7 Burst results for "Laurel Hi Ari"

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And that she and really all NPR reporters all the reporters here at W ABE they share this ability and need to ask tough questions These are questions that matter that elicit answers that really guide us in our decisions not just on voting but on daily life think about the pandemic and how important being pressed were health officials How important that kind of element was to getting the truth out And that is what you get when you become a member of W ABE And it's really become a member If freedom of the press matters to you then W ABE matters to you Consider a monthly donation to W ABE It's really the best way to support us and here's the reason you don't give it as a lump sum but a little bit consistently from month to month And yes you can change it at any time Also for most listeners we found that $10 a month seems to be about the most comfortable giving level But you can give what you can afford Please know that we really do depend on you especially now this afternoon as we're trying to make our $20,000 goal here during all things considered 84% of all of our funding UWB comes from the Atlanta community that includes listeners like you 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 and thank you That's right and when you decide to give it $20 a month right now that $20 a month becomes $40 a month thanks to our very generous cornerstone society members but only if we reach that $20,000 Mark that's why we are really really asking for your help this happened in 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 work slash donate Thank you This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Sarah mccammond And I'm already Shapiro 17 people from a Christian aid mission who were abducted in Haiti over the weekend are still missing They were with an organization called Christian aid ministries based in Ohio and because Laurel Walmsley is following the situation hi Laurel Hi Ari What's the latest on this abduction Well a gang called 400 mouse has claimed responsibility for the kidnapping and is reportedly asking for a ransom of $1 million per person The U.S. and Haitian governments are working to free them as is Christian aid ministries I should mention that this group's abduction is far from the only kidnapping that's happened in Haiti where there's been a huge spike in kidnappings recently mostly a patient people There have been a 119 kidnappings just in the first half of October according to the local nonprofit center of analysis and research of human rights And can you tell us anything about the specific people who were kidnapped Well the group includes 6 men 6 women and 5 children The kids range in age from 15 at the oldest to just 8 months old at the youngest Their Haitian driver was also abducted 16 of them are U.S. citizens and one is Canadian They were reportedly all traveling in one van returning from visiting an orphanage outside Port-au-Prince According to the Detroit news 5 are members of one family from western Michigan a mother and her four children that arrived in Haiti ten days ago The father was apparently back at the mission's home base in Haiti It's possible that the group is a mix of people visiting short term from the United States along with long-term staff members who live in Haiti And what more can you tell us about the group Christian aid ministries that sponsored these people Christian administrators it's a relief and development organization It was founded in 1981 in Holmes county Ohio and that's an area with one of the largest communities of Amish and conservative Mennonites Christian aid ministries is one of the main service organizations connected to these communities And they're pretty big The organization had a revenue of a $132 million last year They do a range of both domestic and international projects And the group has actually been in the news before Two years ago one of its former employees was convicted of sexually abusing two boys in Ohio and that employee allegedly admitted to abusing many boys in Haiti over a 15 year period So what is this organization doing in Haiti They have a long history there They have been doing work in Haiti since the late 1980s I spoke with Steve null who is a Professor of history and anabaptist studies at Elizabethtown college And here's what he told me about their work there They've done a number of things through the years including support and sponsorship of orphanages have a microfinance program They distribute what are called the school kits which are collections of school supplies that are provided free to schoolchildren They also supply medicines and distribute Christian literature And recently they've been doing rebuilding projects after the earthquake they're in August And this is just one of many similar organizations doing this kind of work in Haiti Definitely It's the poorest country in the western hemisphere So there's a lot of need And it's also really close to the United States So it's an easy place to travel to even if the conditions there make it an increasingly difficult place to work We spoke with Karen richman a cultural anthropologist at the university of Notre-Dame who's done a lot of work in Haiti She said she doesn't know the exact number of missions in the U.S. from the U.S. in Haiti but it's a lot Haiti has a reputation of being one of the most missionized countries in the world She says many missionaries live there for a long time and established schools and clinics And what's next in the effort to get back these kidnapped folks In an update this afternoon Christian aid ministry says it's holding a day of fasting and prayer tomorrow inviting people to pray for the kidnapping victims the government's working for their release and for the kidnappers themselves That's been something interesting that Christian administration has stressed throughout Prayers for the kidnappers It's a reflection of the group's religious tradition of nonviolence and peacemaking Ten years Laura Walmsley thanks a.

Haiti NPR news Sarah mccammond Christian aid ministries Laurel Walmsley Laurel Hi Ari local nonprofit center of anal U.S. Ohio NPR ABE Shapiro Steve null
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KCRW

"Season with a tax deductible donation KCRW dot com slash join ten five nineteen at Casey are W. thanks so much for being with us on this Tuesday evening for All Things Considered here's what's coming up on the program took talk is one of the world's fastest growing apps it has racked up one point five billion downloads and is defining music kids but the Chinese owned app is also making people in Washington and Silicon Valley very nervous you're gonna hear why also ahead a conversation with the director of strategic communications for the trump twenty twenty campaign more about how impeachment will follow president trump on the campaign trail will facing impeachment help him or hurt him win reelection in that up coming in their upcoming twenty twenty presidential race will talk about that as well how to secure roads now Culver city a sig alert there north bound for a five Washington Boulevard offramp blocked due to a box truck fire and the traffic flow from the ninety over to Sherman oaks we go there without one oh one at van Nuys Boulevard stalled car blocking the left lane a formal place for that stop and go from laurel canyon and in downtown LA the north bell one ten at night St stalled car in the left lane there and you are backed up from Florence Avenue it's five twenty it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro a judge has found Exxon Mobil not liable in a landmark climate change lawsuit the case was a defeat for new York's Attorney General who accused the oil giant of defrauding shareholders downplaying the risks that future climate regulation could post with investments and Paris laurel once he's been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case is about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay to know fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so it excellent place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon used more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods had resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock had actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices lot of people watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well excellent says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation bass lessons at that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how X. on had made materially false and misleading representations the American P. people but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and that she'll keep fighting Dan climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits is just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases while we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against acts on the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking to looking at public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impacts of climate change that company that different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line in other cases and Charles laurel once a thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tech talk twenty nineteen the at the Spahn means dance contests even minted hit songs it's.

Casey
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Q. we I. F. M. north highlands it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish I'm ari Shapiro a judge has found Exxon Mobil not liable in a landmark climate change lawsuit the case was a defeat for new York's Attorney General who accused the oil giant of defrauding shareholders downplaying the risks that future climate regulation could post with investments and personal once he's been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case was about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay so no fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so at excellent place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon use more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods have resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock had actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices a lot of people watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well excellent says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation bass lessons at that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how X. on had made materially false and misleading representations the American P. Paul but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and of that she'll keep fighting than climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits is just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases while we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against Exxon the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking building a public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impacts of climate change that companies that are different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought it after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line in other cases and tears laurel once a thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tictoc in twenty nineteen the actors fund means dance contest even minted hit song it also set off alarm bells in Washington and Silicon Valley.

Audie Cornish NPR ari Shapiro
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish I'm ari Shapiro a judge has found Exxon Mobil not liable in a landmark climate change lawsuit the case was a defeat for new York's Attorney General who accused the oil giant of defrauding shareholders downplaying the risks that future climate regulation could pose to its investments and Paris laurel once he's been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case was about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay to know fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so at Exxon place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon used more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods had resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock had actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices lot of people watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well Exxon says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation bass lessons at that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how Exxon had may materially false and misleading representations the American people all but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and that she'll keep fighting to and climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits it was just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases while we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against ex on the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking to looking at public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impacts of climate change that companies that different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought it after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line in other cases enters laurel once a thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tech talk twenty nineteen the at the Spahn means dance contests even minted hit song that's it also set off alarm bells in Washington and.

Audie Cornish Exxon Mobil NPR ari Shapiro
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on KCRW

"Three twenty it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish I'm ari Shapiro a judge has found Exxon Mobil not liable in a landmark climate change lawsuit the case was a defeat for new York's Attorney General who accused the oil giant of defrauding shareholders downplaying the risks that future climate regulation could post with investments and Paris laurel once he's been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case was about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay to know fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so at excellent place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon used more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods had resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock have actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices lot of people are watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well Exxon says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation bass lessons at that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how X. on had made materially false and misleading representations to the American people but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and that she'll keep fighting to and climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits is just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases well we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against ex on the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking building a public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impacts of climate change that companies that the different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought it after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line in other cases address Laura once a thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tech talk twenty nineteen the act the Spahn means dance contests even minted hit songs it's it also set off alarm bells in Washington.

Audie Cornish Exxon Mobil NPR ari Shapiro
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The listeners who support this NPR station it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish I'm ari Shapiro a judge has found Exxon Mobil not liable in a landmark climate change lawsuit the case was a defeat for new York's Attorney General who accused the oil giant of defrauding shareholders downplaying the risks that future climate regulation could pose to its investments and Paris laurel wands these been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case was about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay to know fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so it excellent place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon used more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods had resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock had actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices lot of people watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well Exxon says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation based lesson said that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how X. on had made materially false and misleading representations to the American people all but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and that she'll keep fighting than climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits is just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases while we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against acts on the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking to looking at public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impact of climate change that companies that different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought it after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line in other cases hunters laurel Wamsley thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tech talk twenty nineteen the at the Spahn means dance contests even.

Audie Cornish NPR
"laurel hi ari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"laurel hi ari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He's been following the case and she's here in the studio hi laurel hi ari why did the judge decide in favor of Exxon Mobil well this case was about securities fraud and for one thing the judge said that new York's Attorney General had failed to produce any shareholders who would say they were actually misled okay so no fraud found tell us more about this case mark came from well it's a little thorny so stick with me here in this case all the parties involved agreed that Exxon had use different methods to account for the potential impact of future climate change regulate regulation on its investments and so at excellent place testified during the case that they used one method to estimate the cost of carbon in the future like in the year twenty thirty and twenty forty assuming that the countries of the world will take certain steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions but internally for specific projects like the oil sands in Alberta Exxon use more specific numbers that were available to estimate the future carbon costs so public accounting in a private accounting yes so the attorney general's office argued that using these different methods have resulted in misleading investors but like I said the judge said the attorney general's office had failed to produce enough evidence that this occurred and an analyst from Wells Fargo he testified said that he'd read the climate change documents in question and he didn't think much about them and during this time Exxon stock had actually outperformed suggesting that shareholders weren't hurt by these practices lot of people watching this case for what it said about climate change about the energy industry now what with the judges ruled one of the two party saying well excellent says that the ruling affirms what it's been saying all along it called the investigation bass lessons at that millions of dollars of taxpayer money had been wasted on the case in the ruling was a big blow to new York's Attorney General the teacher James in a statement she said that her office had laid out how Exxon had me materially false and misleading representations to the American people but she says her office will continue to fight for companies to be held accountable and of that she'll keep fighting to and climate change this is the leading edge of a wave of similar lawsuits is just the second one to reach trial but there are so many others pending against Exxon and other fossil fuel companies what is this verdict likely mean for those other cases well we're gonna have to see so in the end the judge in this case said it wasn't a climate change lawsuit really but a securities fraud case and because of this loss it may be that other states don't pursue securities fraud charges against acts on the Attorney General of Massachusetts has announced a similar lawsuit against Exxon and I imagine this decision could lead to a shift in that strategy but elsewhere cities and states are pursuing other other lines of of of strategy so they're looking building a public nuisance argument saying that energy companies should be held accountable for their role in climate change the idea there is to force them to help pay for the mounting impacts of climate change that company that different communities are struggling to address and so it may be that those cases are more squarely about climate change rather than about accounting practices and risk assessments but even in this case the Attorney General brought after gaining access to troves of internal documents and it could be that those documents are able to pay off down the line and other cases address laurel once a thanks you're welcome now time for all tech considered and when it comes to tech twenty nineteen may go down in history as the year of tech talk twenty nineteen the act respond means dance contests even minted hit song it's we also set off alarm bells in Washington and Silicon Valley and beers tech correspondent Jim bond joins us now to talk about how the video sharing app one from teen fad to cultural juggernaut to possible national security threat to shed welcome back thanks for having me how big is tech talk at this point how many users well it's kind of crazy it's not even a year and a half old and it's been downloaded one point five billion times so that means something like one in five people around the world have put this app on their phones and teenagers and twenty somethings in particular have embraced it I spoke with the tech shocker that's what they're called her name is Alexia down by like really exciting to other people are doing something that I thought of you know yesterday and I just read a minute video about device is a twenty one year old student she goes to college in Miami and she makes these videos where she plays different characters this summer she made a parody of the Netflix show stranger things it's called if Latina moms were in stranger things devise party can and she drew on that for the video do you think you're gonna walk in someone else let me tell you something Morgan I mean you know why I still don't think you're not going to come into my house dirty I'm not doing that that video blew up on tictoc and devise a now has more than three hundred and thirty thousand followers she says it's really changed her life she's fans now she's actually been stopped in the street by people asking for pictures so what you're describing our lakes skits I know it's a big place for dance routines and some pop songs have even been launched there it all seems innocuous why is Congress raising the alarm about tick tock what's gotten the attention of lawmakers is who owns tictoc and that's a Chinese company called bite dance at actually the head of tech talk was supposed to come meet with lawmakers in Washington to talk about some of these concerns this week he's now rescheduled those meetings for after the holidays but when he does come he's probably gonna get questions about whether because of the Chinese ownership tech talk is censoring content that might upset the Chinese government just last month the app vanden American user who made a video criticizing China's treatment of we are Muslims tech talk did apologize and reinstated the videos soon after but there are worries about how any Chinese I'm company handles the date of American users because of censorship and surveillance by the Chinese government here's Republican senator Josh Holly of Missouri he was talking about tech talk and hearing in November a company compromised by the Chinese Communist Party knows where your children are knows what they look like with their voices sound like what they're watching and what they share with each other to talk sense at stores all American user data in the US and Singapore not in China and I'm not sure that many tech talk users in the US are particularly worried about this yet but political pressure on the company's only going to rise there's reportedly and national security review of bite dances ownership of tech talk our Silicon Valley leaders worried about the rise of tick tock when he hearing from companies there yeah the most alarm out here is coming from Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg really seized on tech talk as a foil to he touts Facebook as an American company with American by is versus tech talk as a company that reflects China's interests here's what he said about that in October well our services like what's that are used by protestors and activists everywhere due to strong encryption privacy protections on tech talk the Chinese outgrown quickly around the world mentions of these same protests are censored even here in the US that the internet that we want you know the interesting thing about it is that Facebook is actually trying to copy tictoc it's testing out these tools that allow people make tech talk like videos so going to capture the popularity especially with young people but the bigger picture I think here is that there's been a lot of successful Chinese social media companies but they've all been in China tech talks the first Chinese social up that has broken out globally and that scares Facebook and it scares the US government the.

Exxon Mobil securities fraud new York Attorney twenty one year