19 Burst results for "Lauren Boban"

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Brain stuff. Lauren boban here as happy holiday. Traditions go the catalunians may have the rest of the world beat that's because this northeastern outpost of spain has some bathroom jason christmas customs that may leave unsuspecting visitors scratching their heads laughing or both without further. Ado we present to you. The cabernet a statue of person. Pooping off in a corner of a traditional nativity scene. This is not some recent cultural development that was the downfall of modern society. Rather it's a tradition that dates back at least two centuries in catalan. A romance language from the region of catalonia. Spain the word cagney translates roughly to crapper. Although some sources use rougher language the most popular cabernet features a male peasant and red hat crouched with his buttocks exposed and an unmistakable. Little brown pile at his feet at christmas time. The cabinet is nikolay hidden somewhere within nativity scene. A children make a game of trying to spot the pooping figures he crouches in the shadows and the cabinets never at the front of the scene. Because that would be disrespectful. No one really knows what gave rise to this. Long tradition because fecal matter has been used as fertilizer for agriculture throughout history. Some say the statues or a fertility symbol of sorts by plopping pooper in the midst of the scene. A perhaps farmers will gain favor with heaven find favourable conditions for crops and ultimately wind up with greater yields at harvest time but there are a couple of other theories and play because the christian faith states that jesus literally became human in order to save followers from their sins. Perhaps the pooping statue is a reminder of humanity's common bonds a furthermore. Maybe the cagney. Purposefully portrays a rather undignified private moment in conjunction with an activity seen to reinforce our shared vulnerability in the presence of a higher power. No one really knows but one thing is for sure canada's our a big business. The cabinets turned toward fame. Came in two thousand three. When demand for catalonian made statues was dropping and cheap. Chinese imports were cutting into the market company out. Cognate took note that it was an election year and made kagan as with politicians likenesses rather than take offence. These politicians gamely embraced this silly mockery and consumers loved it. The reverend haggas became a huge hit. And now the company sells tens of thousands of items every year since then the artists who make these figurines have been earning famous people like politicians and celebrities into pooping figures each year they monitor news headlines and pop culture introducing new faces that they think will sell well that has included donald trump shakespeare spock tiger woods. Boris johnson george michael. The pope madonna and a whole lot more then. The workers carver likeness from plaster and constructive. Old from that mold could come hundreds or even thousands of clay reproductions pooping all the little figures painted by artists. Which sometimes includes disabled people from local communities the lesson at christmas time in catalonia. Poop smells but it also sells cabinets. Aren't the only poopie katelyn. Tradition children also feed a te'o dana doll or christmas log with treats during the weeks leading up to christmas parents. Sneakily switch out the logs to make it seem as though it's getting bigger on the final day. The log takes a pinata form in kids. Hit it with a stick while singing this somewhat.

Lauren boban Little brown spain catalonia cagney nikolay catalan jason haggas cabinet Boris johnson george michael pope madonna kagan canada donald trump carver katelyn
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:39 min | 5 months ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Lauren. boban perr with a classic episode for you. today traditionally. It's been thought that liquid water was necessary to sustain life as we know it but some research has indicated that might not be the case. All let former lauren explain. Pay their brain stuff. Lauren vogel bond here life's resilience keeps astounding us unimaginable as it may seem. There's a thriving population of micro organisms in the cold. Dry nutrient poor soils of antarctica. A study may have just revealed the secret to their survival and that revelation could transform our quest to find life on other planets and arctic is a continent which famously goes dark for months on end during the winter season a period in which it sees no sunlight this presents a big challenge to organisms who need photosynthesis that is convert solar light into food intense. Dryness is another hurdle certain parts of the continent received no precipitation whatsoever and arctic is covered in ice drinkable. Water is scarce and then we have the issue of carbon all known life is based on this element and yet very little of it can be found in the arctic dirt but life Finds a way for years now. Biologists have known about the existence of diverse bacteria communities in arkansas. How can anything survive. Under such extreme conditions to gain some insight a team of australian and new zealander scientists took a hard look at micro ville dirt samples from two ice free sites in eastern arctic. Both areas are desert's where no plants can grow. The mcmurdo dry valleys region has even been compared to the surface of mars. The received no fall in almost two million years. It's humidity levels are staggeringly low. An ice snow and liquid water are practically non-existent there on december. Sixth two thousand seventeen. The team published their findings in the journal. Nature there reported seeing dna traces from twenty three microbial organisms inside those soil samples by reconstructing the microbes genomes. The scientists learned that many of these life forms had jeans that made them exceptionally good at processing carbon monoxide and hydrogen the researchers theorized that the organisms are able to meet their energy requirements by pulling both of these gases along with carbon dioxide straight out of the atmosphere in other words because of arctic a shortage of sunlight and suitable water as well as nutrient poor soil. These microbes could be surviving off of air alone. Should this be true. planets moons. That were once britain off as a uninhabitable might be able to sustain life after all maybe alien organisms don't need drinking water abundant sunlight on their home worlds instead. It could be that the only thing they require the right combination of atmospheric.

boban perr Lauren vogel arctic mcmurdo dry valleys Lauren antarctica lauren arkansas the journal britain
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey Brain Steph Lauren Boban here. At some point in ancient history, a starry scene was immortalized on a disk. Lebron's that artifact is an enigma today recovered by treasure hunters in nineteen ninety nine, it's been named the Nebraska Sky disc after the town of Nebo Germany near the site where the disc was found. Some experts say this object might be the oldest surviving attempts to portray astronomical objects like stars a realistic way but we're missing some important context while the numbers I. This is undoubtedly valuable it's age is open to debate. The artifact measures about twelve inches or thirty centimeters wide and weighs about four and a half pounds or two kilos. A series of about forty tiny holes were made along the perimeter of the disc has a bluish green backdrop punctuated by golden symbols? Special attention has been paid to seven tightly packed dots on the disc. They most likely depict platies a star cluster visible from both hemispheres. There's also a large golden circle that to represent the sun or the moon. It faces a crescent shaped object that might be an artist's on an clips or a lunar phase. Finally, there are twenty five golden dots, a curved line towards the bottom and too long arcs hugging the sides of the disc. The latter evoke horizons a possible reference to the solstices. Who knows perhaps the disc helped farmers time their harvests in accordance with the changing seasons it could have had religious value as well. The Arts Stars and other ornaments made of gold and the disc itself is corroded bronze beds. It's Blue Green. Colour. Following its discovery in nineteen, ninety, nine, the number sky disc spent three years on the black market until authorities seized relic in two, thousand, two sting operation. Shortly thereafter in two thousand and five Regensburg University archaeologist Peter Shower claimed the disc was a modern forgery. His arguments have been dismissed the corrosion and other lines of evidence are testimony to the objects advanced age. Still, the nature of its recovery raises questions. The two men who found the sky disc claim they unearthed it at a site near neighbour Germany about one, hundred, ten miles or one, hundred, eighty kilometers southwest of Berlin. Since the disc was considered property of the state. They had no legal right to dig it up or to attempt to sell it. But these guys did both and in two thousand five, they were found guilty of illegal excavation. Before the sting, the looters tried to south disc as part of a collection that also included two axes to swords and other artifacts allegedly taken from these same location. Right, now the disk is on display at the state, Museum of Prehistory in Hell Germany according to the locally based state office, for the preservation of monuments archaeology is official website. It cannot be directly dated using radiometric dating techniques. Yet. All is not lost radiocarbon dating shows that the bark on one of those Associated Sword Hilt is about three, thousand, six, hundred years old if the sky disc was indeed made at the same time more or less than it's definitely a bronze. Age Treasure. However a controversial paper released in September twenty twenty or poses that the discs place of origin may not have been reported accurately. Authors also suspect it could be a thousand years younger than previously thought make an iron age relic. But the director of the Health State Museum isn't sold neither is deputy state archaeologist. Alfred Reichen Burger who wrote a press release questioning the two thousand twenty paper in which he said colleagues not only ignore the abundance of published research results. In recent years, their various arguments are also easily refuted..

forgery Steph Lauren Boban Nebraska Sky Nebo Germany Lebron Alfred Reichen Burger Regensburg University Health State Museum Germany Berlin Museum of Prehistory director Hell Germany Peter Shower official
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Looking to brainstorm a production of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So consider this an estimated fifty percent of all fresh produce in the United States or roughly sixty, six, million tons or sixty million metric tons of produce is thrown away annual. LARGEST INGREDIENT in American limpets. Today's episode was written by Loyal Dove and produced Dylan Fagin.

del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer United States Loyal Dove Hector plot University of Pennsylvania Dylan Fagin Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 8 months ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
"lauren boban" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

04:51 min | 11 months ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"Say. That Laurel Ron was going to be on the show today. There was a conflict shedule with sky sports racing. We're not going to argue with that. But one about tumble step up and do. Magnification. Absolutely stunning stunning on famous. You mess up for a second Laurent had dialed in. Absolutely spectacular right so that's Tom's analysis. Rory for you. I will point The spoke would lawn yesterday. He's GonNa. Be On the show on Monday reviewing the action and he thinks dorm is basically a penalty. Kick care. I guess the one where you would find. Was a victory two-room was where he was drawn. because. He was very keen on his return instance. Mailbox alone was very keen to to draw him in. In the police. So, if he was thrown wide, I could see that being potentially problematic for the soul. One I'm not always a massive fan of soul won't because who? GIVES YOU EVERY OPTION? The world's Talkin than talking in Sutri. That's Great or did you want to press on? From, the rail ground as well. It will sit him. He Still GonNa need a degree of luck. Running you know given, we could have right big field for this racist beat as we usually do. unfinished classics can't be marred I By trump running. So, that's that's the concern for them otherwise. I. Don't think it's at Manila but I think this triple Su fine. He able to come. To save every inch comes. All the energy needs as well. Through this eight, he's going to be hard to be I'm not sure isn't absolute superstars. We perfectly honest, but we haven't seen the problem we have with this season. As effectively started in June, for most of us are not quite the same for the for the French Looking at a good cross Thus far I. I love misery I really do like mysteries. I love the way he got up CBC steed. Is Head is very low. I love with new head courage. It's a sign of state is clearly very honest. Time He was an easy winner from vote was out semi one by four lines, STAR WANNA risk of the course of distance of the same grid. Easily last weekend, so the form being as being very well France. I think. We would have been bit mixture of in a box even these twice. Last season in ordinary company but has clearly progress since. He was a impressive winner of a knock. Assign Step forward will start to seize on. IRAN SAUDI ARABIA ISSUES NEW ORLEANS. Astronaut win the. the new stakes last time is. My concerned with Hayes very good. Jones stole rally being three than one generally. Just the thing it always gives you slightly more options you never. Tried to get real it to move either way. I just wanted with trifles these a real galloper. On a galloping trump is going to sue him very well. Where's I'm not sure he's going to enjoy being taught to homo losses in the same way that visual Latour was. I'm if this falls more of A. Strong on news on Sunday Room in the street that I'd be keenum mischief. Just wondered whether with. The way these wasted Sanofi run will show him to best effect, and your name is out there on the front dance wanted that newmarket. Perhaps you know, press will just go slow rhythm and try to try to make most of the running. Had to be a sitting target. If you do this I'm here as well, but I I want to give shot because I like him more as. A as a horse vigil. Victoria has approved flown i. just think he's got the right setup here to win so I'm GonNa go. Excellent I'll take that about Victor I. Will Happily Take that last minute votes of confidence from Roy dealer. The exact wording from Lauren. Boban last night was I do not see anything in the race that is in his league bear in mind. This is a man who very highly regards. Ocean Atlantique pop quiz hotshots. How many times as a Brian on the French Darby Tumble? I. Remember him having won a tool. Going to go. I'm going to zero rory. It's not. It's not going.

Rory Laurel Ron Sutri Laurent Tom Manila France Latour Brian Hayes Jones Lauren Victoria Victor I. IRAN Roy SAUDI ARABIA
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Boban here a newly launched spacecraft promises to broaden our understanding of the sun called solar orbiter or the Solo for short it left Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Central Florida on Sunday February. Ninth at three PM. The new probes part of an international collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency or ESA both parties contributed to its arsenal of scientific instruments. Some of these gadgets will remotely image the Sun It's atmosphere and the materials it spews forth others are built to keep tabs on the spacecraft's immediate surroundings during the wee hours of February tenth. Two Thousand Twenty European Space Operation Center in Darmstadt Germany got a signal confirming the orbiter's on board solar panels were functioning correctly so begins a seven year plan mission the orbiter is supposed to take to paraphrase. Robert Frost the route less traveled. You see all the planets in our solar system revolve around the sun on the same General Plane. Give or take a few degrees called the ecliptic plane. It's like a giant invisible disk a one that very nearly lines up with Sun's equator most of our space fearing devices are gravitationally confined to this plane but the so low is meant to escape it by exploiting the gravity of Earth and Venus the probe will orbit the sun on a unique and tilted pathway. This unique trajectory will give the solo twenty two close approaches to the Sun as close as twenty six million miles or thirty five million kilometers as well as bringing it within the orbit of Mercury to study the sun's influence on space. It will also give the solo the chance to do something no craft has ever done before take pictures of the solar polls looking down from above or up from below just like Earth. The Sun has a north and South Pole in two thousand eighteen the ESA used data from the probe to satellite trying to determine what the northern pole looks like. But probe to couldn't photograph this region directly. If all goes according to plan the solo will do just that. It's I close pass by. The Sun will be twenty twenty at about a third the distance from the Sun to Earth. And that's just the beginning. Another mission involves SOLO PARTNERING UP WITH BE Parker Solar probe launched in two thousand eighteen. This space craft is able to fly much closer to the sun and the solo ever will comparing the feedback from both probes. Ought to tell us. A great deal about the mysterious phenomenon called solar wind which are streams of charged particles. Any color pictures that the solo gives us should provide relevant insights to the sun's polar probably have a big effect on its atmosphere as a whole along with the winds unleashes. The Solos unique travel plans will put it in contact with intense heat and extreme cold. The new probe is going to revolve around the Sun. Very long very narrow oval shaped orbit as it nears the Star. Things will get rather toasty. And that's why designers fitted solar orbiter with reflective heat shield coated in titanium foil according to NASA this shield stand temperatures as high as nine hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit or five hundred and twenty degrees Celsius. It's also got radiators designed to ventilate excess heat produced within the craft itself but of course scientists aren't just interested in the solar polls one of NASA's upcoming arduous lunar missions is supposed to land the first astronaut at the moon's southern pole none of the Apollo era moon walkers ever made it that far below the equator..

Sun NASA General Plane Twenty European Space Operatio Cape Canaveral Air Force Stati ESA Central Florida lauren Robert Frost European Space Agency South Pole Germany
What's next for Solar Orbiter after its historic launch to the sun

BrainStuff

03:35 min | 1 year ago

What's next for Solar Orbiter after its historic launch to the sun

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Boban here a newly launched spacecraft promises to broaden our understanding of the sun called solar orbiter or the Solo for short it left Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Central Florida on Sunday February. Ninth at three PM. The new probes part of an international collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency or ESA both parties contributed to its arsenal of scientific instruments. Some of these gadgets will remotely image the Sun It's atmosphere and the materials it spews forth others are built to keep tabs on the spacecraft's immediate surroundings during the wee hours of February tenth. Two Thousand Twenty European Space Operation Center in Darmstadt Germany got a signal confirming the orbiter's on board solar panels were functioning correctly so begins a seven year plan mission the orbiter is supposed to take to paraphrase. Robert Frost the route less traveled. You see all the planets in our solar system revolve around the sun on the same General Plane. Give or take a few degrees called the ecliptic plane. It's like a giant invisible disk a one that very nearly lines up with Sun's equator most of our space fearing devices are gravitationally confined to this plane but the so low is meant to escape it by exploiting the gravity of Earth and Venus the probe will orbit the sun on a unique and tilted pathway. This unique trajectory will give the solo twenty two close approaches to the Sun as close as twenty six million miles or thirty five million kilometers as well as bringing it within the orbit of Mercury to study the sun's influence on space. It will also give the solo the chance to do something no craft has ever done before take pictures of the solar polls looking down from above or up from below just like Earth. The Sun has a north and South Pole in two thousand eighteen the ESA used data from the probe to satellite trying to determine what the northern pole looks like. But probe to couldn't photograph this region directly. If all goes according to plan the solo will do just that. It's I close pass by. The Sun will be twenty twenty at about a third the distance from the Sun to Earth. And that's just the beginning. Another mission involves SOLO PARTNERING UP WITH BE Parker Solar probe launched in two thousand eighteen. This space craft is able to fly much closer to the sun and the solo ever will comparing the feedback from both probes. Ought to tell us. A great deal about the mysterious phenomenon called solar wind which are streams of charged particles. Any color pictures that the solo gives us should provide relevant insights to the sun's polar probably have a big effect on its atmosphere as a whole along with the winds unleashes. The Solos unique travel plans will put it in contact with intense heat and extreme cold. The new probe is going to revolve around the Sun. Very long very narrow oval shaped orbit as it nears the Star. Things will get rather toasty. And that's why designers fitted solar orbiter with reflective heat shield coated in titanium foil according to NASA this shield stand temperatures as high as nine hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit or five hundred and twenty degrees Celsius. It's also got

SUN Twenty European Space Operatio Nasa General Plane Cape Canaveral Air Force Stati ESA Central Florida Lauren European Space Agency Robert Frost Germany South Pole
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Welcome to bring stuff a production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren Boban here in the past thirty years. Paleontologists and other fossil hunters have uncovered a wealth of dinosaur eggs. China has been home to many of these fossil finds but researchers have also discovered distant grounds in Argentina Canada South Africa and the United States. This is a big change until the nineteen nineties fossilized eggs where rare find by studying these eggs. Scientists can learn about a lot more than how dinosaurs reproduced eggs and their positions within nesting grounds can yield lots of clues about dinosaur behavior. The structure of the eggs can help. Scientists figure out whether dinosaurs were more like birds or reptiles and in a very few cases. A fossilized egg can show paleontologists what a dinosaur embryo looked like. The trouble is in spite of these recent fines. Dinosaur eggs are still a lot. Rarer than dinosaur bones on top of that very few exit have survived until today still contain their embryos. This is because several specific conditions have to exist for an embryo to fossil is first and ED containing a healthy embryo has to be buried in sediment a freshly laid eggs which hasn't yet developed an embryo won't help the egg also has to be intact if there's a crack in the shell big enough for anything to escape. The material inside will leak out before fossils can occur. This buried egg then has just survived the slow process of fossils ation groundwater containing minerals seeps through the shell slowly replacing the non mineral components of the bones inside most of the time soft tissues and fluids inside the egg breakdown or dissipate. Instead of becoming. Fossil's the shell itself is already of calcium so it doesn't physically change much during the fossils Asian process but if all goes well the embryonic skeleton inside turns to rock. Scientists don't always have to break open dinosaur eggs to see what's inside. Occasionally researchers will find fossilized hatchlings in a nest with whole eggs. Giving make good clue as to what the eggs contain other ads are found broken or weathered leaving their embryos exposed. For example a fossil bed discovered in Patagonia was so full of eggs and egg fragments that became known as outcome. Mojo meaning more eggs because of the sheer number of eggs paleontologists speculate that the entire area was submerged. A flood allowing lots of silt to cover all the eggs at once at the outcome wave site researchers found whole eggs containing embryos as well as eggshell fragments that contained parts of embryos in a few cases skin that pressed it against the inside of the shell became fossilized as well giving scientists glimpse at what embryonic dinosaur skin looked and felt like based on the embryos found with the eggs scientists theorize the dinosaurs that laid these eggs were most likely. Seora pods which are four legged dinosaurs with long necks when there are no convenient hatchlings or broken shells nearby researchers can use computerized axial tomography. Scans or cat. Scans to try to figure out what's inside an egg a cat skin also known as C. T. scan takes lots of xrays of an object a computer. Then combines these x-rays to form a three dimensional view of the object using cat scans scientists can figure out whether the egg contains any embryonic material. If it does they can determine the size and shape of the embryo within the shell the other predominant technique used to figure out. What's an egg involves destroying the eggshell by soaking the egg in a mild acid bath? Scientists can slowly remove the shell. This process is time consuming but it can eventually reveal the entirety of skeleton inside once. Embryonic skeleton is uncovered researchers saturated with plastic to preserve it but just because an acid bath or cat scan reveals. The shape of an embryo doesn't mean scientists can figure out what kind of dinosaur would have grown up to be. Many dinosaurs looked significantly different hatchlings adolescents and adults in some cases dinosaurs embryo may look nothing like any known adult specimen. The size and shape of eggs also adds to the complexity for instance. Researchers have asserted too dissimilar eggs one round and the other oblong both contained a dinosaur known as Xena Sore in two thousand and five paleontologists found fossilized over after pelvises with eggs inside the pelvis contained two eggs and their positioning suggests that the species may have formed and laid eggs in clutches of to the way that many birds do this contrast with the way that many reptiles lay large batches of eggs at once. Absurd was written by Tracey Wilson and produced by Tyler. Clang brain stuff is production of iheartradio works for more in. This month's of other thunderous topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot Com for more podcast? Iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows..

China Lauren Boban Tracey Wilson apple United States Patagonia Argentina South Africa
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by the restless ones available now from Iheart a new series presented by t mobile for business. The restless ones join host Jonathan Strickland as he explores horsley coming technological revolution with the restless business leaders. Who stand right on the cutting edge? They know there's a better way to get things done. And they are ready curious and excited for the next technological logical innovation to unlock their vision for the future in each episode will learn more from these restless ones themselves and dive deep into how the five G. Revolution could enable their teams to thrive. The restless ones is now available on iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio Burgio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Boban here if a tree falls in a forest does it really make a sound and if a website light changes overnight did its previous homepage ever really exist in the first place because so much of our world is increasingly digital and ephemeral. It's not just a philosophical question. It's also simple matter of history. That's why the way back machine which features snapshots of websites as they age. Change is such a fascinating glimpse into the dusty corners of the web. The way back machine is a massive digital archive meant to preserve webpages that would otherwise be permanently. Lost Time without this horde quarter of data every time a page was updated or deleted it would simply vanish as if it had never been there mark Graham. The director of the way back machine noted in Two Thousand Sixteen entrepreneur article that the average life expectancy of a web page is about one hundred days. There are a multitude of reasons why these web pages disappear site creators move onto other projects web hosting companies. Go bankrupt or maybe the pages moved or replaced with new data and content. One place you may have seen the way back. Machines work ask more than eleven million web pages referenced in we kapiti articles have gone bad over the years. In other words they never turn a four zero four or page not found error because they've been archived in the way back machine technicians. There were able to edit those wikipedia pages so the references now point to archived versions of those defunct. Url's the way back. Machine is the brain child of brewster. Kahle and Bruce Gilliat who also founded the Internet archive which is Digital Library of websites books audio and video recordings hoardings and software. Both projects are San Francisco based nonprofits a Kaelin Gilliat also created Alexa Internet which analyzes web traffic patterns and was sold to Amazon Project Director. Graham said by email Vais Kaelin Gilliat had started to archive web pages in one thousand nine hundred six and in two two thousand one launched the way back machine to support discovery and playback of those archived web resources and yes. The name was inspired by the Nineteen Sixties Cartoon Series The Rock Doc in Bull Winkle show in the cartoon the way back. WABC machine was a plot device. used to transport the characters Mister peabody and Sherman back in time to visit important events in human history in a world where there are more than one point seven billion websites with the numbers climbing dramatically by the day. How can anyone possibly hope to catalog? So many web pages the way back machine uses what's called crawlers a type of software that automatically moves through the web taking snapshots shots of billions of sites as it goes. Some of the process is automated. But many of the requests are generated manually by a network of Librarians who prioritize certain types types of sites that they think are important to preserve passivity and for future generations. The crawlers don't capture every iteration of sites the frequency Linzie of snapshots differs by these sites. Importance very significant sites might be recorded every few hours others might be logged weeks or months apart most aren't logged it all so don't worry that embarrassing fan website. You made it high. School is probably long gone by now. The way back machine aims to capture snapshots of important content tent. Say the breaking news. Headlines created by major media companies. Furthermore it doesn't necessarily recreate the entire site and it doesn't preserve the data in a away the eat experience it with your browser. It may only capture a few images of a few pages and not preserved content that's linked to other sites outside of the domain but on a more practical level you've probably had the experience of clicking on a link on our web page and getting a four page not found notation. Now you're wondering wondering what was on the page originally. That's where the way back machine can help to use the way back machine go to archive dot org slash web. Type the euro at the site. You want to investigate in the browser history search bar in the results you'll see a chronological bar graph. That shows how many times the site was crawled and saved in a given year. You're click the year and blow. You'll see a twelve month. Calendar with various dates highlighted blue highlights mean. The site was saved properly. Red Means it was not click one of the highlight of dates and the site. Stop shots will appear click on one of those snapshots end just like that. You've traveled back in time to that older version of the site. If you want to make sure that a particular site is recorded to archive you can do so manually. Use The save page now option to save specific page. What's but realized that doing so? Only save that one page entire website and it doesn't guarantee that the site will be crawled in the future and if content owners want their material excluded from the way back machine and they can submit a request by sending an email to info at archive dot org. Graham says that the most amazing thing about the way back machine is that it exists at all and how much of the public web is able to preserve given that it has such a small budget and team. They do use volunteers as well. He said with more support. We can do an even and better job of backing up. More of the public web funding for the Internet archive and the way back machine comes from a combination of earned income from ours subscription based Web Archiving Service Archive Dot Org major donors and foundations as well as contributions from more than one hundred thousand individual donors. We love being able to give away our services and don't run ads on our web pages. Says he's sure that way back machine will become even more important in the future quote as the nature of how people communicate and share information evolves. So Oh two we will need to build technologies processes and partnerships to continue to do the best job we can to preserve as much of this public information as possible all in support of the way back machines mission to help make the web more useful and reliable and in particular to help support. Journalists activists academics historians researchers.

mark Graham Internet archive iheartradio Burgio t mobile Iheart Nineteen Sixties Cartoon Serie Jonathan Strickland lauren Alexa Internet director horsley brewster Amazon Bruce Gilliat WABC Bull Winkle Vais Kaelin Gilliat Kahle
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Nobody wanted to talk to you about our old friends from squarespace. You need a website. Everyone it's like the future and if you don't have your own website then what are you doing in squarespace is the best way to do it. It's the all in one platform to build a beautiful online presence and run your business and right now when they have a new feature email. Oh campaigns say more and sell more with squarespace email campaigns. It's really great again the platform that makes it easy to unify your brand and voice from your homepage to your emails. Pretty great everyone and right now. Check out squarespace dot com slash short stuff for a free trial trial. When you're ready to launch us to offer code short stuff to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain Tracy Wilson one of the hosts of the podcast? Ask stuff you missed in history class. We have just put out a new episode on Zhen Beret. She is the first woman known to circle navigate the globe. We do that episode. Thanks to sponsorship from the all New Twenty Twenty Ford Explorer and we want to thank them for sponsoring the show stay tuned for some favorite clips from that episode for his part. Commerce claims that he was totally surprised with this entire revelation writing the Beret was quote a courageous young woman who taking the clothing living in temperament of a man and the curiosity audacity to circumnavigate the world accompanied us without us knowing it I think he might have been covering his own tail. They're he really. It is just bordering on impossible. The would not have recognized her. If you like what you heard just now give us a listen and check out stuff. You Miss Them. History Class iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Welcome to brainstorm introduction of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren Boban here. It's no wonder Rudolph the red nosed reindeer is the most famous member of Santa's his team on top of being a skilled flyer his nose as his name suggests glows bright red. This unusual variation on the reindeer nasal prominence could have all kinds of benefits. The most important of which of course involves guiding Santa's sleigh according to folklore. If the weather's bad on Christmas Eve Santa is still still cleared for flight by the FAA less thanks to the brightness of Rudolph's nose but how does Rudolph's nose actually work. How could one reindeer create a light bright right enough to lead a slave through darkness and inclement weather and how could a reindeer actually develop a glowing red nose although no one may ever know for sure just how Rudolph got unusual knows we it? How stuff works have what we think is the most logical explanation for how this dough idear guides Santa's Sleigh Science Rudolph off could use something many organisms us on earth in order to create natural light a neat little scientific trick called bioluminescence? Animals make their own light by mixing certain chemical go compounds together to produce a glow. The reasons vary firefly's for instance flashlight at each other in order to attract mates while some fish that live very deep in the ocean. Use Use light to bait prey. If this is the case with Rudolf there would be three parts to his nasal beacon. The first would be just like any other. Reindeer knows. It's playmates. Technically shouldn't have sent him from any reindeer games. In the first place he would you know breathe oxygen through it and the tissue would be made up of two layers the Durmus which which is the thick inner layer of skin that contains blood vessels and hair follicles and the epidermis which has the thin outer layer that you can see and touch the other two parts however however would set rudolph apart from all the other reindeer the second part would be thin. Enclosed layer of a light producing organ between the Germans and the epidermis inside this layer could be the compound Lucifer in which produces light and Lucifer race. which is an enzyme to catalyze the light producing reaction? So that's your glow. The third part is where the red-nosed comes in most bioluminescence life forums like fireflies produce. Greenish light the outermost. Part of Rudolph's Snow's therefore would have to be a Red Fox. forescent layer once. The light producing organs started putting off green light. The false resident part of his nose would absorb that green light and emit it a red light. How does not get so bright though? BIOLUMINESCENCE often requires another substance like oxygen to make light and Rudolf would breathe lots lots of oxygen right near the light producing organs providing enough reactions for long intensely shiny bursts of light. But why is brewed off the only reindeer without knows that glows. How something like this have happened? Could Santa be some kind of mad scientists tweaking reindeer DNA for his own benefit or could Rudolph's news via biological accident accident. It's possible that Rudolph's bright honcker could be a reindeer atavism. Let's break that down. An atavism is a trait of distant ancestors. Offers that randomly POPs up in modern day organisms. Like human with the tail. This trait may have served a purpose for the animal way back when but for whatever reason that trait was silenced. Silence over time every once in a while making a rare return could distant reindeer ancestors of Rudolph have needed to produce light in order to survive in the wild. You'll it find most reindeer in Scandinavia and it does get pretty dark there during the winter. So maybe Rudolph's ancestors needed a better way to get around at night. Oh and although although Rudolf is what's called a bull male reindeer there's a rumor that many of Santa's reindeer might be cows or female reindeer that's because Santa's reindeer. They are depicted flying on Christmas Eve with fully grown antlers male reindeer typically shed their antlers by early December. Well before Christmas Eve grow back in the spring. Bring in this cycle of growth and growth continues but cows keep their antlers all year long. This isn't to say that all of the other reindeer are female. Most males shed ed their antlers. But not all of them and it's possible that a bowl won't lose its antlers until after December st episode was written by John Fuller produced by Tyler claim. Brain stuff is production of iheartradio's has to works for more on this and lots of other very shiny topics visit our home. Planet has dot dot Com and from our podcast for my radio is the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite.

Rudolph Santa squarespace Rudolf iheartradio New Twenty Twenty Ford Explore apple Zhen Beret Tracy Wilson lauren Boban FAA Scandinavia John Fuller Tyler
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"USA NA welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren Boban here. Discussions about climate change tend to focus on low lying areas like coastal cities yet people who live at higher elevations also feel it's negative effects including fresh water shortages to help these folks get by the duckie inventor named Sonum one Schuch has created a line of artificial glaciers called called. I stoop as their restoring frozen water so it can be used hydrate crops in the driest stretch of the year. Glacial meltwater is a necessity for most villages judges in Lubbock a region of northern India. The DOC sits on the debt and plateau between the Karakoram and the Himalayan mountain ranges this elevated terrain is is world famous for its is supply Abedin Plateau and surrounding mountains contain more ice than any other non polar area on earth. Much of this is stored up in glaciers. His will help feed vital Asian waterways the young Zee the Mekong and Indus rivers. Unfortunately those glaciers are receding because of climate change between two thousand and three in two thousand fourteen the ones located near the Brahmaputra River source lost six point nine billion cubic miles of ice. That's twenty eight point. Eight billion in cubic kilometers with glaciers some seasonal melting is expected but normally winter snowfall allows glaciers to replace the melted ice. They lose during the springtime however across the plateau. Glaciers are no longer getting enough annual snowfall to offset their lost water and so many of them have been dwindling in size as a cold desert. The dock area sees very little rainfall receiving an average of two to three inches per year. That's about fifty to seventy millimeters meters. The summer months of June through August. Do get a modest amount of precipitation however that's also when a large quantity of melted water from neighbouring mountain. Glaciers enters the streams teams. That depends on a steady water flow fills the streams during the winter as well yet because of the frozen ground and low air temperatures. The farmers can't hint grow crops during the coldest months of the year. According to an Chook winter water gets under utilized as a result demand for meltwater grows exponentially in April April in May when the life-sustaining crops of wheat buckwheat and barley need to be sown and hydrated. But in the springtime before the glacial water arrives enforce the streams often run dry. Climate Change has worsened. The problem a twenty seventeen study found that over the past six decades about twenty percent of the permanent ice ice preserves and the Docs home state have disappeared that translates to less meltwater for the locals hoping to solve these water woes. A civil engineer by the the name of Chihuahua North L. devised an innovative reservoir system in the nineteen eighties and I hope I'm saying his name correctly I couldn't find a pronunciation using dams and channels nor fell L. diverted large volumes of glacial water into Manmade Lakes on the shady sides of mountains where it froze into blocks come springtime. The ice would melt and be sent downhill the farms and villages eligible by way of canal. But this ice melted to quickly so the water tended to run out before the summer rains arrived in two thousand thirteen Wangchuk deduced I ice in Norfolk dams melted so fast because too much of it was exposed to direct sunlight. When chook figured that if he could somehow freeze the ice into a conical tower with the narrow oh end aimed skyward much less surface area would be exposed to make his frozen stalagmites when Chook devised an irrigation system? That's brilliant in its simplicity. implicity the major component is a long pipeline most of this is buried deep underground with one end tapping into a glacial stream or naturally occurring reservoir high high in the mountains through the tube the water rushes in the direction of populated areas at lower altitudes. No moving parts are electrical gizmos are needed to keep the liquid water flowing. Gravity does the trick it also pushes the water into the final stage of its journey downhill. The pipeline connects at a sharp angle to another narrower pipe. That rises soil standing vertically like a telephone pole as the saying goes water seeks its own level gravity pretty and pressure gained by flow through the narrowing pipe together naturally propel the liquid straight up that pipe until it flies out of a sprinkler on the pipes raised tip high in the air. The spray encounters atmospheric temperatures in the ballpark of negative four degrees Fahrenheit. That's about negative twenty Celsius or lower before landing it freezes. He's a solid forming a large cone of ice around the vertical pipe. The cones distinctive shape resembles that Stupa which are traditional Buddhist prayer monuments that have graced creased look for thousands of years. Hence when Chook and his associates have taken to calling the new glacier like structures I status the ducks ice Tubas meltdown meltdown in late spring. Right when the need for liquid water is greatest. The prototypical stupa erected in the winter of two thousand thirteen contained about forty thousand gallons. That's about one hundred hundred and fifty thousand liters of frozen water and lasted until may eighteenth of two thousand fourteen. Since then numerous others have been constructed. Single Stupa has is watered as many as five thousand newly planted trees standing at sixty feet eighteen meters tall. It held a breathtaking five hundred and thirty thousand gallons. That's two million liters a frozen water. Others may someday exceed one hundred feet about thirty meters in height and hold two point six million gallons or ten million liters of water outside India. The stupas have spread to countries like Switzerland in two thousand sixteen. When tooks icy brainchild earned him a coveted Rolex award for enterprise But I- stupid are not without their critics. went to in companies legal right to divert. Glacial meltwater has been challenged by a group of the duckie villagers furthermore anymore although the stupas are meant to help sustain human life they won't reverse the Tibetan Plateau's worrisome climate trends but if Homo sapiens is to survive on a changing Jin planet will need to reevaluate the ways. We use an store water. Projects like this can kick start those conversations..

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host mark murphy celebrity chef and run tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty. Look at the world food food history science and culture tuned into food three sixty with new episodes every friday could listen and subscribe on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts look to brain stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff lauren boban here. If you're an american you've ever ever had a conversation with someone from another country about the weather. You've probably been a little confused when he or she said the afternoon. Temperature is a nice twenty one degrees to to you that might sound like a chilly winter day but to them. It's a pleasantly warm springtime temperature. That's because virtually every other country throughout the world uses the celsius temperature scale part of the metric system which denotes the temperature at which water freezes as zero degrees and the temperature at which boils as one hundred degrees but the u._s. u._s. And a few other holdouts the cayman islands the bahamas believes in palo clinging to the fahrenheit scale in which water freezes at thirty two degrees and boils at two hundred and twelve twelve that means that the twenty one degrees celsius temperature that we previously mentioned is the equivalent of a balmy seventy degrees fahrenheit in the united states. The persistence of fahrenheit is one of those puzzling american idiosyncrasies like how the u._s. uses the word soccer to describe what the rest of the planet calls football so why is it that the u._s. Us uses a different temperature scale and why doesn't it switch to be consistent with the rest of the world. There doesn't seem to be a logical answer except perhaps inertia americans generally. I don't really seem to distrust the metric system. A twenty fifteen poll found that just twenty one percent of the public favoured converting to metric measures while sixty four percent were opposed it might make more sense of fahrenheit was old school in celsius with some modern upstart a sort of the new coq of temperature but in reality they were created only about two decades apart part fahrenheit was created by its namesake. A german scientist named daniel gabriel fahrenheit who in the early seventeen hundreds was the first known person design alcohol and mercury thermometers that we're both precise and consistent so that any of his instruments would register the same temperature reading in a given place at a given moment thanks to his working skill in managing glass when fahrenheit started out the key thing he was interested in was coming up with the same temperature reading all the time not comparing temperatures of different things or different times of day but when he presented a paper on his system for measuring temperature to the royal society of london in seventeen twenty four he apparently realized that he had come up with the standard temperature scale as well. We spoke with don hilfiger a research meteorologist to colorado state university's cooperative institute for research in the atmosphere and and also president of the u._s. Metric association a group that advocates conversion to the metric system he explained basically the fahrenheit scale was devised a zero as the coldest oldest temperature for a mix of ice and salt water and the upper end was thought to be body temperature approximately ninety six degrees fahrenheit making a scale that could be progressively divided by two do this resulted in the freezing melting temperature being thirty two degrees fahrenheit not very useful number. The boiling temperature for water was then set at two twelve again not not a very useful number the temperature's one hundred and eighty degrees apart again a multiple of two nevertheless the system apparently sounded pretty good to officials officials of the british empire who adopted fahrenheit as their standard temperature scale which is how eventually became established in the american colonies. Well meanwhile though in seventeen forty forty two a swedish astronomer named anders celsius came up with a less unwieldy system based on multiples of ten in which there was precisely a one hundred degree difference between the freezing and boiling temperatures of water at sea level the neat one hundred degrees symmetry of the celsius scale made it a natural fit for the metric system which was formerly developed by the french in the late seventeen eighteen hundreds but the english speaking world nevertheless clung stubbornly to its preference for awkward units such as the pound in the inch and fahrenheit went along for the ride but finally in nineteen sixty one the u._k. Met office then called the u._k. Meteorological office switched teasing celsius to describe temperatures in weather forecasts in order to be consistent with other european countries. Most of the rest of the world soon followed suit with the notable exception of the u._s. Or the national weather service still publishes temperature data atta in fahrenheit. Even though its own staff long ago switched celsius hilter explained the n._w._s. Catering to the public by reporting in degrees fahrenheit whereas whereas much of their operations such as forecast models used degrees celsius and automated weather observations the temperatures recorded in celsius as well should we choose to metric chicken weather reports the fahrenheit layer. That's now added for the u._s. Public could be removed. We also spoke via email with jay hendrix who heads the u._s. National institute standards and technologies thermodynamic meteorology group he points out that the fahrenheit scale does have one significant advantage quote. It has more degrees over the range range of ambient temperatures that are typical for most people. This means that there's a finer grain temperature difference between seventy degrees fahrenheit and seventy one degrees fahrenheit then there is between twenty one degrees celsius twenty two degrees celsius since a human can tell the difference of one degree fahrenheit. This scale is more precise for the human experience on the other hand though the advantage goes away. If a fractional temperature in celsius used hendrix explained for example the equivalent celsius temperature for seventy and seventy ninety one fahrenheit are equivalent to twenty one point one and twenty one point seven degrees celsius. Today's episode was written by patrick j tiger and produced by tyler clang brainstorms production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics that humans are sensitive to visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows they i would much rather story that you tell off. My daughter was beaten to death. I'm katherine townsend host of the true crime podcast helen one gone and i'm heading back to arkansas on a new case to find out what happened to janey ward on september ninth nineteen eighty nine when there's no justice done it hurts. A lot of people floors listened to hell and gone. That's h. E. l. l. and gone on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

fahrenheit anders celsius apple iheartradio mark murphy lauren boban bahamas jay hendrix soccer united states arkansas don hilfiger palo colorado state university royal society of london katherine townsend scientist janey ward
Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

BrainStuff

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host mark murphy celebrity chef and run tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty. Look at the world food food history science and culture tuned into food three sixty with new episodes every friday could listen and subscribe on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts look to brain stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff lauren boban here. If you're an american you've ever ever had a conversation with someone from another country about the weather. You've probably been a little confused when he or she said the afternoon. Temperature is a nice twenty one degrees to to you that might sound like a chilly winter day but to them. It's a pleasantly warm springtime temperature. That's because virtually every other country throughout the world uses the celsius temperature scale part of the metric system which denotes the temperature at which water freezes as zero degrees and the temperature at which boils as one hundred degrees but the u._s. u._s. And a few other holdouts the cayman islands the bahamas believes in palo clinging to the fahrenheit scale in which water freezes at thirty two degrees and boils at two hundred and twelve twelve that means that the twenty one degrees celsius temperature that we previously mentioned is the equivalent of a balmy seventy degrees fahrenheit in the united states. The persistence of fahrenheit is one of those puzzling american idiosyncrasies like how the u._s. uses the word soccer to describe what the rest of the planet calls football so why is it that the u._s. Us uses a different temperature scale and why doesn't it switch to be consistent with the rest of the world. There doesn't seem to be a logical answer except perhaps inertia americans generally. I don't really seem to distrust the metric system. A twenty fifteen poll found that just twenty one percent of the public favoured converting to metric measures while sixty four percent were opposed it might make more sense of fahrenheit was old school in celsius with some modern upstart a sort of the new coq of temperature but in reality they were created only about two decades apart part fahrenheit was created by its namesake. A german scientist named daniel gabriel fahrenheit who in the early seventeen hundreds was the first known person design alcohol and mercury thermometers that we're both precise and consistent so that any of his instruments would register the same temperature reading in a given place at a given moment thanks to his working skill in managing glass when fahrenheit started out the key thing he was interested in was coming up with the same temperature reading all the time not comparing temperatures of different things or different times of day but when he presented a paper on his system for measuring temperature to the royal society of london in seventeen twenty four he apparently realized that he had come up with the standard temperature scale as well. We spoke with don hilfiger a research meteorologist to colorado state university's cooperative institute for research in the atmosphere and and also president of the u._s. Metric association a group that advocates conversion to the metric system he explained basically the fahrenheit scale was devised a zero as the coldest oldest temperature for a mix of ice and salt water and the upper end was thought to be body temperature approximately ninety six degrees fahrenheit making a scale that could be progressively divided by two do this resulted in the freezing melting temperature being thirty two degrees fahrenheit not very useful number. The boiling temperature for water was then set at two twelve again not not a very useful number the temperature's one hundred and eighty degrees apart again a multiple of two nevertheless the system apparently sounded pretty good to officials officials of the british empire who adopted fahrenheit as their standard temperature scale which is how eventually became established in the american colonies. Well meanwhile though in seventeen forty forty two a swedish astronomer named anders celsius came up with a less unwieldy system based on multiples of ten in which there was precisely a one hundred degree difference between the freezing and boiling temperatures of water at sea level the neat one hundred degrees symmetry of the celsius scale made it a natural fit for the metric system which was formerly developed by the french in the late seventeen eighteen hundreds but the english speaking world nevertheless clung stubbornly to its preference for awkward units such as the pound in the inch and fahrenheit went along for the ride but finally in nineteen sixty one the u._k. Met office then called the u._k. Meteorological office switched teasing celsius to describe temperatures in weather forecasts in order to be consistent with other european countries. Most of the rest of the world soon followed suit with the notable exception of the u._s. Or the national weather service still publishes temperature data atta in fahrenheit. Even though its own staff long ago switched celsius hilter explained the n._w._s. Catering to the public by reporting in degrees fahrenheit whereas whereas much of their operations such as forecast models used degrees celsius and automated weather observations the temperatures recorded in celsius as well should we choose to metric chicken weather reports the fahrenheit layer. That's now added for the u._s. Public could be removed. We also spoke via email with jay hendrix who heads the u._s. National institute standards and technologies thermodynamic meteorology group he points out that the fahrenheit scale does have one significant advantage quote. It has more degrees over the range range of ambient temperatures that are typical for most people. This means that there's a finer grain temperature difference between seventy degrees fahrenheit and seventy one degrees fahrenheit then there is between twenty one degrees celsius twenty two degrees celsius since a human can tell the difference of one degree fahrenheit. This scale is more precise for the human experience on the other hand though the advantage goes away. If a fractional temperature in celsius used hendrix explained for example the equivalent celsius temperature for seventy and seventy ninety one fahrenheit are equivalent to twenty one point one and twenty one point seven degrees celsius. Today's episode was written by patrick j tiger and produced by tyler clang brainstorms production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics that humans are sensitive to visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows they i would much rather story that you tell off. My daughter was beaten to death. I'm katherine townsend host of the true crime podcast helen one gone and i'm heading back to arkansas on a new case to find out what happened to janey ward on september ninth nineteen eighty nine when there's no justice done it hurts. A lot of people floors listened to hell and gone. That's h. E. l. l. and gone on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Fahrenheit Anders Celsius Apple Iheartradio Mark Murphy Lauren Boban Bahamas Jay Hendrix Soccer United States Arkansas Don Hilfiger Palo Colorado State University Royal Society Of London Katherine Townsend Scientist Janey Ward
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart i._B._M.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash slash red hat welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren Boban here getting good sleep is important for everyone. It's essential for optimal cognitive performance physiological Michael Processes emotional regulation and quality of life but the National Sleep Foundation founded. It's two thousand eighteen annual sleep index study that just ten percent of American adults prioritize sleep over other things in their daily lives such as fitness nutrition work social life and hobbies. Lobbies and personal interests in the study just thirty five percent of those surveyed describe their sleep. Quality is good while twenty two percent said it was fair and twelve percent rated their sleep quality as poor. Most adults should get between seven and nine hours of sleep per night and the effects of sleep deprivation when you don't get enough sleep can be serious so what's one to do when they either can't fall asleep or simply. Don't get good quality of sleep when they do a pop culture legend of sorts suggests that the military might have the answer the members of the armed forces do have to sleep in dangerous and stressful environments all the time and the consequences of Parsley for soldiers on missions can be catastrophic soldiers on deployment often have unpredictable schedules that conflict with their natural circadian rhythms and they have small sleep quarters that double is personal and leisure space. That's why soldiers reportedly use a meditation technique that helps them or anyone fall into restful sleep in two minutes according to a November two thousand fifteen report from the U._S.. Army a metric called. The performance triad is used to assess and improve soldiers readiness in the areas of physical activity nutrition and sleep. The report revealed that almost one third of soldiers get less than five hours of sleep per night one out of every twenty active duty soldiers takes prescription sleep medication and sleep deprivation can increase the risk of soldiers developing post traumatic stress disorder the report includes the performance triad course offered to soldiers provides technical sleep techniques to help them get as much rest as possible while on deployment it also suggests soldiers aim to get eight hours of sleep in a twenty four hour period and avoid caffeine six hours before bedtime includes advice on how to use caffeine or energy drinks to improve performance while minimizing their impact on sleep. Although this report demonstrates the army's understanding of the importance of sleep it includes no mention of Meditation Asleep Tool. So where did this oft-cited technique come from the technique was developed in the U._S.. Navy pre flight school. It appears to have entered entered popular culture by way of Nineteen eighty-one self-help book. That's now out of print called relax and win championship performance. The author Lloyd Bud Winter was by then a well known track and field coach. The book is actually based on research that winter conducted as as a naval ensign after World War Two years before the book's publication winters technique was tested on two groups and winters navy pre flight academy to teach naval aviators how to properly relax and fall asleep faster the test group outperformed the control group in numerous. I tests and drills and after six weeks ninety six percent of the group could fall asleep practically on command so while the technique has seen a resurgence lately thanks to some mentions in the press. It's definitely not new but it is courtesy of the military. Winter described the process of this book to physically relaxed quickly in short his technique leads you through full body relaxation and then helps you clear your mind you start by slowly relaxing the muscles in your face including your tongue and lips then moved onto your shoulders arms and torso let each muscle go limp and breathe slowly as you concentrate on relaxing focus on your chest while you take deep breaths and exhale releasing your tension with your breaths once your upper body muscles feel relaxed move down to your thighs calves and feet consider them dead weight finally take three deep breaths and when you let them out blow out all of your remaining tension the process should take about a minute and a half it takes practice to relax your body on command so the trick is to I tense up each area. Area and then relax it clear your mind by concentrating on a calming mental image in theory. You should fall asleep pretty quickly based on recent military publications. It's unclear if this technique is still taught or widely used but if you haven't insomnia or just aren't getting a good night's rest. There's certainly no harm in trying it. Today's episode was written by series three and produced by Tyler claim. Breen stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works more than this and lots of other relaxing topics visit our home planet? How stuff works dot com and for more podcast from IHEART radio is iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows I'm Dana Schwartz and I'm the host of noble blood a new history podcast from iheart Radio Aaron Minke that focuses on the stories?

National Sleep Foundation Lloyd Bud Winter iheartradio Army Red Hat caffeine IBM lauren Boban Parsley Navy Breen Tyler Aaron Minke Dana Schwartz apple thirty five percent ninety six percent twenty two percent
Does the Military Teach a Sleep Meditation Technique?

BrainStuff

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Does the Military Teach a Sleep Meditation Technique?

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart i._B._M.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash slash red hat welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren Boban here getting good sleep is important for everyone. It's essential for optimal cognitive performance physiological Michael Processes emotional regulation and quality of life but the National Sleep Foundation founded. It's two thousand eighteen annual sleep index study that just ten percent of American adults prioritize sleep over other things in their daily lives such as fitness nutrition work social life and hobbies. Lobbies and personal interests in the study just thirty five percent of those surveyed describe their sleep. Quality is good while twenty two percent said it was fair and twelve percent rated their sleep quality as poor. Most adults should get between seven and nine hours of sleep per night and the effects of sleep deprivation when you don't get enough sleep can be serious so what's one to do when they either can't fall asleep or simply. Don't get good quality of sleep when they do a pop culture legend of sorts suggests that the military might have the answer the members of the armed forces do have to sleep in dangerous and stressful environments all the time and the consequences of Parsley for soldiers on missions can be catastrophic soldiers on deployment often have unpredictable schedules that conflict with their natural circadian rhythms and they have small sleep quarters that double is personal and leisure space. That's why soldiers reportedly use a meditation technique that helps them or anyone fall into restful sleep in two minutes according to a November two thousand fifteen report from the U._S.. Army a metric called. The performance triad is used to assess and improve soldiers readiness in the areas of physical activity nutrition and sleep. The report revealed that almost one third of soldiers get less than five hours of sleep per night one out of every twenty active duty soldiers takes prescription sleep medication and sleep deprivation can increase the risk of soldiers developing post traumatic stress disorder the report includes the performance triad course offered to soldiers provides technical sleep techniques to help them get as much rest as possible while on deployment it also suggests soldiers aim to get eight hours of sleep in a twenty four hour period and avoid caffeine six hours before bedtime includes advice on how to use caffeine or energy drinks to improve performance while minimizing their impact on sleep. Although this report demonstrates the army's understanding of the importance of sleep it includes no mention of Meditation Asleep Tool. So where did this oft-cited technique come from the technique was developed in the U._S.. Navy pre flight school. It appears to have entered entered popular culture by way of Nineteen eighty-one self-help book. That's now out of print called relax and win championship performance. The author Lloyd Bud Winter was by then a well known track and field coach. The book is actually based on research that winter conducted as as a naval ensign after World War Two years before the book's publication winters technique was tested on two groups and winters navy pre flight academy to teach naval aviators how to properly relax and fall asleep faster the test group outperformed the control group in numerous. I tests and drills and after six weeks ninety six percent of the group could fall asleep practically on command so while the technique has seen a resurgence lately thanks to some mentions in the press. It's definitely not new but it is courtesy of the military. Winter described the process of this book to physically relaxed quickly in short his technique leads you through full body relaxation and then helps you clear your mind you start by slowly relaxing the muscles in your face including your tongue and lips then moved onto your shoulders arms and torso let each muscle go limp and breathe slowly as you concentrate on relaxing focus on your chest while you take deep breaths and exhale releasing your tension with your breaths once your upper body muscles feel relaxed move down to your thighs calves and feet consider them dead weight finally take three deep breaths and when you let them out blow out all of your remaining tension the process should take about a minute and a half it takes practice to relax your body on command so the trick is to I tense up each area. Area and then relax it clear your mind by concentrating on a calming mental image in theory. You should fall asleep pretty quickly based on recent military publications. It's unclear if this technique is still taught or widely used but if you haven't insomnia or just aren't getting a good night's rest. There's certainly no harm in trying it. Today's episode was written by series three and produced by Tyler claim. Breen stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works more than this and lots of other relaxing topics visit our home planet? How stuff works dot com and for more podcast from IHEART radio is iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows I'm Dana Schwartz and I'm the host of noble blood a new history podcast from iheart Radio Aaron Minke that focuses on the stories?

National Sleep Foundation Lloyd Bud Winter Iheartradio Army Red Hat Caffeine IBM Lauren Boban Parsley Navy Breen Tyler Aaron Minke Dana Schwartz Apple Thirty Five Percent Ninety Six Percent Twenty Two Percent
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"My name is Danny Shapiro. The host family secrets three years ago. I took a DNA test and this test meant to be a fun exploration of my family history turned up a massive family secret. I wasn't who I thought I was join me, and my guests in the journey of family secrets wasn't a family secrets on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or ever you get your podcasts. And if you want to read about my family secret, my new memoir. Inheritance is available. Wherever books are sold. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Boban here. Navigating the healthcare system is already pretty dicey and new program put forth by insurance giant anthem is muddying the waters even more for some known as the emergency department review, the company's program launched in two thousand seventeen with the intent of reducing unnecessary visits to the nation's emergency rooms in and of itself. The idea isn't such a bad thing since emergency departments are sometimes ill used a twenty ten report found thirty eight billion dollars per year in wasteful spending things to emergency department overuse, however, per anthems policy. If a person goes to the emergency department with symptoms or a condition that turns out to not be life threatening. They could wind up holding the bag for a whole lot of money. We spoke with Christina gains communications director for anthem Inc. Via email. She said if a consumer chooses to receive care for nonemergency conditions, the emergency department when a more appropriate setting is available anthem will request more information, including a dish. Medical records from the hospital and statement from the consumer as to why they went to the emergency department, then an at the medical director will review the additional information using the prudent layperson standard, and the claim might be denied as not a covered service in the event of consumers claims denied they have the right to appeal. Much of the controversy surrounding this program. Lies with that prudent. Layperson standard gains mentioned the standard was enacted by the US congress back in nineteen Ninety-seven with forty seven states opting to work at into state laws. Well, it was done to add a layer of protection for healthcare consumers, so they can seek care without working up. A huge emergency department Bill. We also spoke by Email with Dr David Farsi, president of the American Academy of emergency medicine. He said the prudently person standard requires health insurance companies to cover visit's based on the patient's symptoms. Not the final diagnosis. This means if a patient has chest pain, but turns out to have a non urgent medical condition, such as guests Rytas or muscular pain, the insurance company must still cover the visit. We have a duty to safeguard patients and cannot expect our patients who have little to no medical training to be doctors. And know the difference between a minor or life and death medical condition. Infamous forcing the patients to be doctors and completely disregard federal and state laws. The protect patients anyone who's ever been in a potential emergency situation knows that sometimes the most logical choice isn't always the most obvious. This is further convoluted by a healthcare system in which it's often difficult if not impossible for person to see a primary care physician or specialist on a timely manner heads emergency department visits that could have been handled. Elsewhere. Such was nearly the case for nurse practitioner. Amanda, Gorman she recalled I was almost forced to go to the emergency room this week because of a kidney stone and couldn't get a new -pointment with a urologist. A Gorman is married to a physician and was trying to go to the hospital where her husband works. She said. So if we're having trouble navigating this, I can't imagine the struggles for regular patients. Gorman ended up finding an appointment with an out of network specialist a potentially costly risk in itself. She estimated that it was about six times as expensive as an ER copay would have been, but she didn't want to deal with the hassle of are many emergency medicine experts. Don't mince words about the potentially damaging effects of the plan. We spoke with Dr Ryan Stanton. A Lexington Kentucky based emergency physician and spokesman for the American college of emergency physicians the AC EP he said, this will harm people and lead to injuries and deaths. The goal of this program is not the denials. It's about the fear. People will be afraid to seek emergency care ACP feels this. Policy is incredibly dangerous and puts people at risk in the name of prophets. I've talked to a number of people that were denied, and the common theme is how upset they were. But more importantly there. No afraid to go to the emergency department. Even if they feel they have an emergency many conditions present with similar symptoms. Whether they wind up being benign or truly life-threatening Stanton said chest pain can be a heart attack or heartburn. Abdominal pain can be appendicitis or gas. A headache can be a ruptured aneurysm or a hangover the challenge with medicine is that it deals in shades of gray and rarely black or white. The key is that if you feel your life or health at risk go to the ER. Not everyone thinks anthems program is completely off base though. Lindsey our tola is a health policy expert with sage health strategy who supports some type of penalty for unnecessary use of the emergency department. She said via Email, the emergency room is by far the most expensive way to get health care. And with the advent of urgent care centers, nurse, triage lines and other alternatives. It's a poor use of health system resources for folks to use the ER as a primary care office. I think if I- penalty for misuse of health system resources isn't necessarily a bad idea. So how bad is the problem of misusing? The ER statistics vary widely a study using data from our visits from two thousand five to twenty eleven found that only three point three percent of ER visits where avoidable which is in line with the two thousand fifteen CDC's statistic of five point five percent. Meanwhile, Truman health analytics drawing on insurance claims data from twenty ten said that seventy one percent of ER visits were unnecessary and avoidable. Clearly, the word avoidable has different meanings for different people anthem spokesperson gainsaid consumers who reasonably believed that they are experiencing an emergency. Medical condition should always go to the emergency room or call nine one one. She points out the anthem will always cover emergency department visits under certain conditions. For example, if a consumer was directed to the emergency room by provider, including an ambulance provider. If the patient is under the age of fifteen if the patient's home address is greater than fifteen miles from an urgent care center. If visit occurred during off hours that's between eight pm Saturday. And eight AM Monday or on a major holiday if the patient received surgery IV fluids IV medications or an MRI or C T skin. Or if the patient had conditions such as chest, pain difficulty, breathing convulsions, fainting or was experiencing a drug overdose. Many of these exemptions were added in January of two thousand eighteen after public objections to the original policy against adds that anthems emergency department program is currently in effect in five states, Missouri. Georgia Ohio Kentucky and Indiana with no current plans to extend its reach.

American Academy of emergency Gorman Dr Ryan Stanton ER Danny Shapiro anthem Inc apple medical director US congress drug overdose Lauren Boban Abdominal pain Dr David Farsi ruptured aneurysm Christina
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Boban here. You know, the image of a standard American usually Christian funeral it takes place at a funeral home with ten dis dressed all in black an open casket with an embalmed body rests in front of the crowd after the service. A Hearst takes the casket to a cemetery for burial. This was a conventional funeral in the nineteen sixties. But this sort of send off the dead has undergone adjustments over the decades. We spoke Gary ladder men chair of Emory university's department of religion and author of two books on death. He said that perhaps the most significant change is the rising popularity of cremation. Some religious beliefs have long worked convince people of the importance of physically preserving loved ones, and it was more profitable for the funeral industry to so burial remained prevalent Letterman pointed to the psychology of it too. He said it's historically rooted in American culture that is the idea that we can preserve the body. That's an important concept, and how you respond to and think about death. But the idea of preserving the body started changing with the publication of a seminal book. Jessica mitford's the American way of death, a nineteen sixty three bestselling expose of how some members of the US funeral home industry were fleecing mourners cremation provided alternative ideas to consumers in the nineteen. Sixties? The cremation rate was only three percent today. Cremations outpace burials if only slightly as of two thousand seventeen according to the cremation association of North America. The US cremation rate was fifty one point six percent by twenty twenty two. The rate is projected to jump by more than six percentage points cremation has raised questions about the importance of the body and its role in funerals. Letterman said clearly the idea that somehow the body needs to be preserved for all time in a casket in a volt no longer holds we have different ideas about symbolic religious, meanings of the body. But mitford's expose isn't the only reason for changing funeral norms, and the nineteen sixties were a time of culture. Trollip evil, which extended to analyze accepted death customs Letterman said it's also in tandem with the whole spirit of the nineteen sixties challenging authority new forms of spirituality, new ways of thinking about the afterlife, all these things. In addition to the politics that to contributes to a major shift in people's thinking about death, how they experienced death and what they do with a corpse. Also, consumer culture has shifted since the nineteen sixties allowing people more opportunities for customization, according to taste, you might recognize this in the myriad ways. Funerals have gotten personalized requests for mourners to wear non black clothing music liked by the deceased playing at the funeral tombstones they pay homage to the person's hobbies these days, our loved ones don't have to lean as much on tradition or guesses about what the dearly departed would have wanted for their funeral until the nineteen sixties people might include funeral recommendations in there will but didn't usually get more specific than that. Now. People have gotten more comfortable with planning. In their own funerals. Further driving the trend towards personalization organized religions lessening influence has also taken its toll on funerals. According to a Pew Research Center study in two thousand fourteen about twenty three percent of US adults marked themselves as unaffiliated religious nuns at people who are atheists agnostic or nothing in particular in two thousand seven only sixteen percent of people were nuns traditional religions began losing their grip after the nineteen sixties which has created more freedom to choose other styles of funerals. Another opportunity for personalization Letterman said to me, it's not a symptom of secularization or religion, being absent it's kind of new forms of religious expression that get bound up in the most religious moment for any of us, which is when we have to face death. Even the terminology funerals has changed over the past few decades. It used to be called a funeral service. But that morphed into memorial service and finally a celebration of life met showcase deceased personality. Hobbies and accomplishments. Today's episode was written by Edina Sullivan and produced by Tyler claim for more on this lots of other lively, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things see that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I've been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charger to join that gig economy. Well, that's right. Just like Uber folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side hustles are created equal exactly every week. We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts, the iheartradio app or ever you. Get your podcast just search for how to money.

Letterman Quicken Loans US Jessica mitford America Hearst North America Lauren Boban Emory university Pew Research Center Gary ladder twenty twenty Edina Sullivan Matt Joel Tyler twenty three percent sixteen percent three percent ninety days
"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"lauren boban" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Jody ever again here to tell you about thirty for 30 podcasts from espn our new season tells the inside story of how lebron james in the miami heat helped turn the hoodie into a symbol for justice after the death of trayvon martin we also have the tail of john madden football the battle for lights at wrigley field and botswana you can find that in all of our episodes at thirty for 30 podcast dot com or wherever you get your podcasts welcome to brain tough from how stuff worth hey their brain stuff lauren boban here from groceries to gadgets the home delivery of goods is depositing cardboard boxes on doorsteps across america and we've collectively falling in love with the convenience of at all but what about the consequences of all that packing material the number of ecommerce transactions increased by more than fifteen percent in 2016 according to the us census bureau and the ecommerce industry has doubled in the last five years to be worth three hundred fifty billion dollars annually it's a trend that predicts delivers online purchases will continue to rise end at least for now you'd think this probably means the use of more cardboard but the amount of cardboard shipped by us companies has actually decreased since 1995 according to the fiber box association or fda which is the trade group for the cardboard industry or the corrugated knockdown box material industry if you want to get fancy fbi member businesses are responsible for 95 percent of wholesale industrial shipments of new or recycled cardboard made.

Jody wrigley field lauren boban trade group espn lebron james miami john madden america us fbi three hundred fifty billion do fifteen percent 95 percent five years