8 Burst results for "Laura Bridgman"

"laura bridgman" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

08:15 min | 4 months ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

"Will. Listen to the of men and women who transformed their lives using pure passion and cheer hard will to become the pioneers in their field and change the course of history. This is wizards whose biography podcast. The podcast helps you learn the real truth about successful personalities subscribe now to get access to future episodes. The biography of Helen Keller. Helen Keller was born in eighteen eighty in Alabama to Arthur Henry Keller and Catherine Everett Keller. Her father was a newspaper editor and a captain in the confederate army. Her mother was the daughter of a general in the confederate army. Helen Keller had two siblings and two half siblings from her father's earlier marriage contrary to most cases Helen was not born blind and deaf she was healthy when she was born. But when she was nineteen months, old Helen Keller contracted a mysterious illness which left her death and blind it was described by. As an acute congestion of the brain and stomach reports suggested that the disease could have been meningitis or scarlet fever. This illness left Helen completely devastated. She had no idea of what was going on around her as nobody knew how to communicate with her with age Helen learned a few signs the Turk convey her needs to her family. When she was seven years old, she could even identify people using the vibration from their footsteps. The unruly kid. Her parents showed extra care for her because of her disability. Since he was a kid, she used this to her advantage and dot whatever she wanted by throwing temper tantrums she dominated the entire household and terrorize the servants. But her parents did not do anything against it because they did not know how to communicate with her. So they gave into her tantrums instead of teaching her to behave properly. Inability to form sentences. Sentences are the basic building blocks of languages but sentences themselves are made up of different words like nouns, verbs, prepositions, etc. so we can say that learning a language without learning, it's words as impossible. However. Helen did not know about the existence of words. So she did not know that everything around her name and she can refer to an object using its name. For example, she can touch table and know that it is there but she didn't know the table can be called a table. Since. She did not know the existence of words she couldn't form sentences either so she couldn't form proper thoughts insider brain since most of our thoughts are in the form of sentences, this could have intern frustrated or in mater unruly and wild. One Book that changed everything. When she was six years old, her mother was reading American notes written by Charles Dickens. It contained his findings during his six month trip to North America in Charles Dickens had written about a deaf blind girl called Laura Bridgman born fifty years before Helen Keller like Helen. She had also lost her ability to see and hear when she was two years old Charles Dickens mentioned that she was successfully. Educated in the English language reading this Helen's mother became hopeful. She immediately sent Helen and her father to visit an ear nose and throat specialist. He referred Helen to Alexander Graham, Bell who in turn referred her to the Perkins Institute for the Blind, this is the same institute where Laura Bridgman had studied the Perkins Institute for the blind sent an old student called an Sullivan to teach Helen Keller. And Sullivan Like Helen Keller and Sullivan had vision problems when she was five years old, she had contracted an eye disease that left her mostly blind after joining the Perkins Institute for the blind she underwent eye is that significantly improved her vision she learned sign language, which is used to communicate with deaf people from Laura Bridgman and graduated when she was twenty years old. Soon after graduating, she was sent to teach Helen. The first word an taught Helen was goal she gave adult to Helen which he took gladly then she felt the letters d. o. l. l. on Helen's other hand Helen learned the letters quickly and imitated ends actions to spell the same word. This indicated to him that Helen was intelligent and can be taught. Meeting her mentor. When an Sullivan I met Helen Keller. She was an unruly kid. She ran around the house breaking things eating from others, plates and was astonished none of Helen's family members did anything to stop her behavior or teacher to behave properly and noticed that her family's sympathy only encouraged Helen to continue being unruly. She understood that she must discipline Helen without using force. And felt that the first step to teaching Helen was to teach her how to behave properly. So with the permission of Helen's family and to custody of Helen for two weeks during these two weeks and was the only person Helen could depend on therefore helen couldn't run to her parents went and tried discipline her. During these two weeks, Helen Learn to behave properly in addition to that helen learn several words from an she could spell them out man's hands but she was just imitating what an was doing just like a monkey she thought it was a game. She did not understand that each of these words have meaning and referred to an object and did not know how to make Helen understand that each of these was a word and had a purpose. In her frustration and took hell into a water pump. She put one hand of Helen under flowing water, and on the other hand she spelled out the letters w. a. t. d. r.. It was only then that Helen had the revelation that this flowing substance had a name cold water helen later remembered the event as. I knew then that W. a. t. e. r. mental a wonderful cool something that was flowing over my hand. That living word awakened my soul. gave it like hopefully set it free. Once, she learned the name for Water Helen Bent. Down immediately touched the earth and demanded its name soon, she learned other words to and by the end of the day new thirty words and their meanings. Helen, later described this meeting as her sole birthday. This signaled the beginning of a forty nine year relationship between and and Helen this interaction between and Helen is brilliantly portrayed in the film. The miracle. Worker. Formal education. Helen's formal education began in eighteen, eighty eight when she and and moved to the Perkins Institute. In eighteen ninety four they moved to New York for higher studies at the Horace Mann School for the deaf in eighteen, ninety six, she got admission into the Cambridge School for young ladies. Nineteen hundred she started her bachelors degree in Radcliffe College. Harvard. University it was unthinkable at that time and age for a deaf blind woman to achieve proper form education through such reputed institutes. But Helen had a thirst for knowledge and helped her quench it. Mark Twain who was impressed by Helen and her perseverance introduced her to an oil magnate who later sponsored Helen's education in nineteen nine, hundred, four Helen graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Radcliffe school she was the first deaf blind person to get this degree. Learning to speak. Helen was determined to Converse with people conventionally. So she slowly began reading lips with her hands in speaking small sentences. She used sign language very proficiently and became an expert in Braille. The writing system used for the visually impaired Helen spent the rest of her life giving speeches and lectures on how she overcame the disabilities that crippled and became an inspiration to death and blind people across the world. She shared the joy that life gave her in her speeches and motivated young women and men to live life to the fullest. Personal Life. The nineteen o five and married John macy and John and Helen move to forest hills in New York along with.

Helen Helen Keller Helen Learn Helen Bent Arthur Henry Keller Charles Dickens Catherine Everett Keller confederate army Perkins Institute Laura Bridgman Sullivan editor Alabama New York North America Radcliffe College Mark Twain intern Horace Mann School
"laura bridgman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I didn't realize brown's university was that old Brenda brown is done I think it's the seventeen seventies probably I could be wrong now as far as a matter is go we were. having a little conference before the show and wondering if. Jerry Mathers the beaver was related and turns out he's not turns out he's not and also just say no Eminem the rapper Marshall Mathers the it actually said in this website. I'm educators no relation between cotton Mather and Eminem or cotton Mather and the beaver however we did learn that there was a Marvel villain the trade cotton mother named after gotten more with the name cotton Mather who actually had super powers and he is weapon was a cross that shot a purifying fire not of fire would burn you up the fire would purify you yes cross purify Amin this yellow symbolism their owner who knew all right yeah now Helen Keller own color yeah interesting story Perkins school for the blind opens in Boston in the eighteen thirties Samuel Gridley Howe who is a great well I I suppose you'd call him a great pioneer in education education for the blind in teaching them to read using braille and which is another new invention in the nineteenth century a school strictly for the blind so they can become productive citizens and one of the first well actually one of the great students who came there in the early nineteen midnight nineteen century was and Laura Bridgman girl from New Hampshire when she's about two years old she is stricken with scarlet fever the leaves are blind and deaf to the family had to keep her tied up in a chair so she wouldn't fall into a fire you know you have your blind you can hear and if you are death you can see so there are ways to communicate but how do you communicate with someone who is both blind and deaf and so how the family brings her when she's about seven to the Perkins school which was in South Boston and there are a couple of teachers work with her and she learns that these abstract symbols that they are using their fingers to press into her hand actually means something. this allows her to communicate allows them to communicate with her and then her to respond back using these abstract symbols and she becomes a phenomenon only house users a great way to raise money for the Perkins school because people say but this is a Marvel the first deaf blind person to learn to communicate and Charles Dickens when he comes to America in the eighteen forties most wants to meet Laura Bridgman yeah he meets Henry David Thoreau enemy truffle do Emerson but Laura Bridgman I think impresses him the most and everyone comes to see Laura Bridgman and so she lives there until she's she dies when she's in her fifties is a money maker for the place she is wonderful very nice woman people like talking to our she has opinions about people Charles Sumner she thought was a very cold and shouldn't really like his she could tell up by you by holding your hand and in the eighteen seventies a young girl from Boston Anne Sullivan who is temporarily stricken blind her and she's a her father is alive her mother's died father sensor to the Perkins school because he has to work so this young Irish girl is sent to the Perkins school the Yankee kids were blinds don't want have anything to do with this Irish girl the person who befriends her is Laura Bridgman this deaf blind woman now middle aged woman who befriends young Anne Sullivan Anne Sullivan recovers her eyesight and becomes a teacher and in the eighteen eighties the Keller family in Alabama I have a daughter who is deaf and blind they knew about Laura Bridgman and they knew about the Perkins school because of Laura Bridgman so they bring their daughter Helen to Austin Austin or hear more about Helen right after this okay WBZ. hi John..

Jerry Mathers Eminem Brenda brown Mather nineteen century two years
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So how had always planned to include religion in his process of educating Laura, but he had kind of strange ideas about it you normally think of a religious education starting as young as possible, but he didn't think she should have any kind of religious instruction until her mid teens after her physical, and intellectual educations were complete at least to his idea. So he hoped that just as she had shown people possess, some sort of natural innate understanding of language, or at least he believed that she would also eventually show that people possessed an innate understanding in love of God that was his hope so his plan when he came back from his honeymoon was to present her, you know, he had a plan just like his labeling system. He would present her with these everyday miracles instead of everyday items like forks and knives in this case, it would be something like plants growing from seeds, and he expected that if she presented with enough of these ultimately, she'd real. Realized just issued realize those the significance of those emboss letters that. There was something divine about these things something divine about the whole process and also according to and he hoped that these innate inclinations in understandings of hers would match up with his own unitarian beliefs rather than more serious evangelical beliefs so to make sure that this plan of education worked he knew that she needed to have no sort of religious instruction beforehand. So he banned her teachers from discussing religion while he was gone from answering any kind of questions and while she was writing him about religion. He himself didn't really answer questions in the letters. So she was left pretty frustrated and wondering what was going on. Yeah. Knowing curious Laura by this point, you can probably guess what happened. She managed to get something out of her teacher, Mary swift. And she was also secretly visited by group of evangelicals. Who? Were protesting house methods. She was attracted to what they told her and evangelical religion became a major part of her life from then on when how finally came back. He was disappointed that his plan had been wrecked. And he kind of wrote the whole thing off as a failure, not just the religious education. But educating Laura almost he he became more distant from her after this, and according to and he even said that her religious education was the greatest disappointment of his life, and it caused him to take back some of the precis head for the blind in general. So he took it very extreme took it pretty hard us. Definitely. But when Laura was about twenty years old her last and favourite teacher, Sarah white left to be married, and at this point, especially considering that she and how had drifted apart by this point a little bit of school was going to be over for Laura. So she stayed on at Perkins for a time, but she really found life a lot lonelier an isolated without. Having a constant companion with her anymore. So it was thought best by everyone that she go home to her family farm that didn't really work out either. The family was too busy running the farm doing their everyday things that they did. And they didn't have time for the twenty four hour, companionship, and the constant questions that she was used to. And so she started get depressed. She started to get sick. And how of eventually got word enough to lupin Dorothea Dix who we've talked about on an earlier podcast who was also a friend of Laura's to help raise the money for a lifetime endowment for her to live at Perkins. As long as she wanted to. And she ended up staying there for the rest of her life returning to her family farm, only for summers as an adult at the school. She lived in a cottage, and she taught needlework apparently she was a really strict teacher too. I think we mentioned that before I think if you if you didn't have neat stitches, she just make you rip the whole thing out and start over that's tough. But. She'd also read a lot she'd write letters constantly she'd travel occasionally to she'd knit she'd embroider she'd make lace and so things to sell to people who came to see her often, she would include an attached autograph with that. And she liked having money of her own. She liked having some money to give to charity and buy presents for her friends while she was home one summer. She was baptized in a brook near the family farm, and she also convinced the pastor's wife to learn the manual alphabet. So they could communicate and that way Laura could get more religious instruction, and we mentioned this little bit when talking about her her sense of humor, but to strangers she did seem less friendly and less pleasant as she grew older, but perhaps that's in part due to all her losses. She got very close to her younger sister on these trips back to the farm and her sister passed away how died in eighteen seventy six and just within a year or so after that two of her teachers died. Died. So at age fifty nine Laura got sick with erysipelas, which is a streptococcus infection and died may twenty fourth eighteen eighty nine. The last word that she spelled out was mother a year before she died, though, Laura did meet Helen Keller. And as we mentioned the eight year old annoyed Laura by stepping on. But so bad I impress. But Keller's parents who were dealing with the same tantrums that Laura's family had dealt with years earlier happen to read dickens, eighteen forty two American travels where if you'll remember from the dickens podcast he wrote at length about the Ben sensational twelve year old Laura who was imprisoned in a quote, more marble cell. He was very poetic and his descriptions of her and the promise of Laura's story made Keller's parents contact Perkins where they were connected with recent grad and Sullivan, a good friend of Laura's and someone who was familiar with house method of instruction. So the famous auto moment in Keller story. He came. When Sullivan spelled out water on Keller's hand, while running water, the other it's very famous seeing that I think we all probably learned in grade school. Yup. Exactly and Keller is so close, I guess, I should say bridge. Minnesota closely connected with Keller because of that link in her, parents, and dickens and all of that. But Keller did always acknowledge bridge 's earlier education and its effect on her own life. But lures stories may be best summed up with something that she said as a child when her teacher was explaining to her that while most people had five senses. She just had three senses. And according to Krista delusional in American nineteenth century history. Laura thought about this for a moment. And then she answered her teacher that no she actually had one more since the match she had the sense of touch. She had taste smell and then a fourth fence, which she called think. And I mean that. How does that not just some up everything she learned and did that you can think, but if you have the ability to express it you can live a full life? Thank

Laura Helen Keller Perkins dickens Sullivan Dorothea Dix Mary swift Sarah white Krista Minnesota summers Ben erysipelas twenty four hour twenty years twelve year eight year
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Resources Defense Council and the Ad Council. So after that generous two week period that she got he started to teach her he quickly decided to scrap the basic sign language that she'd been using it home and instead teach her English. So here's kind of how it work. He would give her something basic like a key or four or a knife that was labeled with embossed writing. And then after she familiarized herself with objects he'd separate the object from that label, and she would have to match them to each other. Yeah. And he wrote of the time, quote, it was as though she were underwater, and we were on the surface over her unable to see her, but dropping align and moving at about here, and they're hoping it might touch her hand. So that she would grasp it instinctively hoping that she would put to into together and realize it wasn't just a matching game these labels actually signified something about the objects. They went with. But according to Jane, Seymour Ford and Perkins help believed that her ability to match really was just kind of a game. It was just memorization at this point. She liked getting approval. So she knew the knife label went with the knife and so on so the next step for him was to cut up the labels into their separate letters. And he would spell out the word that she was familiar with and he'd jumble them up. And then he would leave Laura to figure out how to piece them back together again into something. She was familiar with. And he describes the Haas Mahomet when she finally got this that letters made up words and words signified things, and he wrote quote, the truth began to flash upon her her intellect began to work she perceived that here was a way by which she could herself make a sign of anything that was in her own mind and show it to another mind and at once her countenance lighted up so from their Laura tried to. Learn the name of every single thing that she encountered communication got faster when she learned the manual alphabet, and could put aside those embossed letters that she had initially learned with she only needed about a year of instruction and vocabulary building before she could join in the regular classes for the blind. And she would have a personal teacher with her who is finger spelling everything out for her. So that she could follow along and cloud at other than that just following along with the lessons. Pretty remarkable one thing to mention here, though, how promoted Laura's ability that a hospital moment. He he promoted that as something in Nate like she just had the capacity for language there. But two of her recent biographers, Elizabeth jeeter and Ernest Friburg suggests that she probably did have some distant memory of spoken language before. She was even if she might not have remembered being two years old, she probably had something left in her head and jitter also thinks that she had likely been imprinted with the capacity for grammar since her later ability to understand. All these different complex tenses kind of put her apart. From a lot of other deaf blind people who've learned language, which to me sounds like another way of saying Nate ability. So maybe so we should also point out that. While braille was by this point being used in some parts of the world, Laura end, the other students at Perkins read with raised Roman letters, which was known as Boston line type and made for some really huge book as they had to blow up the letter. So big that you could actually feel the differences between them and Laura right with a grooved guide that was slid under her paper. So you'd write a letter in one of the grooves cover it. And then move onto the next letter and it was called square handwriting. Because it has this very strange sort of square look to it. You can you can feel letter that Laura herself wrote, and it is a very unusual looking hand. But pretty remarkable. It sounds really time consuming it does. But apparently, she was a voracious letter writer, so she must have gotten pretty fast at it. And while she studied reading writing geography, and algebra and geometry and all the other subjects in the classroom. She would pepper her teachers with questions at the same time outside of the classroom things like, why don't flies have names. Why can't we sail to the sun in boats? If I eat fish hooks could I be dead. Other questions. Yes. And she flourished socially too. She could recognize people that she hadn't seen in a long time by feeling their faces. She made distinct noises for friends which were kind of like individual names that people could recognize other people, and how describes this sort of girlish social butterfly behavior that Laura had in a passage. I really liked he said, quote when Laura's walking through a passageway with her hands spread before her, she notes instantly, everyone she meets and passes them with a sign of recognition. But if it'd be a girl of her own age, and especially if one of her favorites there's instantly a bright smile of recognition and intertwining of arms grasping of hands in a swift telegraphing upon the tiny finger. So I think that really conveys how happy she was to finally be able to communicate with people in say, what was on her mind and hear what was going on in the world, and she joked around too, that's another important thing. To mention because she does have a reputation being older kind of severe. But as a kid she'd joke grown. She'd purposely misspell words, and then strike it out with the other hand or she would spell with her nose when finger spelling instead of her fingers, she spin donuts on her finger something that she actually did her her whole life. And when she was alone to she could entertain herself. She liked to always be able to ask people questions, but she could entertain herself. She kept a journal her whole life. She would practice new words, spelling out, the names of new words, she would carry out these sort of private dialogues, and she would knit and so in had a very strong sense of fashion. She was always very neatly dressed very stylish she'd so all her own clothes in had some things that almost sound like amazing party tricks to she could thread a needle with her tongue. Just really cool talents that kind of get overshadowed by some of the other abilities. But just these. Everyday thing. She was also able to do in addition to reading and writing, but even in spite of these more entertaining aspects of her personality, and that sense of humor that she had Laura would also still sometimes throw tantrums. And this was something that how of course didn't cover much in that PR campaign that made Laura so famous she'd hit student sometime shove teachers, she would get very upset with slow finger spellers two and since she'd worked so closely with her teachers sometimes spending twenty four hours a day with them. She'd also form these really deep attachments and really truly suffer. When changes happened in her time at Perkins as a student. She had four main teachers Lydia, drew Morton, Elisa Rogers, Mary swift Lamsam, and Sarah, white bond, and she stayed lifelong friends with all of them. But when they leave Perkins to marry or to get new jobs, she would beg to go with them. And when she would get upset when things like this would happen. She wouldn't be able to eat. One of those really traumatic transitions came when how himself Mary. Julia ward in eighteen forty three Laura had of course, been house pet project. He promoted her in medical journals periodical 's children's magazines enough to make them both internationally famous people from around the world would come to see her sometimes just visiting sometimes just watching her behind partition which Ray over minded me a little of some of the Barnum episodes we've been talking about which is around the same time. And I don't know it's it's a more disturbing side of the story yet another kind of disturbing aspect of this. According to Louis men, and in the New Yorker, she was so well known little girls would poke out there dolls is and name them, Laura, a very special kind of fame. They're yes. But Laura also had kind of become house adopted daughter by this point, according to see more Ford at Perkins. She even lived in his apartment with him in his sister. So they were really very close. So Laura was really. Feeling kind of abandoned when how married and spent a year and a half after that on a working honeymoon in Europe. She wrote to him constantly and often asked questions about one subject that she was particularly interested in learning more about and that was religion. If you're going to build something from nothing, you've got to know what really works. I took a thousand dollar loan and built a five billion dollar business. And now, I make smart investments new businesses on shark tank. I'm Barbara Corcoran. Now. I'm sharing my secrets on my podcast, cold business unusual. You might think that looking at someone's resume and asking them a lot of questions are the key to finding the right person for a position, you're dead wrong. Follow business unusual on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. So

Laura end Perkins Nate Mary swift Lamsam Ad Council Resources Defense Council Barbara Corcoran Boston writer Europe Elizabeth jeeter Jane Julia ward Ray Ernest Friburg Ford Louis Barnum Seymour Ford
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hey, everyone we would like to tell you about a new podcast called family secrets when Danny Shapiro's husband asked if she wanted to submit her DNA for genealogy test. She was like sure sounds good. She didn't think she would really learn anything new about herself because she came from a well documented family with pretty deep roots. When the results came back, though, she was completely shocked the story that she had always been told about who she was and where she came from was totally different from the DNA results that were staring in the face family secrets is a new podcast from the New York Times bestselling author Danny Shapiro in a world where DNA tests in the internet or revealing information to people at every corner, a staggering amount of family secrets have been resurfacing. And this is the podcast where Danny Shapiro talks to guests about all their family secrets, and however one has one and the experiences aren't just painful, but can also be really liberating. New episodes are released on Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe on the iheartradio app or wherever you get podcasts. Happy Saturday everybody. This classic is coming out during death history month, which goes from March thirteenth to April fifteenth each year its first day commemorates, the successful conclusion of the deaf president now protests, which we covered in a previous episode of the show that has also been a previous Saturday classic. And then the last day of deaf history month marks the establishment of the American school for the deaf, which was the first permanent school for the death in the United States. So today, we're sharing one of our earlier episodes related to death history. Which is on Laura Bridgman. She was the first deaf blind person in the US to receive a formal education, and she also came up on our recent Saturday classic. I'm Charles Dickens in this twenty twelve episodes Sarah into Bellina talk about potential future episodes on Helen Keller. And Louis braille both of whom are still on our ongoing list of topics. So enjoy. Welcome to stuff you missed in history. Class a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Welcome to the podcast. I'm Sarah dowdy, and I'm WSB chocolate boarding and earlier this year. Some interesting news came out of Georgia Tech here in Atlanta, researchers there and now that they'd come up with a texting app. Called braille touch which applies computer braille specific type of braille to touchscreen devices and the app is mostly been in the news because it has potential as a general is free texting app. Even for people who aren't visually impaired, you could text under the table or something. But for folks who are visually impaired. A braille ABC could really mean a lot less stuff to lug around. No, keyboard, just a phone and easier communication, and it really got me thinking about how much communication has improved for people with visual disabilities in the past century. Yeah. And today, we're going to revisit a subject that we touched on briefly in our dickens visits America episode, and it's kind of related to that topic of communication. It's about Laura Bridgman who is the. I deaf blind person to learn language also to communicate with letters and writing and to be educated and she didn't use the now. Ubiquitous braille system that we just talked about which was only beginning at the time. But instead, she used the manual alphabet to spell out words, and she also read from raised Roman text and a learned to handwrite with a special grit system. The Richmond was about fifty years older than the more famous Helen Keller. But if you remember from that earlier episode their stories are really closely connected aside from the fact that young Helen Keller annoyed Bridgman by stepping on her foot when the two of them that. But while Keller really became a champion of disability rights and an international figuring somebody who's internationally famous bridgeman was on the earlier end of the disability rights story. And in fact, when she started school in the eighteen thirties, people were just starting to believe blind people could be educated. So the idea of educating a deaf blind. Person. This deaf blind girl seemed completely impossible. Yeah. So we're going to tell you a little bit about her early story and the challenges that she had to face before we get to that story of her learning Lauren, Dewey bridgeman was born December twenty first eighteen twenty nine near Hanover, New Hampshire her parents, Daniel, and harmony had a farm and Laura was their third daughter. She was a pretty baby with bright blue eyes. But she was really sickly at twenty months. She finally started getting bigger and lively she was chatty and seemed very smart, but at twenty four months she and her two older sisters came down with scarlet fever her two sisters died. But for Lara the fever went on for weeks after that. And when she finally started to get better. She was blind in one eye nearly blind in the other death, and she had very little of her senses of smell and taste left her vision in her non blind. I was destroyed when she walked into the spindle of. Her mother spinning wheel. So are really sad start here. But remarkably by age for she had recovered the strength. She had lost during the fever. She was strong again. And while she wasn't talking anymore. She was still very smart. She was still displaying that interest. She had as a two year old in everything she came across. She would touch everything she encountered she'd clinked her her mother and feel her arms and her hands and try to mimic her mother's hand. So she learned how to help out with housework that way, she even learned how to knit and to so and from a workman on her family farm ace attorney who himself had some impairments that made speech difficult for him. She did pick up some ability to communicate or at least communicate more fully with her family. She he had a way of sort of understanding what she was going through and helped her perfect this basic sort of sign language, and so each family member had unnamed sign that they could respond. Two and a Pat on her head met row. Okay. Pat on her back. No, she had a way of expressing really basic needs at least. But by age seven she started throwing these really violent temper tantrums, she'd only obey her father who would stop on the ground when he was upset with her. And she reached the limit of communication, basically with her family, and she was just overwhelmed, and they were overwhelmed too. They were busy farmers, and they didn't know what they were going to do to help her. So fortunately at that time an article was written by Dartmouth professor on Laura's ability to sign and that got the attention of Samuel really how and a few years earlier actually the very same year. Laura was born how had founded Perkins which was a school for the blind. And it had opened for students in eighteen thirty two with a mission not just to educate blind children. That's kind of how you'd see it today. But to really prove that blind children could be educated and could become. Come independent adults kids at the school learned everything from history to philosophy plus sports music, including piano, tuning and domestic work. So it was really a very broad education. Getting them ready for life house, quite a character himself. We should mention he idolized Lord Byron and fought in the Greek revolution where Byron died. He financially supported radical abolitionist John Brown, and he was married to Julia ward who wrote the battle hymn of the Republic, but he was also a proponent of education reform and not just for blind students. He wanted rote memorization replaced with a curriculum following the child's interests. He disliked John locks idea of the type Beulah Rosza the blank slate. And instead thought that the mind came with certain innate facilities something in line with the pseudoscience of phonology. Yes. So when how heard about Laura he realized that she would really be his perfect subject. She was an opera. Community for him to do. Good. Clearly, he was very interested in that. She was excellent PR for his school. And she'd be a way for him to test his theories on the mind, and probably most importantly a challenge for him at this point. He he was doing so successfully with his school. He wanted a challenge so Laura's parents met with how and they agreed to send her to Perkins and Laura arrived there in October eighteen thirty seven when she was just shy of eight years old. She just got a little bit of time to settle into her new surroundings. She was obviously very scared very disoriented. But how gave her two weeks to get used to the new world? Hey, listeners one of the things that we've been trying to be more mindful about at my house is how much food we waste because it is so easy to stock up on things, and then not really have a plan for getting them into your body discovering that you have things that you're going to have to throw away. And that is not just unique at my house every year up to forty percent of the food in the United States never gets eaten. This translates to two hundred and eighteen billion dollars lost in wasted water energy fertilizers crop land and production costs that number is really being in probably doesn't even seem like a real thing. So on a smaller scale, the average American family of four wastes nearly a thousand pounds of food every year resulting in about fifteen hundred dollars lost. You can cook. It store it share it. Just don't waste it. Learn more at save the food dot com. Brought to you by the natural Resources

Laura Bridgman United States Helen Keller Danny Shapiro Sarah dowdy American school iheartradio New York Times bestselling John Brown president Charles Dickens Perkins ABC Georgia Tech WSB Richmond Pat New Hampshire Lord Byron Atlanta
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Disabilities. Hey, if you love stuff you missed history class, you're going to enjoy Adam ruins everything. Comedian Adam conifers hit investigative comedy show on TV past episodes have included segments about how John F Kennedy almost caused World War three how the United States stole the Panama Canal, and how radically different the real story of Pocahontas was from the animated film. If you've never seen the show the character of Adam pops into people's lives and then Bruins them by correcting popular misconceptions with facts often to his own social payroll, new episodes returned two true TD Tuesday nights in January, and you can watch Adam ruin more historical misconceptions anytime on the TV app or on demand. Dicken's work also led directly to the education of none other than Helen Keller decades after dickens, visit Keller's parents read has American notes and came across the story of Laura Bridgman. They went to Perkins and were connected with the graduate. And teacher who is an Sullivan the miracle worker who taught Keller language, and this little sub story here too. So interesting to me, it makes me almost wanna maybe do a future upset on Helen Keller. But it wasn't. Of course, all pleasant trips like trips to low trips to Perkins for dickens, he visited Washington DC in March and he met president John Tyler he toured the capital, but the trip was kind of defined by the disregard for spitoons that he witnessed in the nation's capital. He later wrote Washington may be called the headquarters of tobacco tinctures the live. The thing itself is an exaggeration of nastiness, which cannot be outdone. And he went on to warn readers that if they were gonna tour the capital, and I mean, the capitol building if in case, they dropped anything be careful not to pick it up without a gloved hands because you were probably going to run into a bunch of tobacco's, but other issues around the country involved what he saw as poor table manners, overheated homes arrogance hypocrisy and a tendency towards violence that was illustrated by a gun fight between two kids who were using real gun. So it kind of ran the whole news from the whole ungloved hands to poor table manners and went up from their temerity, it got more serious than that to enrichment he saw slavery, which he was very outspoken against. And then some of it was just disappointment in Saint Louis, for instance, he was disappointed by trip to see the looking glass prairie, which is something. He had really wanted to go see the prairie according to professor Jerome Medicare. Who's? The author of dickens an innocent abroad, quote, the longer dickens rub shoulders with Americans the more. He realized that the Americans were simply not English enough and dickens himself wrote to his friend Creedy who was taking care of his kids. This is not the Republic. I came to see this is not the Republic of my imagination. So those are harsh words, but after he got home dickens did one better he started polishing up his travel journals, and he ended up publishing them as promised as American notes for general circulation, then he stepped it up again the following year. He started a new book called Martin chuzzlewit. And when the first issues weren't really selling that. Well, he decided to pack off his hero to America in included. A lot of his own kind of experiences. He had seen in the mid west. So both his travelogue and has novel painted quite an unflattering picture of America. Seems folks wouldn't have expected the man famous for tearing apart. Policies of British life to be entirely kind. But in fact, they had new friends like Washington Irving were hurt even outraged people in New York burned copies of Martin chuzzlewit papers. Denounced the American notes, the trip very likely changed dickens to some scholars see his work getting less optimistic after his American Journey, and I can kind of see this from several different perspectives one. It does seem like people overreacted quite a bit. The travel notes do include kind of unfavorable comparisons to British things we were talking about the Lowell low factories and how it's England that comes across as worse than that. Write the tuition there's a lot of stuff like that. But if people were overreacting a bit will, then maybe also dickens kind of had unrealistic expectations. If you go into a trip and your expectations are that. It will be a land of innocent people where everything's perfect, you know, kind of utopia. It seemed he was expecting. You're probably going to be a little bit disappointed, especially people are ripping out of your coat, and that's true. So it's not that any of this really affected dickens popularity as an author in the US more than twenty years later dickens who by this point had multiple households to support. And that's just a hint for the next pun cast with he decided it might be time to revisit America. And this time as a part of his smash lecture series in which he'd act rather than read portions of his own works from special gasoline lectern. So after sending a reconnaissance scout on ahead he arrived in Boston in mid November of eighteen sixty seven during his northeastern tour quite a few things happened. He met Mark Twain, Mark Twain saw him. And of course, Mark Twain is also known for his his public readings which were apparently just as good as dickens and twelve year old girl chatted with him on a train telling him that she'd read all his books, but skipped the quote lengthy does. Doe parts, and she in fact, grew up to write Rebecca of Sunnybrook farm. They'll a popular children's book there in doctor Samuel grizzly how Perkins who we mentioned contacted dickens about publishing the old curiosity shop. In braille and dickens, actually, not only gave his approval he put up one thousand seven hundred dollars to have two hundred fifty copies printed which were in turn distributed to all of the blind schools in America, something I thought was pretty cool. The lectures themselves were a huge hit. I mean, of course, that was why he was back in the United States in the first place. He made nineteen thousand pounds in many folks, couldn't remember the first tour. So there weren't any hard feelings there. And even the press took dickens return as a sign of goodwill. For instance, the New York Tribune wrote dick and second coming was needed to disperse every cloud in every doubt into place his name undimmed and the silver sunshine of American admiration kind of an overblown. Welcome. Welcome back Dicken and some cell felt differently to in his farewell speech. He spoke of the quote, gigantic changes he'd seen in the country changes. Moral changes, physical changes in the amount of land subdued and people'd changes in the rise of vast new cities changes in the growth of older cities almost out of recognition changes in the graces and amenities of life changes in the press without whose advancement, no advancement can take place anywhere. And he asked that the statement added to every copy of American notes and Martin chuzzlewit, and it still is there today. Kind of I take it back. You guys have made some improvements. So I think it was really interesting to learn about an author so associated with England or really so associated with London in a different context. See him out of his element a little bit. That was what appealed to me about the story. Yeah. I think in a way it's actually quite a testament to travel itself that you can go abroad, and it opens your eyes, and you just see things in a different way. I mean, he obviously didn't work out. So well the first time because he had a bad experience. He was disappointed. And like you said that was probably equal parts has fault. And you know, the fault of wedding saw exactly if people spitting tobacco on the floor. But when he came back the next time, it seemed like he sort of how two different point of view. Definitely learned a lesson about maybe being careful when you're traveling to keep some of your opinions. Although it's kind of nice to have that honesty. I'm looking back on it. Now. Yeah. Thank

dickens Martin chuzzlewit America Perkins United States Helen Keller Adam conifers Dicken England Panama Canal Mark Twain Laura Bridgman John F Kennedy Sullivan New York Tribune Washington Washington Irving Rebecca of Sunnybrook farm Boston
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Off your first purchase of a website, or domain. Though. Maybe it's not too surprising. Dickens was known as an eccentric dresser, particularly in his youth one Massachusetts on liquor called him a genteel rowdy. So once he got pointed out, maybe no, that's dickens because. As little as half a century. Earlier. They'll authors hadn't really been very famous as individuals at least at least not in a stop and stare at them kind of way, they were known mostly for their work. But with better dissemination of news more gossip spreading around. I mean, think of our old very old by now. Lord Byron episode these famous personalities, whether they were authors or actors or singers started to get as big as anything they were producing. They started to become names and recognizable people, but for dickens fame wasn't very fun thing to acquire. No. I mean, it involves fancy parties and meeting icons, but it also involved a lot of the unpleasantness that we associate with modern day celebrity culture, which shocked dickens and really disturbed him. Crowds would follow him everywhere. He wrote, quote, if I turn into the street, I'm followed by a multitude, and I can't drink a glass of water without having one hundred people looking down. In my throat when I opened my mouth to swallow on a boat stopover near Cleveland, he caught a quote party of gentlemen, staring at his sleeping wife through a cabin window people on the docks would actually rip handfuls a for from his coat when he came by. And then I mean if that's not bad enough. There was this profit-driven side of a lot of the celebrity craze to the Barbary mentioned he tried to sell his hair Tiffany's and company apparently made copies of dickens bust and offered those for sale and this really bothered him all of this money making surrounding his name. And there's another aspect of this fame that really bothered dickens in that was wherever he went whether it was Boston Philadelphia Saint Louis Washington DC Richmond, New York City Louisville. He met throngs of American fans who had obviously read and enjoyed his books. Okay. That's a good thing. Presumably they've all been buying those books, which was true. The only problem with that due to a lack of. International copyright laws. Dickens new hadn't made any money off of these many fans since US publishers could rip off his work. So on the one hand he's seeing these busts of himself that people are trying to sell he's knowing he's not making any money for the actual books that have made him so famous in the first place. So he started peppering his speeches with disatisfaction about the laws, but he wasn't oblivious. He didn't try to as argument on his own personal finances. Instead, he chose to focus on the fact that all writers Americans included would benefit from a change in that at the end of the day. He'd quote, rather have the affectionate regard of my fellowmen as I would have heaps of gold heaps in minds of gold. So he tried to couch it in terms like I'm just looking out for all writers and gradually though that sort of spin on his argument changed in got a little more intense than while many average Americans would have agreed with him that there needed to be some kind of copyright changes. The. The press really pounced on this copyright obsession in declared it an indelicate an improper avenue of public discussion something that an honored guest shouldn't be going around talking to everybody about in. It was really the first strike in what became known as dickens quarrel with America because the press escalated thinks so too dickens. Okay. But before we get into more particular is about what really is going to sound like the ultimate failed vacation it's worth noting that there were some high points to this. There were some good times sometimes being celebrated author meant parties as we mentioned and mingling with fellow famous people on Valentine's Day, eighteen forty two. For example, dickens was the guest of honor at one of the biggest parties to that date in New York City's park theatre which was according to Simon Watson BBC magazine decorated with wreaths paintings and a bust of dickens with an eagle soaring over his head, which sounds a little strange, and I can't help but wonder if that had anything to do with. Dickens request in his will that no monuments made of him seeing that eagle flying over his head. And like, you just mentioned he also did get to meet a lot of fellow writers. He met Edgar Allan Poe, Washington. Irving longfellow, Oliver Wendell, Holmes, Harriet Beecher Stowe, a lot of folks who pop up in the podcast on you. And then he and Catherine had some fun too. I mean, I know there later relationship is not characterized very, well, we're going to talk about in another episode. But during this time, they seem to have a pretty good time. They acted in a play together on the last leg of their trip was which was a John through Canada that included a stop in Montreal they really enjoyed that. And then whenever he could he broke away from all of the hubbub all of the fancier people who were flocking around him to deal what he liked to do most which was just wander twirl. These new towns, he was visiting he toured the some of the worst neighborhoods, in fact of New York City at the time that was five points in the Bowery, he visited. The mills Lowell Massachusetts. And was impressed to find a model industrial community a place where the women workers only stayed a few years. They lived in comfy boarding houses. And they had access to things like lecture series, a house, run periodical and pianos. So it was really different from what he knew of similar situations in England. And I think that's an important thing to consider when we get to some of the later particulars in this episode that he did see some he did compare some things in the United States, positively compared to to what he saw England. He also toward prisons in insane. Asylums might seem a little strange to us now to do that on your vacation. But according to Natalie McKnight, a professor at Boston University interviewed on the world. It wasn't that weird for British writers to include investigative travel on their trips to the US, very go. Another major high point for dickens was a trip to the Perkins institute, which was well end is a school for the blind in Massachusetts. And I think. It really speaks for dickens sincere interest in social issues that the top items on his to see in the United States lists where Niagara Falls as we already mentioned. And then Laura Bridgman who was a little girl who is deaf blind. But had been educated with language and Bridgman who incidentally is believed to be the first deaf blind person to be educated had been written about by Perkins director, doctor Samuel grizzly how and he was the man who had also come up with the system for teaching her language in the first place. He had written this publication, which proved pretty popular internationally in dickens had heard of it so dickens was so impressed by meeting Laura that he included quite a bit of the meeting in his later published notes on America. And according to Jan Seymour Ford. Who's a research librarian at Perkins schools for people with disabilities where really just starting to as she said get traction during this time and dickens work. Help spread the word a little bit about. What an institution like this could do for people who had disabilities.

Dickens New York City United States Massachusetts Laura Bridgman America Cleveland Edgar Allan Poe Lord Byron Perkins schools mills Lowell Massachusetts Jan Seymour Ford Barbary Louis Washington Canada Niagara Falls Valentine Simon Watson Boston Perkins
"laura bridgman" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"laura bridgman" Discussed on Historical Figures

"There were members of the family who thought she was a monster and needed to be institutionalized helen's mother kate was adamant about not sending her daughter away but even she realized the situation could not continue for the safety of helen and those around her but there was some good news in july of eighteen eighty five arthur was appointed us marshal for the northern district of alabama this gave the family a much needed infusion of cash and in eighteen eighty six kate had a second daughter this time the captain got his way and they name the child mildred mildred was five years younger than helen and one day a jealous helen flipped over the baby's cradle fortunately kate was there to catch mildred otherwise she could have been seriously hurt another time helen was holding her wet apron in front of the fire to dry it off and the apron caught on fire this time helen's nurse was there and she was able to throw a block over the fire to snuff it out in searching for a way to handle helen kate considered the case of laura bridgman charles dickens wrote about her in his book american notes which kate had read laura bridgman was a woman who had lost her sight and hearing when she was two years old but still became educated kate center husband along with young helen to baltimore to visit an ear i in throat specialists j julian chisolm chisholm ver them to alexander graham bell.

arthur us alabama laura bridgman mildred mildred helen kate charles dickens baltimore alexander graham bell five years two years one day