21 Burst results for "Laurel Walmsley"

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

05:02 min | Last month

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"For a better tomorrow learn more at code for america dot org live from npr news in washington. I'm jack speer. President biden was promoting his climate agenda with a trip to colorado today including outlining the costs of continued inactivity appears asthma holidays traveling with the president and follow this report from air force one. The president repeated his concerns that climate change is a code red situation. He pointed out that in the last few weeks his seen destruction firsthand from extreme weather in louisiana new york and california part of a pattern of extreme weather events that have been linked to global warming. Here's the good news. Something that is caused by humans can be solved by humans. The president's remarks came after a tour of the national renewable energy laboratory in colorado action on climate. Change is a key part of the budget. Reconciliation bill in congress democrats have yet to agree on what that bill should include and how much money it should be as mahala npr news solder. Gamble is pledging to have net zero greenhouse gas emissions in less than twenty years cincinnati. Public radio's to lean almond dada says moore proctor and gamble is one of the biggest commercial goods companies in the world. Though ohio-based company says it plans to make changes at every level of operations from its supply chain manufacturing to raw materials it already cut absolute emissions by more than half over the last ten years through energy efficiency and renewable electricity efforts to make a difference. This decade p. and g. says by twenty thirty it helps to reduce emissions across operations by another fifty percents and reduce greenhouse gases generated through its supply chain by forty percents for npr news. I'm julie dot is in cincinnati disturbing portrait of the final weeks of the trump presidency by journalists. Bob woodward and robert. Kosta the washington post today. Reporting on the first excerpts of the book entitled peril including a section where chairman of the joint chiefs of staff mark millions reported to of twice called his counterpart in china to assure him the. Us had no intention of launching an attack or suddenly going to war amid concerns about trump's mental state senior defense department official confirmed the account. Some republicans have called for millie to step down government. Relief payments had millions of americans out of poverty last year. That's according to new data and laura walmsley as more last year the rumour than thirty seven million people living in poverty in the united states the official poverty rate went up last year by one percentage point after five straight years of declines but by a different measure taking into account government benefits and emergency covert relief payments. The sheriff people in poverty actually dropped last year by two point. Six percentage points the takeaway says the bureau is that the social safety net prevented millions of people from falling into poverty. Data also showed that nearly nine percent of americans didn't have health insurance at any point last year laurel wamsley. Npr news washington day on wall street. The dow dropped two hundred ninety. Two points the nasdaq fell sixty seven points. The s&p was down twenty five points today. This is npr. Notwithstanding the damage to air travel caused by the corona virus pandemic airplane builder. Boeing says it is upbeat about future demand for airplanes boeing announcing today it expects the aerospace market it'd be worth upwards of nine trillion dollars over the next decade that includes planes for airlines and military uses as well as other aerospace products and services accord in china is ruled against a woman in a sexual harassment case that has been seen as a bellwether for china's struggling metoo movement as npr's john roy which explains the court said. The charges did not meet the burden of proof josiah show and launched her case in two thousand eighteen for years after she says she was sexually harassed while interning state broadcaster. Cctv joe has come to personify china's metoo movement the person she accused a male anchor named jujan denied the allegations. He also sued joe for defamation. Complicating her years long legal battle now. According beijing has thrown out or case saying the evidence didn't stack up the ruling was yet another blow for the metoo movement in china. Which has fizzled under pressure and censorship from the authorities last week a court dropped a sexual assault case against a former employee of the e. Commerce company alibaba john rich. Npr news sequoia national park amid a threat to its namesake. giant trees posed by wildfires. Burning nearby is shutting down for the moment. Park officials say two fires were ignited week apparently by lightening of combined now burning in steep and dangerous terrain. Both expires expected move toward the forest park. Spokesperson however says the forest areas not imminently threatened. I'm jack speer. Npr news in washington. This message comes from npr sponsor. Xfinity celebrate historically black colleges and universities with a collection of tv shows movies and more. Just say hp you into your xfinity voice remote visit xfinity dot com slash black experience to learn more..

npr news jack speer President biden almond dada moore proctor Gamble julie dot colorado mark millions cincinnati laura walmsley national renewable energy labo china united states washington laurel wamsley
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:49 min | 2 months ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Order only applies to counties with substantial or high transmission of covert nineteen. Right now that includes most of the country laurel wamsley npr news. Virginia couple who illegally entered the us capital on january. Sixth has been sentenced to probation and home confinement jessica and joshua bustle argue that their punishment should be no stiffer than those sentenced before them. More from npr's ryan lucas. The bustles spent about twenty minutes in the us. Capital on january sixth and did not engage in violence or property destruction. The pleaded guilty to win. Misdemeanor count picketing parading or demonstrate on capitol grounds at their sentencing. Hearing the bustles acknowledged. They had broken the law announcing his sentence. Judge thomas hogan said the capitol. Right was a threat to democracy but that the bustles case was unique since they showed up at the capitol from a nearby anti vaccine demonstration ultimately hogan spared the bustles jail time instead. He sentenced him to two years of probation forty hours of community service and a period of home confinement ryan lucas. Npr news washington new york state. Assembly members are preparing impeachment proceedings against governor andrew. Cuomo in case he continues to resist calls for his resignation. The move follows an independent investigation concluding that komo's sexually harassed at least eleven women. Several prosecutors are seeking information from the pro for consideration of possible criminal. Charges fumbled denies any wrongdoing in a women's olympic soccer. The united states takes on australia in the bronze-medal match on thursday from tokyo. Npr's russell lewis reports that the us team had higher hopes the us the top ranked team in the reigning women's world cup champion. But it's the second olympics in a row the us women's soccer team has faltered at the two thousand sixteen rio de janeiro games the. Us didn't meddle after losing in the quarterfinals. Now the us has playing for the bronze after losing to canada one. Nothing in the semi's the us is without it's starting goalkeeper. Listen nair who was injured in that game adriana. Franch will take place against australia. These two teams met in group play earlier in the tournament in ended in a scoreless draw. Russell lewis in tokyo. This is npr news us. Customs and border protection is blocking seafood. Imports via tuna fishing boat based in fiji. It's part of an effort to bar goods that are produced as a result of forced labour. Us customs officials say there is evidence that the crew of the fishing vessel is working under slave like conditions attorneys for alway executive among joe say the united states acted in bad faith when it requested her extradition from canada as dan carpenter chuck reports that claim came during the final set of hearings in monks extradition case which began this week before the british columbian supreme court moon's lawyer. Mona docket argued that the us misuse the extradition process called washington's conduct egregious and troublesome the defense team also said the court should grant a stay of proceedings to denounce the us conduct ducats. The us was selective in what it disclosed. Canadian officials in its bid for extradition. His wanted by washington to face allegations. That she misled. Hsbc putting the bank. At risk of violating us sanctions against iran mung wa have denied the allegations among has been free on bail living under a loose form of house arrest since her detention by canadian authorities in december of two thousand eighteen for npr news. I'm dan carpenter chuck in toronto. International chemical weapons watchdog is demanding. The syrian government handover more information on the alleged destruction of chlorine cylinders linked to a twenty deadly attack in the town of duma the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons alleges two cylinders were destroyed in june eighth air strike on a syrian military facility. I'm shay stevens. This is npr news..

ryan lucas us laurel wamsley joshua bustle Judge thomas hogan governor andrew npr Npr russell lewis Franch Russell lewis dan carpenter chuck komo soccer tokyo Cuomo jessica hogan washington Virginia
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:21 min | 4 months ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Amazon has figured out how to make it smart home gear like it's eco and ring devices work better outside where Internet service can be spotty. Its solution is called Sidewalk and the way it works has privacy experts worried NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports, and we should note Amazon is among NPR's financial supporters. Here's how sidewalk extends the Internet range of Amazon devices. Essentially crowd sources data from other people on the network. You're using their network. They're using your network in the event of a WiFi outage or whore signal. That's Pat Moore had a tech analyst who has been briefed on sidewalk by Amazon, one of his clients. Amazon did not make a spokesperson available for this story. Say you and your next door neighbors both have devices that are compatible with sidewalk. Your neighbors decide to put a ring security camera on their garage. But the device is too far from the router to always get a good signal. Their camera will be able to send small amounts of data like an image or notifications using your connection, but Can't stream video in real time off because the bandwidth is so narrow. Amazon says only your neighbors and not you would be able to see their data because there are three layers of encryption. Amazon's echo smart speakers were added to the network this week. Some ring devices had already been added trackers from the company Tile, which are used to find lost keys or pets will also be able to connect to the network. Privacy experts have a number of concerns about the applications of sidewalk as well as how Amazon rolled it out. For one thing, it uses your Internet connection unless you take action to block it. The fact that this thing is opt out rather than opt in, is always a big red flag. That's Jen King, a privacy and data policy expert at Stanford University. She notes that Amazon just automatically added people's devices, forcing customers to hunt through layers of settings to opt out if they don't want their band with used by the network and King isn't convinced by the warm and fuzzy applications of sidewalk that Amazon describes to me. It's especially telling when they do things like emphasize the fact that you can use it to locate your lost pet or things that you've, you know, otherwise misplaced because I feel like the bigger motivation here is to create a private Surveillance network. Matthew Greg Lia, a policy analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, agrees. It begins with one doorbell camera on the front of your house, and then it extends to more stick up. Cameras extends cameras inside the home. It would not surprise me, if in the next year or two sidewalk becomes a huge avenue by which they can extend that surveillance out into the neighborhood. He suspects sidewalk might be used in the future to provide Internet connectivity for Amazon delivery drones. Even in rural areas. The network extends half a mile from an enabled device and a sidewalk extends connectivity to tile tracking devices beyond your WiFi network. There are worries for victims of domestic violence or stalking. The concern is that you can slip a tile or a tag into somebody's purse and track them as they go about their day. A spokesperson for Tile says they are working on a fix for this issue. Graglia says people should think about how much audio video and data all of these Amazon devices are collecting and sending to Amazon servers and as long as it's sitting there, and it's unencrypted. It is accessible to the police and two governments. If they bring a warrant to Amazon, and it is unclear whether or not you will even know if Amazon has received a warrant for your data. It's a big warning, he says about putting one of these devices in or on your home. Laurel Wamsley NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. People are getting vaccinated, reuniting with family members, an opening back up to the world and the debut album from Vincent is just the right soundtrack for it. A conversation with the musician is coming up next on all things considered after Look at traffic starting in San Jose, Here's Julie deputy, We're looking at a four car collision on North bound to eighties Saratoga Avenue. Looks like everyone managed to get to the right hand shoulder.

Laurel Wamsley Jen King Electronic Frontier Foundation Pat Moore San Jose Amazon Matthew Greg Lia NPR Graglia King Saratoga Avenue half a mile next year both one thing two governments this week four car collision Stanford University one
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 11 months ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Workers are still having a hard time getting coronavirus tests and as NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports, the lack of testing means there could be lots of asymptomatic healthcare workers caring Pretty sick people. In a recent round table with Joe Biden. Mary Turner, a nurse in Minnesota, told the president elect something he found surprising. Do you know that I have not been tested yet? And I have been on the front lines in the ice to you since February. You're kidding me. No guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control say that healthcare personnel should be tested if they're symptomatic or haven't known exposure to the corona virus. But treating covert 19 patients while wearing personal protective equipment, or pee pee Doesn't count as exposure that warrants testing. A recent survey by national nurses United, the nation's largest nurses union, found that only 42% of registered nurses in hospitals said they had ever been tested for covert 19. It continues to amaze me that we are not doing this. Michael Mina is an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health. He says, Well, PPE generally offers good protection. There have been outbreaks of hospitals at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where Minna runs the virology Lab. One outbreak involved 42 employees and 15 patients. Hospital blamed patients not wearing masks, staff without eye protection and employees failing to social distance while eating. Now that is an outbreak that shouldn't have happened. I believe very firmly that we would not have seen an outbreak grow so so quickly and it wouldn't have even been able to get started. If we were doing frequent testing. There are so many ways that hospital could be doing this and they're not Ministers. Hospitals could either use rapid auntie gin tests or pool PCR tests to do screening for the virus more cheaply they get Have ever on swab and put 50 swabs that a time into 12 and run that one tube and cool the test for very, very cheap. You could do a whole hospital departments with one Past for 50 Bucks a day. California State Health Department announced new guidance two weeks ago that strongly recommends weekly testing of healthcare personnel. But hospitals have struggled just to get enough tests for patients. Susan Butler. Wu is associate professor of clinical pathology at USC, and she directs the clinical microbiology lab at a large hospital in Los Angeles. So we were to take something like this recommendation. Where, Okay, let's say we screen everybody weekly. There's very few clinical hospital labs that would be able to have that much testing available to be able to do that. Color. Woo says that her hospital there are 10,000 workers that would likely need testing under the new guidance, and she says, without operational support from the state, the new protocols are going to cause problems. Including greater testing backlogs, but as a country because we don't have a national plan or national strategy, these air this This is the situation we find ourselves. Football players can get tests people choosing to socialize and wanting to feel safer doing so, even though it's a pandemic can get tests but a program to test the country's health care workers. Nope. Many nurses and doctors suspect hospitals are worried that widespread testing could reveal asymptomatic cases and then result in quarantining critically needed staff. And for Mina, the Harvard epidemiologist, The lack of regular testing of health care workers raises other questions. There's a clear problem when we're saying that the greatest risk people, the people who are at the greatest risk to themselves and to their patients or the health care workers, and so that's why we're going to give them vaccines before anyone else. But then when we don't have a vaccine, and it's just testing, we say, don't worry about it. It's not a big deal. You don't need to be tested. It's an approach, he says. That doesn't make sense.

Woo Wu California State Health Depart NPR Laurel Wamsley asymptomatic Susan Butler Los Angeles associate professor Julie Mina Football USC Harvard
Coronavirus among health workers: Exposure, lack of testing

All Things Considered

03:38 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus among health workers: Exposure, lack of testing

"Workers are still having a hard time getting coronavirus tests and as NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports, the lack of testing means there could be lots of asymptomatic healthcare workers caring Pretty sick people. In a recent round table with Joe Biden. Mary Turner, a nurse in Minnesota, told the president elect something he found surprising. Do you know that I have not been tested yet? And I have been on the front lines in the ice to you since February. You're kidding me. No guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control say that healthcare personnel should be tested if they're symptomatic or haven't known exposure to the corona virus. But treating covert 19 patients while wearing personal protective equipment, or pee pee Doesn't count as exposure that warrants testing. A recent survey by national nurses United, the nation's largest nurses union, found that only 42% of registered nurses in hospitals said they had ever been tested for covert 19. It continues to amaze me that we are not doing this. Michael Mina is an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health. He says, Well, PPE generally offers good protection. There have been outbreaks of hospitals at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where Minna runs the virology Lab. One outbreak involved 42 employees and 15 patients. Hospital blamed patients not wearing masks, staff without eye protection and employees failing to social distance while eating. Now that is an outbreak that shouldn't have happened. I believe very firmly that we would not have seen an outbreak grow so so quickly and it wouldn't have even been able to get started. If we were doing frequent testing. There are so many ways that hospital could be doing this and they're not Ministers. Hospitals could either use rapid auntie gin tests or pool PCR tests to do screening for the virus more cheaply they get Have ever on swab and put 50 swabs that a time into 12 and run that one tube and cool the test for very, very cheap. You could do a whole hospital departments with one Past for 50 Bucks a day. California State Health Department announced new guidance two weeks ago that strongly recommends weekly testing of healthcare personnel. But hospitals have struggled just to get enough tests for patients. Susan Butler. Wu is associate professor of clinical pathology at USC, and she directs the clinical microbiology lab at a large hospital in Los Angeles. So we were to take something like this recommendation. Where, Okay, let's say we screen everybody weekly. There's very few clinical hospital labs that would be able to have that much testing available to be able to do that. Color. Woo says that her hospital there are 10,000 workers that would likely need testing under the new guidance, and she says, without operational support from the state, the new protocols are going to cause problems. Including greater testing backlogs, but as a country because we don't have a national plan or national strategy, these air this This is the situation we find ourselves. Football players can get tests people choosing to socialize and wanting to feel safer doing so, even though it's a pandemic can get tests but a program to test the country's health care workers. Nope. Many nurses and doctors suspect hospitals are worried that widespread testing could reveal asymptomatic cases and then result in quarantining critically needed staff. And for Mina, the Harvard epidemiologist, The lack of regular testing of health care workers raises other questions. There's a clear problem when we're saying that the greatest risk people, the people who are at the greatest risk to themselves and to their patients or the health care workers, and so that's why we're going to give them vaccines before anyone else. But then when we don't have a vaccine, and it's just testing, we say, don't worry about it. It's not a big deal. You don't need to be tested. It's an approach, he says. That doesn't make sense.

Laurel Wamsley Mary Turner National Nurses United Brigham And Women's Hospital Michael Mina Joe Biden California State Health Depart NPR Susan Butler Harvard School Of Public Healt Centers For Disease Control Minna Minnesota Boston WU USC WOO Los Angeles
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Are created equal, Long says, And they don't all offer the same cooling effect. Even if you can walk to a park within 10 minutes of where you live, if it doesn't have any trees, or if it's covered in asphalt, you're not getting that same cooling benefit. From another park. That may be the same size but has really nice tree canopy and really great vegetation. Jose Gonzalez is the founder of Latino Outdoors, a community and advocacy organization. He says more investment in green spaces for low income communities of color is overdue, but that investment has to be done with community involvement alongside other investments and housing and education. He says the pandemic has shown that Parks can no longer be treated as nice to haves but must be understood as he central in the past. They tended to be one of the first things you get cut. You'll be with cities, right? Take fire protect police can wait until the very end. We can't afford to continue to do that. This is the moment he says to explore what a new, more equitable future. Khun B. Laurel Wamsley NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Australia's seemed to be one of the big success stories in managing the Corona virus. But there's been an ongoing spike of positive cases in Melbourne and that has led to some serious lock down restrictions. Today, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that travel in and out of Australia will remain restricted. Elizabeth Cola's is a reporter in Melbourne. She joins us now. Hi, Elizabeth. Thank you for having these Daisy. So tell us more about why there was the spike in Melbourne compared to other parts of Australia. Yeah, this current spiking in Melbourne really can be traced back, if not completely, at least in in large part to the use of a hotel quarantine system that we've had in place in slight march for return travelers. So that's anyone returning to the country, spending a mandatory stay of two weeks in a hotel and then there's testing and other conditions before they're released. Sydney and Melbourne. Of course, main transport hubs have have handled the bulk of those days and Victoria the state where Melvin is located, has handled that quarantine set up quite differently to other states in in Melbourne that relied very heavily on the use of private security firms. Who then subcontracted some of those jeans at two other security guards in other states and territories in the country, Police and the defense Force We used more more more heavily, so it's now understood that the likely outbreak with currently experiencing was a result of breaches in that hotel quarantine system. That same system that was really Intended to keep the city safe and reports circulating about inadequate use of paper A and an adequate supplies of Haiti, a lack of training to security staff. Things like carpooling happening on the way to work in a lack of social distancing guidelines being met, so we know that that's very likely, if not the result of the source of every case were experiencing right now the vast majority off them On. We've got a royal commission into the failures that system currently happening. It's been pushed out as a result of these very increased lock down conditions we've been under since Monday, and we now expect that it will return its findings in early November to understand exactly what's happened. So Elizabeth walk us through the most recent numbers, and where exactly do they seem to be increasing? Yes, I look. Most of the current case numbers are coming from well. There's a number of clusters and outbreaks happening that many of the environments that have bean hot spots around the world. So aged care homes, for example. Schools. High schools, in particular, have been the result of some of those outbreaks of the center of some of those outbreaks, mate Distribution and Abbott Wass and his way housing distribution centers on high density living arrangements like public housing complexes as well and The focus is really being the latest focused. This lock down has really been on work environment. So where, where, where, which work and employment environment She's the virus spreading through that's really informed the lock down that we've had in place since Monday. Do we have a sense of like hundreds of cases? Thousands of cases. What are we looking at here? Look on average. Yeah Case numbers of them by minutes. Somewhere around 500 a day. We've painted it this week with the highest single day rise over and 725 cases. But the hope is now, of course, that we'll see a sustained dropping that Well, I mean that that number of cases is is definitely more than there were, but it seems kind of small compared to what we've been experiencing in the US. I guess that is exactly what you're trying to avoid, though. Absolutely look. The situation 1080 put in context as Wilson calculations on daily per capita infection rates this week that would put the state of Victoria with Melvin. He's around 34th out of the 50 U. S. States. But in the context of the Australian situation were increasingly isolated The moment we can't travel outside of the Metropolitan area little loan into a neighboring state, so No, it really does depend on the context that you put it in. But, yeah, I guess so. The idea is really too tame for suppression as much as possible, which I know is everybody's go. Elizabeth Cola's is a reporter in Melbourne. Thank you so much. Thank you, Stacey. This is NPR news. KCR W Sponsors include so Cal gas, reminding listeners to contact 811 by phone or online at least two business days before digging. Natural gas pipelines can be located anywhere..

Melbourne Elizabeth Cola Australia NPR Jose Gonzalez reporter Victoria Khun B. Laurel Wamsley Long Prime Minister Scott Morrison Haiti founder Abbott Wass Sydney US Stacey Melvin Wilson
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To start in person. Yeah, Their concerns run the gamut. You know, Some working parents don't know how they're going to also oversee remote learning. Sure, Others are worried because they have Children with special needs. And I spoke to one mom of a child with autism. She didn't want to give her name to protect her child's privacy. I think it's more unhealthy for them not to go to school. Screen time is horrible. And I think more kids are like that on the autism spectrum. Our screen time's not good. It's not good for their vision. It's not good for their brains. So both of your states are among the first to experiment with in person school again. There have been so many open questions about this about testing and cleaning and what to do if a student test positive and how to keep kids socially distant and school busing. So what do you think is the biggest thing that's been learned this week from the experience in both of your states? Well, the biggest thing I've learned is that underneath everything parents, teachers, even public health experts all agree. That it's better for kids to be in school. They just disagree on whether it's safe to do that now, especially in a state like Georgia, where coded cases air so high Yeah, I think there's just a very fluid nature to all this. You know, as cases happened Racing school have to react immediately, whether that's closing down to clean or going to online and I think it's more students get back is going to be interesting to see how they respond to wearing masks all day, and I'm watching to see how quickly some districts that start the year virtually will resume in person learning. Some have said that they want to bring students back in some capacity by Labor Day. That is Martha Dalton of W. A. B in Georgia and Eric Weddle from W F Y I in Indiana. Thanks, guys. Thanks, Daisy. Thank you. In the pandemic parks have become the place to get fresh air exercise and meet up for socially distanced hangouts. A new study finds that access to parks differs sharply depending on income and race. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports. In the age of social distancing and rising temperatures..

Georgia Laurel Wamsley Eric Weddle NPR Martha Dalton Daisy Indiana
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Walk of a park are as much as six degrees cooler than the areas beyond and shaded surface. It's Khun B, up to 45 degrees cooler than unshaded surfaces. But not all parks are created equal, Long says, And they don't all offer the same cooling effect. Even if you can walk to a park within 10 minutes of where you live, if it doesn't have any trees, or if it's covered in asphalt, you're not getting that same cooling benefit. From another park. That may be the same size but has really nice tree canopy and really great vegetation. Jose Gonzalez is the founder of Latino Outdoors, a community and advocacy organization. He says more investment in green spaces for low income communities of color is overdue, but that investment has to be done with community involvement alongside other investments and housing and education. He says the pandemic has shown that Parks can no longer be treated as nice to haves but must be understood as he central in the past. They tended to be one of the first things you get cut. You'll be with cities, right? Take fire protect police can wait until the very end. We can't afford to continue to do that. This is the moment he says to explore what a new, more equitable future. Khun B. Laurel Wamsley NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Last week at a protest, a transgender woman named Nicky Stone was grabbed by a group of men and thrown into an unmarked fan. The men turned out to be NYPD officers who were arresting stone for vandalism. Her mother later told CBS News that officers punched her in the face and told her to quote act like an effing human being and not some animal. And in June, a transgender man named Jamal Young sue the NYPD. He after they arrested him in a traffic stop in the suit, he says he was groped Miss gendered and humiliated. Well, joining us by Skype today to talk about these cases as well as how the NYPD interacts with transgender people is Alphonso David, president of the Human Rights Campaign. Alfonso, Welcome back to WN. Nice. Thank you so much for having me. How unusual is it for you to hear about cases like this? Where transgender people say they're abused by police because of their gender identity. Unfortunately, this is not unusual. The evidence suggests. That transgender people are mistreated by police officers. In many ways, one that we often hear about is transgender people being harassed when they are arrested or have any interaction with law enforcement. We also know many cases where transgender people are subject to strip searches in order for law enforcement officers to determine their gender identity. We also see cases where transgender people are placed in the wrong holding facilities, holding facilities that are not consistent with their gender identity. And the strip searches that you mentioned. Those were supposed to be prohibited back in 2012 right? Yes, the NYPD issued patrol guy changes that were specifically going to prohibit. Officers from using strip searches to determine a person's gender identity. But unfortunately we have seen as recently as 2019 in the drum all young case where he indicated that the NYPD were actually looking to confirm his gender identity, and the officers groped him. Then there's Miss JJ Enduring right. So that's when people identify a trans person's gender incorrectly. The NYPD He has been known to miss gender people, and that makes it hard to track how many trans people are affected, right. Exactly. It makes it very, very difficult. We do not have a comprehensive set of data points to really understand the full scope of the problem. So how have you seen this type of discriminatory treatment by police actually affect trans people just in their everyday lives? I had relationships with many friends who unfortunately have had interactions with law enforcement. And specifically, I'm thinking of one person who's a member of the transgender community, and she was harassed, discriminated against attacked. By police officers, and she has been public about the impact of that treatment where she suffers from PTSD. Transgender people face so many obstacles when they then face additional obstacles with engaging with law enforcement. They lose faith in our democracy. They lose faith in law enforcement, and they have more challenges in interfacing with members of our community. I want to turn to state politics, which I know you used to be involved in. There's this New York anti loitering statute known as the quote walking while trans ban It's It's informal name. Activists have been trying to repeal it for years. How does this law affect trans people? And what are the chances of it actually getting reversed? So under the law, a woman can be improperly arrested and detained simply because a police officer views her clothing or appearance as indicative of engaging in prostitution. And the impact is significant. In 2018 alone, there was 120% increase in arrest under this statute, with 47% of all arrests. Across New York state happening in Queens, Black and Latin ex women, including transgender women remained the most impacted. I know that the governor has indicated that he does support repealing the statute. And I'm hopeful that members of the Legislature will support it as well. We anticipate that there is some support in the Senate as well as the assembly. The open question is whether or not we have sufficient votes to pass the bill. We've been speaking with Alfonzo David, president of the human rights Campaign. Alfonzo. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me and we should add that after Nicky Stone's arrests last month, E NYPD issued a statement saying she was wanted for damaging police cameras in five separate incidents. The department has not immediately responded to a request for comment about its interactions with transgender people. Support for W N. Y. C comes from HBO. Max presenting an American pickle, based on Simon Riches, New Yorker novella and American Pickle star.

NYPD Nicky Stone Khun B Alphonso David E NYPD Jose Gonzalez New York NPR president Khun B. Laurel Wamsley Long Alfonso CBS News PTSD founder Jamal Young HBO
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Them not to go to school screen time is horrible. And I think more kids are like that on the autism spectrum. Our screen time's not good. It's not good for their vision. It's not good for their brains. So both of your states are among the first to experiment with in person school again. There have been so many open questions about this about testing and cleaning and what to do if a student test positive and how to keep kids socially distant and school busing. So what do you think is the biggest thing that's been learned this week from the experience in both of your states. Well, The biggest thing I've learned is that underneath everything parents, teachers, even public health experts all agree that it's better for kids to be in school. They just disagree on whether it's safe to do that now, especially in a state like Georgia, where Kobe cases air so high Yeah, I think there's just a very fluid nature to all this. You know, as cases happened Racing school have to react immediately, whether that's closing down to clean or going to online and I think it's more students get back is going to be interesting to see how they respond to wearing masks all day, and I'm watching to see how quickly some districts that start the year virtually will resume in person learning. Some have said that they want to bring students back in some capacity by Labor Day. That is Martha Dalton of W. A. B in Georgia and Eric Weddle from W F Y I in Indiana. Thanks, guys. Thanks, Daisy. Thank you. In the pandemic parks have become the place to get fresh air exercise and meet up for socially distanced hangouts. A new study finds that access to parks differs sharply depending on income and race. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports. In the age of social distancing and rising temperatures..

Georgia Eric Weddle Laurel Wamsley Martha Dalton NPR Daisy Indiana
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Trump says he is considering moving ahead with executive orders that would cut payroll taxes and extend federal unemployment benefits. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports the White House and members of Congress and negotiating a new Corona virus relief measure, but have yet to reach a deal. President. Trump says he's looking at various steps he could take if Congress does not approve additional aid soon, he said, he's also looking at extending a freeze on evictions in response to the pandemic. People get evicted and then they go into shelters, and there's thousands of people in the shelters and this is not a time you never want to be in a shelter, but this is not a time to be in a shelter with the cover. Trump argued that he has the authority to act without Congress, but it's unclear how much he can legally do through executive orders alone. Trump Administration officials and top Democrats in Congress have said they hoped to reach an agreement by the end of the week. Aisha Roscoe. NPR news video shows a huge explosion, causing massive damage in Beirut, Lebanon. Today, the blasts emanating from that city's port and raiding radiating out for a long distance. May be some time before it's clear exactly who or what was to blame the reports of at least 70 dead. Some 3000 people were injured due to the massive explosion. Videos on social media show what appears to be a large cloud of either a blast or fire and then a huge explosion. After that, it left debris over a wide area. Some residents initially thought it was an earthquake. Amnesty International says it's documented 125 instances of disproportionate violence against protesters in the US Earlier this summer. NPR's Laura Wamsley reports, researchers studied 11 day period following the death of George Floyd. The incidents include beatings by police officers, the misuse of tear gas and pepper spray and the firing of so called less lethal munitions that left some individuals partially blinded. The instances band 40 states and the District of Columbia. Amnesty International says excessive force was used by state and local police as well as National Guard troops and federal agents. Amnesty report says that in the five years since Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Missouri, there has been quote a disturbing lack of progress in ensuring that officers use lethal force on Lee when there's an imminent risk of death or serious injury. Neither the Justice Department nor the Fraternal Order of Police responded to a request for comment. Laurel Wamsley NPR news With continued uncertainty over what the start of school will look like in the father traditional back, the schools shopping season has been upended. France will be starting to look toward buying back to school items for kids. But so far less of that kind of shopping is taking place. Two things parents do appear to be buying protective equipment and electronics. National Retail Federation, pinning its hopes on the back to school shopping season on pricey items like computers with others think it could be a major disappointment for retailers Stock closed higher today. The dollar 164 points. The NASDAQ rose 38 points. This is NPR. And this is Casey AR W at six. So forum Larry Perella, Here's what's happening on this Tuesday, August 4th. Health officials in multiple California County say the electronic system used by most most local health departments to report data on infectious diseases, is currently experiencing serious technical issues, and that's resulting in Corona virus cases being significantly undercounted. Both officials and Orange and Riverside County's reported a lag and the cow ready system. The state did not say how many days Corona virus counts had been affected by the issue or the scale of the undercounting. State Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galley attributed the glitches to the high volume of code 19 case data quote, testing the capacity of the system. He didn't know when the problem would be fixed. While most students in California will have another semester of distance learning this fall, some younger kids could return to class in person state is allowing elementary schools to apply for waivers to bring students back to the classroom, even if the county is being monitored for elevated transmission rates of Copan, 19. Outbreaks have been linked to summer camps and daycares in other states. But golly says that California won't make the same mistakes. And that's why we study them so closely. You see when activities are held indoors without face coverings when activities that are much better done outdoors, no doubt or avoided. It all happened indoors. You see transmission Gally recommended keeping in person learning to groups of eight students or smaller, but local health officials will have final say over elementary schools plans. Ah federal grand jury in L. A has charged Democratic donor Ed Buck with four new felonies. The charges are in addition to a charge he provided meth to a man who later overdosed and died. Buck was arrested. On that charge. Nearly a year ago, Buck had a history of luring young black gay men to his apartment, where he would inject them with crystal meth for sexual gratification. The additional counts today include one for allegedly enticing Jim Elmore to travel to L. A for prostitution in 2017 back, also gave Methe tomorrow who died in Bucks home. Moore's death was investigated by the L. A County Sheriff Department, But District Attorney Jackie Lacey declined to charge Buck, another black man named Timothy Dean died at Buck's home. Last year. Support for NPR come from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, which aims to improve the quality of people's lives, their grants supporting child well being the environment, medical research and Performing arts. It is six or six at K. C. R W from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, and I'm Stacy Vanek Smith in New York..

NPR President Trump Congress Ed Buck Amnesty International Aisha Roscoe executive California Trump Administration Jack Spear President Asia District of Columbia Riverside County Laurel Wamsley National Retail Federation Ari Shapiro Beirut State Health and Human Service
'In fact, we will be doing more testing': Fauci says he was never asked to slow coronavirus testing

Marketplace

01:01 min | 1 year ago

'In fact, we will be doing more testing': Fauci says he was never asked to slow coronavirus testing

"Dr Anthony Fauci and other top health officials testified today before a house committee on the administration's response to the corona virus pandemic after president trump remarked this past weekend it asked his people to quote slow the testing down about you short lawmakers no member of the coronavirus task force has ever been asked to do that more members laurel Wamsley doctor felt she was unequivocal I know for sure but to my knowledge none of us had ever been told to slow down on testing that just is a fact that she is the top scientist involved with the federal response and he said that while the New York metro area and Washington DC have done well in bringing down the number of cases he was disturbed by the current surges in states including Arizona Texas and Florida bottom line is the chairman it's a mixed bag some good and some now we have a problem with he said that it's critical to use testing isolation and contact tracing over the next two weeks to address those surges laurel Wamsley NPR news

Dr Anthony Fauci Donald Trump Scientist Chairman President Trump Laurel Wamsley New York Arizona Texas Florida NPR
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum the World Health Organization is sending a high level fact finding team to China to try to get a better understanding of the corona virus outbreak NPR's Jason Beaubien Hong Kong reports even as officials in China start to talk about re opening businesses and factories tens of millions of people remain under mandatory travel restrictions tens of thousands more are sick and another one hundred and seventy thousand are being monitored by medical staff because they had close contact with someone who's come down with the illness foreign minister **** she says China's extraordinary efforts to contain the virus have been successful the bulk of the cases have remained centered around Wuhan where the outbreak was first detected in December but the regional and global impact of the health crisis remains huge Honda motors is the latest company to say it's delaying restarting its factory in Wuhan for at least another week Jason Beaubien NPR news Hong Kong a senior US official says the US and the Taliban have agreed to what's being described as a significant reduction in violence for seven days it's not clear when that would start such a reduction would be seen as a step towards ending the eighteen year war in Afghanistan a federal appeals court as of held a lower court's decision to block states requirements that Medicaid recipients must work in order to receive benefits NPR's our Walmsley reports a three judge panel on the DC circuit ruled that the trump administration acted unlawfully when it approved Medicaid work requirements and Kentucky and Arkansas that affirms a lower court's ruling last year that found health and Human Services secretary Alex is our had failed to analyze whether such requirements would promote the primary objective of Medicaid which is to provide medical assistance that ruling forced Arkansas to end its work requirement program and prevented Kentucky from implementing its own in Arkansas the new requirements resulted in more than eighteen thousand people being dropped from the Medicaid rolls trump administration officials have promoted work requirements arguing that working to lead people to live healthier lives such requirements are under way in some form in eighteen other states laurel Wamsley NPR news Washington a federal jury in New York Friday convicted celebrity lawyer Michael of a not a of trying to extort money from ninety by threatening to uses media access to hurt the sportswear giant's reputation his attorneys guts Rudnick says he will appeal the next stages.

Kentucky guts Rudnick laurel Wamsley secretary Medicaid Jason Beaubien Honda NPR Michael New York Alex Arkansas Washington Afghanistan Taliban US official Wuhan
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tell everyone to go away and leave you alone for the next few minutes thank you for telling the symbol of sound stay live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine herbs defense secretary mark as per says he hasn't seen specific evidence that Iran plan to attack for U. S. embassies that money's claims made by president trump about the justification for killing a runny and commander and fears laurel Wamsley has more in an interview with CBS is Margaret Brennan secretary asper said he shared the president's view that US embassies were probably going to be attacked well the president didn't say when there was a potential us he didn't cite a specific piece of evidence what he says he probably he believes are you saying that it wasn't one I didn't see one with regard to four embassies what I'm saying is I sure the president's view that probably my expectation was they're going to go after our embassies some members of Congress have complained that the trump administration has not offered any concrete evidence that there was an imminent threat to prompt the strike on Qassem Soleimani without first getting congressional authorization laurel Wamsley NPR news Washington democratic presidential hopefuls senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders rarely publicly criticized each other so far in the race for the White House with a little over three weeks to go into the carcass voting starts in Iowa the center's team is now more directly engaging against Warren if yours wanna summers reports politico reported this weekend on a script used by Sanders campaign volunteers when connecting with potential supporters.

Iowa Washington secretary Margaret Brennan laurel Wamsley commander U. S. Iran NPR White House Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Qassem Soleimani Congress president asper CBS
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

"It is KCRW stay close live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine herbs defense secretary mark as per says he hasn't seen specific evidence that Iran plan to attack for U. S. embassies that money's claims made by president trump about the justification for killing a Ronnie and commander and fears laurel Wamsley has more in an interview with CBS is Margaret Brennan secretary asper said he shared the president's view that US embassies were probably going to be attacked well the president didn't say when there was a potential us he didn't cite a specific piece of evidence what he says he probably he believes are you saying that it wasn't one I didn't see one with regard to four embassies what I'm saying is I sure the president's view that probably my expectation was a run to go after our embassies some members of Congress have complained that the trump administration has not offered any concrete evidence that there was an imminent threat to prompt the strike on Qassem Soleimani without first getting congressional authorization laurel Wamsley NPR news Washington Greta presidential hopefuls senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders rarely publicly criticized each other so far in the race for the White House with a little over three weeks to go into the carcass voting starts in Iowa the Sanders team is now more directly engaging against Warren and here's one of summer's reports politico reported this weekend on a script used by Sanders campaign volunteers when connecting with potential supporters the script instructs Sanders volunteers to tell voters leaning toward Warren that's the quote people who support her are highly educated more affluent people who are going to show up and vote democratic no matter what in that she's quote bringing no new bases and to the Democratic Party begin to reporters today in Iowa Sander said he just read about the memo Cold War and a great friend and said that no one is going to be attacking Warren earlier in the day Elizabeth Warren said that she hopes Sanders campaign reconsiders these talking points that she says trash her as a candidate Juana summers NPR news in Australia the bureau of meteorology is warning that poor air quality as possible across large parts of the southeast because of the ongoing wildfires and here's a symbol be in in city reports officials are urging residents to monitor fire conditions of dozens of places remain out of control three fires on the border between the state of Victoria and New South Wales emerge into one mega fire the blazes in Gulf nearly two million acres is pushing plumes of smoke across much of the region Melbourne.

Australia bureau of meteorology secretary Margaret Brennan laurel Wamsley commander U. S. Iran NPR KCRW Melbourne Gulf South Wales Victoria Washington Juana Sander Democratic Party
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Predictions and contradictions at the end of life first this news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum secretary of the navy Richard Spencer has been pushed out following his handling of the case of a navy seal accused of war crimes defense secretary mark as for objected to talk Spencer had with the White House over the case NPR's laurel Wamsley reports those talks involved in the case of navy seal Eddie Gallagher Gallagher was acquitted of murdering a wounded Islamic state militant in Iraq in twenty seventeen he was later convicted of posing with the body of the dead prisoner president trump restored Gallagher's rank after he was demoted by a military jury according to the Pentagon asper learned on Friday that Spencer had privately proposed to the White House a deal in which Gallagher could retire as a seal and retain his trident pen in a letter to the White House Spencer said he'd been terminated he wrote that quote the president deserves a secretary of the navy who is aligned with his views for the future of the force laurel Wamsley NPR news Washington the Supreme Court says justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is home from the hospital NPR's Nina Totenberg has more justice Ginsburg returned home this morning discharge from Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore where she was for I guess about twenty four hours are a little more she was admitted on Friday night suffering from chills and fever there was an infection they treated her with fluids and antibiotics and she was back at her apartment by mid day today having chicken soup I'm told NPR's Nina Totenberg in Hong Kong it appears pro democracy candidates easily won the most seats in elections for district councils there was a record turnout seventy one percent of the electorate voted there were long lines at the polls but no major disruptions the district councils have little power but the election was seen as a referendum on the pro democracy demonstrations that began in Hong Kong in June the government of Congo is hoping a new national museum just inaugurated in Kinshasa will soon get order effects back from European countries that eluded them during colonial times teri Schultz reports one lease president Felix stricken city open to the new museum after almost three years of construction the twenty one million dollar price tag was covered by the south Korean government which is also training Congolese experts to manage the institution chicken Sadie says his government is seeking the return of its cultural heritage in an organized way mentioning from Belgium in particular Brussels re opened its own African museum last year after a five year renovation that included an effort to reform the colonial way of thinking about former territories including Congo which it ruled from nineteen oh eight to nineteen sixty the director of the Belgian museum says he's open to repatriation request but stress is not all of the one hundred eighty thousand items there most of which are from Congo were acquired illegally for NPR news I'm teri Schultz in Brussels this is NPR news from Washington a small plane crashed in the Democratic Republic of Congo today in a densely populated neighborhood in the eastern city of Goma officials say at least twenty six people died everyone on the plane and some people on the ground plane crashes are relatively common in Congo because of poor maintenance and lacks air safety standards in the UK the fallout from prince Andrew's BBC interview continues Vicki Barker reports from London the queen has reportedly cancelled an official sixtieth birthday celebration she planned for prince Andrew and his charities for next February instead the Sunday times of London reports the occasion is to be marked with a private family dinner Andrews decision to retire from public life until further notice was effectively made for him more than twenty charities of already severed their ties with him and he's reportedly expected to resign from the remaining hundred and sixty or so within days the Duke of York has also lost the office space he once occupied inside Buckingham Palace for NPR news I'm Vicki Barker in London billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg is running for president the former New York City mayor made the announcement today saying he is uniquely positioned to be president trump Blumberg joins seventeen others seeking the democratic nomination Bloomberg is seventy seven and he says that he'll spend millions of dollars of his own money.

NPR twenty one million dollar seventy one percent twenty four hours three years five year
Exxon to face trial in New York investor fraud lawsuit

Morning Edition

02:11 min | 2 years ago

Exxon to face trial in New York investor fraud lawsuit

"Exxon Mobil goes on trial in New York today in the state says it misled shareholders about the risks that the company faces from climate change it's a civil lawsuit and more cities and states are doing the same thing they're trying to hold oil companies accountable for climate change and pears laurel Wamsley has the story new York's Attorney General is suing Exxon Mobil arguing that he defrauded the public for years by misrepresenting how carbon regulation would affect the company's financial outlook the case goes back to twenty fifteen when reports found that while Exxon scientists were in Ridley researching climate change to plant operations the company was outwardly casting doubt on global warming then New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman told PBS newshour how its investigation could lead to legal action there's nothing wrong with with advocating for your own company which you're not allowed to do is commit fraud the state argues that acts on used two different ways to calculate carbon costs and wasn't clear when it was using one or the other which had the effect of making its assets appear more secure than they really work that in turn affected it share price the lawsuit says and defrauded investors that would be a violation of a New York statute known as the Martin act it's the same law that's been used by previous Attorney General in the state to bring charges against big financial firms there's not a general law for better or worse against lying in general but there is a law against lying to shareholders that's Michael Gerard the climate law expert at Columbia Law School he says one focus in the case will be excellent investment and the carbon intensive Canadian oil sands project some investors worried won't make financial sense under tougher climate regulations and all the details get a little wonky this is a case with potentially big consequences this is the first case on alleged securities fraud about climate change over to go to trial Exxon says the lawsuit is politically motivated and driven by anti fossil fuel activists the company says it was honest with shareholders about how it calculated carbon costs Effexor loses a could be vulnerable to a string of lawsuits in other states that's because it had to give New York thousands of pages of documents and a lawsuit elsewhere will be able to use what comes out in the trial to build their own arguments laurel Wamsley

Fraud Laurel Wamsley Martin PBS Attorney Exxon Securities Fraud Columbia Law School Michael Gerard Exxon Mobil Eric Schneiderman Ridley New York
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Is here right now. Looking at traffic as we move on all things considered. Hello, holly. We have a big swerve alert. Steve. Are you ready for this? All right. Tell me a large air duct in the number two lane. What does that even look like, I don't even know? But it's westbound one oh five at central avenue. Don't hit a large air duct, please. Yes. And also we have a problem on the southbound four or five to the westbound ten connector at truck. Stuck in the carpool lane. Right. Holly. I'm gonna take a little breath and move on with more of the news with afternoon this evening KCRW. It's NPR four the Southland at five twenty. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Audie Cornish. The women's World Cup is less than three months away and the world champion US women's soccer team. Once again heads into the tournament ranked number one. But the players say there is a problem. They're suing US soccer the sports governing body in this country over what they alleged to be unfair pay treatment. Joining us now is NPR's laurel Wamsley under the studio, Hank you. So what does the lawsuit accused US soccer of doing? So US soccer is the employer for the men and women who play on the national teams for the US. And with the women's team argues is that despite performing the same job responsibilities as the players on the men's team. They're consistently paid less than men are and that they say is violation of equal pay act and the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four they want equal pay for equal work. So what they're seeking is an. End to these discriminatory practices. They say, and they also want to be paid, and they wanna get punitive damages. So when we say they were the parties involved here. This is the entire US women's team all twenty eight players on the team that are in the mix for the World Cup this summer, and they're also seeking this to be a class action lawsuit. So that would cover other women who may have been discriminated against. So do the women get paid less yet. They definitely do. So they get paid less for each game. They play friendly matches. And they also get paid less for making the World Cup roster. And then they got paid less way less for winning the two thousand fifteen World Cup than the players on the men's team did for getting knocked out of their World Cup in the round of sixteen. So it's a little complicated, actually, though, because fica in that case is the one that allows the prize winnings to the nations, and and that sort of based on how much you know, the men's World Cup brings in which is more than the women's World Cup does. So. It's sort of tricky for them to see. So we know the women's team wins on the field. What about the business side are the women paid less because they generate less revenue? I mean, you mentioned that when it came to the World Cup. So neither US soccer nor the women's players union has released that sort of financial data, but in a lawsuit the women's complaint. The women complained that US soccer doesn't work hard enough to market their team, and that it unilaterally decides to charge less for tickets to their games which depresses revenue, but the team definitely has a following. And the final of the last World Cup in two thousand fifteen when the US beach pan that was the most watched soccer game in US history men or women, what does US soccer, I have to say about all this. Well, they told me that they won't comment on existing litigation. But in response to a case in two thousand sixteen with similar charges. US soccer said that any pay discrepancy wasn't on the basis of gender. But they're actually in sort of a tricky spot because it's a World Cup here. And a big part of the messaging around the team is how. Fierce these players are how talented they are. And the players have been outspoken on a number of issues, including LGBT rights police brutality. And they've been especially vocal when it comes to equality for women at a game. Just last weekend. The players each were the name of different iconic and influential woman on the back of their jerseys. So also is a little complicated because the current president of US soccer when he was campaigning for that job even said that the US women's team should be respected in value just as much as the men's teams, but that the female players have not been treated equally. And so some of the top women do get paid more now than they did just a few years ago. But the lawsuit says that US soccer only plays lip service to gender equality to get the sense of this is a surprise. Or is this something that's been brewing for a while? I think that US soccer had hoped that some of this was sort of behind them, and that that things were not going to be tense going into the World Cup which starts in June. But at the same time, there was a charge filed back in two thousand sixteen that was never resolved. So I think they must have known that. There was a chance that this would bubble up again. That's NPR's Laura wants Lee, thanks so much. Thank you. Paradise California has begun asking anxious residents how they think they're towns should be rebuilt. Of course, many residents are no longer there. They had to leave paradise after the campfire wiped out much of the town and surrounding communities in the Sierra, Nevada. Foothills NPR's Kirk siegler has been reporting on the difficult recovery there, and he sent us this update the campfires prompted a lot of questions about whether towns like paradise in high risk areas should even be rebuilt very long tried to squash that immediately as he kicked off a crowded town hall meeting at the paradise alliance church. One of the first questions we were.

US soccer NPR Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Steve Holly Southland Nevada paradise alliance church KCRW California laurel Wamsley Kirk siegler Hank president
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm doin' cycle. Tau? The partial government shutdown is in its tenth day amid a stalemate over funding for a border wall. As NPR's Laura Lee reports negotiations to reopen. The government will continue a new session of congress begins on Capitol Hill on Thursday, a new congress will be sworn in and with a majority of Democrats in the house that same day. The house is expected to vote on a package of funding bills tree opened the government and the partial shutdown Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. A Republican has said that the Senate will only take up a Bill the President Trump will sign Trump rejected earlier legislation that would have avoided the shutdown nine federal departments and agencies are at least partly closed during the gap and federal appropriations about eight hundred thousand federal employees are either furloughed or working without pay. Federal contractors are also taking a hit, and maybe less able to recover lost wages when the government does start up again, the House Democrats propose. Does not include the five billion dollars that Trump wants to build a wall along the border with Mexico. Laurel Wamsley NPR news just after midnight in the new year NASA spacecraft new horizons should be some four billion miles from earth. And if on track it will pass a tiny icy object about twenty miles across nicknamed ultimate Tuli. Allen stern is the lead scientists monitoring the new horizon spacecraft mission, this is the most distant object ever explored. But it is an addition because of the cold temperatures out there the most primitive object ever explored and therefore probably the best time capsule. We've ever had for understanding the birth of our solar system the planets in it. The new horizons probe is about the size of a baby grand, piano. Data from the spacecraft will take about six hours to get back to earth on Wall Street today, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up two hundred sixty five points up slightly more than one percent. You're listening to NPR news. Good afternoon. It's four thirty two. I'm Eric Roy for four Steve achier take on KCRW people looking for prime viewing of the one hundred thirtieth rose parade started claiming their spots along the route in Pasadena today in an annual tradition now, we'll see hundreds of thousands of people camping out along Colorado boulevard tonight. Colorado boulevard will close to motorized traffic at ten pm, but all people and property such as by Kitson chairs must remain on the curb until eleven pm after that spectators can move out to the blue online on the street. You'll be windy and cold close. Possibly getting down into the thirties. Bonfires are prohibited along the rose parade route, although small barbecue units are allowed also open containers are prohibited on public streets and sidewalks and other public areas in Pasadena activists across the country will take to the streets for the third annual women's March next month, but one California edition of the March has been canceled on onboard county organizers say they called it off over concerns that the participants would be quote, overwhelmingly white case George has more on Saturday. Nineteen the third annual women's March will take place in downtown LA. It's the biggest one in California by far. But by no means the only one here during Donald Trump's presidency January marches have taken place in Santa Barbara, Orange County, San Diego even more rural communities like Eureka, California, but not this year organizers and their supporters in Humboldt county made national headlines when they announced the cancellation they released a statement saying they want to broaden diversity among organizers because quote, the participants have been overwhelmingly white lacking representation from several perspectives in our community, and quote, instead the group is encouraging people to attend Martin Luther King junior day events later in the month. Casey ws Evan George support. For NPR comes from visiting angels, professional caregivers assisting adults at home in bathing, dressing, meals, and light housework nationwide. Visiting angels, America's choice in senior home care. Learn more at one eight hundred three six five forty one eighty nine and I drive maker of a mouthpiece. Providing real time remote access to PC's maximum service from anywhere for us one telecommuting or for remote.

Donald Trump NPR California Pasadena Allen stern Senate Evan George congress Culver City Mitch McConnell Laura Lee Laurel Wamsley NASA America
House narrowly approves farm bill that could cut food stamps to millions of low-income Americans

Midday on WNYC

02:52 min | 3 years ago

House narrowly approves farm bill that could cut food stamps to millions of low-income Americans

"To follow each state's tax rules recent estimates found that states were losing billions of dollars in revenue each year due to sales tax not collected on online sales laurel wamsley npr news washington a federal grand jury minnesota has indicted three illinois men on federal civil rights and hate crime charges in connection with a bombing last summer of a minneapolis area mosque matt setback of minnesota public radio says it's in addition to previously filed arson charges prosecutors say forty seven year old michael harry twenty nine year old michael mc water and twentythreeyearold joe morris drove more than five hundred miles to carry out the early morning attack august fifth the bomb caused extensive damage to the building but no one was hurt authorities say the three are part of an antigovernment militia based in clarence illinois setback reporting hundreds of people have been rescued from floodwaters in south texas we're up to fifteen inches of rainfall has inundated communities over the past few days governor greg abbott issuing a disaster declaration for six counties hit by the flooding meanwhile flooding in minnesota and south dakota caused some road closures including the brief shutdown of i ninety in minnesota this is npr news conservative columnist charles krauthammer has died at the age of sixty eight npr's windsor johnston reports the pulitzer prize winning political commentator recently announced he was in the final stages of cancer in an online farewell message krauthammer wrote i leave this life with no regrets he also thanked reader's television viewers and colleagues who had given consequence to his life's work krauthammer had been a columnist with the washington post since nineteen eighty four and was also a longtime political commentator on fox news he graduated harvard medical school in one thousand nine hundred seventy five despite a first year diving accident that left him a quadriplegic he ended up leading the field of psychiatry to take on politics in nineteen seventy eight he accepted a position in the carter administration directing planning in psychiatric research he later served as a speech writer for vice president walter mondale windsor johnston npr news president trump's national security advisor john bolton has heading to moscow the pave the way for a possible us russian summit trump and russian president vladimir putin discussed a face to face meeting in march when trump called the russian leader to congratulate him on his reelection the republican led house has narrowly passed sweeping farm bill that would toughen work requirements for food stamp recipients democrats unanimously opposed the measure and twenty republicans also voted no saying it would toss too many people off government food assistance the house bill sets up a clash with the senate which is looking to skip the food stamps changes and make mostly modest adjustments i'm jim hawk npr news.

Vice President Minneapolis Arson Michael Harry Joe Morris Clarence Illinois Greg Abbott NPR FOX Washington Walter Mondale President Trump Advisor Moscow Jim Hawk Senate
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Authorities now believe that steven paddock shot compost around the same time that he began firing on the crowds at the music festival across the street but investigators don't know paddocks motive or why he stopped firing laurel wamsley npr news the suspect in a workplace shooting and harford county maryland has been arrested in delaware authorities say radi prince killed three coworkers and wounded two others that accompany an edge edgewood maryland police say prince than drove to a used car lot fifty five miles away in wilmington delaware where another man was shot and wounded there is no word on a motive for the attacks california fire officials have reported significant progress in on containing wildfires that ravaged parts of northern california about twenty two thousand people remain under evacuation orders that's down from about one hundred thousand at the height of the fires blaze has killed at least forty two people and destroyed six thousand homes on wall street stocks closed modestly higher with technology and banking shares pushing all three major indexes to new record highs this is npr news nineteen state attorneys general are asking a federal judge in california to force the trump administration to continue government payments to health insurance companies the states are requesting an emergency court order a my partisan plan to continue the subsidies for two years is to be unveiled in the senate on thursday while a group of ten democratic and republican governors is asking congressional leaders tobacco proposal to extend the payments a federal judge in washington is ordering texas and the government to allow undocumented teenager to undergo an abortion and without delay the team was detained at a shelter in texas since entering the us without apparent.

steven paddock harford county maryland delaware california health insurance companies court order senate washington texas us radi prince edgewood used car wilmington npr two years
"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"laurel wamsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston attorney general jeff sessions is testifying in front of the senate judiciary committee today on capitol hill democratic lawmakers are questioning him on a wide range of topics including the fbi investigation into russian meddling in the us presidential election i have never ahead all a meeting would any russian officials to discuss any kind of coordinating campaign in his opening statement sessions also discussed his agencies focus on fighting terrorism prosecuting hate crimes and attacking the opioid crisis in the us a man hunt is underway up and down the northeast corridor of interstate ninety five police are searching for a man after shootings in maryland and delaware that left at least three people dead and two wounded and pr is jeffrey reports the first shooting was just before nine a m at a business northeast of baltimore where the suspect radi prince worked wilmington delaware police released a photo of the thirty seven year old man and a description of an suv he was driving a black gm's he acadia authorities say prince has an address in family in the wilmington area and should be considered armed and dangerous police from maryland delaware in pennsylvania along with the fbi are involved in the manhood and pr zgiet brady a hotel security guard wounded by a gunman who opened fire on a crowd of concert goers in las vegas is giving his first media interview npr's laurel wamsley reports he's appearing on the ellen degeneres show his compost says that it was an alert about an open door that sent him to the 30second floor of the mandalay bay that night.

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