7 Burst results for "Laura Walmsley"

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:39 min | 5 months ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I got here, there was definitely a celebratory mood with those folks. They were just sort of to the right in the front of the capitol, and they were actually chatting. Hey, hey, goodbye. They were playing loud music. There's an air of celebration among those folks. And actually, it was just speaking with a family from Tennessee who was visiting and they decided to come here for the day, a woman said, you know, I wasn't there when the Berlin Wall fell but I can be there for this. Interesting, oftentimes these protests have some sort of point to them in terms of action that they're encouraging people to take. Are you seeing organizing whether it be at the ballot box or other forms of activism? This is definitely bringing out, I would say activists of all stripes, especially on the left, you know, people here who's maybe day job is working and voting rights or civil rights. They are coming out for this saying that this is a human rights issue. In terms of next steps I think it's still, they're still trying to figure that out. I mean, I spoke to one activist who was saying, we hope that Congress now will act to protect abortion, but she doesn't have a lot of confidence at will. I've also seen people here with the D.C. abortion fund trying to raise funds for that so that in the places where abortion is still legal, there will be funds for women to still get those. One of the two important points that President Biden ended his remarks with today was that he wanted all protests to be peaceful, no intimidation, he said, threat is not speech. Are the protests you're seeing, peaceful? It feels very peaceful. I mean, people are fired up for sure. There's cops that the fringes, you know, there's definitely protections here, keeping people out of safe distance from the from the court itself. But even though there are these two groups that feel so vehemently about the subject, just hear sort of mixing, it doesn't feel hostile or violent at all. It feels very peaceful. Although I assume still a strong reaction and people are passionate on both sides. Absolutely. People are people are definitely fired up and holding signs that just express their dismay at what has happened. A woman is holding a sign saying, I can't believe it's easier to get a gun than to get an abortion in this country. You know, there's a lot of big feelings out here today. And so, you know, things are calm now, but there's a lot of people here, and I think the crowds are just going to continue to grow throughout the day. NPR's Laura Walmsley outside of the Supreme Court, thank you so much. You're welcome. This is here and now. On the next radio lab. It's like

President Biden Tennessee Berlin D.C. Congress Laura Walmsley NPR Supreme Court
"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:55 min | 10 months ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's four 30 Live from NPR news I'm Duane Brown The United States and NATO have made no concessions to the main Russian demands to resolve the crisis over Ukraine That includes not giving Russia or Moscow any guarantee that its western neighbor can never join the alliance Here's Pentagon press secretary John Kirby The principal threat right now at least from a military perspective is from Russia on Ukraine And to Ukrainian soil which is why we continue to provide security assistance material to the Ukrainian armed forces another shipment just arrived on Friday There will be more coming and coming days and why we still have trainers on the ground The U.S. and Russia faced off at the UN Security Council today over the Russian military buildup around Ukraine Russia tried but failed to block the open council meeting calling it an attempt by the U.S. to whip up hysteria Meanwhile The White House says it's working closely with Congress this week on legislation to impose sanctions on Moscow The Biden administration is named a new leader of its efforts to fight homelessness as we hear from NPR's Laura Walmsley homelessness was rising even before the virus pandemic Jeff all of that is a new executive director of the U.S. interagency council on homelessness His experience ranges from doing outreach on the street to being CEO of the center on social innovation and founding an antiracist consultancy Oliver joins the agency as it creates a new federal plan to prevent and end homelessness The agency has returned to a housing first policy to quickly re house people a change from the Trump administration's agency head who argued that housing first is ineffective Numbers from January 2020 the most recent available found homelessness nationally had increased 2% from the year before Laurel Walmsley NPR news Washington Stocks finished higher on Wall Street today the Dow gained 406 points up more than 1% The tech heavy NASDAQ was up more than three This is NPR news From W ABE news in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim berry and sir time now four 32 and breaking news this afternoon a federal judge is rejecting a plea deal in the hate crimes trial for two of the three men found guilty of murdering ahmaud Arbery Arbery's parents had denounced the proposed deal for Travis mcmichael but the judge proceeded with plans to summon potential jurors next week Our berries mother Wanda Cooper Jones asked the judge to reject the deal and describe the U.S. Justice Department's decision to propose it as quote disrespectful proposed plea agreements for father and son Gregory and Travis mcmichael were filed with the court late on Sunday The two men and William Bryan were found guilty in November of murdering ahmaud Arbery Brian is also serving life in prison but he does have the possibility of parole Georgia power is planning on closing all of its coal fired power.

NPR news Russia Duane Brown alliance Here's Pentagon John Kirby U.S. Biden administration Moscow Laura Walmsley U.S. interagency council center on social innovation an Oliver joins Trump administration NATO UN Security Council Laurel Walmsley NPR news Washington Stocks Travis mcmichael
"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Community centers to pediatricians offices and pharmacies more than 20,000 sites are administering vaccines to young children White House COVID adviser Jeff Zion said in a briefing there is enough supply to vaccinate all 28 million children in this age group More and more sites are opening So the page will be increasing across the next couple of weeks Last spring the president at a goal of vaccinating 70% of adults with one dose by July but the administration has declined to set a goal for 5 to 11 year olds saying the aim is to vaccinate as many as possible Alice and Aubrey NPR news Washington With the U.S. facing the sharpest increase in prices since the 1990s the Biden administration is looking to convince Americans it's more than $1 trillion infrastructure improvement plan can help fix some of the problems by paid a visit to the port of Baltimore today to emphasize how federal support can strengthen the global supply chain The Department of Housing urban developments announced $74 million in American rescue plan funds for tribal communities more from Paris Laura Walmsley The block grants will provide funding to 68 tribal communities for infrastructure projects including new housing septic systems and health clinics This pandemic kind of brought out the fact that our infrastructure is sort of lacking especially when it comes to broadband and those issues there for our children That's Joseph rupnik chairperson of the Prairie band potawatomi which will receive a $1 million to expand high-speed Internet on its reservation Hud says the funds will help tribal leaders protect the health and safety of their communities particularly for low and moderate income people Laurel wisely and PR news Washington And Wall Street the Dow was down 240 points the NASDAQ plunged 263 points today You're listening to NPR From W ABE news in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim burris It's 5 O four The city of Atlanta is signing on to an international pledge to phase out gas powered car sales in the coming decades Molly Samuel reports the declaration comes out of the international climate change talks happening now in Glasgow The citizen states that signed the pledge say they'll work towards converting their fleets to zero emission vehicles by 2035 and put other policies in place to help encourage the growth of a mission free transportation Atlanta is one of a handful of American cities that signed on The United States itself did not More than 30 other countries are participating in it Automakers that joined include Ford GM.

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And that she and really all NPR reporters all the reporters here at W ABE they share this ability and need to ask tough questions These are questions that matter that elicit answers that really guide us in our decisions not just on voting but on daily life think about the pandemic and how important being pressed were health officials How important that kind of element was to getting the truth out And that is what you get when you become a member of W ABE And it's really become a member If freedom of the press matters to you then W ABE matters to you Consider a monthly donation to W ABE It's really the best way to support us and here's the reason you don't give it as a lump sum but a little bit consistently from month to month And yes you can change it at any time Also for most listeners we found that $10 a month seems to be about the most comfortable giving level But you can give what you can afford Please know that we really do depend on you especially now this afternoon as we're trying to make our $20,000 goal here during all things considered 84% of all of our funding UWB comes from the Atlanta community that includes listeners like you 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 and thank you That's right and when you decide to give it $20 a month right now that $20 a month becomes $40 a month thanks to our very generous cornerstone society members but only if we reach that $20,000 Mark that's why we are really really asking for your help this happened in 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 work slash donate Thank you This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Sarah mccammond And I'm already Shapiro 17 people from a Christian aid mission who were abducted in Haiti over the weekend are still missing They were with an organization called Christian aid ministries based in Ohio and because Laurel Walmsley is following the situation hi Laurel Hi Ari What's the latest on this abduction Well a gang called 400 mouse has claimed responsibility for the kidnapping and is reportedly asking for a ransom of $1 million per person The U.S. and Haitian governments are working to free them as is Christian aid ministries I should mention that this group's abduction is far from the only kidnapping that's happened in Haiti where there's been a huge spike in kidnappings recently mostly a patient people There have been a 119 kidnappings just in the first half of October according to the local nonprofit center of analysis and research of human rights And can you tell us anything about the specific people who were kidnapped Well the group includes 6 men 6 women and 5 children The kids range in age from 15 at the oldest to just 8 months old at the youngest Their Haitian driver was also abducted 16 of them are U.S. citizens and one is Canadian They were reportedly all traveling in one van returning from visiting an orphanage outside Port-au-Prince According to the Detroit news 5 are members of one family from western Michigan a mother and her four children that arrived in Haiti ten days ago The father was apparently back at the mission's home base in Haiti It's possible that the group is a mix of people visiting short term from the United States along with long-term staff members who live in Haiti And what more can you tell us about the group Christian aid ministries that sponsored these people Christian administrators it's a relief and development organization It was founded in 1981 in Holmes county Ohio and that's an area with one of the largest communities of Amish and conservative Mennonites Christian aid ministries is one of the main service organizations connected to these communities And they're pretty big The organization had a revenue of a $132 million last year They do a range of both domestic and international projects And the group has actually been in the news before Two years ago one of its former employees was convicted of sexually abusing two boys in Ohio and that employee allegedly admitted to abusing many boys in Haiti over a 15 year period So what is this organization doing in Haiti They have a long history there They have been doing work in Haiti since the late 1980s I spoke with Steve null who is a Professor of history and anabaptist studies at Elizabethtown college And here's what he told me about their work there They've done a number of things through the years including support and sponsorship of orphanages have a microfinance program They distribute what are called the school kits which are collections of school supplies that are provided free to schoolchildren They also supply medicines and distribute Christian literature And recently they've been doing rebuilding projects after the earthquake they're in August And this is just one of many similar organizations doing this kind of work in Haiti Definitely It's the poorest country in the western hemisphere So there's a lot of need And it's also really close to the United States So it's an easy place to travel to even if the conditions there make it an increasingly difficult place to work We spoke with Karen richman a cultural anthropologist at the university of Notre-Dame who's done a lot of work in Haiti She said she doesn't know the exact number of missions in the U.S. from the U.S. in Haiti but it's a lot Haiti has a reputation of being one of the most missionized countries in the world She says many missionaries live there for a long time and established schools and clinics And what's next in the effort to get back these kidnapped folks In an update this afternoon Christian aid ministry says it's holding a day of fasting and prayer tomorrow inviting people to pray for the kidnapping victims the government's working for their release and for the kidnappers themselves That's been something interesting that Christian administration has stressed throughout Prayers for the kidnappers It's a reflection of the group's religious tradition of nonviolence and peacemaking Ten years Laura Walmsley thanks a.

Haiti NPR news Sarah mccammond Christian aid ministries Laurel Walmsley Laurel Hi Ari local nonprofit center of anal U.S. Ohio NPR ABE Shapiro Steve null
"laura walmsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"For a better tomorrow learn more at code for america dot org live from npr news in washington. I'm jack speer. President biden was promoting his climate agenda with a trip to colorado today including outlining the costs of continued inactivity appears asthma holidays traveling with the president and follow this report from air force one. The president repeated his concerns that climate change is a code red situation. He pointed out that in the last few weeks his seen destruction firsthand from extreme weather in louisiana new york and california part of a pattern of extreme weather events that have been linked to global warming. Here's the good news. Something that is caused by humans can be solved by humans. The president's remarks came after a tour of the national renewable energy laboratory in colorado action on climate. Change is a key part of the budget. Reconciliation bill in congress democrats have yet to agree on what that bill should include and how much money it should be as mahala npr news solder. Gamble is pledging to have net zero greenhouse gas emissions in less than twenty years cincinnati. Public radio's to lean almond dada says moore proctor and gamble is one of the biggest commercial goods companies in the world. Though ohio-based company says it plans to make changes at every level of operations from its supply chain manufacturing to raw materials it already cut absolute emissions by more than half over the last ten years through energy efficiency and renewable electricity efforts to make a difference. This decade p. and g. says by twenty thirty it helps to reduce emissions across operations by another fifty percents and reduce greenhouse gases generated through its supply chain by forty percents for npr news. I'm julie dot is in cincinnati disturbing portrait of the final weeks of the trump presidency by journalists. Bob woodward and robert. Kosta the washington post today. Reporting on the first excerpts of the book entitled peril including a section where chairman of the joint chiefs of staff mark millions reported to of twice called his counterpart in china to assure him the. Us had no intention of launching an attack or suddenly going to war amid concerns about trump's mental state senior defense department official confirmed the account. Some republicans have called for millie to step down government. Relief payments had millions of americans out of poverty last year. That's according to new data and laura walmsley as more last year the rumour than thirty seven million people living in poverty in the united states the official poverty rate went up last year by one percentage point after five straight years of declines but by a different measure taking into account government benefits and emergency covert relief payments. The sheriff people in poverty actually dropped last year by two point. Six percentage points the takeaway says the bureau is that the social safety net prevented millions of people from falling into poverty. Data also showed that nearly nine percent of americans didn't have health insurance at any point last year laurel wamsley. Npr news washington day on wall street. The dow dropped two hundred ninety. Two points the nasdaq fell sixty seven points. The s&p was down twenty five points today. This is npr. Notwithstanding the damage to air travel caused by the corona virus pandemic airplane builder. Boeing says it is upbeat about future demand for airplanes boeing announcing today it expects the aerospace market it'd be worth upwards of nine trillion dollars over the next decade that includes planes for airlines and military uses as well as other aerospace products and services accord in china is ruled against a woman in a sexual harassment case that has been seen as a bellwether for china's struggling metoo movement as npr's john roy which explains the court said. The charges did not meet the burden of proof josiah show and launched her case in two thousand eighteen for years after she says she was sexually harassed while interning state broadcaster. Cctv joe has come to personify china's metoo movement the person she accused a male anchor named jujan denied the allegations. He also sued joe for defamation. Complicating her years long legal battle now. According beijing has thrown out or case saying the evidence didn't stack up the ruling was yet another blow for the metoo movement in china. Which has fizzled under pressure and censorship from the authorities last week a court dropped a sexual assault case against a former employee of the e. Commerce company alibaba john rich. Npr news sequoia national park amid a threat to its namesake. giant trees posed by wildfires. Burning nearby is shutting down for the moment. Park officials say two fires were ignited week apparently by lightening of combined now burning in steep and dangerous terrain. Both expires expected move toward the forest park. Spokesperson however says the forest areas not imminently threatened. I'm jack speer. Npr news in washington. This message comes from npr sponsor. Xfinity celebrate historically black colleges and universities with a collection of tv shows movies and more. Just say hp you into your xfinity voice remote visit xfinity dot com slash black experience to learn more..

npr news jack speer President biden almond dada moore proctor Gamble julie dot colorado mark millions cincinnati laura walmsley national renewable energy labo china united states washington laurel wamsley
"laura walmsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"laura walmsley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Depart <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> rob said the british <Speech_Male> government will offer concert <Speech_Male> support the families <Speech_Male> of the dead and said <Speech_Male> the attack on the line. The <Speech_Male> dangers facing those <Silence> still in the country <Speech_Male> then. <Speech_Male> Npr news <SpeakerChange> rob said the british <Speech_Male> government will offer concert <Speech_Male> support the families <Speech_Male> of the dead and said <Speech_Male> the attack on the line. The <Speech_Male> dangers facing those <Silence> still in the country <Speech_Male> then. <Speech_Male> Npr news <SpeakerChange> on the lamont's <Speech_Female> on the <Speech_Female> hurricane ida <Speech_Female> is gaining <Speech_Female> strength in the warm <Speech_Female> waters of the gulf <Speech_Female> of mexico. <Speech_Female> Npr's <Speech_Female> debbie elliott <Speech_Female> reports. It's <Speech_Female> on a path to strike <Speech_Female> louisiana <Speech_Female> tomorrow as <Speech_Female> a major hurricane. <Speech_Female> Evacuations <Speech_Female> are underway <Speech_Female> in at least five <Speech_Female> south louisiana <Speech_Female> parishes and <Speech_Female> governor john. Bel <Speech_Female> edwards has activated <Speech_Female> the state's national <Speech_Female> guard to <Speech_Female> respond to what's <Speech_Female> forecast to be <Speech_Male> a devastating <Speech_Male> category for <Speech_Male> hurricane. <Speech_Female> Benjamin shot <Speech_Female> with the national weather <Speech_Female> service. In new orleans <Speech_Female> says it will bring <Speech_Female> wind gusts of <Speech_Female> up to one hundred <Speech_Female> and seventy miles <Speech_Female> per hour. Fifteen <Speech_Female> foot storm <Speech_Female> surge and <Speech_Female> nearly two feet <Speech_Male> of rain <SpeakerChange> in some areas. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> will be life <Speech_Music_Male> altering storm <Speech_Music_Male> for those who are <Speech_Music_Male> prepared <Speech_Music_Male> and ready to take <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Music_Male> i'd is. Go throw <SpeakerChange> at us <Speech_Male> later this <Speech_Female> weekend. Parts <Speech_Female> of louisiana are still <Speech_Male> recovering from <Speech_Male> a record. Five <Speech_Female> tropical landfalls <Speech_Female> last year. <Speech_Female> Debbie elliott. <Speech_Female> npr news <Speech_Female> ida is <Speech_Female> expected to make landfall <Speech_Female> on the exact <Speech_Female> date when <Speech_Female> hurricane katrina <Speech_Female> struck. Sixteen <Speech_Female> years ago <Speech_Female> devastating. A large <Speech_Female> swath of the gulf coast. <Speech_Female> Katrina <Speech_Female> was a category three <Speech_Female> storm while aita <Speech_Female> is likely <Speech_Female> to be a category <Speech_Female> four. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> This is npr <Silence> news <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> in <Speech_Female> california. The <Speech_Female> lake tahoe visitors <Speech_Female> authority <Speech_Female> is urging people <Speech_Female> not to visit. <Speech_Female> The air. quality <Speech_Female> is terrible <Speech_Female> because of a major wildfire. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The kaldor fire <Speech_Female> has burned more than one <Speech_Female> hundred forty thousand <Speech_Female> acres in <Speech_Female> the sierra nevada. <Speech_Female> It's now only <Speech_Female> about twelve percent <Speech_Female> contained <Speech_Female> after breaking out <Speech_Female> on august fourteenth. <Speech_Female> It's one <Speech_Female> of nearly ninety <Speech_Female> large blazes <Speech_Female> burning in. Us <Speech_Female> mostly in western <Speech_Female> states <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> administration is <Speech_Female> urging state <Speech_Female> and local leaders <Speech_Female> to give tenants <Speech_Female> a chance to apply <Speech_Female> for rental assistance <Speech_Female> before <Speech_Female> evicting them. western <Speech_Female> states <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> administration is <Speech_Female> urging state <Speech_Female> and local leaders <Speech_Female> to give tenants <Speech_Female> a chance to apply <Speech_Female> for rental assistance <Speech_Female> before <Speech_Female> evicting them. <Speech_Female> As npr's <Speech_Female> laura walmsley reports <Speech_Female> the move <Speech_Female> follows the supreme <Speech_Female> court's decision <Speech_Female> to block <Speech_Female> continuation of <Speech_Female> the cdc's <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> temporary addiction. <Speech_Female> Been in a <Speech_Female> letter. Cabinet officials <Speech_Female> call on governors <Speech_Female> mayors county executives <Speech_Female> and court administrators <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> take action to prevent <Speech_Female> what they call unnecessary <Speech_Female> evictions <Speech_Female> among <Speech_Female> their recommendations <Speech_Female> are local pauses <Speech_Female> on evictions <Speech_Female> and requiring landlords <Speech_Female> to apply for <Speech_Female> emergency rental assistance <Speech_Female> before <Speech_Female> they file addictions <Speech_Female> tenant advocates <Speech_Female> say. The message is a <Speech_Female> powerful nudge. Too many <Speech_Female> states and counties <Speech_Female> addictions <Speech_Female> are handled at the state <Speech_Female> and local level <Speech_Female> twenty. Five billion dollars <Speech_Female> is available in <Speech_Female> federal rental assistance <Speech_Female> but in many <Speech_Female> places that money <Speech_Female> has been slow to reach the <Speech_Female> renters and property <Speech_Female> owners who are <Speech_Female> counting on it <Speech_Female> laurel wamsley. <Speech_Female> Npr news washington <Speech_Female> spacex <Speech_Female> will try again <Speech_Female> tomorrow to launch <Speech_Female> a falcon nine <Speech_Female> rocket and send <Speech_Female> a dragon capsule <Speech_Female> to the international <Speech_Female> space station. <Speech_Female> The weather didn't cooperate. <Speech_Female> This morning <Speech_Female> is to deliver <Speech_Female> some forty eight <Speech_Female> hundred pounds of <Speech_Female> supplies <Speech_Female> as well as fresh <Speech_Female> food for the crew. I'm nora raum npr news.

Man tried 6 times for same murders released on bond

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Man tried 6 times for same murders released on bond

"Mississippi judge has granted bail to a man who has been tried for the same crime six times as NPR's Laura Walmsley reports. The Supreme Court overturned his most recent conviction after finding evidence of racial bias. Curtis Curtis Flowers is free on two hundred and fifty thousand dollars bond after twenty two years in state custody. He's been tried six times in Winona Mississippi where he was accused of the murder of four people at a furniture store in the nineteen ninety S. Four convictions were overturned for prosecutorial misconduct. And the other. Two trials ended in deadlock in June the Supreme Court reverse the two thousand ten conviction that put flowers on death row. Finding the District Attorney Doug Evans had shown racial bias in blocking black jurors during jury selection the N. W. ACP and four black residents of Devon's district have filed a lawsuit against the prosecutor arguing that he has systematically prevented African Americans from serving on juries prosecutors have not said whether they intend to try flowers for seventh time

Curtis Curtis Flowers Supreme Court Mississippi Laura Walmsley Winona Mississippi Doug Evans NPR N. W. Acp Prosecutor Murder Devon Fifty Thousand Dollars Twenty Two Years