17 Burst results for "Laura Owens"

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

02:24 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Think it's it's more relatable. Well i wonder with my final question. Which is how we finish. All over interviews at the mistake will create a. What do you think it is that makes somebody or something unmistakable. I think it's not being afraid to show your scars. I think that that's something. We are all really struggling with. I think that the pandemic has made us all rethink the fact that we need to show appreciation for our fellow mankind here but i think that we need to remove the stigma of victims being we. We still have at the black lives matter movement victims. Don't have something wrong with them. The shame shame needs to be thinking to run a brown and everything. I i learned from listening to her for so many years. We just need to remove the shame we need to be proud of who we are and encourage each other to be the best versions of ourselves that we can while also being genuine. and that's what makes somebody unmistakable. amazing. I can't thank you for taking the time to join us and share your wisdom and insight slow listeners. Where can people find out more about you. You're working you're up to Well thank you so much. It's been such an honor to talk with you as somebody who's been a longtime listener and you guys can find out more about the show that is host with my mom. Nobody told me at nobody told me. Show dot com and you can check out my personal instagram. Which is laura m owens and yeah you can keep up with us on every platform very active awesome and for everybody listening. Well the show with that. Thank you for listening to this episode of the unmistakable creative podcast while you're listening for there any moments you've found fascinating inspiring instructive. Maybe even heartwarming. Can you think of anyone a friend or a family member who would appreciate this moment. If so take a second and share. Today's episode without one person because good ideas and messages are meant to be shared..

laura m owens instagram Today one person dot com years
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

06:08 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Between you guys. I would say. I'm i'm gonna say what has bothered me and that all be to listen to gas exactly. She has her own side to Really should my mom is with responding to reach and really doing things that quite frankly. I don't have the attention to do. I have. adhd and i'll be somebody who will reach out and then i'll get a response but then when it comes to booking times everything i get overwhelmed and i don't follow throws much into. She's great with that. But then all get angry with her. If i feel like i'm spending too much time editing show or working on social media because that's something she doesn't do now So so it really just has to do with the role division and again i would say it's more on my end by mom has so much patients and she is such a veteran in broadcasting and has won all these awards and everything that i really can't get mad at her for anything she does wrong because she's so much more experience than me but you know it's a mother daughter thing i mean i i have to try as the daughter right. I get on your skin a little bit. So i have to ask as the daughter of somebody who has won all these awards. Do you ever feel it moments. You're kind of living in a shadow. I have and i certainly felt that with my dad too because his career has been more relevant in my life. My mom Quit her job to be a stay at home. When i was six so a lot of the stuff that she won she. I wasn't really aware of at the time whereas with my dad. You know. I've gone to a lot of these. These events that my dad's been getting a awards at and so i i do feel like to an extent. There's there's been that on especially being the daughter of both of them. I get that all the time from people at the station with my dad that i don't really feel like i have my own identity necessarily. It's i'm runnin. John's daughter and that's been. That's been something that i think has motivated me more than anything to try and create my own path. And say hey. I'm not doing this in just because my parents have been successful in radio broadcasting. Before that. What i'm doing is really unique to how i feel about the world in how i feel like invest contribute to people so i think with more shows that we've done now were close to three hundred a starting to feel a lot more comfortable in my own skin and have a lot more belief in myself so you mentioned a sister earlier. There's no way. I wanted to get out of this conversation with asking about her. Like what role does she play in all of this anything or she. Just listen and watch you guys from the sidelines. She is the best we've had her on a couple of times. And she's absolutely my confidante and she's really into two motivational videos and books as well and she's amazing. She has a huge job advertising but on the side. She's also trying to become a personal trainer just because she really wants to help people with their appearance in looking better means you feel about her on the on the inside so she has the same basic message. She just conveys at a different way But she has said many times that she thinks it would be very difficult to to work. the three of us together. We thought at the beginning. You great to have all of us do it. I don't think she could do it. She doesn't have experience working with my mom in the same capacity for for so many years But you know she's she's just wonderful. She's she has helped me so much through the issues that i've had with my relationship With my abusive relationship relationships afterwards has helped me become somebody who feels like they can help other people so it really is mary much due to her. So two final questions i want. What role has the have the people that you've gotten to speak to played in your own healing. Because i can honestly tell you i'm a very different person after starting the show then i was When i did and you know like it definitely changed values to change the way. I thought about the world so i wonder in what ways your own creative work changed you and helped in this past healing our show was started on the basis of trying to figure out how people got through tough times so i think that i've been really helped by just realizing that successful people had struggles since on the surface. It seems like they've just been successful. They haven't gone through anything. And so to see people display themselves warts and all has really me become Somebody who has a better understanding of people and it's interesting that you say you're you're not the same person as you were before because i feel i feel that same way that just having in-depth conversations where people really bare their soul gets you to know just the world who we are and that people have so much more good to them than we give them credit for and i think it's really easy when you've had a negative experience with a person doesn't have to be an abusive relationship like i had. I mean it could be bad upbringing or depression or something. It's it's really refreshing to be able to hear a podcast where you're hearing people talk more than just in a two minute interview and they come off as real. I.

John two minute both six three two final questions three hundred two motivational
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:35 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"You been through something. That's made them passionate about wanting to share their message with other people but just because they have a good message and they've had an interesting past doesn't mean that it's yours well. I really appreciate that. Because i think that i jokingly said i was like if i could actually incorporate every piece of advice i've gotten from a podcast guests. I'd be a billionaire. Six pack abs and have women are true about my life. it's czar. I realized at a certain point that. When i was thinking about the people that i interview that i had to take you know what i could from each one and come up with my own recipes using their ingredients and i think that there's so often this tennessee and i see this over and over and over in the world of self development all of that is to treat guidance as gospel where we literally say. Okay this person has authority This person is famous This person has status. What they say suddenly becomes more credible. And i should see that you know absolutely as that i should trust so anytime i hear the words everybody should. I'm like okay right now. This is this is anytime somebody says that. I think you should be skeptical because there's nothing that everybody should do absolutely absolutely and i think that a lot of people do have the tendency to worship these motivational speakers as gods and join extent. I have done that in. Continue to do to some extent with tony robbins. I think the world of him. And i've gone to a bunch of his events but in all the information is super fresh in my mind right after the events and maybe for a couple of months after but then i haven't been to one of his events in a year and a half at this point and i feel like what i learned and how strong i felt after has has largely dissipated. And that's been really disappointing for me. trying to relive what i experienced his conference. How's it doesn't help to just watch these videos online of what happens at the conference or to try to watch. I am not your guru on debt flakes. You can't really relive the moment and somebody like tony robbins. That's not the answer. It's not just one person. That's the answer i mean. I think he has a lot of great advice. And i do watch him more than just about anybody else but at the same time. He's not god and you're right. We worship these people unfairly in a lot of ways. I think that we overlook the fact that they have character flaws and this way had asked you as somebody who is a victim of abuse in a relationship. When you see somebody like tony comment on a metoo moment. What do you think about a backlash. Yeah i was there at that conference with that. And i do think that was taken a little bit out of context. I wasn't so struck by what he said in an angry. I know a lot of women were. But i think when the video came out and everything I think that women kinda wanted her. Fifteen minutes. I understood what tony was saying that it discredits a lot of people who really have been victims by everybody coming forward and saying that they were metoo If they really weren't and stay like okay somebody who had a their boss said that they look good in address or something like that to say that to the extent of what i experienced you know being suffocated and attempted drowning. And everything i it's not the same. And so that's where. I think tony's point was also that having a victim mentality is not beneficial to have all the time i actually learned that from him and and to the extent bit. You don't have the have to have that happen. I think it's good. I don't think the victim mentality helps people. Well it's funny because you reminded me of a conversation. I had with a dating coach that i worked with the nick notice. Who's also been a guest here and remember at at the time we had him like this was all starting to basically become very very prominent in the media and his clients said the illegi literally was having trouble because his clients were terrified even to kiss somebody on a date because they were so afraid and the reality is he said if there's no initiation he's like you're not going to have relationships form without some semblance of intimacy and That really always stayed with me Because even made me think back to like bad dates where. I'm like many of my male friends like. Oh we've questioned our own behavior in certain moments like damn. Was that a moment in which could have been accused of something right and something. That's made humanity so beautiful has been the fact that intimacy comes naturally. Maybe it doesn't right now with cova and everything and everybody keeping their distance and and that's fine but in the past it's been really nice to spontaneously be able to touch someone on the shoulder. Give somebody a hug and not question yourself. And i think that's been really the shame of the metoo movement and more guys like you and your friends in the moments that really shouldn't be over thought have had become over thought and it shouldn't be that way and i think some of the best moments that i don't know that i've had even in my horseback riding relationship with my instructors have been when they put their arm around me or they put their hand on my knee. When i'm on the horse about to go in and it's it's been moments that now somebody would probably say. Oh my gosh. that's inappropriate but it just made me feel supported. let's is. I want to wrap up. Something more lighthearted You host a podcast with your mom and you mentioned part of what prompted. This journey was the abuse situation. I i have to ask you about the dynamics of hosting podcast with apparent. Because i think i would probably want to shoot myself if i had to hope podcast. We would just be arguing the whole time right right right. Yeah i think. My mom. And i had a lot of experience together because my mom i am just we naturally been closed and she and i have had this whole experience since i was eight years old during the horses together since i was sixteen having a business together so we knew how to work together but i. I have to be honest. It was not my idea the beginning to work with her. I wanted to go and do a show. But i actually tested it out with a couple of male co hosts and then my mom said to me you know. I think this would be a really interesting dynamic. And i've wanted to get back into broadcasting. So so why. Don't we try this. And for the most part it goes well and we have our own roles with the show and we don't really step on each other's toes and we know those but to say that it's like a seamless process would be a complete lie in agree I certainly have times when i get very angry at At her and it's difficult but luckily at the end of the day we bowl have the same goal of just really wanting to bring a message of hope to people and being really on the same page in terms of the the goal. So it ends up working out while the it's not it's not the easiest. I'm not gonna lay off the hook that easily. Wh what are the. What are the things that have caused conflict.

Fifteen minutes sixteen tony one person each one eight years old tony robbins a year and a half one of his events Six pack couple of male co hosts of months piece cova of
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:40 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Said to me. He read my forum and it just sounded like the guy was an ass and offered me a ride home and i was really surprised by that and more than anything i felt really because i thought while if i'm not believed by the cops than i don't i don't have another option. I've done the most extreme thing this is. This is what i thought was betrayal to the guy This was me being vulnerable and nothing. Nothing happened and that really needs to change. Because because you're going to have these victims who are going to be afraid to tell their stories and to be honest about what's going on so they're not gonna come forward and then you're going to have more. Instances of injuries both emotional and physical. I mean there is so much abuse that goes on emotionally in these relationships that i think can be a lot more damaging than the physical abuse and it needs to be something where we don't need to feel. This is something i've really felt is that There's an element of shame to being a domestic violence victim. And not not to get too honest here but this has been something that i've had serious discussions with with my mom about was when i decided to talk about my story to say what happened. She said a will. You're going to have guys who aren't gonna wanna go out with you because they're gonna come with baggage because of this. Well that's exactly what needs to stop. Is people thinking that this is baggage. Why should women be feeling or or men. Men can be victims as well. But why should the victim be feeling like they have this code of shame to wear around because they tried to believe the best in somebody and were taken advantage of. So ask you about how you how you start to heal and trust people what i wonder. Also i'd imagine. This does a huge number on self worth a. How do you begin to recover a sense of self worth when you've gone through something that has been so damaging to your self worth. I think like. I said i watch. I watch a lot of ted talks. I listen to you a lot of podcasts. I don't have the answer for that yet. I do gratitude journaling. I i just think a lot of the healing process for this has to do with coming in contact with people who you can trust and who have your best interests at heart. Just realizing they're more of those than there are who are extreme abusers and it's an everyday struggle. I know this. Because i've talked to other victims in every day struggle to try to move on from what happened and i don't think there such a thing as moving on completely and i don't know if there really should be because it's such it's such a part of you and i think it's given me a sense of empathy for people that i wouldn't have otherwise. Yeah so this is. This might be an odd question. But what do you think men who are just average guys like me not abused anybody and have no intention misunderstand just based on what we see a news and what misperceptions about domestic abuse teasing the media creates i think that this. I'm going to answer this based on what i thought happened in domestic violence situations. I always thought that the woman was week on. And i. I know that's what men think as well as the woman was weak and people always ask the question. Why didn't she leave. So i think that you have these guys who are wondering. While if she's not damaged in some sort of way why would she put up with that or is she a liar. Did it really happen. Because she shouldn't have stayed if it went to if it was as bad as she said it was. And i think you have guys who just think that the are going to carry the weight of this for the rest of their lives and in wanna be a victim or in my case. Wanna be an advocate for victims and be very passionate about it. And i think in a lot of ways men wanna show their friends their family that they're with this perfect girl who doesn't have a past even though the past is what adds a sense of depth and wisdom character So this is a question. So i think that for me. It's funny because we're talking about self-improvement. Listen to podcasts. And i just published this piece on medium titled a skeptics guide to a good life and then literally came from a conversation. I had with a friend who described unmistakable creative as a skeptics guide to a good life because i don't just want to take things at face value and and let people spout inspiring bullshit Without anything to back it up. But i think self-improvement is one of those things that we resort to and sometimes to a point where it becomes sort of just an obsession in and of itself. That doesn't lead anywhere so one. I'm curious to hear what you have to say about that. But another question around this. Is you know some people. Let their past inform their future. Other people let it define the future. Why do you think that happens when what do you think is the difference between those two people. Yeah i want to answer that question. I i had thought about it. i think that the difference between informing defining is what you're you decide to do about it and it doesn't have to deal with. Was the abuse worst for the person who allows it to define them versus the one who allows. It allows their pass to inform their future. I think that it has to be a really conscious decision in one that involves so much bravery to say. I'm not going to let my abusive relationship. Be the rest of my life. Rather i'm going to let it inform me so i don't have. I not just this naive girl. Like i was in the past but at the same time i do understand people better. I have my guard up on you. Learn to trust your gut a little bit more. And i've kinda done both ways myself and i did let it to find my future for for really too long and that wasn't giving me great results into your other point listening to a lot of self-help alive. It wasn't beneficial for me. A lot of it wasn't. I mean i would have just people would make fun of me because i have a constant stream of positive talks than in shows on i mean in my ear. I would be listening on my airpods while i was riding and when i was home i would just have youtube on in the background. Speeches by matthew mcconaughey just all these different things on all the time to try. And just point positivity into my mind. But i think you really need to find one person who resonates with you and really focus on what they have to offer rather than just listening to a ton of people and getting confused because they all really can't each other out the end of the day. Most of 'em deal i mean. Yeah they they all have. Have.

two people youtube matthew mcconaughey one both ways both one person each
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:04 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Held up on the phone or even zoom call in the same way And i think one of the keys to getting out of of a relationship like this is that you need to have somebody around you who notices changes in your behavior make. That was something that was really key for me My parents actually did not know anywhere. Near the extent of the abuse intel. I was out of the relationship. And i had gone to the police. They they had no idea. But i did have a couple of friends who knew and who were able to see that i was becoming Fearful and in in my relationship involves stocking as well and i was really paranoid about where the guy would show up. He was showing up a lot of places. I was at and My personality was changing. So i think that a real way for them to figure it out and i think that another really scary thing that i've thought about with co vid relationship started to take back to that is i've wondered to myself. Stay these women do want to get out and they wanna get help. I don't even know how they would take the first step. because if they're Their partners monitoring their phone. Or if they're reading their text messages you can taxed one of these groups that can try and help you. I feel just so sorry for women who are dealing with us right now and that's one silver lining to being sold to being single. During all of this i guess is that i don't need to worry about that but Yeah yeah i. I think that i knew if my parents were to know the extent of what was going on especially with them. Living in the same city they would like fifteen minutes remain. I thought that they would try to I had this idea that they try me. Try to force me to end the relationship. And i didn't want that so i think that's why i kept it private from them And i still wanted them to think the guy was really a great guy. I don't know why i did though so you. So did you just to clarify. You didn't want to end the relationship or you didn't want them to tell you the relationship. I didn't want them to tell me to end it. But at the same time i was also in that abused mentality of thinking that somehow i had done something wrong in i deserve to be abused and i was desperate to be in this relationship which i i know. That sounds really messed up. But that's where i was So when you come out of something like this how it how do you. How do you heal. But even more importantly how do you begin to trust people enough again to open yourself up to the possibility of something better. Because i'd imagine that you know this probably has done a number like going to date any situation with this sort of your backdrop. It must create challenges that the average person doesn't necessarily have it really does and it's actually been a real. I don't know it's been a real journey for me since then To trust people like you said it's been very difficult. And so what i try and do i have this journal that i keep of just random moments of kindness that i've seen from people to remind myself that people can be really good and they can be who i thought that guy was when i first met him so for example on the day that i decided to leave the relationship and get help from the cops who were another story not very helpful when i decided to seek out help. I found just the absolute best in people from a woman's organization a a women's shelter. Who were so kind and helpful and bay said that there was going to be somebody else for me and this guy was going to be some somebody that i would look back on and say thank god i didn't end up with him and i'm still waiting for that perfect one to to show up some waiting but you know there. There have been at the same time. I've had some relationships. Since then that have been they've certainly been a lot healthier. I think that it's just been hard for me to completely let my guard down. But i know that's i know that's going to happen very soon. I mean i'm i'm working on it. I wanted to go back to what you said about. The police not being helpful. Because i've heard that this is the case in not just abuse situations but numerous situations where law enforcement is effectively useless even though that's their job given sort of what we're seeing in the news with law enforcement i mean having had this experience like what kinds of reforms do you think need to happen. for people not to end up in situations like yours particularly in the case of law enforcement. Because we've got a lot of people who've been law enforcement professionals here and i've also had people who've served time here and the thing that you look at is just how screwed up the legal system is like i remember widow a criminal defense attorney who became chocolate maker and he told me he said people plead guilty to crimes. They didn't commit day long because if they don't they're going to end up with a much longer sentence simply because they can't afford the legal protection Yeah yeah it's it's completely crazy. What is going on. Obviously in today's world and i think for domestic violence victims. It's really sad and my experience opened my eyes up to what actually goes on. When you go and contacts the cops for help on your own as a young girl. I thought it would be one of these things where i would go into the police station and they would be saying. Oh you poor thing. We're going to go and get him and will help you in every way possible and that i would be believed and i had the absolute opposite. Experience i showed up to the police station absolutely a mess. I was in tears I was told. I needed to fill out a form. I was the only person in the police station and there were three people that were working behind the desk. And i'm seeing. These officers are just messing around in the background. And after an hour i finally went up to the front and i said hey you know is somebody gonna come out and talk to me. And they're like oh you know you need to wait. Will i mean what was i waiting for so so finally finally somebody came out and it was some new cop who.

fifteen minutes three people today one silver lining one first first step single intel these couple of friends an hour keys
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:20 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Connect with people in your life. That's really interesting. And i've actually never thought about it that way but i think it's made me a better listener I also have a real passion for rescuing senior dogs. Who gosh you wish you could understand. What their story was before they came to you especially since so many of them were abused but yet does make you a better listener in. I think you have a curiosity about what happened to you. And why did you become the way you were. And you're never going to hear the answer but it's interesting to try and figure it out on your own so Walk me through sort of the trajectory of sort of that first spark of you know falling in love with broadcast journalism to what you're doing today like a was the past two getting here. I really would not have had any interest in doing podcast of my own. Were it not for inexperienced. I had in an abusive relationship. That made me really. Try to figure out who i was as a person. And have this obsession with trying to become a better person. And i turned to all these podcasts and books on self help self improvement and entrepreneurship books. I mean just trying to figure out how to be a more successful unhappy person and it was from becoming obsessed with those things that i decided. I wanted to figure out how i could put my own. Take on it and help other people Figure out how to get out a similar situations. I want to go deeper into this. So one a wonder how your parents relationship influenced your relationship choices and i know when you wrote in this. A lot of people are often in abusive situations without even realizing it. How do we get. How do you find yourself in such a situation like that because you don't seem like a likely person to end up in an abusive relationship. I don't and i've gotten this question a lot. And it's very difficult to answer because i don't know the answer myself. I can only speculate as to why. I think that i've always been somebody who has tried to see the best in people and has been very innocent and a lot of ways in terms of just thinking that people will do the right thing and if you treat somebody well that they're going to treat you well back In the situation that i was in with my relationship. Things just seem to happen. Slowly things seem to change slowly. I became abused slowly. And so when you look at it day to day. It didn't seem like there was a very big change. But when i look back at it i see how crazy it really was and i wonder how did it go from this great relationship or or so. I thought to something that ended up being almost deadly. You know you. You really can't get the answer to that. It's just so frustrating to try and even think about it so let's talk about mobile plans for a minute because honestly we can't live without them and there's nothing as annoying as yelling. Can you hear me to someone on the other end of the phone or refreshing your phone to listen to the latest episode of the unmistakable creative only to discover that it isn't there if you're anything like me you want the best coverage fastest data speeds without spending a fortune or without getting locked into a contractor promising. Your first born just to get a new phone. Reach mobile offers the best mobile network at a fair place plus amazing customer service convenience and no contract so switching providers is usually a pain but switching to reach a simple. You just order you. Welcome kit an activate and minutes from home you can even bringer lock phone and keep your number and twenty four seven. Customer support team is friendly helpful and uses common sense. They actually pick up the phone when you call them. It's no wonder they have four point. Eight out of five stars trust pilot when it comes to lower your cell phone bill. Reach mobile's best fit feature is a game changer. Don't stress about which plan to choose us less data one month they'll discount your bill automatically to the plan you actually used. That's money going back into your pocket. Not theirs and customers can save an extra three hundred dollars per year reach mobile. Brings you the best mobile network with no contract. No sketchy pulses and no fine print. So if you're ready for better mobile service head to reach mobile dot com and use the code creative to save forty five dollars during the first three months. Seth godin wants. Describe the internet as a fountain of knowledge and you have so many opportunities to give yourself education to kick the crap out of the school if you wanna satisfy your thirst for knowledge one way skill share and they have classes on just about everything former unmistakable creative guest andy. Pizza has class called. Find your style five ways to unlock your identity. Another awesome classes. Creativity unleashed discover share. And hone your voice. Online skill shares an online learning community that offers membership with meeting with so much explore real projects to create and support a fellow creatives skill. Shirt empowers you to -ccomplish real growth. So you could spend hours each day. Scrolling through social media or start making progress towards your creative goals with skill. Share and skill shares also incredibly affordable especially when compared to a lot of those pricey in person classes and workshops an annual subscription is less than ten dollars a month explore your creativity at skill share dot com slash create and get a free trial of their premium membership. Again that's skullshaver dot com slash create. So you've heard from so many of our podcast guests about how stress sleep in recovery impact your ability to perform at your best every day about a month ago. I started using new calm. And i'm always amazed by how refresh feel after twenty minute session with newcomb. I'm only reenergized but able to focus more and do more creative work after a really bad native sleep or on those days when i just can't get into the zone it's like a twenty minute power nap. The system uses cutting edge neuroscience and consists of three non invasive and non pharmaceutical items. All of which are included in your monthly subscription that actually costs less than a daily cup of coffee. The whole process is easy us into work into your daily routine to achieve better sleep reduce stress and boost recovery. If you wanna see some serious improvements in your performance do what. I did own the day with newcomb. We have a special link set up specifically for our listeners. Go to creative news dot com and get fifty percent off your thirty day. Subscription of newcomb and their money back guarantee that's creative and you see a l. dot com again creative and uc l. dot com. Yeah i guess is how do you even get out of the situation like that. I mean outside of ending the russian. Because i know there are people you know what i have heard. Even in covid like abusive relationships are really really struggling because allies. People don't even have anywhere to go because of the current situation where n and also you know. What role did your parents play in helping you get out of this. Yeah that's what's really sad is with covid right now. I've been really interested in hearing about how many women are struggling even more because now there with their abuser all time and if they had friends who were may be looking out for them and could see how their body language was and how they were reacting in person they can't.

fifty percent five stars twenty minute Seth godin three hundred dollars forty five dollars first three months one month first today Eight less than ten dollars a month thirty day five ways a month ago each day uc russian about less than a daily cup of coffe
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:57 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"San francisco on and showed up with three pages of single-spaced questions for this guest for half an hour interview it was it was crazy and i went into the room and i'm setting everything up to do the interview and my dad comes in and i was like. Hey what advice would you like. Do you wanna see. What i wrote is okay. And he looks at my papers and he or them up in front of me and he's like now. You're ready to go. I i cried at the time i was like. Oh my god what did you just do. What did you just do. And that was very extreme. What he did. And i definitely wouldn't thank him for that. But at the same time. I think about that example. All the time to remind me that i don't need to rely on what is written and that i pretty much have the answers on how the questions. Because i've done my research and i don't need to rely on a piece of paper but i also learned so much from my mom about how to do the engineering for the show and my dad at this point still doesn't know the first thing about that. After that many years in the industry he wouldn't he wouldn't have a clue how to just volumes or even press play and records so. I'm lucky that my mom knew all about so. I have to ask about the kind of chemistry that happens on air with two people so much so that they end up getting married like what in the world led to that. I hear different versions of this story all the time. They actually didn't have a show together. They worked opposite on the radio station with my mom working morning drive and my dad worked nights so i think they would just kinda pass each other and apparently they were the only two somewhat young people at the station like i mentioned. My mom was eighteen when she started. And i know she was nineteen when she met my dad. And my dad was thirty I guess they just had some sort of chemistry in the same sense of humor that drew will that drew them to each other and they didn't date for the first year. I believe they were just good friends. And then one thing led to another and Yeah they got married. They had two kids and even now you can see that they still have that banter back and forth and Just kind of a spark that is unique. So what do you think it is. That makes that kind of a spark last for so long curious because this is subject that i've researched endlessly and i'm still single so this is just out of personal curiosity. I was gonna say. I don't know if i'm the right person to ask this. I've been trying to figure that out myself as well. I think that what they have going that so many people are lacking is that they have one thing is a shared history at this point which i think makes a big difference and i know we all can't start with that so maybe that's not the answer you're looking for but they do. Have that sense of humor. Which the older. I've gotten the more i've realized how important of a factor that is and i think they have very similar values and morals their different religions and in a lot of ways i would say they're opposites but they have at their core. They're very similar And i see every day that they wanna make each other better they wanna make sure the other ones informed they talk about her events all the time and try and stay relevant an i. It's it's beautiful to see something like that that has lasted so long So i wanna come back to that. But i have to ask about this love affair that you have with horses That seems like a very strange backdrop for everything else going on here particularly in the heart of silicon valley. Where you grow up. Isn't it just the weirdest thing. And it's even weirder. Because i grew up in san francisco proper. So i grew up. Yeah yeah The last place you would ever think that people would ride horses and there was one stable in the city that i went to a summer camp out when i was eight years old. And my love for horses just started. Then i was the most fearful rider you could ever imagine like. I don't think. I got on the horse for the first year but for some reason i was just determined to learn how to do this. And that all my time researching about horses and beat watching videos. And doing everything i could to try to learn how to overcome this fear that i had of writing and try to figure out some way to just figure out how to be with these animals that i so badly wanted to have a relationship with And so as the stable closed i ended up having to drive further and further out to pursue that passion To the point where now. I spend easily two hours a day in the car Going to see the horses every single day on it blossomed into this huge passionate. Became a business that i ronald by mom. In addition to the to the podcast we have a business buying and selling horses and i compete almost every week Even with covid. It's starting to be back to normal a little bit but yeah it's an obsession. It's not even just a passion. It's an obsession. I don't even know what my life would look like without the horses. Okay so the way that you talk about. Horses sounds a lot like the way that i've talked about surfing and snowboarding What is it like what happens when you get on a horse that makes it this way for you or for anybody and italy. What is it like. What are the things that we don't know. Because i mean to me i see horses. I think you know zoro like that's my. My understanding is old movies where people riding horses and you know fighting on serbs and all sorts of crazy shit like that but you obviously have your firsthand experience with. It's what is it that draws people to horses the way that you are drawn to it. What is it the feeling of it. You know when you're on a horse don't even know if i would say that it's something you feel as a whole with every animal that you get on so much as it is learning each horses personality and then realizing they have their quirks and they have their strengths and you get to work together to figure all of that out together and it's really building a partnership with an animal that you can't talk to they they can't talk back and you're trying to figure out how to do things that are crazy together. I jumped horses and so the idea that two different beings and go around and jump a course of jumps setting make it look easy when they really can't communicate is just beautiful and it's amazing every horse is so different And that's really what the challenges for me that after all these years. It's not like you can have it figured out on all horses. He can't even have it figured out on on one. Even my long term partners are still learn so much about them all the time but there. There's just fascinating and they're really unique On the ground to when you're just hanging around them they're really funny My family's had the same pony. This is like a pet is not an investment that i've had since i was a little girl and she's hilarious. She's still makes me laugh every day. So this is a weird question but you take the ability to communicate with an animal who can't talk back. I wonder how that influences your ability to communicate and.

san francisco two kids thirty half an hour eighteen nineteen two people first year italy three pages first thing one stable each horses eight years old two hours a day silicon valley single day San francisco two different beings single
"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

07:37 min | Last month

"laura owens" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"It was some new cop who said to me he read my form and it just sounded like the guy was an ass and offered me a ride home and i was really surprised by that and more than anything. I felt really hopeless. Because i thought well if i'm not believed by the cops than i don't i don't have another option. I've done the most extreme thing this is. This is what i thought was betrayal to the guy. This was me being vulnerable and nothing. Nothing happened and that really needs to change. Because because you're going to have these victims who are going to be afraid to tell their stories and to be honest about what's going on so they're not gonna come forward and then you're going to have more. Instances of injuries both emotional and physical. I mean there is so much abuse that goes on emotionally in these relationships that i think can be a lot more damaging than the physical abuse. I'm srini route. And this is the unmistakable creative podcasts where you get a window into the stories and insights of the most innovative and creative minds who started movements built driving businesses be written bestselling books and created insanely interesting for more check out our five hundred episode archive unmistakable. Creative dot com. This episode is brought to you by nourished by nature made the number one pharmacist recommended vitamin supplement brand nourishes a personalized vitamin regimen customized. To you backed by forty five years of science they removed the guesswork from your vitamin regimen with thousands of happy customers nourishes. A trusted supplement brands by many visit. Nourish dot com. Create your customized package today. Laura chris thanks so for taking the time to join us. Thank you so much for having me on today. I am thrilled to be here. It is my pleasure to have you here. So as i was saying before he hit record. Founded about your work because you wrote in but As always with jessica pick. There's some method to this madness which is only my curiosity and you know i read your about page. I think two things really struck me one. Is that you actually host a podcast through the moment that you have this immense love for horses and i'm always obsessed with people who are either good or obsessed with unusual things But before we get into all of that. I want us to rescue. What did your parents do for work. and how did that end up influence in shaping what you've ended up doing with your life in your grew it's been a pretty direct correlation so my parents actually met when they were talk. Show hosts at the radio station My dad's been at the same station now for more than fifty years in my mom started working there when she was eighteen so they met they fell in love they continued hosting radio shows and somewhere along the way i caught the bug and i was trying to resist for so long but couldn't do it. How old were you when that happened. When i first started to get into broadcasting myself i would always go on my dad's chauffeur take your daughter to work day from the time i was maybe six on and i would go on there with my sister. She would do vast majority of the talking because i was painfully shy. But i got interested in doing a show of my own actually just a few years ago maybe within the last four or five years so while you're going up anybody who does a creative career knows that it's fraught with uncertainty no guarantees. Did your parents actually encourage this or did they suggest something more practical and for your dad who have had the same job working at the same radio station for fifty years that to me is somebody who has committed to craft in a way that so few people are because i mean fifty years nowadays is a lifetime. I mean you know. I always come back to what semel said in his startup school where he said you know founders go into startups thinking that they're going to basically company An exit in three to four years and go count their cash on a beach somewhere. Somebody said the reality is a long term view as your greatest competitive advantage and he defined a long term view as ten years. And your dad has at a fifty year career. That's crazy in one field. And i think i grew up feeling like that was normal. That's what's so. Crazy is now that i've gotten to be older. And i grew up in the hub of the dot com world and silicon valley. And i realized how crazy dot is that most of my friends are with companies for a couple of years or like you said for the most ten years but my dad's had this incredibly long career in the same field for the still same radio station and that's not normal and that something that is definitely commendable. So the older. I get the more i appreciate that But but you know. I don't think that they really pushed me. One way. Or the other into broadcasting. You would think that they would have pushed me towards it that that would have been my guess just because both of them did it But they didn't necessarily do that. I think they wanted me to be a more outgoing person. And i think they thought in the sense that trying to be on the radio or do some sort of broadcasting would be a way for me to come out of my shell and i guess eventually was what. What did they teach you. When you're growing up about kraft and commitment and how do your perception of what they taught you change with age. Because i think it's one thing for somebody to tell a kid you know. Hey you know ten thousand hours. Whatever it is and of course you end up with overly ambitious helicopter parents to as a byproduct of that but i wonder you know that same advice with land differently with age rate wonder the things they have taught you about kraft Particularly in the arts and this given philip protesting What are they teach you when you were younger. And how did your perception of that change with age. My parents for as much as they were in the same field and involved in really the same topic of trying to talk about current events had a very different approach to what they did. So i think. I learned the craft in a couple of different ways and at my mom was always really hands on and she was the person who was wanting to do hours and hours of research and write out questions whereas my dad was somebody who enjoyed watching the news and reading online to find out the latest things going on in politics or celebrity gossip and he just kind of have these ideas off the top of his head. He wouldn't write things down. So i got to see two different approaches and it worked well for both of them and then when i decided to get involved in broadcasting in went to both of them to see hey what advice would you have. I found that. I was naturally drawn a lot. More towards my mom's way of thinking because it made me feel like i couldn't get stumped britain down and if i knew everything about a person i would be in a much better situation and that would make me less anxious but when i went to my first interview i was so nervous. I did the interview at my dad's radio station in.

fifty years Laura chris fifty year ten years jessica pick three forty five years six five hundred episode eighteen four years semel more than fifty years first interview two things ten thousand hours first both five years one thing
"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to nobody told me. I'm jan black. And i'm laura owens. It's an honor to welcome our guest elizabeth smart to the show today as you're probably aware in two thousand and two. When she was just fourteen years old. Elizabeth smart was kidnapped at knife point by a pedophile from her home in utah elizabeth endured nine months of being shackled raped starved and threatened by her kidnappers. Brian david mitchell and his wife wanda barzi for she was rescued and reunited with her family. Elizabeth we thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me your first book..

Elizabeth smart laura owens wanda barzi utah
"laura owens" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"laura owens" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

"So important. So what laura is your biggest takeaway chimera experience that you want people to really here. Yeah i think if you've had a past like mine if you've experienced this kind of thing you need to embrace it and embrace the fact that you went through really tough times and you should be commended for being able to overcome that. That is a huge thing in. Maybe you don't get a certificate for it. Maybe at best you walk away with domestic violence restraining order but at the same time how much strength does that take and there is always a way out of a bad situation like that there are domestic violence groups and suicide prevention hotline's podcasts. You know there's always they're always available and you need to utilize them sooner and also one last thing to that. You always have more support than you think you do. And even when you think to yourself okay. It's down to a one person and if this one person doesn't believe me then that's it. I need to stay in this relationship. That's just that's not true and one of my one of my takeaways from this for those of us who are bystanders. Bystander intervention is real. It is critical. And it's not. It's not confrontational. She turned around and yelled at him or done something else. That could very easily escalated situation. Puts you in an even deeper darker places sooner But her outreach to you very quietly very privately dear girlfriend. I'm praying for you whether you are a person of faith or now like her no just resonate so much. And you're able to hang onto that and keep that private and that was your your beacon your light your northstar bystander. Intervention is real and this this person this woman did that in such an amazing. And i think that's such an inspiration for listeners. Who are you know whether you're in an abusive relationship right now or not. Keep that in mind because there are people around us. That need us yeah. I think that if you're somebody who's a friend or a family member you can have that bystander. Impact as well if you're questioning whether or not to say something to a friend or family member who you are a little bit concerned about just just to do it. I hear i'm both of those. I hear you say. Just do it like yeah. Do a sooner for bystanders. Just do it and for those who are in an abusive relationship. Just do it. just get that help. Just tell someone else..

laura
"laura owens" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"laura owens" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

"To. I'm not in an abusive relationship. I'm your host for this episode. I'm dan and i am joined today by a survivor. Who when i heard laura's story i heard it through another interview she shot to us and and there's just so much here so many lessons and so much inspiration and so i was very happy to welcome our guest today. She is a ceo. She is a very successful podcast host. She is someone out in the world who is successful and you might never think that she has something in her background. The so many of us listening might be going through right now but she is also a survivor of domestic abuse. She was in an abusive relationship. And her name. Is laura owens laura. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me today and thank you for having this platform for survivors like need to be able to speak about our stories so that we can try and help people who are in relationships right. Now get out before we did absolutely and and that's such a huge part of your story getting out and so much a part of so many survivors stories. How did that happen. So we'll we'll get to that for sure but you're welcome. I appreciate you reaching out and being a part of the so lord. I wanna learn a little bit about you if you could let listeners know where you where you are today in your life journey your success. 'cause i wanna paint a picture of like i said a minute ago this can be anyone an abuser. Isn't someone who you can just put into a box. So many women and men and people in general convenient abusively but we may never know it so. Let's paint the picture of your success right now. Where where are you today in life laura. Yeah well. I think that i am the woman who is guilty of up until very recently trying to look like. I had it all together on instagram and facebook. When in reality. I had dealt with something that really impacted my life in every way possible and had started to go through this incredibly abusive relationship back in two thousand seventeen and since then i was hiding the truth about who i really was and the pain that i was in So from the time. That i was in the relationship until now when we're talking I was able to start a podcast with my mom that has become very successful called. Nobody told me which largely was started. Because i had these awful experiences with my ex-boyfriend and just had this incredible desire to try to help. Other people get out of their own tough times and to help them through struggles Also during the time. I was in the relationship. I was a big part of a company. I also have with my mom and To other family members who are silent members of it called quartet farms where we buy and sell Show horses we've had. I don't know maybe thirty or forty over the years that have been really successful and singing. Songwriting that's been a big part of my life. Since my early twenties that has in recent years become more of a hobby. But i'm getting back into it. And yeah i mean just just all these things i really am a pretty dynamic person and that was something that i did not embrace when i was in the midst of this relationship because i was told that i was really scattered. Brain just didn't know what i wanted to do. But now i really realize that that's a beautiful thing is to have a lot of interests And try and make those passions into something that resonates with other people and can give back to other people. And it's it's so it's so impactful when you say that you had altogether on social media and that was part of what prompted you..

laura owens ceo instagram facebook
"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

03:48 min | 8 months ago

"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcomed nobody told me I'm Laura Owens. I'm Jan Black. Have you ever found it tough to communicate with others of a different age race, religion, gender or job function? Would you like to close this conversation gap between you and your boss? Coworkers employees, our customers our guest on this episode. Elicit Carpenter has advice on how to do just that Eliza is a workplace communications, expert and the owner. Owner of everything's not okay, and that's okay. where she provides training consulting and speaking services to organizations. She's also the author of how to listen and be heard inclusive conversations at Work Elizabeth. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me..

Laura Owens Jan Black Work Elizabeth Eliza Carpenter
"laura owens" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"laura owens" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"Come i want i want l everyone i want you guys the disclosure secret of how anyone could have just how do you deal windsor west tell me you're secret i think the one thing we did at the start that a lot of people don't do is we started out with thirty episodes we've posted thirty at once so it wasn't like we were gonna post one podcast never do it again mhm mhm yeah somebody somebody in the misdemeanors it was like wow we're gonna be a really brought up a we put up a bunch of up to make it look like hey were in business were serious about it that it yeah i'm gonna let us know we we've we've posted that many so and we had really good people i mean i think because i'd been in the business that i knew a little bit about who to contact and you know everything a really really good piece of advice to people to follow certain types like if you think about it and extrapolation content creation like yeah we missed you wanna create lots of content incorrectly a little bit doesn't it it does not say what you will be consistent right ramsey and also doing a lot of what a what does the opposite that's the first thing right and that's that's what they what were the first thirty when they okay do you look back at those first is they suck all you love the first thirty like i feel like it's a mixed bag i i personally wouldn't go back and listen to the first thirty two i'm scared i like my personal i love see my first year operates on his dad and i loved right now is that right dan is amazing syllabus i chose my purpose and that's and that's what i think we did we we went from people who we knew were good talkers that we could relate to it had been out stories and we were interesting topics we also went into it with this idea that we were going to post shows regularly like it had to be like every shows a week and we want it advertisers from the start question to you is your audience you have like a female yes i want more female kimi of ice oh i want more if you don't have enough female incidents like i think i have this repetitious massages i'm not i am not guys get a sense sent me currently i am like i'm a lover a whatever specter women and i have a daughter who i'm more from anything goes like in our lives and so but i could cause of the movie yeah they you know and and it was a different time back then everyday what i even then i respect you let me just like everything my my mother or night let me just say the tree biased in the movie a real i saw moda like i have multiple fucking hell right now is ours i almost to the murder our problem but anyway but you know i saw motor about a year ago to an end she i did a big event new yorker speaking she came to see me at the raptors as part of the between people in the data.

"laura owens" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"laura owens" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"And i'll just like you know what fuck it i'm done and i took a deep breath now like the compulsion do drugs were lifted from me aj be announced the wolf this year with the world's than the other great podcasts this is a special one i have to own i mean double team there okay mom and daughter combination they're alleging i got jen black who's been by we just i just found out she's like been in either team and she's like like in vipers not one years old i think we hope i hope so if you wasn't we have it and then we have a daughter laura owens who is also austin they do a banana podcast together a it's a it's got like four point nine stars is really popular dealer is the number one self help podcast a for many weeks is it still has been been off and on and off and yet not only as very very popular and they're they're really awesome in may and i think for them it's mostly a labor of love it so that that's very authentic for it's not like you know i'm sure they do well with the financial but it wasn't about that it's more about they they do it because they love doing it and great story to tell and and i also want you know that anytime you wanna ask me any questions i know you guys do interviews so don't think it's just a one way i wanna have a dialogue would you guys and nothing's off limits both ways right right absolutely so i wanna start by saying okay what were you doing it for years old so at four year old ashley what year was in his okay i would have had nineteen sixty okay okay end a i i watched a televised a local kids tv show in albuquerque new mexico where i grew up begged my mother could i be on the show could i be on the show because they had an announcement saying we need more kids for the shows on my mother said yeah okay okay okay in drove me down front audition and i got on the show and so i was on it for i dunno of few months or so and then the show went off the air right but a that what did you do on the show though it was just it was just a kid show would like six kids doing different things we haven't when we were growing up one drama that like do you remember that show wonder i'm rama i know i'm not may not named in east coast it yeah i mean yeah the kids were wave their hands back in for i mean we lived in a different we post your age right so yeah exactly and it was such a such a big thing but i got the bug van and then just really want it to be in tv and radio and got get back into it in a serious way when i was a teenager when there was a real poll 'em a real push for women in broadcasting in the in the seventies because there weren't many and you know there was a real push to get women hired in broadcasting so i thought well let me try it again and what are you living it up again in it was in albuquerque new mexico so it was a smaller market and i think in a lot of ways it was easier to break in because it wasn't new york it wasn't loss angeles it was a smaller market and you could make mistakes see now you could make mistakes in small towns and so so that was it and got into radio and tv their move to san francisco san francisco at right so so now when you came into the picture i thought so don't matter story now right yeah so now okay and you guys you grow up in san francisco right yes born and raised in san francisco my parents met in radio so my dad has been on the radio for forty some years so what is he doing like what's what did he do is on the base zone talk show he has a talk show he's now doing a briefer news commentary 'cause i'd had been seventies now so he's still wants to be on the air but he also wants to kind of retire so.

aj four year one years
"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to nobody told me i'm jan black and i'm laura owens joining us on this episode is carol roth who's a well known advocate for entrepreneurship and small businesses she's the creator of the future file legacy planning system a billion dollar deal maker bestselling author and tv host she's also the author of the bestselling book the entrepreneur acquaintan cheryl thank you so much for joining us it is so pan pastic to be here with both of your merely looking forward to that well we're excited to talk with you and wonder if you could tell us more about your background how you got to where you are today oh goodness well that's a that's a crazy situation i would go back and say that i had no chance to be normal because i was born to mom who had martha stewart cross was share and adad that would have mobster have jewish grandmothers i'm the normal one in the family but there wasn't sort of a lot of neither of my parents graduated from college so i ended up being the first person in my family to go to school and got myself into warton undergrad top business undergraduate program in the country and went to my union electric and father and said you know i'm i'm going to the school and he was like i have no idea how you're paying for it and i watch him through the whole thing when's school got my forty thousand dollars in college debt which today sounds like not a lot but back in nineteen ninety five about the equivalent of one hundred twenty thousand dollars a day and decided i had to pay that up quickly because that is one of the lessons and so i became an investment banker i kind of always felt like there were two options either consultant for the people who like to deep dive into something and investment banking for those who had add and since i clearly had add and i work on twelve deals at one time that was going to be my route but i never really wanted to be the world best investment banker and you kind of did that for the money and the financial stability and to to create that foundation and get a lot of great experience and so over the years just kept trying to figure out what i wanted to do when i grew up never really figured it out but became a collector of periences and so you know from that time from you know now being recovering investment banker 'cause it's sort of a twelve step program that you don't really get out of yeah as you mentioned have done your best selling book i've been a reality tv show judge for our mark burnett reality show that was on tv out have hosted radio i've been a tv contributor i've.

laura owens carol roth investment banker consultant martha stewart mark burnett one hundred twenty thousand do forty thousand dollars billion dollar
"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to. Nobody told me I'm Laura Owens and I'm jam black. Most of us know that gratitude is good and good for us, but many of us find it hard to sustain a meaningful life of gratefulness. So says, Diana Butler bass, who is the award winning author of ten books on American religion. Her latest book is called grateful. The transformative power of giving thanks. She says, gratefulness is not a magic fix, but it might just be the bright star directing us to a new and better place. Diana, thank you so much for joining us today. It's too good to be with you. So you've written a lot of books and we're wondering why you decided to tackle gratitude for your latest one. Well, I got into a certain place with my with my writing career. And most of the things that I had written in the past were about Christian history or theology or trends around spirituality and religion, and all those books were about subjects. I knew well, 'cause I've actually have a PHD in religious studies. And so for fifteen years, I wrote out of a well of knowledge that I that I had well of expertise, and then I got into my late fifties, and I realized I pretty much said everything I wanted to say. Things I already knew, and and I started thinking about the kind of person I want to be over the next two, two and a half, three decades or much time. I get to have left in this lovely place, and I realized I wasn't very good at gratitude. And so for the very first time ever as a writer, I chose to write a book about something I didn't know much about. As a matter of fact, I always struggled with it and it was it's been an entirely different project for me because of that having to learn something from the ground up, getting rid of my own sort of misconceptions, and even my own struggles about what gratitude isn't or is and to try to learn something brand new. Well, in your view, what what is gratitude and what does it mean to be grateful? Well. Would it isn't is the fight that my mom and I had went so often when I was a little girl and that was a fight of a writing. Thank you notes and you know what I had sought. It was for a very long time was an obligation to make sure that you said thank you if you gotta gift and that if you didn't, you were somehow not a very good person. You weren't well mannered, or, you know, you weren't fit for polite company or whatever it was. And, and so that's what it's not. And what I discovered in this process is that gratitude is both and emotion, and it's also something we do about that emotion or from that emotion. And so- gratitude is the feeling that we actually have when we receive something that we believe as a gift. And that's whether it's an actual gift. You know something. Get as a birthday present or present from a friend or your grandparents gave you presents for Christmas, whatever. And and we feel something about that. You know, we go, oh, what is the prize? Or, gosh, this person knows me so well or this is amazing. It's exactly what I wanted, but didn't even know I needed it. And, and so there are these feelings that we get in response to gifts, and that is gratitude. That is a very important part of what it means to be grateful to recognize those feelings and to let those feelings wash over us. 'cause those feelings are positive emotions and they're very, they're good for us, but then there's something further and deeper and that is we can act on those feelings. And so when my mom was trying to teach me how to write thank you notes, it wasn't about the Gatien. It was really, it should have been dealy a. Way of an acting

Diana Butler Laura Owens Gatien writer fifteen years three decades
"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"laura owens" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to. Nobody told me I'm Laura Owens. I'm Jan black just a few years ago. Our guest Daniel Chidi AC was sitting in his bedroom with a blank note pad in front of him and a burning desire to share the lessons he'd learned about shaping your own destiny after hitting rock bottom after thousands of hours of hard work. Daniel turn that blank note pad into an Amazon dot com. Bestselling book called who says, you can't, you do, which is all about helping you create the life of your dreams. Daniel, thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you. I hope you know, we are massive fans of your Instagram and my mom, and I are constantly sending each other little snapshots from your your account, which has its five hundred and one thousand followers now, and you have all these great sayings and quotes and just all this amazing advice and that has most of that is from your book. So what. Would you to write the book? What's your story. Got a couple of days. Well, we take a condensed version. How about that. In a nutshell, I guess the journey. I mean, look, I said, Jenny started when I was born to be on that because I think all of experiences laid off out to a certain point of a loss. But I say that mine time was when I was at university and left school and started komo's degree. I'm not sure if you guys call it. It's like sort of a financial degree. Accounting and finance. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I just thought about its quota, calmness degree here. And I guess I did that from my parents and you know, I 'cause I was lost. Then you know, you need that sort of pace of paper to say that you successful, you need to achieve something like, you know in education was, and it was just never for me. I remember sitting lecturer Monday and there was about three hundred students that and it was a lecturer was talking about he's job and he's career and stuff like that, and it just wasn't for me. I, I decided to pick up my books and that was pretty stupid of me. My what I wanted to do next in my life. But I just knew that I didn't wanna be there. So I left that and just started working for a marketing company. So a little bit lost with what I wanted to do. But I just wanted to do and decided to go to Europe with my brother and we'll in Italy and we kind of clothing brand that we really locked. So they young and stupid never been clothing before the thought of fees. They had a distributed for straight and they didn't say we a lot of money from the Bank and a viable stupid for giving us the money because we had no security at all. I still don't know how we got the money. We must have had a pretty good business plan. I guess we started clothing business and that was running for about two us. And then the J of C show you guys remember the two thousand nine thousand one. Sure. Yeah, yes, that he and old Italy really bad. So all the factories put their prices out some other time. We them over to a straight and distributed them, just going to be whites expensive. So we had to close the shop and stuff meeting and that really my ego, and we didn't that experiment to potty drugs just speak about openly in the book as well. So I guess I didn't really have a sound understanding of who I was and what else to do. And yeah, crush really hot and started lighting at that time. So when I crush and he walked bottom, I really sound myself and started documenting everything. ELS finding all these things that about myself and my mom you starting to alike. And and I said, if people outside crying the things that I'd once lost about, I started to see beauty and sees the would never even take notice before some online really started to wake up and I started to write it down and that's how started. And what was your goal when he started to write this down when you you knew you'd hit rock bottom. You've found some tools to help you climb out of of this whole, but what made you? What was your goal with this writing yet mug? My goal was to teach people what I'm Sam myself. I thought that he fought could come out of what I'd come out to like. I was completely depressed, but I really must use that tag anymore. But people to say it. But you know, my motions really down and and I thought that he could help people get out of that situation and get out of that spot through my writing and what I've limited myself. That was the main intention. So again, I guess you know, that's coming through the rate of, so I sort of captured my wife getting as it was happening. I didn't wait until four or five years later and wanted to cite those little book. So I could use that use that as a plug. It was never locked that I'd never been Rutter in my life. I never thought about this industry is helping the street, and even while his body in the book, people say, all you should listen to. These guys shouldn't to that. And I didn't even talking about just literally outta me four in the morning, wake up in my mind I the time I had another job then to try and pay off the debt that I had and started another business within that time. But yeah, the ninety tension moves just to share what I discovered the

Daniel Chidi AC Italy lecturer Amazon Laura Owens komo Europe Jenny Rutter five years