It's time to rediscover all your favorite things. Not just because things are getting back to normal, but because discover is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that accept credit cards. And you'll be earning cash back on every purchase. That's right. And discover automatically matches all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year. So go ahead. Make a reservation at that one restaurant you love or book a tea time at your happy place. You do you and let discover do the rest. Learn more at discover dot com slash match, limitations apply, 2021, Nelson report. The award winning vizio M series TVs and soundbars are the perfect pairing to bring every world to life, immerse yourself in quantum color with a vizio M series four K HDR smart TV, and with seamless soundbar integration, takes a round sound to epic heights with the M series 5 one two home theater soundbar with Dolby atmos and DTS X enjoy endless entertainment from apps like iHeartRadio to stream your favorite music and podcasts, like hit nation radio and stuff you should know. Shop vizio's M series collection now in Best Buy dot com. Welcome to brainstem, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren boga bomb here. If you've ever driven on an American highway, you know them. The big blue signs near interstate exits showing travelers, the nearest gas, food and hotel or motel options. They're officially called interstate logo signs, or specific service signs. But the places featured aren't random, a score in a spot on these signs, boosts profits from any companies, and for the states that control them. As of 2019, Tennessee nabbed about $8 million per year, and Virginia got about 6 million thanks to the signs. Before the article this episode is based on, has to fork spoke by email with Jenny kampanna, a spokesperson for the Nebraska Department of Transportation. She said, all highway signs serve a specific purpose. And their color is how you can easily tell what the science purpose is. Direction, information, regulations, et cetera. These signs in particular are blue or informational signs. A regardless of what state you drive through, if you see a blue sign, it's going to provide helpful information to motorists, as they travel along their way. There are three basic types of blue logos signs. First, main line, which is the first one you see. It lets you know certain services are nearby. These are bigger than you might have thought, typically about 19 feet that's 6 meters wide by about ten feet or three meters high. The second type of blue sign is the ramp. This is closer to the exit and indicates whether you turn right or left at the end of the off ramp. A businesses that are clearly visible from the exit might not qualify for a ramp sign. And finally, there's the trailblazer. This last and smallest sign is placed at each corner where drivers should turn in order to reach the business. Only certain types of businesses can advertise on the logo signs. Gas stations, restaurants, lodging, and attractions. How stuff works also spoke with Mark nagi, a spokesperson for the Tennessee Department of Transportation. He said, the attraction category was added later for tourist attractions. In general, the businesses need to be within 5 miles or 8 kilometers of a freeway exit, except attractions can be within 15 miles or 24 kilometers. And they have to be open to the general public during normal business hours. Each state sets its own criteria, but usually the businesses listed must have public restrooms, drinking water, and public phones. Those that are open around the clock sometimes get priority over those that are open for fewer hours of the day. And distance from the highway may count in some states, too. In Florida, for instance, priority is given to businesses less than three miles, that's 5 kilometers from the exit. Though those up to 6 miles about 9 and a half kilometers from the exit are eligible for inclusion. Attractions like museums, wineries, agritourism sites and zoos are eligible for sign placement, too, but not churches, movie theaters, and adult oriented entertainment venues. Applying to be featured is easy these days. You just fill out a form online. But having a spot is another story. Some businesses wait for years to get a spot in some urban locations. A house of works also spoke with Tracy bramble, and information specialist for the Iowa Department of Transportation. She said, in the urban areas, it can be difficult to secure a spot on the blue motorist service signs or logo signs, because they often fill up capacity. There's a limit of 6 spots on the signs. She adds that all signs have to be spaced at least 800 feet that's about 240 meters apart, and must be placed directly in advance of the interchange where the business can be accessed. A green and white guide signs that is for cities, highways and major destinations of interest have a higher priority classification. So where interchanges are designed closely together, there may not be enough room to install the blue logo sign, and still maintain the spacing required. And even if space is available, it can be pricey. In Nebraska, for example, it's a $1200 per year per sign. So if you want to cover exits in both directions, it would cost you 2400 per year. In Tennessee, the price is around $900 in urban areas and 6 50 in rural locations per direction. New Jersey, meanwhile, can be as high as 2400 in each direction. If you're a nonprofit organization, you'll receive a discounted rate in some states. But in some rural areas, the blue signs often feature plenty of open spaces, causing drastic price declines. In Iowa, you can snag spots for as little as $230 in the right areas, according to bramble. As she explained, in Iowa, the fees charged are not commingled with other road user fees, but our earmarked specifically for outdoor advertising control purposes, including the administration of the logo signing program. Some states hire private contractors to run the program, who are then allowed to set their own price structures. Iowa has reinstated its state run program and has avoided raising fees since 1996. The biggest private contractor in the business is a company called interstate logos, which handles the fabrication and installation process for over 20 states around the country. It makes most of its money from the sign permits, but it also actively markets any unfilled spaces in hopes of filling any blank spots on those big blue signs. Negi says that the Tennessee Department of Transportation gets 80% of the gross revenue from the contractor it uses. Prices for businesses can and do change once a contractor takes over. In New Hampshire, for instance, the annual fee rocketed from $500 to $1800 per sign, drawing ire from some businesses, according to a local newspaper. States initially began deploying these signs to provide valuable and accurate motors to service information for the traveling public. Decades ago, the science took on even more importance as Americans began to decry the overuse of billboards. And so dense were these unsightly clusters of commercialization, the president Lyndon B. Johnson signed the highway beautification act in October of 1965, which limited billboard and other outdoor.

Lauren boga Nelson Jenny kampanna Nebraska Department of Transpo Mark nagi U.S. Tennessee Department of Transp vizio house of works Tracy bramble
How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

BrainStuff

05:59 min | 4 years ago

How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

"In two thousand and four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered nearly fifteen years later her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. Ideal. Mention so much ear to guys out there yell depressed, dude. I'm Katherine towns. And this is Helen gone binge all of season one now at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff I'm Lauren Boga bomb and the concept of creating New Year's resolutions is so ingrained in US culture that the government keeps a list of popular resolutions and resources for achieving them. It's a baker's dozen of good intentions including drink alcohol. Eat healthy food, get a better education. Get a better job get fit managed at manage stress and recycle digital research. Backs up this lists universality. According to a twenty eleven Marced university poll losing weight top the list for one in five resolution making Americans closely followed by exercising more with spending less than saving more quitting smoking. And being a better person all tied for third. But is it true that most people don't keep their resolutions? The answer as many of us around the house to forks office were relieved to discover appears to be a resounding. Yes. Richard Wiseman as I collagen and author with a penchant for mass participation experiments found that fifty two percent of people making New Year's resolutions or confident that they'd stick it out yet only a scant twelve percent really did. So why bother a New Year's resolutions are as one author wrote a triumph of hope over experience there a way to quantify what we wish for selves, their means of cataloging, our personal satisfactions, and perhaps most importantly their method of racing errors of the past year. Yes. New Year's resolutions are all about hopefulness. And it's always been that way. Of course ringing in the new year isn't a construct of modern Americans some four thousand years ago by balloons rang in their new year with an eleven day festival in March and ancient Egyptians celebrated the advent of their new calendar during the Nile rivers annual flood by forty six BC e Roman emperor Julius Caesar had moved the first day of the year to January first in honor of the Roman God of beginnings. Janice, an idea that took some time. To catch on however in fifteen eighty to see pope, Gregory, the eighth breath January first new year back in vogue with the Gregorian. Calendar. A concept the persists today. The origin of making New Year's resolutions rests with the Babylonians who reportedly made promises to the gods in hopes that earn good favor in the coming year. They often resolved to get out of debt. Sound familiar? Many of us are still making that resolution today. So what's the secret to actually keeping it just wanting something to change is not enough? You need a strategy to make it stick one way to do. This is to share your resolution with others. We spoke with Joe Ferrari, professor of psychology at depaul university in Chicago as he pointed out when you keep resolutions secret. No one is going to check up on you. You're only accountable to yourself. He says that a party to publicly share your resolutions an admirable way to ring in the new year. Social media offers another avenue to let others and on your goals. But once you've involved others in your resolutions. What steps can you? You take to ensure that when they do check up on you. You'll have something positive to report. Success of your New Year's resolutions starts in your head limiting yourself to a few resolutions, maybe even one and being specific are a few things to keep in mind. This prevents overload and frustration for example, I want to lose ten pounds by March first or I want to save fifty dollars each paycheck. The best goals are challenging but manageable, and that's a sensitive balance that only you can find for yourself overly ambitious goals can drain a person's confidence when they're not met instead build on small observable victories and possibly achieve bigger goals down the line and take things on one at a time. Whatever goals, you do tackle be sure to monitor your progress. Ferrari said if your resolution is to lose weight check your weight regularly if it's to save money right down where you spent your money monitoring those few challenging goals, you set will dramatically improve your success rate. Sometimes just the active recording everything you eat or spend can cause you to eat or spend less, even if you don't consciously change anything else. Whatever. Your New Year's goals. Give yourself some time to make them a reality more time than you may have planned on actually while most people cling to the widespread belief that new habits can be formed in twenty one days. New research is Justin that we need a longer timetable one. We study found that it took participants average of sixty six days to do something different and stick with it. Today's episode was written by loyal dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other fresh topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bounds and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Rebecca Gould Richard Wiseman Helen Lauren Boga United States Forks Harvard Marced University Tyler Clang Twitter Katie Golden Janice Professor Of Psychology Joe Ferrari Depaul University Ferrari Nile Rivers