36 Burst results for "Latino"

Fresh update on "latino" discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

LeVar Burton Reads

03:45 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "latino" discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

"Hi, I'm LeVar Burton, and this is LeVar Burton reads. In every episode, I handpick a different piece of short fiction and I read it to you. The only thing these stories have in common is that I love them. And I hope you will too. You know, there's been a good number of stories on the podcast that really tap into childhood and revisit childhood experiences. And I think that's probably for a couple of reasons. I think children are brilliant. And I love how they use their imaginations. But it's also because being a child, a person early in their lives, such a unique experience. Children are brought into a world that's already spinning and working and churning, and they have to figure out what's going on around them at the same time, they're learning to eat food and walk. And read. They have to square the world with what they know, or have experienced, right? The boy, in this story, is in the fourth grade. His family immigrated from Mexico and now he's being raised solo by his dad. They've been dealt a tough hand and the boy is doing his best to understand why and how these things have happened, while also dealing with school and crushes on girls. The author of this story, Luis Alberto orea, has said that it was inspired by his own boyhood. His own dad, who worked driving a bakery truck. And the story has brought a lot of personal memories, letting back for me. Louise's dad drove a helms bakery truck and my childhood in Sacramento. It was the wonder bread truck. And there are more similarities that I'll talk about after this story. Anyway, it's a really special piece that comes to us from the anthology, small odysseys, selected shorts presents 35 news stories. It was published by algonquin books in partnership with the wonderful radio program and live show selected shorts. And Luis Alberto Rea is a bestselling Mexican American poet, novelist, and essayist who's been a Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction. Member of the Latino literature Hall of Fame and a Guggenheim fellow, just to name a few of his honors. His most recent novel is entitled the house of broken angels, and he's got another novel out next year. It's entitled, goodnight, Irene. And it's inspired by his mother's own Red Cross service during World War II. I truly loved reading this story, y'all. So if you are ready, let's take a deep breath.

Levar Burton Luis Alberto Orea Luis Alberto Rea Mexico Louise Latino Literature Hall Of Fame Sacramento Pulitzer Prize Red Cross Service Goodnight Irene
There Is a Season for Everything... Which One Are We in Now?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:55 min | Last week

There Is a Season for Everything... Which One Are We in Now?

"A season for everything it says in the Bible and ecclesiastes. Let me actually try to get that verse. It's a great verse. And it's hard to tell what kind of season we are in. Yeah, it's ecclesiastes three one three 8 written by Solomon for everything there is a season, a time for activity under heaven, a time to be born a time to die a plan to plant a time to harvest time to kill, and a time to heal. A time to tear down and a time to build up the time to cry in a time to laugh. Yes, I know you're probably thinking it's a Simon and Garfunkel song. That's where they got it from. Time to grieve in a time to dance, a time to scatter stones and time to gather stones. What season are we in right now? There's a few of those in there. That might apply. And there's a time to tear in a time to mend the time to be quiet, a time to speak, a time to love a time to hate, a time for war and a time for peace. I mean, what I think when I charly, when I think about where we're at as a movement, we have to look at all the positive things that have been built. Here's a couple of positives. And we've talked about this at length. Trump shattered what was a trajectory that was going to be, that was going to put us in a bad place for a long time. It's just true. If it wasn't for Trump, the gains that we have in the blue collar and Latino communities and everything else would not be there. He bailed us out, man. He bailed us out. He shattered things he redirected. It created an alternate timeline. Yes. That was really positive for conservatives. Now what our job has to be is, how do we take that? And it involves everybody, right? It's not just up to president Trump to decide what he wants to do and everyone just goes along with it. It's not up to Charlie Kirk on what we do. It's not up to you. Every individual member of the grassroots and every grassroots organization, what we do. This is an effort together. And this is what truly America what makes America wonderful is that that's an ebb and flow emotion that requires all of us to show up. And then we all start hurting cats in a direction that has to be positive.

Garfunkel Solomon Simon President Trump Charlie Kirk America
One Bright Light in This Midterm Landscape

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:29 min | 2 weeks ago

One Bright Light in This Midterm Landscape

"There are not a lot of bright lights and this midterm landscape. But one of them, surely, is the steady movement of Latinos toward the GOP. Now, this is not a movement that has been completed. It is a movement that is underway. If you look, for example, at Florida, heavy Latino vote for desantis and interestingly, he seems to have won Latinos kind of across the board. With Greg Abbott in Texas, the results a little bit more mixed, but Abbott got a decent share of the Latino vote. If you look at the Rio Grande valley a special interest of W's and mine because Debbie grew up there, we had three Latina Republicans running Cassie Garcia and Myra Flores, who was in Debbie's own district where her mom lives. And then Monica de la Cruz. So normally one of them, Monica, dela Cruz won. But the other two actually came really close. Cassie Garcia was edged out by the way by a fairly conservative Democrat cuellar. Is that the guy's name Henry, Henry cuellar, and Myra Flores, I mean, this is a district that used to go easily 60 40, 20 point difference or more. Even more. And Myra got what, 43 or 44. And so the other guy, so does that still a ten point gap, but the point is the gap is narrowing.

Cassie Garcia Myra Flores Desantis Greg Abbott Debbie Monica De La Cruz GOP Dela Cruz Rio Grande Valley Abbott Florida Henry Cuellar Texas Cuellar Monica Henry Myra
Gov. Ron DeSantis: Miami-Dade Is Becoming a Republican Area

Mark Levin

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Gov. Ron DeSantis: Miami-Dade Is Becoming a Republican Area

"Dade is a typically heavy Democrat area and yet things are seem to be changing there right governor Yeah I think so I mean we actually going into election day we have had more Republicans in Miami dade cast ballots than Democrats have Now you don't necessarily know who they vote for but I think in Miami those Republicans are like 95% kind of vote for me The Democrats were getting Democrats down here particularly Latino Democrats to vote for us And so we're going into election very likely with a good lead and we anticipate a really strong turnout tomorrow So I think this is going to be a major sea change This is the most urban highly populated county in the state of Florida This is obviously a major area that's attracted a lot of people over the last few years Republicans typically don't win those types of areas We're usually winning suburbs exurbs and more rural This is going to probably be after this election going to be considered the most conservative major urban area in the United States

Miami Dade Dade Miami Florida United States
Rep. David Kustoff: Predictions for Tomorrow's Election Results

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Rep. David Kustoff: Predictions for Tomorrow's Election Results

"This could end up shaping to be another 1928 election cycle for the Republicans where back in 1928, Republicans had a 32 point or 32 seat lead in the House of Representatives. I mean, this could be huge for the Republican Party. You know, we're on the cusp of cusp of it. And like I said, it feels good. The enthusiasm is certainly there. I think that if we could get to around 35 seats, 36 seats, something like that to your point would be the largest majority that we've had in 90 years on the Republican side. Conservatively, I feel good about 15 to 20 seats, but the potential is there. And you know, I look at things right before we right before we came on, I was looking at a story that had posted on The Wall Street Journal website, headline is GOP gaining support among black and Latino voters. And that's true. And especially, I look at some of our candidates nationwide. Who are Latino, we elected a fair number in 2000 and 20 and in special elections with my Flores. We've got a number of minority candidates and Latino candidates who are running on the Republican side who are espousing the same conservative values that we talk about every day. So it's not, it's not one, it's not one sided, it's not monolithic. We are all talking about the issues that people are concerned about. The inflation, the economy, crime and the border. I mean, those are those are the top issues. That's what people, that's what people want to see solutions about and they certainly haven't seen it over these past two years under the realm of Pelosi and Schumer and Biden.

Republican Party House Of Representatives The Wall Street Journal Pelosi Schumer Biden
How Jennifer Horn Is Feeling 6 Days Out From the Midterms

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

How Jennifer Horn Is Feeling 6 Days Out From the Midterms

"We're 6 days out. How are you feeling? I feel good. I actually feel really good. Maybe and you know, but here's the thing, I'm an optimist. We know this. I always feel good, but I feel good for good reason, I think. What I'm watching is not necessarily the polling about Doctor Oz and John fetterman or Herschel Walker and Raphael Warnock. What I'm looking at is the polling about voting groups, likely voting groups, and I don't know if you saw the poll that came out from The Wall Street Journal today. Maybe you've talked about it already. No. But white suburban women have grown in support of Republicans by 16%. And they even ask the question if the 2024 presidential election were held today, 55% would vote for president Trump. I hang on hang on, hang on. We've been told for 6 years that they hate him. The white suburban women hate president Trump. They're back. What happened? They're back because I think personal freedoms were taken away from their families from their kids. The crime is a huge problem. You have to figure out if you want gas or groceries. There are all sorts of issues those kitchen table issues that Glenn youngkin in your state of Virginia talked about that brought white suburban voters to the table with him. They're now back on board if you believe the polling numbers on The Wall Street Journal. This is a huge piece of the winning strategy for the Republican Party. And even more than that, a survey that came out last week talking about Latino voters and about black voters. Latino voters support Republicans now, and this is just in a generic matchup. Who's better at serving the country, Republicans are Democrats. 40% of Hispanics say it is Republicans. Now, that's not the majority. But we don't need the majority of black and Hispanic voters. Black voters up to 20% both of these groups have gone up 8% since 2020 alone. View figure we picked up 8% of black support, 8% of Latino support, we are on the precipice of something really big. And I think now it is up to Republicans. Once we get past election day, they better deliver.

President Trump Doctor Oz John Fetterman Raphael Warnock Herschel Walker The Wall Street Journal Glenn Youngkin Republican Party Virginia
Tiffany Cross Dismisses Minorities Who Are Conservatives

Mark Levin

01:49 min | Last month

Tiffany Cross Dismisses Minorities Who Are Conservatives

"Now according to numbers provided by the national Republican congressional committee 80 of the Republican incumbents in candidates on the ballot next month are women 33 or Latino 28 are black 13 are Asian Asian American and three are Native Americans It wasn't that long ago when the Republican Party was criticized for not running enough minorities Now they're working their asses off to identify minorities who are conservatives or Republicans or who will switch from Democrat to Republican as conservative But Tiffany cross doesn't care What's the big deal Go ahead Do not always equate two voices of color And as our own NBC Scott Wong points out in his great reporting the leadership will still be almost entirely composed of white men So the leadership will still be almost entirely composed of white men So this is very interesting to me Why It's interesting to me because on the one hand she the back of her hand dismisses all the minorities attracted to the Republican Party now who are running for office in the Republican Party But they don't have a leadership in the Republican Party How many blacks are leaders in the democratic Senate How many None But if 90 95% of the black population votes Democrat Shouldn't it be significantly more than none When you think so ladies and

Republican Party National Republican Congressio Tiffany Cross Scott Wong NBC Senate
"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

03:44 min | Last month

"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"We <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <SpeakerChange> out of here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Where do we go? <Music> You know you're born <Music> in less than a kid or <Music> no excuse me <Music> but in the suburbs <Music> <Music> there I've been on <Music> a plane <Music> in my house <Music> away <Music> so but I don't think there's <Music> anything I need a <Music> new thing that you love seeing <Music> for the first couple of <Music> times I lost his <Music> gun through then on my <Music> second last minute <Music> <Music> <Music> got no plan in my <Music> eyes the <Music> way that. <Music> <Music> <Music> I <Music> know I love you <Music> <Music> <Music> sometimes I know I like <Music> anything <Music> <Music> sometimes I <Music> bet he <Music> got. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Me that old <Music> <Advertisement> person <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> and then another <Music> foot beat I <Music> can't pull me <Music> up and I saw <Speech_Music_Male> this <Music> there looking on <Music> me got nowhere <Music> in my eyes <Music> no way that my <Music> eyes I <Music> know I saw you <Music> secretly <Music> <Music> must be <Music> the <Music> one below you like <Music> there's a night <Music> last but then <Music> I hit my 90 <Music> like I know where they <Music> might go <Music> find them. <Music> <Music> <Music> It's <Music> not going to be <Music> nobody <Music> <Music> something I know what I <Music> can think deep and I <Music> <Music> got the one <Music> I feel like. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> The white is <Music> bad for <Music> the people <Music> and all my <Music> life <Music> <Music> and I <Music> was gonna get <Music> it <Music> out and it's <Music> gonna <Music> <Music> <Music> be <Music> <Music> <Music> so bad I ain't gonna <Music> die <Music> but I ain't gonna <Music> cry because. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> But <Music> he looks at him. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> But he has to <Music> try to <Music> get everybody. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sorry lost <Music> my love <Music> suddenly <Music> right. <Music> <Music> <Music> It's time to get <Music> lost my love <Music> so good. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> The <Speech_Music_Female> opinions expressed <Speech_Music_Female> by the guests <Speech_Music_Female> and contributors in this <Speech_Female> podcast are <Speech_Female> their own and do <Speech_Female> not necessarily <Speech_Female> reflect the views of <Speech_Female> futuro media <Speech_Female> or its <SpeakerChange> employees. <Speech_Male> As <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we know, the Latino <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> community is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> hard to fit <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the mold <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of conservatives <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> versus liberals. <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> why I'm excited to <Speech_Male> tell you about also <Speech_Music_Male> ypres, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the new podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from the lost debate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that reflects <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that diversity <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is a weekly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Spanish speaking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast that covers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the latest issues <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the U.S. and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Latin America, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> post Carlos guber <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and fabiola <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> galindo come <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from different backgrounds <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and perspectives, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> come together to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fight polarization <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and disinformation. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Join the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> conversation, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> check out pulso <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> E pendulo <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> today wherever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you get your shows. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> From <Music> PRX.

"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:01 min | Last month

"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Whatever. I mean, I don't want to get deep into that. Read the stories that are coming out and Latino rebels because our correspondents are writing about them. But listen, just want to focus on a couple of other things that I didn't cover in my story. We did ask about, if an election, you know, if you felt like a candidate didn't win, it kind of getting at the big lie of Trump in 2020. And I thought some of those responses were pretty fascinating. There were plenty of Republicans who were kind of like, yeah, you know, the election was stolen. I mean, do you want to get into that a little bit? Of what you found across the states? Yeah, I mean, we found pretty consistently that Latinos are pretty skeptical of the validity of the U.S. voting system, which is, you know, pretty highly problematic, especially if both parties are trying to engage them more, it may also be that a lot of folks coming from countries where elections are stolen or where elections are not as transparent. They kind of are seeing the U.S., they're seeing politicians in the U.S. question elections more and more. And for them, it's like, oh, like, I know this. I've seen this play before. This isn't surprising. This is what I expect from government, right? So it's really kind of tragic because the U.S. really does put in a lot more scrutiny in terms of how we conduct our elections and the fact that politicians are undermining our democracy like this is not great. Yeah, no, and I think that was one of the other findings that I probably want to explore a little bit more next week. Anything else from the poll that we asked that you want to share with people about things. I know we asked about labels. I know we've asked about voting if you were from your country of origin, just a couple of last nuggets before we wrap up. Yeah, I mean, I think I just want to touch on our question about which party do they feel represents them the most? Oh, yes, let's start with that. I totally forgot about that question and I didn't even include it in the story, but you did put it in the deck. Talk about that one. Yeah, so it's a great question because you can kind of see how Latinos are thinking about the two party system here. And we're seeing consistently in Pennsylvania was 26% in Georgia was 26 and Florida was 19% that feel like neither party represents them. So when they're voting, it's kind of like, well, how are they making these choices? It seems like it's a combination of economies slash the particular candidates slash kind of issues that they've heard about. They're just not as locked into one party or the other as potentially other voters. So both parties, there's opportunity for them to do work here. It's clear in Florida, the Republican Party has an edge, whereas in Georgia and Pennsylvania, the Democrats have an edge. All right, so we're going to continue to share more of this information. There were some questions about LatinX and all that and it's consistent with labels. But what was fascinating about that part of the poll was there was actually more like more than a third of people who were like, I really don't care how Latinos label themselves. And I don't think anyone really talks about that. You know what I mean? But it kind of validates a lot of the reporting that I've done where there is still a significant sector of Latinos who don't really worry about labels, right? I mean, not pulling a line. Final thoughts on that? I think it's funny that it gets so much press attention because it's so non substantive of an issue. You know, it's like exactly. There are so many other things you could focus on that they care so much more about yet we're here criticizing people for whatever word they use. Yeah, I get it. Well, Gustavo Sanchez just want to formally thank you again for authoring this poll. I hope this is the start of many future ones with futuro, but you helped us create some history in the history of media and Mariana Jose was tweeting it out is like history made of futile media. So thank you. Thank you so much for working with us. Yeah, and thank you all for the opportunity. I think we need to see more of this and it was a pleasure to do it. Yes, we do need to see more of this and we're going to keep at it. Thank you again. Thanks for being on Latino rebels radio and I'll talk to you soon, my friend. Yep. All right, that was it. You know, we did this poll first time in the history of futile media. Go to Latino rebels dot com, follow the stories that are going to be coming out pre midterms also post midterms. I really thankful for Gustavo Sanchez for authoring this poll for us. The polls available on my story, it'll be on the stories that other correspondents write, we will also follow up after the midterms to think about, oh, how accurate was this were we that far off, were we not? So he's good to assess. In the meantime, we're very aware that elections are coming. And we're going to do a couple of things here at Latino rebels radio. First of all, we're going to focus on Brazil next week because I'm going to do the final countdown for a second. The final countdown between Bolsonaro and Lula is happening this weekend and we're going to focus on Brazil next weekend. Then we have a little special on Instagram Live post election conversation with Hector Luis Alamo and myself, I think it will be the day after election day to see how did Latinos do and how did they vote so we're going to do that on Instagram Live. So follow us at Latino rebels on Instagram. It's really easy. Latino rebels were there. We got a blue check mark. And then we're going to take a pause. We're going to do something really special. Because the World Cup is happening. And then the week after we'll do more election conversations also on in the thick, Latino USA. Fernando Santos are editorial director, got the whole teams together and there's going to be a lot of really interesting coverage and commentary coming out of. So follow us, follow Latino USA following the thick, follow Fernanda Santos follow Gustavo Sanchez follow myself. Oscar Fernández of Latino media collective Hector Luis Alamo, who filled in for me. I really appreciate Hector stepping into the host share a couple of weeks ago. We'll bring him back. And yeah, and now we're going to get into the next couple of weeks. I think I'm live blogging for MSNBC, so if you want to follow me there during election day, I'll be there. So there, rate and review us, share this podcast, and you know, exercise your right to live in a democratic society. How's that? Go out and vote, damn it. All right, that's it. That's it. And like we always do, we always close out with la plebe and Ben savior that's Latino rubbles radio.

USA Gustavo Sanchez Pennsylvania Georgia Mariana Jose Florida nuggets Hector Luis Alamo Republican Party Bolsonaro Brazil Fernando Santos Lula Fernanda Santos Oscar Fernández World Cup Hector MSNBC
Most Latino voters have already decided how they will vote, poll finds

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Most Latino voters have already decided how they will vote, poll finds

"Election day is November 8th but over 100 legal challenges are already underway Nationwide more than a hundred lawsuits have been filed concerning the upcoming midterm elections over issues like mail in voting rules voting registration access for voters and partisan poll watchers and questions about voting machines It's the most litigation ever seen around a U.S. election and takes a more well organized approach than the roughly 60 lawsuits filed by ill prepared pro Trump attorneys that were roundly rejected in 2020 Charges that elections were rigged have become a major talking point for many Republican candidates The Republican National Committee has hired 37 lawyers in key states and says this time they have thousands of volunteers in place Democrats have lawsuits underway as well a team led by attorney Mark Elias is litigating roughly 40 cases in 19 states somewhere

Donald Trump U.S. Republican National Committee Attorney Mark Elias
Los Angeles police investigating whether council members were recorded illegally

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Los Angeles police investigating whether council members were recorded illegally

"Los Angeles Police are investigating whether the recording that captured city council members racist remarks was made illegally Los Angeles Police detectives are investigating how a recording of city council members meeting in private last year was made and by whom The tape posted on Reddit included racist remarks from those at the meeting police chief Michael Moore says council members Kevin de Leon and Gil saidel and labor head Ron Herrera asked for the investigation They approached the department on Friday this past Friday and requested that we conduct an investigation into the illegal recording of their private conversation Council president Nouri Martinez resigned after the tape was made public The group was heard using racist language to mock colleagues as well as one councilman's young black son while they plan to protect Latino political strength in council districts I'm Tim

Los Angeles Police Kevin De Leon Gil Saidel Ron Herrera City Council Reddit Michael Moore Los Angeles Nouri Martinez TIM
ABC News: The Path to Republican Victory Is Through Arizona

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:58 min | Last month

ABC News: The Path to Republican Victory Is Through Arizona

"According to ABC's Rick Klein and Jonathan Carl yesterday, the path to Republican victory might just come right through here in Arizona with a Blake masters victory. Yeah, John, this poll with ipsos shows that both parties have their areas of strength, but Republicans are starting to open up pretty open up a pretty significant gap on some of the biggest issues that motivate voters, inflation, crime, issues around the economy, double digit plus gap. That's what the campaign has been about. That's what the ads have been focused on. Now, Democrats have their issues as well. They have yawning advantages on things like gun violence, abortion, climate change, but the problem for them, John, is that those aren't the issues that are motivating voters first and foremost. Either in polls or talking to voters, it's those issues around the economy. And if this campaign is about inflation, high prices about crime, Republicans have a big, big advantage. Okay, and here in Arizona, a senator Mark Kelly, the Democrat, obviously running against Blake masters, tight race, you have been saying that this could come down to something you're calling McCain Democrats. Yeah, and John, this is kind of a microcosm of what we've seen around the country. Keep in mind that right here, this used to be red territory. Maricopa County fastest growing county in the country. John McCain won right here in 2016 last time he's on the ballot by 15 points. Fast forward just four years though, Mark Kelly and Joe Biden both win this state. Biden winning by barely 10,000 votes. One of the biggest upsets of the election cycle. So the battle right now, it's over suburban voters. It's over new voters in this fast growing county is over Latino voters. These are the trends you're seeing everywhere, and this drop voters, people that for decades voted Republican now have been voting Democrat where they land almost certainly determines where Arizona lands. And if you want to see why that matters, John, take a look at this. If just this one Senate seat flips, if Blake masters is able to beat Mark Kelly in a few weeks, Republicans go from a four in ten chance to an 8 in ten chance to take the Senate.

Rick Klein Jonathan Carl Blake Mark Kelly John Arizona ABC Maricopa County Mccain John Mccain Joe Biden Biden Senate
Hispanic and Latino Voters Are Going in the RIGHT Direction

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:17 min | Last month

Hispanic and Latino Voters Are Going in the RIGHT Direction

"Wall Street Journal is finally following our lead here where we've been saying for quite some time that Hispanic and Latino voters are going in the right direction. Very, very quickly. Democrats are in trouble with Hispanics. Wall Street Journal William galston writes, Republican gains among Hispanic voters have generated a wave of concern among Democrat strategists. In 2020, Trump received 38% of the Hispanic vote compared to 28% in 2016, much better than Willard Mitt Romney. It's funny how the guy who talks about immigration and culture and language actually does better. It's interesting how that works. Maybe all of those Republican consultants that talk endlessly on television have no idea what they're talking about. Mister Trump's share rose to 46% from 35% and in Texas to 41% from 31%. He made very large gains in other states as well. Now, at turning point action and turning point pack, we are leaning into this. We are doing Hispanic outreach. And in fact, we have an advertising campaign that we have just launched. Can we put up the images where this is all across the country? Actually focused in Arizona, where we're putting up billboards specifically targeted towards the Hispanic community. I think we're the only group that is doing this.

William Galston Wall Street Journal Willard Mitt Romney Mister Trump Donald Trump Texas Arizona
Meet Yesli Vega, Challenging Rep. Abigail Spanberger

Mark Levin

01:57 min | Last month

Meet Yesli Vega, Challenging Rep. Abigail Spanberger

"Well tell us the country in virginians about your race You're running against this phony moderate And the area that you represent and why you are the true blue conservative and she's a phony moderate Sure you know Mark I just stepped outside we actually have a Latinos Vega rally going on right now where we have over a hundred folks that turned out here tonight And there is no coincidence for why we're having so many people coming out to our events People are tired of what's been coming out of Washington over the last couple of years They're tired of my opponents double standards and her lip service and they're ready for change folks are hurting right now because of record high inflation because of the cost of fuel because of the cost of groceries And because they're seeing every single thing in their lives going up from crime to the economy to big hand of government trying to interfere with everything that we do And so we're really excited as we get closer to election day We have the momentum We're talking to voters about the issues that matter to them And we're excited because we're seeing a movement here and there's nothing my opponent or the Democrat party can do to stop it Whatever you do or would you like to represent Say that again What is the area that you're running in So the 7 congressional district begins in eastern Prince William county and then it has the staffer spotsylvania Fredericksburg culpepper Greene county Orange County Caroline county and king George and half a precinct in albemarle So it's a newly drawn district after redistricting this district is now 70% new to my opponent And I live work and play in Prince William county and I've been serving there as a county supervisor for the last three years I also had the privilege of leading the Latinos for young and coalition where we proudly delivered 54% of the Hispanic vote across the Commonwealth And so we've laid the groundwork and now we're starting to see people coming out like never before and they are ready to take our country back

Prince William County Mark Democrat Party Washington Spotsylvania Caroline County Greene County Fredericksburg King George Albemarle Orange County Latinos For Young And Coalitio
Nury Martinez Resigns From L.A. City Council

The Officer Tatum Show

01:50 min | Last month

Nury Martinez Resigns From L.A. City Council

"Disgrace Los Angeles councilwoman, nori Martinez announces leave of absence of men amid the scandal over the leaked racist remarks. You guys heard about this Los Angeles councilwoman nury Martinez announced she is taking a leave of absence Tuesday amid ongoing calls for her resignation after a recording revealing racist and offensive remarks was released over the weekend. You guys may have heard them. I certainly did. This has been one of the most difficult times of my life. She says, and I recognize this is entirely of my own making. The statement was released ahead of Los Angeles city council meeting that was scheduled for Tuesday at 10 a.m. at this moment. She continued, I need to take a leave of absence and take some time to have an honest and heartfelt conversation with my family, my constituents and community leaders, Martinez stepped down from her role as they counsel president on Monday, but did not leave her seat on the council, which has prompted backlash among those who won her out. LA city council president resigns after the racist remarks again, were revealed. Mike bonin, who was one of the targets of Martinez's comments, has been joined by Los Angeles mayor Eric garcetti, U.S. senator Alex Padilla and many others in calling for her resignation. I don't know why people are surprised because Democrats are a systemically racist party. Doesn't surprise, I grew up in Los Angeles. I've heard I can tell you, honestly, I've heard the N word a couple of times. From white people, the direct to me at that directed it at me. I've heard it. I heard it about 200 times, if not more, when it came to the feuds between blacks and Latinos when I was going to school. It just doesn't surprise me. And then to add to it, it doesn't surprise me that a Democrat would say it. It just doesn't surprise me.

Nori Martinez Nury Martinez Los Angeles Los Angeles City La City Council Martinez Mike Bonin Mayor Eric Garcetti Senator Alex Padilla U.S.
LA Council faces uncertainty amid furor over racist remarks

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

LA Council faces uncertainty amid furor over racist remarks

"Los Angeles city council members all Democrats including the president heard on leaked audio making racist comments are facing calls from among others President Biden to resign The LA city council will try to hold another meeting today after yesterday's that included protesters yelling for resignations of nori Martinez who took a leave as president and apologized Kevin de Leon and Gil se dio white councilman Mike bonin whose black son was called a little monkey by Martinez was emotional as he spoke Bubba officials are supposed to call us to our highest selves And these people stabbed us and shot us and cut the spirit of Los Angeles Council members like Mitchell Ferrell backing him The court of public opinion has rendered a verdict and the verdict is they all must resign The tape includes racist comments as the three discussed securing Latino power and the redistricting process in LA I'm Julie Walker

Los Angeles City Council President Biden Nori Martinez Kevin De Leon Gil Se Dio White Mike Bonin Los Angeles Council Mitchell Ferrell Bubba Martinez Court Of Public Opinion LA Julie Walker
Townhall: A Compilation of Joe Biden Pandering to Minorities

Mark Levin

02:16 min | Last month

Townhall: A Compilation of Joe Biden Pandering to Minorities

"Cut one hat tip town hall go I got raised in the black church He knows that I'm not kidding I got my education for real in the black church And that's not hyperbole It's a fact I was sort of raised in the Puerto Rican community at home politically It's a large very identifiable Somali community I might add if you ever come to the train station with me you'll notice that I have great relationships because there's an awful lot of driving cabs I probably went to shore more than many of you did You all think I'm kidding We've got the first sort of mainstream African American Who is articulate and bright and clean Nice looking You can not go to a 7 11 or a Dunkin Donuts Unless you have a slight Indian accent I'm not joking If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump then you ain't black Have you taken a cognitive No I haven't taken a test Why the hell would I take a test Come on man That's like saying you before you got in this program you take a test where you're taking cocaine or not what do you think huh Are you a jumper you say to president Trump who brags about his test and makes your number say an issue for voters Well if he can't figure out the difference between an elephant and a lion Young black entrepreneurs are just as capable of succeeding given the chance as white entrepreneurs are But they don't have lawyers They don't have they don't have accountants Poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids What you all know but most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions but Latino community is an incredibly diverse community Romney wants to let He said in the first hundred days he's going to let the big banks once again write their own rules Unchanged Wall Street You're going to put you all back in chains

President Trump Puerto Romney
Newt Gingrich Reacts to Tulsi Gabbard's Announcement

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:48 min | Last month

Newt Gingrich Reacts to Tulsi Gabbard's Announcement

"Heard Tulsi Gabbard announcing today that she is leaving the Democrat party. Are you hearing from people in your communities? People you go to church with, people you work with. Have you heard from Democrats that have said, you know what? We're done. Yeah, we're not, you know what? We're not buying into all of this. This doesn't look like the party of JFK. And it's not. It's not. I know my dad was a southern Democrat back in the day. And the last time he voted for a Democrat was Jimmy Carter. And Jimmy Carter's administration convinced my father that something was really wrong with the Democrats. Well, you know what, Jimmy Carter's administration? It looks like Donald Trump's compared to what we got right now. That's how radicalized the Democrats have become. So look, Newt Gingrich, speaker newt, was on Fox earlier today, talking about this cut number 6. Oh, look, I think Charles is somebody who has always spoken her own mind. She's always been sort of an independent maverick. And I think when she ran for president, she realized how really isolated she was from the great majority of the Democratic Party, which is now, frankly, a pretty weird party. We said the same thing happened in a slightly different way in Philadelphia last week where the former deputy mayor a Democrat endorsed Doctor Oz for the U.S. Senate and said that federman is just so crazy on crime and so pro criminal. He couldn't be for him. So I think you're seeing this drift and we've certainly seen among Latinos a huge drift towards the Republican Party as they're driven away by the weirder policies of the Democratic Party.

Jimmy Carter Tulsi Gabbard Democrat Party JFK Donald Trump Newt Gingrich FOX Federman Charles Democratic Party U.S. Senate Philadelphia Republican Party
Racist remarks spotlight rivalry between LA Latinos, Blacks

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Racist remarks spotlight rivalry between LA Latinos, Blacks

"A leaked recording of racist comments resulting in the Los Angeles city council president's resignation also provides a look into city hall's racial rivalries Democrat nori Martinez stepped down as president of the LA city council Monday and apologized saying she was ashamed of her racially offensive language in the year old recording her remarks which included mocking the black son of a white councilman came during a discussion with other Latino council members about protecting their political power during redistricting The white councilman Mike bonin called for the resignations of the others involved in the discussion as well describing it as a coordinated effort to weaken black political representation in LA I'm Julie Walker

Los Angeles City Council Nori Martinez Latino Council City Hall Mike Bonin LA Julie Walker
Larry O'Connor: A Certain Group Should Not Vote a Certain Way

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

Larry O'Connor: A Certain Group Should Not Vote a Certain Way

"You know, our pal Mark Davis and Dallas pointed something out this morning that was so important. He was talking about the voter disconnect between where people were their hearts are where they live. Their ideological beliefs and how they vote. He said Hispanic Americans don't favor open borders. Hispanic Americans don't aren't pro abortion, and yet many Hispanic Americans in Texas, for example, will say, oh, I'm going to vote for beto. I'm going to vote for beto o'rourke. And why do you suppose that is Larry? Why are there so many groups of people, so many segments of the population that seem to continually vote against their own self interest? You know, it's funny. You hear the same thing sometimes from Democrats to remember that book, what's the matter with Kansas? Do you remember when they said, why did kansans keep voting against they keep voting Republican when Republicans are actually harming them? So I don't know. I always hesitate to think that a certain group should vote a certain way because of where they live or certainly the color of their skin. I think Democrats are much better at that than I am. I would say that almost all of the Hispanic Americans, Latin Americans that I've ever met in my lifetime, they have a deeply held Christian beliefs. They're either Roman Catholic or there's a huge growing number of evangelical Christians and Baptists who are Latino American and I think when they look at their faith and their principles and what they care most about and then they see how radical the Democratic Party is going. They don't even lie anymore. They can't pretend I want abortion to be safe legal and rare. No, they want taxpayer money to go to abortions up until the moment of birth. And then the transgender ideology, it couldn't be further away from the strong family, Christian beliefs that most Hispanic voters hold. So I think that there's a disconnect there and they're starting to come around on it.

Mark Davis Rourke Dallas Larry Texas Kansas Democratic Party
Larry O'Connor: Biden Fished for Hispanic Votes by Going to PR First

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | Last month

Larry O'Connor: Biden Fished for Hispanic Votes by Going to PR First

"The cynic in me pointed out the shock and awe that he decided to go to Puerto Rico first. That to me blew my mind. Can you imagine? I mean, you know, obviously Puerto Rico was hammered too, but you might want to go to Florida before you go anywhere. Well, I'll tell you, I don't know if you've seen the latest polls out from telemundo of all places, but the conservative Latinos in America, ten years ago in 2012, I self identified conservative Latinos, lean Democrat by a factor of plus 6, ten years later, they lean Republican by a factor of plus 56. That's an extraordinary political earthquake that's happened. And this, by the way, with the propaganda from the media end Democrats telling Latino Americans the Republicans hated them that we were racist that we were building a wall. The fact is Latino Americans, especially conservative ones, they want that wall too. So my guess is that he's trying to shore up the Hispanic vote base by going to Puerto Rico first.

Puerto Rico Florida America Earthquake
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Of the American Latino is its new director. You heard from him at the beginning of the show when he was welcoming us to. Before this, Jorge spent more than 20 years at the history Miami museum. Most recently, as its executive director and CEO. Now, he's a director of a museum that doesn't even physically exist yet. So if you can imagine, his responsibilities are already pretty substantial. You have to raise hundreds of millions of dollars. You have to travel across the United States, collecting stories and artifacts, and objects along with your team, of course. You know, you need to consider all those things. We interviewed him a few weeks before he officially became executive director of the museum of the American Latino. That was back in May. We asked him about his plans to address the wide range and scope of the LatinX community in the museum, including matters of race, nationality, and gender. He said he's aware of the matter, but he didn't really have a specific game plan yet. We know that the Latino community is not a monolithic group, right? Different backgrounds and different needs. And that's really important. So the team and I are really going to cover it as main themes as possible and main topics to try to explore what needs to be told and how it's presented. Because it's tough. You don't have space for everything. Jorge also said that he's working with staff from the former Latino center, who have now joined the museum. For years, they've developed content and worked with Smithsonian museums on exhibitions and Jorge says that a lot of the foundational work has already been underway thanks to them. To build off that work, Jorge talked about creating a widely accessible institution. That's a big priority for him. I want our presence to be throughout the United States and Latino communities. So that's going to be a new way we develop a museum where we take it out into communities across the United States. Maybe a satellite exhibits, maybe it's travelers and ways to engage different communities, especially those that can not make the trip to D.C.. How are they going to experience this? And how are they going to share their story? So that's what we need to figure out over the next few years. We also ask Jorge about his vision for the museum in the long term. It's going to be a vision that's going to develop not only by the team and myself, but really by talking to people and challenging ourselves. What can we do better than other museums? Final stories of why this museum matters, right? And how do we make sure that this Latino history is American history? That's going to be a challenge. And I don't have the answer for it right now. What that main vision is, but it's going to be fun to explore. The museum is currently a work in progress, but overall, it seems that there are still way more questions than answers about the future of this space. For rosa, it still feels disingenuous to have an institution like the Smithsonian, one with a history of centering whiteness and colonialism, claimed to be prioritizing diversity. Ultimate museum job is to make sure that every story where their batter good is told. Whether we were excluded one time and now we're not. So those are the things that I also think people are grappling with in a way, but also we have to be careful how much time we spend begging people to include us. Rosa says she doesn't want to feel like a visual prop, and she has a point. The Molina gallery, the new state of the art space, holding the placenta exhibition, is only about 4500 ft² in size. Compare that to the 325,000 ft², available to the public in the entire museum of American history. It's just a little bit more than 1% of the total space of this massive building dedicated to American history and culture. Considering Latinos represent 19% of the U.S. population, it's telling that a space like this completely dedicated to Latinos and latinas. Never existed in this particular museum to begin with.

Jorge Miami museum museum of the American Latino Latino center Smithsonian museums on exhibit U.S. D.C. Molina gallery rosa Rosa
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Finds herself drawn to museums as spaces for discourse and archiving. But as a black Puerto Rican woman, she's all too aware of how these institutions often fail, her and her community. It wasn't until she got to college that she began to understand her own history. She just didn't have access to that knowledge growing up. I don't even think I knew why Puerto Rico was a colony. I just, I knew I was Puerto Rican and I was always proud of that. Rosa began to look for spaces that were intentionally built for her and her Afro black communities. Which is very different from institutions that simply just make room. She says you can always tell the difference. I love going to museums. A part of me when I walk into them, I look at what's on the wall and then I go who's not here. And that's how I feel this museum is going to be. It's going to open one day and 15 million of us are going to walk in and be like, where are we? That's why she felt she had to call out the Smithsonian. Earlier this year, rosa wrote an op-ed for the new site, Latino rebels, which, like this show, is a futile media property. Her piece was titled Afro black LatinX people, the missing pieces of national museum of the American Latino. Rosa was concerned that the stewards of this new museum were excluding Afro black Latino Latina and LatinX history and input in this space. She drew that conclusion after learning that a lot of folks who were publicly advocating for the museum did not identify as black or Afro LatinX themselves. There's 60 5 million LatinX people potentially. Now imagine if one out of every four of us identified as black, that's 15 million of us. They fundamentally know they can't move forward without us, they want us without us having any politic or power in these discussions. And the work itself. Shortly after rosa's op-ed was published, the national museum of the American Latino reached out to Latino rebels and to respond and to add a clarification. They said that she specifically called out the board of an unaffiliated advocacy group called Friends of the national museum of the American Latino. The advocacy group told Latino USA that they agree that inclusivity needs to be a priority, 100%. And they're working on opening their lines of communication to see how they can improve in that area. But they also said the question of inclusion and diversity will ultimately be the responsibility of the Smithsonian. For her part, whether it's an outside advocacy group or the real deal, rosa stands by her bigger picture critique. Why do you need to differentiate if you all all working towards creating this museum and making sure it's on the mall in D.C., your cherry picking right now to try to break down my argument as opposed to dealing with the issue at hand. Leading the charge at the national museum

Puerto Rican Rosa national museum of the America rosa Puerto Rico Latino USA ed D.C. national museum
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Of always, they're strongest when they're places of conversation. And those conversations are not always easy. And this is the beginning of this process. So I would say, come on in. Who gets to be part of the national museum of the American Latino? Both behind the scenes and on display that question hangs in the ballots, as this institution begins to take shape. Stay with us, not there by yes. Imagine, instead of James Bond, it was Jaime Bond, javi Bond, Bonnie simo. The super successful James Bond franchise was actually based on a Dominican man, what a video ruby rosa was a diplomat, Playboy, multilingual international polo champion, race car driver, pilot, and became the richest man in the world twice. Join host Chris rivas, a Dominican American author and storyteller, and lifelong fan of James Bond in this new podcast from witness stocks. Listen to ruby rossa on SiriusXM, Pandora, stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Don't forget to follow the show so you never miss an episode. Hey, we're back. When we left off,

national museum of the America James Bond Jaime Bond javi Bond Bonnie simo Chris rivas rosa ruby rossa
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:51 min | 3 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Involved in this issue, we have to first understand that the Smithsonian is actually part of the federal government. It's granted authority over its own grounds and buildings. But it depends on Congress for some funding and the authorization of major projects. Projects like a national Latino museum. And the Smithsonian is, in part, funded by us. U.S. taxpayers. In 2021, more than 60% of the institution's funding came from the federal government. Creating a national Latino museum became a legislative priority for eliana. And she started working on it with former congressman Jose rano, a Democrat from New York. First, they needed to figure out what to call it. We fussed about whether it should be called Hispanic American or Latino. All kinds of words that you could throw out as to who we were. And finally, it was settled on the national museum of the American Latino. Then it was time to draft some legislation. Jose and I filed a bill that would create a commission to study whether we could have such a museum. They couldn't introduce legislation to create a national Latino museum without formally exploring the possibility first. After several years of pushing for it, the creation of the commission was approved at the tail end of George W. Bush's time in office in 2008. The commission wouldn't actually be formed until a year later under the Obama administration. Remember Henry munoz, now the chairman of the national museum of the American Latino, he was also the person chosen to lead this commission. This is Henry talking at a 2009 press conference about the work ahead. I want to say that at this moment in our nation's history, the appointment of a commission that is composed of citizen members of people who will volunteer their time over the course of the next year to look at the location, the concepts, the collections, and the fundraising to create a national museum of the American Latino is historic. The group wrapped up and presented its findings to the president in 2011. The result was what illyana and supporting colleagues were hoping for. Building a museum for Latinos on the national mall was possible and vital. Anything less would fall short. Once we had that, then we wanted to actually build the museum. Oh boy, it's a task worthy of Hercules, but in 2017, we introduced the national museum of the American Latino act, and I'm sorry to give you such a chronology, but it's been quite a struggle. The bill had a surprising amount of bipartisan support behind it. Especially from senators and House members who represented areas with large LatinX populations. The national Latino museum was backed by people like then California congressman Javier Bethesda. Today, he's President Biden's secretary of Health and Human Services. If you walk through the mall of the nation's capital, you can come out understanding better than any place else in the world, what it means to be an American. But once you finish that walk through all those museums along the mall, you don't have a complete picture. Former senator Ken salad of Colorado and senator bob Menendez of New Jersey, both Democrats, supported the museum. And some Republican heavyweights also threw their support behind it. The late senator orrin hatch from Utah was an early proponent. And Texas senator John cornyn helped introduce the final legislation that would make the museum official. But it wasn't all smooth saline. There were many moments where we thought, oh my goodness, this is just never going to get off the ground. There were many arguments against creating a national Latino museum. Things like it was too expensive or too political. There were also objections to building on the national mall. One line of thinking from several people in Congress was that, oh, if we give Latinos the museum, then every quote unquote minority group is going to want one. Another popular suggestion among those not in favor was, instead of a Latino museum, why not a national immigration museum wouldn't that be more inclusive of other communities? Here's Utah senator Mike Lee, who at one point blocked legislation to create a national Latino museum. But the last thing we need is to further divide it and already divided nation with an array of segregated separate but equal museums for hyphenated identity groups. It was an ongoing tug of war and the bill kept getting bogged down and kicked off the floor for many years. Then, December 2020 came along. We were in the midst of an unprecedented pandemic and political tensions in the U.S. were reaching all time highs. Congress was on the verge of passing COVID-19 relief legislation. So illyana and her colleagues decided to attach their bill for a national Latino museum to this larger package. It was a tactical move. She says they knew the COVID legislation had to pass. And it finally did on December 27th, 2020. The national Latino museum was wrapped up in a nearly $900 billion COVID-19 relief package, like a Trojan horse. Illyana says a Trump administration took it in stride. I guess some people would think that it was ironic, but actually the Trump administration did not fight this bill at all. The president's signature greenlit

national Latino museum national museum of the America Jose rano Obama administration federal government Henry munoz illyana eliana Javier Bethesda President Biden Congress Ken salad senator bob Menendez senator orrin hatch senator John cornyn George W. Bush national mall Jose
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:49 min | 3 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"And I think someone we know is in here. Oh yeah. And we know this person. I think pretty well. It's a Wednesday morning in June. The Smithsonian's national museum of American history in Washington D.C. is mostly empty right now. It stores won't open to the public for another hour and a half. But my colleague Alejandra Salazar and I got early access today. So we're here and so is our boss. Well, kind of. Yeah, that's Maria, that's okay. She's standing there with hoop earrings and her red lipstick. Okay, so she is an actually here, here. But she's on a screen in front of us, dressed in a black jump suit and heels. Welcoming us to a groundbreaking new exhibition called Latino history of the United States. And now I'm standing here with ray, my colleague you just heard from. And we're face to face with the life size video of Maria nosa. Hi, Maria. Hey, Maria. Maria is one of about a dozen Latinos and latinas featured in this exhibition for their work in the Latino community. She popped up on screens in the center of the gallery space, along with others, a nurse, an immigration activist, other journalists like her. It's kind of funny. We usually don't have Maria watching us while we're out working as producers for Latino USA. But it sent this housed in the Molina Latino family gallery. It's in the museum of American history, and it's a Smithsonian's first permanent space dedicated to the Latino experience in the United States. That alone is something remarkable. But we're here to cover the opening of this show mainly because it's a precursor of something big to come. Thank you all for being here today and helping us celebrate this momentous day. Today we celebrate this new gallery and soon we will celebrate an entire museum. Dedicate to the rich and vibrant history of the American Latino. That he's the inaugural director of the upcoming museum he's talking about. The Smithsonian's national museum of the American Latino. And presente is a major step towards that museum. Like our democracy, we're all part of this new museum. I hope you enjoy the exhibit and do course. I look forward to seeing you all at the new national museum of the American Latino. Thank you. From the media and PRX, it's Latino USA. I'm Mariano rossa. Today we trace the origins of the national museum of the American Latino, and how it's starting to take shape. Museums are political

Maria Smithsonian's national museum Washington D.C. Alejandra Salazar Maria nosa USA Molina Latino family gallery museum of American history ray Smithsonian's national museum national museum of the America Mariano rossa
"latino" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

05:15 min | 6 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"Plurality, right? So it hasn't been the case for some time. Well, and we can't justify that the folks there don't cross over vote for Latinos. Because one of the provisions, one of the requirements legally in order for us to hold our ground and say, don't tear us apart, is that other communities mostly the non Latino mostly white community has to vote against or Latino candidate in order for us to have any legal grounds to say our communities are being negatively impacted. That doesn't seem to be the case in some areas of that district where the majority who in this case are no longer Latino don't vote against the Latino candidate of choice. They vote for Lydia. They vote for Antonio reynoso in terms of burrow president, right? They vote for Jan Gutierrez. They vote for Alexa obvious. They write so all these things play into the legalities I would say and whether or not our communities are really negative for me being impacted. Do we want it to be a majority seat? Well, if we have the population, we should absolutely make it. But that could not happen. No matter how much but the other issue, the concern that came up with that district in particular, one is a sunset park was basically cut in half. And that, to me, it appeared, and we've talked about this before, you see, all right? That our community was being used in a way to try to force, right? New York 11 to become democratic versus maintaining it a Republican seat, which I believe that was the district that really was the basis for that lawsuit. You're talking about legislation when the legislature passed their lines that event deemed unconstitutional by the courts. Yes. And that was remedied. Now all of a sudden. All of us is in the tenth new tenth, not an idiot. And I would say technically the reason why that was such a difficult choice, I would say for anybody is because the way the district ten cuts across to grab sunset park and Red Hook, it pretty much divides Nida's ability to go south without negatively impacting black districts, which is, in that case, that Clark and Jeff Hawking Jeffreys. So the geography right where we live, how we live, all of that. And the fact that Manhattan to come into Brooklyn has limited entry points, well, three different entry points. Williamsburg, by hand, and the Brooklyn Bridge in terms of their entry point. And or even the other entry point that's done by. Bay ridge, right? The tunnel. But there are, you know, they chose their route and I think this is one of the best case scenarios, actually. I agree..

Antonio reynoso Jan Gutierrez Lydia Alexa Jeff Hawking Jeffreys sunset park legislature Nida New York Clark Manhattan Brooklyn Brooklyn Bridge Williamsburg Bay ridge
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:26 min | 6 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"An exploration of one person's migration story and the endless search for happiness. Dear listener, you know, on this show, we feature many stories of migrants, often migrants who are dealing with incredible hurdles and for whom the process just to get to the United States is incredibly arduous. But even in the best of circumstances, migration can take a toll. Today, we're welcoming back the former senior producer of Latino USA. Miguel macias. And he's going to take it away for today's episode with a very special story. The story of a lifetime, or as he calls it, limbo. This story starts in 2012. That's the year I started taping interviews with my friends in Spain. It's 2008 economic crisis was four years in and not going away anytime soon. I saw many of my Friends keep up on their dreams a little bit more fulfilling life as I watched from the outside. So we talked, we talked for hours and hours about the crisis, politics, society, Spain, our generation. My generation was born around the time Franco, the Spanish dictator died. We grew up under a new democracy full of promise that things would be better for us. Better than for our parents. Not just politically, but also economically, but the crisis took away that promise. By then, I had been in the U.S. for more than a decade. I had a stable job as a professor at teaching ready production at Brooklyn college in New York City. And at that moment, when so many of my Friends were basically drowning, I felt lucky to live somewhere else to have some instability. That's my friend, Pablo, in architect. Studying architecture in Spain seemed like a good idea for a while for my generation, when construction was moving until it wasn't. Until the crisis devastated the sector. Works started to dry out progressively until there was no work for Paolo. He was unemployed for years. He went into a dark place, taking that a 40 years old, he had nothing to show for his life. Wondering what could happen to him in 20 years. He started doubting himself. Everything you expect to feel when you're unemployed for a long time, he knew this feelings for coming, and he still suffered from them. As I listened to my Friends talking about assistant, I felt like it was falling apart. I told myself, why would there be a place for me in this society? And they told me, too, in no uncertain terms, Miguel don't come back to Spain now. It's horrible here. So for me, at that moment, the crisis took away a different kind of promise. My dream to go back to Spain one day. I am by all means a privileged immigrant, I came to the U.S. because I wanted to, I was able to study, get a job, I even had support for my family in my early years here. I guess we could say that I've been fairly successful too. So.

Latino USA Miguel macias Spain U.S. Brooklyn college Franco Pablo New York City Paolo Miguel
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:46 min | 9 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Favorite film of the year, but I cried during the whole thing 'cause it was my first time coming back to a movie theater and I was there watching a piece of me on screen that I don't get to see very often. But I looked around and there were very little journalists that looked like me that shared that same space. It was critically acclaimed. It did so well critically. But I remember reading through so many of the reviews. And it was just there were a lot of, I want to say basic takes, but I was waiting to read the part where abella has boiling like on her stove. I was waiting to see eating rice and beans at the table. Just these little nuances that are us. They're so few Christina Escobar's and Jack RICO's in the world, there is just us, so we have to have each other's backs or who else is going to. And that's the next big thing that needs to change. You know, Jack, Clayton just brought up in the heights. Of course, as you know, I'm a little partial because I had a role in in the heights. And I do feel like in the heights was entirely snubbed and shut out. Even though there was legit criticism, but I do feel like, as you said, Clayton, there were people crying throughout the entire film. And I'm wondering, Jack, Vis-à-vis the conversation of Latino and Latina film critics. How you see how that played out? I love that there's a sense of community. But there's also a tremendous amount of pressure on you. Well, the first thing is actually Clayton created the Latino entertainment journalists association, which is probably the only I love that. Film critics organization where Latino film critics can go. But part of the problems is we're not all working for The New York Times or The Washington Post. We're independent and so scale is a massive problem with Latino LatinX film critics. We don't have the mass audience to be able to talk about a Latino film and have that go viral or national or be shared by the elite. By the influencers who actually change rules and laws depending on what we say. I think the other second challenge about Latino critics is that sometimes we just don't want to criticize our films because we're barely getting any promotion and if you have Latino critics bash a couple of Latino films that are key, for example, like even in the heights or west side story, then the support for that then dies because an executive in Hollywood says, see, even Latino critics are bashing their own movies. Which, by the way, is the most racist thing. It's the thing that drives me nuts all the time. When I get pictures and they're like, but you're Latino. And it's literally the argument. We don't have to like just one thing. We like other things. And we also need to stop putting all the weight of our culture on Lin-Manuel Miranda's shoulders to represent for everyone. I thought he gave the best response to in the heights, the colorism debate. We was like, listen, I will try better next time. I can't expect him to get all of us in one go. There's like, again, 500 million of us. Like, come on. Yeah. Get Christina. Well, I would add that. So we at Latina media co, we do a lot of work on helping latinas and particularly because women are even more underrepresented. Speak out and share their voice and that feels amazing and I love doing that. But I also want to say the whole industry is a mess. And the folks that I look at who've made it, who are editors at big publications or who get great jobs. Then there are one layoff away. I've seen them rise up, do amazing stuff for years, get a claim, and then they get laid off. There's a part of me that feels like, am I encouraging Latinos to go into an industry that is not going to respect them, that's not going to value them. That's going to be the first to lay them off no matter how good they do no matter what audience they build. And that is a problem that is, in many ways, bigger than us, but we need to build different systems because this one isn't working. It's not working for Latinos, but it's not working in general in terms of getting meaningful, strong, criticism, out there, and elevated from a variety of different voices. Yeah. It's really frustrating, especially when you think about the kinds of stories that exist in our communities across the board. You know, Latinos and latinas, we consume what one out of every four movie tickets, oh my God, when movie tickets were sold. But you know, we're a quarter of the movie going audience. And we're getting older and that means that there's another generation of younger people who are developing their own desires and tastes Vis-à-vis Hollywood and film. So I was speaking with another young Latina, and she was like, you know, it's an Aaron Sorkin film. I'm not going to go see that. Or look, Steven Spielberg, great, but west side story. I'm not so sure. So it feels like there's this tension where you have a generation of younger Latinos and latinas, they're not actually watching what the Oscars are doing. They're kind of losing interest Clayton, let's start with you. What does that mean for the future of Hollywood if Latinos are essentially like, you're not valuable, and I'm not turning to you to give me the props that I need. So the Oscars not being watched is, I think it's more complex. Maybe not even complex. I would say even more simplistic than Latinos not seeing themselves there,.

Clayton Christina Escobar Jack RICO Latino entertainment journalis abella Jack Manuel Miranda Latina media co The Washington Post The New York Times Hollywood Lin Christina Aaron Sorkin Steven Spielberg Oscars
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:33 min | 9 months ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"Bose wins the Oscar, she's going to be the second Latina to ever win an acting Oscar. The second and the first was Rita Moreno, playing the same role. So we're not seeing the progress in this space and to say that there are roles for Latinos, sure, they're usually gang members and janitors all right, Jack, can you just chime in and you two Christina? What makes a film a Latino Latina film? Obviously all we do on this program is talk about the complexity of this community. So on the issue of film, what is it? Because it does begin to feel a little boxed in. Things are so complicated and weird now in terms of the regulations and the policies and the academy. For example, memoriam, Tilda Swinton was in it, but it took place in Colombia. Was that a Colombian film? Was that a European film? So I think that the basic fundamental of what a Latino movie is is if it has a Latino themed story with Latino actors, does the director, like for example, John chewing and the heights is he need to be Latino for that film to be a Latino movie for the most part, most journalists most Latin critics when they look at a movie like in the heights. We call that a Latino film. When you talk about west side story, to me, as a Latino critic, I see that as a Latino film because the majority of the emphasis in the focus was on the Puerto Ricans in this particular film. So I would call that a Latino film. I want to dance. I'll just be straight up. I mean, Steven Spielberg, and he's directed obviously phenomenal films, but there was a part of me that was like, okay, why Steven though? Is your sense that then west side story is a Latino film or not? I think that one's tricky. I think we have to take it as one of ours because of the amazing performances that the latinas and Latinos put in on that film. And we have to celebrate them and shot them out and scream from the rooftops about how great they did. Because we don't want to be only able to work with Latino creatives, but we also need to say really clearly that it is not enough that west side story is very limited. It's very limited in its portrayal of our community. It's limited. They did the best that some white guys can do, but they couldn't bridge the gap and make it meaningful and advance, I think, the representation of our community outside of giving the.

Oscar Rita Moreno John chewing Bose Tilda Swinton Christina Colombia Jack Steven Spielberg Puerto Steven
"latino" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"latino" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"Welcome to Latino vote 21, a pop up podcast from Gotham gazette. I am Eli Valentin, a contributing Gotham gazette columnist and political analyst. Now that the general election is over, our eyes will turn to other matters that will equally grab our political attention. One of those matters is the very important redistricting process. This process occurs every ten years right after the census information is made available across the city and state we have seen a rise in the Latino population. In fact, the census data shows that Latinos in New York have increased by over half a million. This should have implications for how districts will be drawn. This episode will focus on this redistricting process and Latinos. I am honored to be joined by three distinguished guests who are working this with district in process, which is currently taking place with us today is Lucia Gomez was currently the political director at the New York City central labor council. Also with us is doctor Carlos Volga's Ramos doctor Volga Ramos is director for public policy, external and media relations and development at hunter college's center for Puerto Rican studies. And we also have Frederick Venice Burgos, the national director of civic education and engagement at Hispanic federation. I want to begin right off the bat and want our audience to understand what is the process behind redistricting. We know what happens every ten years, but I think outside of that, there are a lot of folks that need a primary, if you will, how this happens, what transpires? Who are the players involved? And who makes the final decision? So Lucia, I'm going to pick on you first because this is not your first rodeo. And you've worked on redistricting issues and in fact, I'm going to I've highlighted his name before, but I know you've worked with antelope falcon in the past and making rest in peace on redistricting and so again, you know the lingo, you know the process. So can you explain a little bit what is involved with this redistricting process? Thank you so much Elaine. Thanks for having me on. You always find the way to get me to choke up. So, yes. This will be my third redistricting process. I have got involved in 2000 through the Puerto Rican legal defense and education fund now called Latino justice and through Angelo falcon at the policy institute within the Puerto Rican legal defense fund. And then after that, they never found a way to get me out of it. And how come we're kind of pivotal and ensuring that Latino community was always actively engaged not just on the legal part, but on the part of advocacy and ensuring that Latinos were engaged in the process. And I think, you know, the process is could be convoluted depending on what lens you're viewing it from. But it is the process immediately following every decennial census. You know, the year followed by the zero. Once we receive.

Gotham gazette Eli Valentin Lucia Gomez New York City central labor co Carlos Volga Volga Ramos hunter college's center for Pu Frederick Venice Burgos Hispanic federation New York Puerto Rican legal defense and Lucia Angelo falcon policy institute Puerto Rican legal defense fun Elaine
"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Rebels radio, <Speech_Music_Male> we <SpeakerChange> out of here. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> The light is <Music> back. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> It's time. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The opinions expressed <Speech_Female> by the guests <Speech_Female> and contributors in <Speech_Female> this podcast <Speech_Female> are their own, and <Speech_Female> do not necessarily reflect the views of Futura media, or its employees.

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"After the stag hoti of these toppings and they've gone from being just a snack to being a symbol of urban black and brown culture and richard thing is along with the myth surrounding his rags to riches story was effectively turned into a folk icon by the mexican american community in los angeles. That is until the la times decided to follow an anonymous tip. That stated that richard's claim to fame was nothing more than that a myth one of the strongest voices that rallied to richards. Defense was rachel. Ray is a community organizer from los angeles. Rachel who he heard from briefly at the beginning of the show wrote an op. Ed titled hot cheetos are los angeles. It was published by knock. La a nonprofit community journalism project if felt so personal to my own understanding of myself as a mexican person but also as an angelino. They never write about us when they do. This is what we get an all of the things that you could find to write about in the city. This is a dynamic vibrant city full of so many stories that needs to be told and this is what they chose to focus on for. Rachel richard story is reflective of so many others that she often. Here's as a labor rights organizer in los angeles county stories of hard working dino's and latina's who put in the extra hours to gain some level of respect from their employers only to continue to be undervalued and under appreciated. And i'm gonna try to knock get emotional. It's so silly rate because that's the subject is on cheetos but it's so much more than that you know. I do think about how hard my dad has worked in. Nonunion jobs his entire life and has had no protections but has gone into work every day and worked so hard and has given everything you know. Richard talks a lot about how hard he worked mopping floors and mopping them twice. And just doing doing a really good job and having that work ethic and not something that's taught a lot in our communities and that's what i grew up with and that's what i hear in his story. I hear the importance of hard work and a strong work ethic and so to that being diminished by a white reporter really clearly struck a nerve in me years a disclaimer for you. Rachel ray is used to date. Sam dean the reporter who wrote the la times piece so it upsets me because it reminds me of so many of the stories that i heard growing up the ways you have to do things to get recognition and respect in the workplace that often go completely unnoticed and finally someone's hard work was not s. So yeah we want to hold onto that story who stopped at a yano felt that the backlash that came from the latino community towards the l. a. times and against him to personally he said it was actually largely misdirected. I understand we do not have the best reputation when it comes to treating latino writers right or even covering latino writers right. And i know this because i wrote a whole history for our paper examining our pathetic legacy of both of those situations but now i'm trying to tell people like look. I am telling you as guy who wrote the book on mexican food in the united states. I believe the story then. Of course people telling me. Oh you're trying to tear down a successful mexican and for me. I'm like wow. This is really insulting. Because it shows that no one read my buck or no. One even reads what i write because i have an entire career of lifting up latinos especially mexican food entrepreneurs in this industry that has always just gone after them. Total avail. i know. I know it's a cliche to say but it's a total novella. This take down by a white male reporter at the la times a legacy paper with a reputation of not always treating the latino community. And its own. Latino staff fairly made the article that much more incendiary for many including rachel. We're not at a place in our city or in the world. Frankly where racism. A problem where capitalism isn't a problem where workers rights are all good. And everyone's happy so the way. Those three things intersect with the story are incredibly important And the fact that that wasn't made clear to anyone before they hit publish.

Richard Rachel Rachel richard los angeles Rachel ray both richards united states richard twice Ray rachel mexican Latino three things one mexican american Sam dean angelino latino
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"This week. President joe biden was inaugurated as the forty-six president of the united states high on his legislative agenda our promises to reform the country's immigration system and to attempt to undo donald trump's most controversial policies. One of those policies is the migrant protection protocols known as mpp or the remain in mexico policy under the program established in january of two thousand nineteen nearly sixty eight thousand asylum seekers have been ordered to wait in mexico as their asylum. Cases make their way through the us system. The weight can often take years now and it can often be deadly in fact. That's what i witnessed last year. When latino usa visited what is in mexico's northern border and later on by chula play on the southern border with what they ma. I was there to meet with asylum seekers who were living in shelters and in parks on the streets and with mexican government officials who denied working with the united states on immigration policy even when we were witnessing taking place right in front of our eyes obvious. Personas or younger is on the atari camels in this mid-quarter does theocro will see ten people today number. Nineteen thousand four hundred and twenty eight mexican official calls this out to a large room. Does the person holding the number approaches the official to say that they're here. What those interested in you know what of those interested in a mexican officials won't admit on the record that they're managing the list. They know that working with the us on this would be controversial in our two part series. The moving border we broke down the ways that mexico had become integral in trump's plan to build the border wall. Even if the actual border wall was a paper one built on seemingly impenetrable policies the asylum seekers met in mexico shared heroin stories of crime and abuse and vulnerability and desperation both at the hands of criminals and the police and authorities while waiting in border towns and all of this coupled with the fear of being deported by the country that was supposed to be offering them protection after mexico boasted about its highest number ever of deportations in two thousand nineteen a group of mexican researchers and migrant advocates set out to document just how extensive involvement has been between the united states and mexico and how this collaborative effort allows policies like the remain in mexico program to flourish. Their research is published in a new report titled in la boca the logo in the mouth of the wolf and it was released last month. Our guest today join us from mexico. City there alesia manga. Who's a human rights investigator at the foundation for justice and the democratic state of law and gretchen. Kunar who's director of the institute for women in migration and welcome alycia and gretchen to let new usa. Thank you so much maria. So the both of you were part of a group of mexican. Researchers that led an investigation into the lasting effects of this so-called remain in mexico program which essentially forces asylum seekers to wait in mexico even though they're actually seeking asylum in the united states. Why was it so important for you to look into this issue right now where maria day. Us mexico have been pushing migrant policies against the mosque wallner rabble people in our region people who are running for danger that they face in their home countries people who are seeking for international protection so they can stay alive in this report we command how the us mexico join decleration and a migration agreement as well as the remaining mexico program are happy. Human effects in terms of human rights violations against asylum-seekers sewn up these seats on states have been recognized as the most violent places mexico. Like komo leap as places where the us department does not recommend. Americans see the sense basis in district board. We document cases off violence in serious crimes against a people such as more dirt kidnapping disappearance and multiple forms of gender violence. The mexican government had promised a temporary permission for people to remain mexico as well as the rights to jobs health and indications while date await the outcomes of their asylum process but has not fulfilled these commitments so literally. They are in the most off the wall. What kind of danger are we talking about when we're talking about these refugees being level level. So we've had case says you know people who are in mpp and <hes>. Many of the cases that we've represented the people have been kidnapped <hes>. We had a young girl who was sexually assaulted and some people have even been murdered. The title of the document comes from a direct quote from one of the asylum-seekers that we interviewed. And i think that he was talking about the situation at that time. In where people were being sent back and literally from immigration offices in mexico they were being sent to a bus station and the kidnappers. Were there waiting for them. And what happens is that people are taken to <hes>. Homes in remote places and then their family members in the united states are contacted and so we started collecting. Some videos and audio tapes of the families would take any of the kidnappers talking to them and telling where to send the money.

last year mexico President forty-six today this week joe biden mexican january of united states chula play usa la boca donald trump latino two thousand nineteen nearly s years One of those border marina hoarser
"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"I don't know if you saw a story that i wrote earlier this week about latino voters and it's really geeky amazing information great report out of ucla actually have three guests from ucla. Going to talk about this report that we published earlier this week. A latino rebels pre inauguration. One of them beat me in a video game and she's still like talking trash and rightly so so you want to introduce yourself and then we'll introduce the rest of your colleagues. Absolutely this is sonia anti as the founding director of ucla latino policy and politics initiative and honestly it's only holy <hes>. That keeps reminding everybody that he lost. We do this life facebook and you totally kick are asked and i love the trash talk. You know <hes>. But we're friends and then your colleague rigo further your can you say hi bigger. And i'm the director of research at ucla latino policy and politics initiative great and finally daisy say. Hi hi. i'm daisy. I am one of the students and senior policy fellow at l. p. Are you like a brazilian soccer player. You go by your first name. Do you want stacy basket. Is there go by daisy daisy scientists. So i wanted to get the three of yuan because of findings of this report that you all put out with your colleagues about. Latino voters is pretty definitive. Yeah sonia can you start you know you can talk about the findings but also the reason why and what were the biggest takeaways. I know it's in the report but sometimes just hearing it and talking about it. It really hit home when you put it in the perspective. So what can you share absolutely contextualized. What are facing in the united states right now. I like to term it this nexus of invisibility and disposability. And so when it comes to the you don't often think about latinos akin to asian americans in many ways. They're invisible for variety of structural reasons. But then there's also the disposability which really means they don't get their credit and so our research at ucla was trying to find empirical evidence about the might the impact of latino voters across the country. It builds off of research that we're doing in two thousand eighteen and this is really distinct because this is let the researchers studied latino voters in illinois in florida in new york in the southwest. But on top of that. We're doing something that is really distinct where you can't rely on aronie punditry or exit. Polls that don't have adequate samples of latinos. This is actually an analysis rooted in facts. And i know daisy can get into all of the methods which are important because our study you so pathbreaking in so many ways that we kind of have some followers that replicated and try to do this methodology. All right before we get into the data geeky into data scraping. If i had a profile data scraper but curly go. What were the top findings. Maybe put it in the context of the most i to say that were surprising but findings that maybe changed the narrative. A little bit about twenty twenty two you starting. With the fact that latino vote grew dramatically in at a faster rate than the national search and voters we twenty twenty so we estimate that from two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty latino turnout nationwide increased by around thirty one point nine percent over these four years whereas the growth for the rest of the voters was only around fifteen percent so latino voters turn grew double the pace or double debris that the growth for other voters. So that's a huge dining and it's definitely surprising. I mean we saw a huge turnout growth for everybody but latinos definitely outpaced that growth of the second thing is that either by themselves or in multiracial coalition. Latino voters really delivered several states for joe biden including in arizona and georgia two states that have not had a democratic candidate. Win the states for the presidency in several cates and so those two. I think are pretty important findings or my report

arizona illinois new york florida twenty percent julio georgia facebook two twenty twenty two states Sonia ucla One one Stitcher second thing around thirty one point nine p sonia anti seventy
"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"latino" Discussed on Latino USA

"If i was somehow asked to say only one thing about the place. I'm from it would be that it. Has this unforgettable smell when it rains. It slightly floral but mostly. It's this very specific cool earthy desert aroma. And there's usually a calm clear breeze which carries these concentrated little pockets of fragrance. The smell comes from the creosote bush. A resilient plant that thrives only in this particularly arid landscape especially after a thunderstorm the bush releases a bunch of these oil compounds into the air stuff found in citrus rosemary pines and it just smells like the earth. Exhales creosote can live for thousands or tens of thousands of years. It's one of the oldest living things on the planet and here. This ancient brush grows at the foot of the franklin mountains and the valley they nestle below cutting through the desert valley is the rio grande dividing to cities and countries. Al paso texas to the north and south. What is in mexico to the south. This story my story long before. I became a journalist and moved to the east coast begins here. I remember seeing opazo from the hill. Where my morning lived. This is my brother. Jesse will actually. His name is kiss. Who says he goes by. Jesse he was five when i was born in. What is just a few miles from the border. One of his very first memories is looking across the border to the. Us we could she youtube. We could see the buildings highway could see the other signed. My parents could see the other side to in mexico. We lived in bath. These tenements studio apartments all connected through the same courtyard. Something like ten families shared one bathroom outside. My dad like a lot of folks already crossed the border practically every day to odd jobs in el paso like an act factory. He and my mom had to quit school by the age of thirteen to help their families. The other side of the border looked safer. Quieter the kind of place. That could afford my brother. And i the life. Our parents couldn't have when i was three. My parents took all the money they saved and moved us across the border to a small refurbish trailer in the most rural undeveloped outskirts of el paso county. The land was dry and flat untouched. And i remember getting off the car and seeing those huge tumbleweeds and under they're usually there's snakes snakes and when i moved out here there was always there was always snakes coming out. One of my earliest memories. Ever is the smell of creosote bush. Here we were ecstatic as a family. Love the trailer nelson demos on your house. Basically we still went to. What is every weekend. There was always cousin's birthday party or a baby shower or an anniversary in mexico. We made home videos at these big family parties. A bunch of kids speaking english and staying way late. I remember what is always being loud like fun loud. We danced into the early morning hours. At either of my grandmothers houses of root of cousins eating street tacos glistening in the dark amber of the mexican streetlamps. This was my early life mexico on the weekend. The states during the week soon i started school on the first day of first grade. My teacher called me mary. My actual name is linda unnamed down for my grandmother. My mom says no one ever asked her. If changing my name from monday to marry it was okay. She just kind of found out in an open house with c. Was we loping house when my teacher started talking about mary medicine. Meister this the my mother. Mary and she was like who's that on the mary mary. All it didn't even occur to my mom to object. We were knew she didn't speak english. We were undocumented students. Like i guess they'll call her. Mary

Mudiay sia latino one thing american