22 Burst results for "Latif"

"latif" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

07:53 min | 2 months ago

"latif" Discussed on New Media Show

"It is a little bit of a coming out and we're coming back. However you want to say it. This particular event, I think, is going to be really the first event that's of scale that's coming back from the pandemic, and hopefully people won't have to wear masks, but that may be a possibility still, but yeah, are you excited to get back in the game with the with the evolutions event? I know it's been a few years now. Yeah, I'm super excited for all the reasons you just mentioned, obviously our bread and butter at podcast movement are the events and it's been two or three years now so it feels like since we've been able to do it like we wanted to and hopefully this is the first year back where we're able to really put our best foot forward with an event. We did have a Nashville p.m. 21 with everything going on. I think it went really well. We had over 2000 people there in person, which kind of still in the heart of things being crazy. It was good, but like you said, hopefully with some mask mandates going down and people feeling more comfortable traveling and I know I can speak for several organizations and companies in the podcast space who now have lifted their travel restrictions. So that's going to kind of flood the event with some of those folks as well. So yeah, all signs are pointing to evolutions here in three weeks from today, actually. Being a really good one. And you know, I've noticed something that has to be mentioned. You've got a beard. Okay, so the question, I can't remember if because we did do one of these shows before Nashville. And I can't remember if we had that, maybe it wasn't groomed as much. But yeah, it definitely started as a pandemic beard in 2020. And the true story is I had a daughter born right when the pandemic was starting. So she's nearly two years old now. And she's never known me without it. So at this point, I think if I were to, if I were to lose it, then she might not recognize dad anymore. Well, you don't want to lose that connection. No, exactly, exactly. And my older daughter, she's four, and I asked her, do you want me to get rid of it? And she doesn't remember me without it at this point, either. So both of them vote for me to keep it. Yeah, and I grew one too over the last couple of months. It's been something that I've been I've been trying to actually I was challenged by Todd and James cridlin to grow this beard. You got to so you got to at least see them both in person with the beard, right? James will be in Los Angeles, so we got to prove it to him that it's not just drawn on for Skype. That's right. I keep mine pretty thin, so I'm not letting it get to Shaggy like you're so of course it's a difference between 20 years of age difference too, you know? You don't have to worry about the gray hair yet. Not yet. But hey, Dan, it's glad to have you on and I know you guys are busy and I've been seeing lots of announcements. It looks to me and of course rob and I have been gone for two weeks, so we're going to have to talk about some other stuff today too, but we'll get the evolution stuff out of the way. Number one, podcast Hall of Fame announcement. 8 people inducting. Yeah, we're super excited to bring that back. It felt like the last few times I was on here. That was obviously a point of conversation is when that was going to come back and super pumped for libsyn to step up and partner with us to bring that back awesome Hall of Famers coming in. And one of our concerns obviously with things going on was were we going to be able to get 8 people there in person to accept. And save for one, they'll all be there in person and it's a really great class and we're super excited to bring that back from our side from a production standpoint. It's a fun event to put on. But then also just for honoring those in the space who deserve to be honored, being able to do that once again. Awesome. And you've scored a comedian. Is he going to be a comedian or is he going to be talking about his podcast? Yeah, so TBD. So yeah, Will Ferrell is I guess from the podcast space what he's done the most of is his own podcast, the Ron burgundy show, which is the spin off to the anchorman movie. But within iHeartRadio, he's got his own network, his own podcast network, which they've done for several other kind of celebrities. They've spun up little networks underneath the iHeart umbrella in big money players is what his is called and they've got a stable of comedy podcasts. So I believe a lot of the conversation is going to be about that and kind of the network within the network and things like that. And obviously, it'll be cool to have someone like Will Ferrell on stage as one of the keynote speakers of that first day. And then today we just announced that latif Nasser, who is the new host of radio lab, the longtime radio host radiolab host jad stepped down several months ago in latif has been on the team for years and is now one of the host of that show and obviously one of the largest podcasts in the world, radio lab is. So we're excited to have him there. And he's actually doing a solo talk presentation, which usually when you get bigger names to do. Keynote talks, you kind of have to do it as a panel or do it as a fireside chat just for the lift to be a little less for those folks. But yeah, he's going to be doing an original talk and presentation. So kind of excited for that as well. Yeah, I've got a confession to make, though. I have not listened to a single episode of radiolab. Yeah. That's okay, right? That's why we love podcasts. And it shows that you don't listen to. And it's not that and I don't know why. I understand it's a fantastic show, but I don't know why I've never subscribed to us. I probably should at least listen to at least one episode before evolutions to get a feel. Highly produced program that's very interesting, I think, that I've listened to a few episodes over the years. And I think we can do a terrific job. So this change in hosts should be interesting. Check it out again. Are you here in rob okay, Dan? I am here in rob O cat. I don't know if the audience is. It sounds like you're not. Yeah, it might mean if you're hearing him okay, the audience is hearing him okay, and it's just on my end. So it's a little weird, but it's okay. But rob, like you said, he's a new host of radio lab and it's one of the most highly produced this whole concept of in depth sound design and lots and lots of producers working on the show. That's radio lab. It's probably the most produced podcast I've ever heard. It's kind of what they're known for. But yeah, so the theme of it is the show. Again, well known podcast and radio show as well. I think nationwide on NPR. But the evolution of that with the new host and the new direction. So we're kind of mirroring that evolutions of podcasting theme with the talk that he'll be doing. So I'm excited to see how that turns out. I think the overriding concept of the show is to kind of be at the cutting edge of audio and renewal per se. So I think that that's why it has that kind of sound design to it, but before we get too far into it, I'm sure there's a few people that are listening to this that aren't maybe are not familiar with podcast movement evolutions in LA and I just wanted to mention it's march 23rd through the 26th coming up here this month in Los Angeles and it also has a virtual component to it too. So then once you tell us kind of just start from the top with it for those that may not be as.

James cridlin Nashville Will Ferrell latif Nasser Dan rob Skype Todd Los Angeles jad latif James rob okay NPR LA
"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Transfer of you know muhammad al qahtani so i i think either. You're missing my point. I wasn't clear and my money is on the line. Maybe both so my point is not that they ought to do this at the expense of every other item on their domestic agenda. Because it's not hard to imagine. How every single republican will react. My point is that it is not. We're not gonna get anywhere unless they do. And so. yeah. I mean ben. Do i understand why. Closing guantanamo is administration's expanding any capital. Of course i do. If i were in the administration would feel the same way quite. Possibly that doesn't change the fact that they're the only ones in a position to do anything about it. And that's that's why were stuck now as opposed to why we've been stuck previously. I do think there are things they can do. Short of you know using their razor thin democratic majorities on guantanamo. I don't think for example the video plea deal proposal requires any legislation at all and so in so far. That was something they were willing to. Do you know as long as there were defendants who are willing to acquiesce. Identify could be pursued. I didn't they could really ramp up the efforts to not just get all ten of the pr. Be clear detainees out of guantanamo. But to actually see if any of the seventeen not. Pr be clear detainees might now actually get through the process because that has happened before so i won't be as clear as possible. It is not that. I blame the biden administration for where we are today. I do not. It's that so much of the sort of reasons why we're going to continue to be stock are because of the political factors that will lead the administration to expand capital on the things. It would need to do to actually make meaningful dent in that number okay and this brings us very neatly to al hilla the dc circuit case a to which you referred earlier which involves has actually potentially substantial implications for a lot of people but i think particularly for the remaining detainees who were in abdelatif nassar's position that is people who were pr be cleared for transfer got kind of stuck so Walk us through where where we are with that okay. So is one of a couple of the seventeen detainees who have not been cleared by pr. Bees whose habeas petitions took a really really really long time. These are not like second successive. These are first petitions and al hilo along with stifle a piracha. And there's i think one other. Ms i fully to purchase i. It's it's even hard for me to keep track of all these things. Anyway so al heels case finally got to the dc circuit last year and it produced this remarkably two thousand and nine like opinion because it produces remarkably two thousand nine like panel where you had a three judge panel of judges naomi. Row a raymond randolph. And former judge riffs and for folks who don't have the dc circuits guantanamo jurisprudence committed to memory. Judge ran off is the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in brazil. He's the one who wrote dependent was your first by the supreme court in hamdan. He's the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in boumediene and he was the one who worked the opinion that was vacated by the supreme court in piazza has some views on guantanamo. So the three judge panel held a couple of pretty important things but most importantly it held at guantanamo detainees categorically. Do not have due process rights. Judge griffiths separate concurring. Opinions suggest that it was unnecessary to reach that conclusion because as various other panels had done at various other points. One could assume that you process clause applied if one believe that whatever process that detainees had received met due process standards. And then the the detainee. Mr al hilla sought rehearing on bonk from dc circuit given. How sort of one sided a panel. He had received. The disease agreed to rehear the case on bonk. But and here's what technical especially important only the due process issue. There were actually some other important questions that the panel decided about. Whether the scope of the government's detention authority includes the power to detain someone who is not a member of al qaeda or any of its affiliated groups but who provided substantial support to al qaeda affiliates through non-belligerent activity. That's a big deal to that is not what's going before the on the unbound is just as i am the due process question so of course this led to the question of well. What's the biden administration gonna say about the due process clause and again we're back to carol and charlie's report in an according to caroline charlie. There was a huge interagency. Kerfuffle about what the by initiations position ought to be where all three positions were represented. Basically the notion that the due process clause should apply to the detainees and yet was satisfied. Here the notion that the court should not reach whether it applies because even if it does it was satisfied and the notion that the it was not applicable. All three positions were aired. Apparently the middle one one and so the brief that we have not seen as we've been told by caroline. Charlie takes no position on the due process question. It merely takes the position that to whatever extent to process applies the procedures at guantanamo comport with due process. Exactly so and that's an elegant compromise. If you don't think about it that much the reason why. I'm i'm sort of wary of that compromise and the reason why i've been wary of opinions making that point. Go all the way back to. I think it was then circuit. Judge brett cavanaugh. Who was the first. Big argument is because various judges on the dc circuit have suggested that some of the critical procedural rulings that the court of appeals reached in the first round of post boumediene cases ben back nine ten and eleven were informed by the assumption that the due process clause did not apply so for example the notion that the correct standard of of the burden of proof is a preponderance of the evidence not clear and convincing evidence. Well judge silverman has all but said the reason why you know. They're not troubled by hamdi is because that case of course was about due process so color me skeptical that the dc circuit jurisprudence over the last eleven twelve years would look the same if the due process clause clearly applied to the detainees. But the larger point. And i'm just gonna say working now i'll shut up. Is you know whatever this means. For the habeas cases it has enormous implications for the military commissions because to whatever extent in the government can get away with the argument that the procedures. These defendants are the detainees are receiving satisfied. You processing the habeas context. You know ben courts have a much better idea of what due process requires the criminal context especially in the capital context. And that's where i think. Al hilla could have enormous practical ramifications on the military commissions side answering that question one way or other. And do you have an instinct about how to handicap the bank dc circuit on this point. And let me just make the question a little harder and do you have an instinct about if the on bank dc circuit agrees with you. What the chances are the. Supreme court would regard the matter cert worthy where i have to say. There certainly is not a majority in my view for the idea..

guantanamo biden administration muhammad al qahtani supreme court al hilla abdelatif nassar al hilo raymond randolph Judge griffiths Mr al hilla ben al qaeda caroline charlie hamdan naomi piazza Judge brett cavanaugh brazil dc carol
"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:15 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Martin stepping down but the government filed something asking for an extension and then the government has since filed a very careful a tight rope walking brief where they are declining to defend. Judge a costa's decision but they're not agree on that it's wrong. Basically where they want sort of live to fight this the the the administration's not asking this emc are to affirm. But they're also not willing to concede that a cost to was incorrect so that they can have this issue for a future case if they want it. That seems to be ben. What forced or pushed martin's out whether it was his own or whether it was he was asked to step down by the very few people above him in the chain of command. I only a handful of people know but it seems to be that. The by the ministration insisted on martin's not defending that ruling on appeal. And that was the last straw. So your your inference. Here is that martin's wanted to defend this decision and the biden administration Did not although having gotten rid of him. They didn't acknowledge error. In the case either right did not have knowledge error. What they're basically saying is that they are not that they're not defending basically that they're going to sort of you know stipulate. I think what they've done. They're going to stipulate to sort of a withdrawal of that opinion without considering that it was error that basically there are no longer going to seek to introduce that evidence against al nashiri and therefore the legal issue is moot. moot not necessarily settled. And so you know. I think the the reason why ben i feel somewhat comfortable in the inference. Although it's right to say that there's an inference is because we only got to this point because the prosecutors under the direction of general martin's had pushed for this ruling in the first place and so i find hard to believe it was the other way round right. I find it hard to believe that. A legal argument advanced by general martin's and his prosecutors that pushed gentle martin's out because he was standing by the same argument. If you follow me. Because he wasn't ended by this. I it's usually the most logical inference here is that he wanted the government to defend that decision. The people above him didn't and they just reached some kind of intractable in impasse. So this brings us to the more general point about the proceedings. Continuing in the military commissions are not as the case may be albeit without the chief prosecutor. Unlike latiff if nasser there are these detainees who have pending charges against them including mr al-nashiri and the five nine eleven accused conspirators. Where are we at this point. I mean for those. I would say overwhelming majority of listeners and l'affaire readers who have frankly lost track of the saga of the military commissions. What does it mean that proceedings resumed and is the resumption of proceedings really mean the resumption of a stalling at a different rate. I would say stalling for different reasons right. That as opposed to be installed by cova did. Now we're back to where we were before. Which is with different cases stalling because of various procedural impasses. So you know the reality is. I mean there are ten defendants spread across four trials or at least four cases there. Is you mentioned the five nine eleven defendants alan the sheree hotmail rocky also known as national to mir and then there are the three sort of the so-called indonesia defendants whose cases the least far along who were just only a couple months ago arraigned and there are also to be clear a couple who have clad right so i'll alu. Oslo was convicted and majd conp- lead so there are two. There are two still guantanamo. Who are on the far side of the military commissions system introduced in in sort of post conviction imprisonment. If you will better we could do like an hour on each of the cases and why they're stuck in the mud make a long story short yes. The resumption of prasino's guantanamo means that we will go from zero movement toward trial in. This case is toward the very slow paced movement toward trial that we had seen before last march. You know i still think a twenty twenty four trial date in the nine eleven cases still to me wildly optimistic probably the same violence show because the the wildcard here and the mark martin store is a good example of this. The wildcard here is interlocutory. Appeals and the specter that if the trial courts hand down you know rulings that really tilt very heavily one way or the other. There's going to be time. Spent taking that issue to the cr. And then if necessary the dc circuit perhaps without the trial being able to continue perhaps without further progress in the proceedings. And in the nashiri case when that happened indeed they went backwards three and a half years so there are so many things still to be worked out. There are so many questions still to be answered. And frankly i mentioned ben. The ongoing fight in the al hilla case about whether the due process clause applies at all to the detainees. That's on the habeas salad. Wait man we're getting to that but don't jump the gun. I'm not jumping the gun. I'm just tying threads together which is to say that like what the dc circuit does in that case could yet further either slowdown or throw a wrench into the you know the the incredibly slow march of pretrial proceedings and each of these four cases. I have a quick question. Actually if i could. But in steve this is like i feel like i'm one of those people that ben was saying before is like sort sort of lost a threat to actually hearing you lay it all out like this is very very helpful but the fact that this is like this has been dragging on for so long my my my question is like he's there anybody anybody on any side of this. Who is happy with the way things are going right now not publicly so you know i had thought this is why i took it back to the mark martin story for a second. I mean you know say what you will about general martin's and he and i have certainly had our differences over the years but man if you needed someone to stand up and say you know this is going okay. We'll just have to keep the only way out is through like yes you know. Kip common carry on like that was his stick. Was you know. We're reinventing the wheel. This is gonna take awhile. They're going to be some bumps and bruises but we're marching in the right direction. And so you know to me. At least right. General martin's sort of stepping off stage is just yet another nail in this coffin of like. What are we still doing here. I mean you know ben no i wrote a piece for for l'affaire i just went back and looked at when i wrote. It was april of twenty nineteen titled. It's time to admit that the military commissions have failed. You know here. We are two years and three months later and they haven't gotten any better. And if you wanna symbol general martin's leaving is quite simple and it's not a good one so there may be people out there who still think. Everything's going great with the military commissions. I'm hard pressed to think of anyone who says that publicly. I don't think there's anybody. I mean as somebody who defended the military commissions for quite a while. I haven't done so publicly in years. It seems to me they. They have a demonstrated record of failure across all of the axes that justify their existence in the first place. And i don't know anybody who argues to the contrary.

martin nashiri biden administration ben al nashiri general martin latiff mr al majd conp prasino emc mark martin store costa nasser cova Martin al hilla guantanamo government Oslo
"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

09:11 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Kind of if you were looking. I say i think from a political strategy perspective. We're coming up on the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven Guantanamo still being there is kind of a reminder of what went wrong. I think to a lot of people and in a way to get people out of there would look like a mic. One time a smaller or to get rid of it Or close it down would be a win for this administration that said they. You know it's it's really hard getting guys out of there abdelatif first of all as you said. He had that sort of transfer package. It was completely done. It was just kind of paperwork that got snarled at the end. Like you know the secretary of defense his signature on a piece of paper essentially and so. That's what was holding him up. But like if you look at sort of his case like he's going back to morocco a country that is a stable country ally the united states. He has family there waiting for a job there waiting for him a house there waiting for him like he he was i think on paper he was the easiest case to transfer one of the folks i talked to who is involved in putting transfer together said that his case was not a low hanging fruit his case was annot hanging fruit it was like it was just right there it was It was the layup that the biden administration could just kind of put in the bucket. So steve how should we understand this transfer. There are fortyish people remaining at guantanamo. How many of them are plausible. Transfers at this point and how many of them fall into this category of really really difficult to imagine what a disposition that doesn't involve continued detention. Looks like there are Often like to think that there are four. categories ben of guantanamo detainees. And you know for folks who haven't seen it. The new york times has a fantastic thing called the guantanamo docket which really is a super helpful breakdown of of all of this including the four categories so with the transfer of missile latif. There are ten detainees who are of the remaining thirty nine who have already been cleared by the periodic review boards. Who you know. Meet the other sort of internal criteria for transfer and so the question is just if the biden administration is going to be able to find somewhere to send them of those tennis. Worth stress in a bunch of them are yemeni and that has continued to pose difficulties on the resettlement question. And just to be clear that because you can't easily repatriate somebody to yemen because of the state of that country so you have to find some third-country country attributing to take the person. At least one of the ten is stateless which raises complications of its own. So those ten. I think it's right to sort of about this the way. Let's put it as no hanging fruit. Said the low hanging fruit are the ten you know who have been cleared in are still there. There are another seventeen who are in detention not in the military commissions who have not been cleared by. Prp's and you know. I think those are the most complicated cases for the administration politically that will be the last nut to crack in the universe at guantanamo. There are two of the remaining thirty nine who are serving sentences pursuant to military commission convictions. And then there are ten who are in various stages of pretrial proceedings in the military commissions. And that's it and so you know twenty seven of the thirty nine on the tension side twelve of the thirty nine and the military commission side and the twelve on the military commission side that have their own problems. But i think from the from the perspective of an administration that has not repudiated commissions. You know. I think it's safe to assume those are going to soldier ahead at whatever terrifyingly slow paced. They're soldier in the the. You know the real political challenge the by administration the the diplomatic challenges. The ted who have already been cleared the political challenges the other seventeen all right before we turn to the other major issues that arose which coincidentally involve those other groups of people. Let's finish up with with the transfer Situation latif have you been in touch with Lot of nassar's family owned with him. I you were sort of famously. Not able to have direct contact with him while you were reporting your story about actually surprised. You're not in morocco hanging out with him now. It's yeah it was. I was very tempted. Let me tell you But i basically in reporting i did. A number of interviews with former guantanamo detainees. And those were the hardest interviews. I've ever done in my entire career impart because these men have been through a lot and they are very i mean they have all kinds of sort of ptsd and they have all kinds of Hesitations and unwillingness which you can sort of imagine to sit and subject themselves to more questions and so to me. I like that was actually very much. My first impulse like here. He's got gets transferred. Just jump on a plane. But then i realized that actually probably more productive. What would lead to a better interview and a more kinda humane way to approach. It is to sort of give them a little time. Let them settle with his family. modal space. I didn't want to be you know the pozo going in through brittany spears bathroom window or whatever and just give them a little space and then and then kinda pursue it. After that. And i think that Yeah i i have been sort of in touch with him through his lawyer and and as well with the family Again through the lawyer and yet they are. They are ecstatic. They're so excited They are and especially because it. Sort of coincidentally thank happened to be. He'd when when he sort of the day before he lands there so he celebrating his first. You know holiday with his family in nineteen years so they are. They are Very excited they are very. They're also a little bit. I mean kind of tender transitional time for them. Yeah so i. I think it's kinda we'll see how it shakes out and hopefully i'll be able to To get that you know interview that i've been waiting for for like five years now. So steve let's talk about general mark martin's who was the chief prosecutor of the military commissions. And as you described contended for a number of years that he would be there through the nine eleven trial mark. Martin's has now announced his retirement. The nine eleven trials still hasn't happened. What happened well you know. We only know been publicly. Reported ben and and so. I think it's an important caveat upfront but there are coincidences. That seemed to give a lot of credence to the public reporting. So carol rosenberg and at least on one of the stories i think. Charlie savage reported that martin's stepped away as the result of fight with others in the biden administration albeit unnamed. Others about the position the government was going to take on an interlocutory appeal in the al-nashiri case al-nashiri folks may remember is the alleged accused mastermind of the october. Two thousand bombing of the us has coal. It's al-nashiri case where the dc circuit in twenty nineteen wiped away three and a half years of pretrial proceedings because of a conflict that the trial judge hadn't disclosed here. Now ben what. We're what everyone's fighting about is an effort by the government led at the time general martin's to introduce statements al-nashiri made while he was in cia custody and by every account accept the government's being tortured not at his trial but at least in support of certain pretrial proceedings and the military commission and that fight produced a ruling by the trial. Judge judge a cost a gosh. I think it was late last year early this year. Adopting what to my mind was a rather implausible. Reading of the military commissions act under which those statements could be admitted for pretrial proceedings because pretrial proceedings were not quote proceedings in a military commission on that the that was just a reference to the trial. Whoever has the better argument al-nashiri has appealed that to the court of military commission review and general martin. Sears for court my favorite court the court that has has done the most the most article one courts bad name of any court. I can think of so. The that appeals. Pending and the time in of martin's departure was the day. The government's response was due and on that date. Not only did you know the times..

biden administration guantanamo abdelatif military commission nashiri morocco Situation latif nassar Guantanamo latif ben steve The new york times tennis brittany spears united states carol rosenberg ted Charlie savage mark martin
"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:43 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Stagnated. We talked about the resignation of general martin's. And we talked about the dc circuits. Latest forays into guantanamo bay. It's though l'affaire podcast. July twenty third a guantanamo update with latiff. Nassar and steve vladeck. So steve get us started. It's been a a big few weeks for guantanamo news which usually doesn't take place in big clusters give us an overview of how the the world the small world of guantanamo bay is different this week than it was safe three weeks ago. Well i mean. I think the first thing is that there are things happening in the military commissions. I mean we've were on the far side of what was a sixteen seventeen month pause in every single pretrial proceeding in all four of the pen. No military commission cases and you know we had the first proceedings in at least two of those cases in the last couple of days in the last week or so. So that's i think a big shift. There's one fewer detainees guantanamo then. There was a couple of weeks ago. So we've had the first you know. Transfer of a detainee out of the administration at least a transfer that wasn't pursuant to a plea agreement since president obama's last folded office in two thousand seventeen and we no longer have general mark martin's as the chief prosecutor of the military commissions even though at various points general martin's had told various folks that he was gonna see the nine eleven trial all the way to its conclusion that ended up not happening Apparently it didn't happen because of a disagreement over some litigation strategy. So you know. These are at least in guantanamo land. Pretty big deals and then the fourth piece of news is sort of less of a pretty big deal because it was sort of a punt but the the biden administration filed its brief under seal in probably the most important guantanamo case. The dc circuit has heard in a while about whether the due process clause applies to the guantanamo detainees and apparently according to report him from carol. From charlie savage the administration took no position on that question. So you know. I would say ben four to five pretty big news items that i didn't matter a lot on their own but together also i think are a pretty interesting inflection point all right so we're going to go through each of those in turn but i wanna start with the transfer. The trump administration had not transferred people at least not pursuant to plea agreement and the the gentlemen transferred was named lot if nassir and we happen to have lots of nassir. Al beit a different one right here. Lot f- tell us about the gentleman who was transferred from guantanamo. This week and how you came to be interested in him. Yeah well. I guess. Maybe i'll answer the second question. I and in a way in your introduction you already answered it. Which that i found too much to my sort of befuddle moment a few years back when i was just sort of procrastinating on twitter that there was this guy at guantanamo who had my same name. Yeah i just like. I didn't realize that such a person exists. As soon as i did. I immediately wanted to know everything i could about him. So kind to your to the first part of your question. Basically what i could find out. Then there was pre little about him out there. The first kind of place where i found anything was on the guantanamo docket on the new york times website. And basically what. I found about him there through those Like leaked dod dossiers. It sounded very nefarious. I mean he basically the the charges. They were actually formal charges. But basically what they said were. He was a top explicit expert of al qaeda. He was top advisor to osama bin laden. He helped blow up the bamiyan buddha statues which were a unesco world heritage site he fought. Us and coalition forces at the battle of tora bora and then wound up at guantanamo where he had all kinds of disciplinary infractions. And everything like that. That's sort of what it said. I had this very stark picture of the sky. And then when i talked to his attorney a woman. By the name of shelby sullivan bennett. Who was then at the law firm reprieve. She basically said the exact opposite she said. No no no. This guy was an aid worker at the wrong place the wrong time. Yeah he never. Al qaeda didn't have any kind of relationship with osama bin laden and so on and so on and basically this guy the us paid a ransom for this guy and they got a guy who you know Who's just mixed up in something. Nothing do with and never had charges and never had a trial and then to kind of to make matters more intense. What at the time. When i discovered around Twenty two ebb and of two thousand sixteen early twenty seventeen. He had gone before this. Pr be hearing this parole like process Board made up of people from the heads of six top agencies of the us government and they unanimously declared that he was that they didn't need to be holding him any longer he was not a continuing threat so he was this guy that was sort of like cleared on paper but remained at guantanamo. Not sort of when. I found him when i started doing research into his story. And as you reported in your excellent radio lab series about him he kind of got hung up in this end of the obama administration period where he was Notionally under under certain circumstances cleared to be transferred to and yet it kinda didn't just didn't happen before trump took office. What do we know a lot about the circumstances of his actual transfer was it just that the biden administration picked up where the obama administration left off when it left office and now that they had the chance they affected the transfer order or is there more to the story than that. That's basically the story. There's maybe a little more to the story like it does feel like in general. The story is the his transfer was kind of this une. Cash check from the obama administration of the biden administration. Just finally you know endorsed or whatever but basically there were other things..

guantanamo guantanamo bay latiff Nassar steve vladeck biden administration charlie savage martin Al beit mark martin osama bin laden shelby sullivan bennett al qaeda steve carol obama dc tora bora ben obama administration
"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

"Story was produced by ariel plotnik. twenty. Twenty one is the twenty-fifth anniversary of the telecommunications act of nineteen ninety-six the last comprehensive update to internet regulation. The internet has experienced more than a few updates since nineteen ninety-six but internet regulations have not. That's why facebook supports updated regulations on key issues like preventing election interference protecting people's privacy reforming section to thirty and more see facebook's progress on key issues and what's next at about dot f. b. dot com slash regulations and now one more thing from national health reporter.

"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:14 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

"And then have that taken away at the last minute. Yeah and to go to the family's house and to see. They sort of renovated a portion of the house to make a little apartment for him and they were all ready for him and even him at guantanamo he'd given away all his stuff he thought he was leaving my fellow producer susi luxembourg night. We went to morocco and we visited his family. And i just had one of the erie est experiences of my life actually with one of his sisters and it sort of plays out in tape and you can play it now if you want so about a dozen relatives in all came up to meet me in any case after the greetings. Cook the some lunch and it's called the ciller. it's a special monroe conditioner asked if you stop recording. They didn't want us to record lunch. So i set my microphone down and went to wash my hands and one of the most striking things that's ever happened to me in my life happen next. I got intercepted by a petite woman in a hijab whom i later learned was ability sister. Cathedra she saw me and just gasped and started crying. She started speaking arabic really fast. A grabbed r interpreter tarek. He told me what she said. She's said that she had known. I was coming and she. She knew that. I had her brother's name but what she didn't expect was that i was his height that i had his build that i looked like him and that i was around the same age that he was when she last saw him looking at me she said and and actually would later say again and again. She felt like she'd gone back in time. She she just wanted him to be in her home so bad and there i was i was close enough. You know and she would take it. Do you know what things are going to be like for him. Now have have you talked to family at all or do you have a sense of what his future might look like now that he's been released in morocco. I've talked to his family. He has his b. Has it's sort of a job lined up for with his brother of was like a pool cleaning company. One other thing that seems really sort of healthy. I guess besides having a a stable family waiting for him job a place to stay within the city that he lives in casablanca. There is a kind of a rehab center for basically torture victims where he can be rehabilitated. There's another thing which may be. Maybe this was sort of naive of me. But but when i when i first got into this story i remember thinking like you know if and when they let this guy al like if he wasn't pissed at the united states then like he's gonna be pissed now and that sort of what i thought but getting to know him through his lawyer and then also through his family. It seems like he's not angry really. He's kinda just tired and sad he. He wants to start a family. He has a name picked out for a son. He's wanted now for nineteen years and he's not being allowed to have. What do you think his experience in the past in going forward says about the legacy that guantanamo leaves around the world the main takeaway that i've like after staring at this guy and his case for almost now five years it just feels like holding the hat long. Nineteen years not charge. No trial tortured him. That is medieval. That is something that is not of the modern age that set-back i believe the american experiment to like a millennium like before the magna carta. I think his getting out is one stop there. I think thirty nine more to go here. It's a one step towards making that right and bringing us back to you. Know twenty twenty.

susi luxembourg morocco monroe Cook casablanca al united states
"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

07:40 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

"Missy. Ryan covers national security for the post this week. Abdulah of nassar was released from prison. Sent back to morocco and is now at home with his family. They will spend eat together for the first time in nineteen years which in there is is a miracle in a statement about a lot of said quote. I have no words to describe my overwhelming sense of happiness and joy and there are other people who have been waiting to hear about abdellatif s- release. It feels good from our perspective. Like i think the. Us government promised this man to give him. it's freedom and they gave it to him and that's great and it feels great but there are also ten other men alone who've already been cleared for release. That are just waiting. There were free on paper. But they're stuck there and besides that there are many men there that haven't gotten their fair trial. If you listen to a lot of podcast you might know this voice. It is a lot of nassir. He's one of the co hosts a radio ad and as you may have noticed. His name is very similar to abdelatif. Nassir that weird coincidence was essentially the origin of a whole podcast series. It's called the other latiff and radio. Lot goes on this. Deep dive to understand more about the guantanamo detainee who shares his name and miss is the story of a guy the other lut if nassir the one that the senses does not count the one that if you write him a letter and i have many times it'll just come right back return to sender the one that doesn't have a passport a driver's license a social security number or phone number for that. I've come to think of him as a black hole in black hole. And that's because the other lot if nassir is detaining. Two four four at guantanamo bay. We talk radio blog on monday afternoon. To hear about what he's been thinking since abdelatif nassar's release and about who. This person is beyond his identity as they guantanamo prisoner. This guy grew up in morocco. Nerdy muslim kid from the suburbs. You know middle class loved science. Had a kind of boisterous family. He felt a lot like me at the beginning. And so for me. I was kind of looking at this guy and i was thinking what happened here. The us government took abdelatif into custody because they believed he engaged in terrorist activities but his defense attorney push back on almost every premise of those accusations. She was saying you know. This guy was effectively the aid worker in the wrong place at the wrong time. He didn't do any of those things he wasn't al qaeda didn't have relationship with osama bin laden like nah. None of these things are true. Is what his lawyer said. And so for me. I thought okay. There's like a like a vacuum of information here except for two things which are diametrically opposed to one another and somehow has really been covering this man and somehow just because of my name. I've been sort of thrust into it and now i can't not do it. You know what were some of the moments from his life that you really honed in on or that you felt like you were able to get a little bit of a better picture of who this guy is. The reason moment though is a big question which was at one point in his life he goes to sudan and he goes to work on osama bin laden sunflower farm and it was such a mysterious thing because he was in before that he was in libya was with his brother his life sort of made sense up until that point and then for some reason he just goes to a country where he knows nobody to work going to farm. He's a city kid. He doesn't have any kind of farming experience. So far as i can tell paper. And why and kinda like trying to report that out really hard trying to figure out. Make sense of this guy's life you know. We came up with a interviewing his family. Basically you you can sort of piece together. Oh it has a little bit to do with. Maybe his mom's death or maybe it has a little bit to do with his feeling like You know he was a very promising. Young academic kidman potentially The first one is family to go to college but then he drops out. Because it doesn't go well you frustrated at all this academic promise and he's sort of spirals out because so much of this reporting process was was just like just piecing together just the tiniest scraps of information and trying to make a full picture of a life out of it. It feels like that. In inev- itself is part of. I think what is for many people so problematic about guantanamo. Is that because there is this vacuum of information about the people who are there. It's so easy for them to be two-dimensional even one dimensional Because they're just name in this kind of obscure black box of the us criminal justice system. And so i feel like what you were trying to do with this person. In many ways like push back against what guantanamo is at its core which is like taking a person and saying that they are a terrorist and then leaving the details at that. Yeah you're you're entirely right. Like if does feel like an erasure an eraser of a of a personality. So for example for so long in guantanamo. She's just Blackbox he didn't have a lawyer he did not so there was really hard to find out anything about it but then we got this one sheet and it was a list of his weights periodically. Way him and you'd be reading it and you'd be like is that like that's either a typo or a hunger strike like i can't tell or maybe he's sick and we were trying to piece together. Like what like imagine if someone had to recreate your life or try to try to imagine your whole life from just a list of your weight's over time. What do you know about how he was treated in guantanamo. He was not waterboarded. There were other. You know interrogation techniques that were used on him that some including myself would would call torture. For example sleep deprivation very prolonged solitary confinement sensory deprivation sensory overload. You've suffered serious hearing damage from being next to like noise machines that were running our generators. That were running for prolonged periods of time temperature. Extremities things like that. That i think i think most people would agree as torture. Did you get a chance to talk to his family or find out from them. What has been like for him to be in prison for did. I did get a chance to talk to his family. And it was very intense. I felt like they were family in mourning but without the kind of closure of a of a death and for them it's been nineteen years of just of just waiting to get their brother back to get some kind of closure to actually see him in person and be able to. Yeah kind of have this person back who've for for on tencent purposes besides like you know once a month video calls was like a ghost to them. Yeah well especially because my understanding is that he was supposed to be released from prison at the end of the obama administration or at least transferred out and then that didn't happen once trump was elected and that i can't imagine what that must have been like for his family to have the prospect of his freedom be so imminent.

abdelatif Abdulah nassar Nassir nassir morocco abdelatif nassar us government guantanamo osama bin laden Missy guantanamo bay Ryan al qaeda sudan libya kidman us obama administration trump
"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:01 min | 10 months ago

"latif" Discussed on Post Reports

"This podcast is supported by facebook from the newsroom of the washington. Post washington post the washington with the washington post reports martine powers. It's tuesday july twentieth today. President biden's renewed attempts to close guantanamo bay and the return of mask mandates so the biden administration has transferred a prisoner from guantanamo bay back to his home country of morocco. And it marks the first transfer of a prisoner from the high-security facility. Under the obama administration missy ryan covers national security for the post senior officials attended. The remaining are eligible for repatriation. Any sense of the targeted timelines for transferring them and is they were broader goal within this administration of closing for that time under yes. Our goal is to close on tano obey and really. It's the second since twenty seventeen because president trump halted. What had been a pretty robust resettlement program from guantanamo bay and it marks what we think potentially is the resumption of an effort to close the prison. Which has become a symbol of some of the problems that the united states encountered in its response to the nine eleven attacks. The prisoner transferred out. Guantanamo is odd elective nassir. He has been there since two thousand two and he's now fifty six years old. The us government believed that he was an enemy. Combatant you spend time in an al qaeda training camp in the ninety s but they never charged him with a crime. He was one five prisoners. Who is teed up for resettlement. At the very end of the obama administration his transfer was approved. Back in two thousand sixteen by an inter-agency panel that looked at these prisoners periodically to say. Is it safe for the united states to release or resettled these people or do they need to hold them. And this panel found back then that abdul latif nassar was eligible for resettlement for transfer back to his home country of morocco. And what happened. Was that for reasons. This group of prisoners at the eleventh hour were not able to be transferred. This was january of two thousand seventeen. There had been expectations that some of them would leave the prison and instead they ended up getting stuck for another four years and so he is now finally getting the transfer that has been approved for all this time. And what is the biting administration said about this publicly about their plan for guantanamo. I mean are they saying we are going to close this detention camp and that guantanamo will be no more. Yeah president biden does want to close the prison. And if you recall. He was vice president. When president obama way back in two thousand nine vowed to close the prisoners one of his first acts as president. I executive order that we are signing by the authority vested in me as president by the constitution and the laws of the united states of america in order to affect the appropriate disposition of individuals traveling retain by the department of defense at lana moth and promptly close attention facility at guantanamo consistent with national security and foreign policy of the united states and the interests of justice and the obama administration really did undertake this very intense effort especially in the early years to close guantanamo but it face so much opposition from congress from local officials who thought that it was too dangerous to release some of these prisoners who had concerns about saddling them in countries that were either in the midst of war or potentially having concerns surrounding their ability to safeguard some of the prisoners and so basically it was stymied for a long time. The obama administration did transfer a resettle more than one hundred and seventy prisoners either to their home countries or to third countries. And you know they were mixed results for that. Some of them have really thrived and flourished others were able to pick up their lives again or some of them did have security concerns but that all ground to a halt when president trump took office. This morning i watched president obama talking about gitmo guantanamo bay which by the way which by the way we are keeping open he was very very opposed to letting any more prisoners out. We'll get a loaded up with some bad dudes believe me. We'll get a load it up. He one point had promised to fill the prison up with new terror suspects. That's something that never happened. But it really was indicative of his policy. His approach to national security there was only one detainee that was transferred during the trump administration. And that was someone who was sent home to saudi arabia. Serve out the remainder of a sentence. He was getting under the military trial process. And i think it's just worth going back to understand. What are the origins of guantanamo. And how long has this prison been in existence. The facility at guantanamo bay has been around for a really long time. It's a military facility on the eastern tip of cuba and it was made famous in part during the cuban missile crisis. And it's something that has a long history but it became this international symbol of the excesses of america's response to the september eleventh attacks in the months following september eleventh. You saw all of these prisoners shackled in their orange. Jumpsuits blindfolded or hooded being taken to guantanamo was more than seven hundred prisoners at its peak and they were prison there now. It's been almost two decades. Most of them were never charged and some of them were resettled or release during the bush administration. And there's been this winnowing of the detainee population but basically advocates will say it really has come to symbolize what the united states did wrong and also it was kind of a rallying cry for extra mess around the world because they could point to this and say this is unjust know. The united states is treating a largely muslim population unjustly and it has also been controversial in terms of its legal basis and that is something that the biden administration is seeking to grapple with. It's incredibly complicated. Because of the The potential for renewed congressional opposition. Something that were already seen hints of at this point. And then the question of these military trials which have just dragged on for years and years and with lots of legal and procedural problems you that there is continued opposition Especially in congress. Tell me what people are saying. Who believe that guantanamo should not be closed. Well you know. I think everybody recognizes. The guantanamo is not an ideal situation at this point. You know there are only thirty. Nine prisoners that remain and the cost of maintaining. The prison is very high. So you're looking at cost of millions of dollars a year for each detainee. The detainee population is aging. Many of them need medical care. That is not available on this island and everybody recognizes that. The military commission process has not worked out as planned so while. There's an that that is the case. There is also a lot of concern especially among republicans in congress about the prospect of bringing any of these prisoners.

obama administration guantanamo bay guantanamo biden administration Post washington post united states martine powers President biden missy ryan morocco abdul latif nassar president biden washington lana moth president trump washington post Guantanamo us government al qaeda facebook
"latif" Discussed on For Your Reference

For Your Reference

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on For Your Reference

"Will just terribly as they did reload pink ghettos just anarchy but we love cheer we do we do. We do so. Let's move on. I wanna talk about a latif. Also want to talk about amara. And i guess we can bring in vince as well. So we get to see latif other star of the show he gets arrested gets released and then he just goes just in the background from then on in about the want. Stunning thing about latif is. He's a fucking gentle giant. Oh can i just say my favorite was staffel. Three latif wool. My man latiff just loved loved loved his family when he found amara wanted to run away with vince. It broke his heart. Yeah you could actually see. He was heartbreaking. it wasn't like toxic masculinity bride when it was just like it to him. It felt like it came out of nowhere. Where did it go wrong. Luckily i knew about it as we need like an army latif song was insane. He really loved the bar on the kids. Even when amara was when he told them to go away and he would take the kids. Take care of the kids. Yeah take school fuck. I'll not see a tiff doing this. I would not see a bus. Doing that will get of to get someone else to do it. If you're going to find a relative or like get some someone yeah he did. He handled his own business. Which is really surprising. I think he was probably the most content with his life. Like you know he. He was good at what he did but also at the same time he probably would have been fined working anywhere else he was happy with the mara he. He loved his children. And i guess you know in stories when you have characters that content. They usually make it unfortunately. Yeah i think one of the best parts for me was when he was really angry with the mara you know for taking the kids running away. Yeah but twenty told him you know..

vince amara twenty latif one staffel Three
"latif" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Players in the national hockey You be quiet. Yeah, change some things for his family to be soft. Oh, So this is John. Yeah, We're good. Morgan gave me the thumbs up. All right, Great. Okay. My daughter's here too. So it was like, sounds. It's just my daughter Cruise around. No, that's cute. I love it. Okay, Good. Okay, so I think Really understand what it was like for John to be on the other end of this to be like, you know, like the butt of a joke. You need to understand what hockey meant to John, like what it meant for him to be playing in the NHL like everyone has their dreams like when your kid expressed in the States. It's football baseball in Canada. When you ask a 78 year old we do those projects in class. What do you want to be when you grow up? And I think 90% of the boys like I'm gonna be in the NHL. And I always said that my parents have all that stuff all over the walls and stuff. But, yeah, I always dreamed of playing the NHL. I think everybody that was there. Big dreams. So, yeah. So John has this classic Canadian hockey kids story put on skates when I was three. My dad built the rink in the backyard played all the time every single day, morning, noon and night and you just go to sleep in your gear and wake up and just jump right on the ice skating till seven or eight at night. And you just jump in bed. Go to sleep. You just kept it on to save time. So, But the thing about John was that even as a kid, I was a monster. I I came out of the room. 24 25 24 a half inches long and I was £11.12 pounds. I was huge school pictures was a joke. Everyone thought I was like Teacher's assistant when I hit like grade 79, because I was so tall, and when you're young and you, that's all you have 00 coordination, and so John was never the top guy in his team. Never the fast. It's never the most skilled Never. You know the best that anything? I just kind of sorry. My daughter just started playing the panel beside us. Um, Yeah. Um Are you okay with the piano? Latif Aiken. I'll get her off. Okay, that we bring. Sorry. It's.

John NHL hockey Latif Aiken Morgan Canada football
"latif" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A time joke between two guys on a podcast would end up twisting the fate and fortune of one of the most feared load. Punishing players in the national hockey You be quiet. Yeah, change some things for his family to be soft. Look. So this is John. Yeah, We're good. Morgan gave me the thumbs up. All right, Great. Okay. My daughter's here too. So if there's like, sounds, it's just my daughter cruising around. No, that's cute. I love it. Okay, Good. Okay, so I think Really understand what it was like for John to be on the other end of this to be like, you know, like the butt of a joke. You need to understand what hockey meant to John. Like what it meant for him to be playing in the NHL like everyone has their dreams. Like when you're a kid expressed in the states. It's football baseball in Canada. When you ask a 78 year old we do those projects in class. What do you want to be when you grow up? And I think 90% of the boys like I'm gonna be in the NHL, and I always said that my parents have all that stuff all over the walls and stuff, But yeah, I always Dreamed of playing the N h. I think everybody that was there. Big dreams. So, yeah. So John has this classic Canadian hockey kids story put on skates when I was three. My dad built the rink in the backyard played all the time every single day, morning, noon and night and you just go to sleep in your gear and wake up and just jump right on the ice skating till seven or eight at night. And you just jump in bed. Go to sleep. You just kept it on to save time. So, But the thing about John was that even as a kid, I was a monster. I I came out of the room. 24 25 24 a half inches long and I was £11.12 pounds. I was huge school pictures was a joke. Everyone thought I was like Teacher's assistant when I hit like grade 79, because I was so tall, and when you're young and you, that's all you have 00 coordination, and so John was never the top guy on his team. Never the fast. It's never the most skilled Never. You know the best that anything? I just kind of sorry. My daughter just started playing the panel beside us. Um, yeah, if you, um are you okay with the piano? Latif Aiken. I'll get her out. Okay? Yeah, that was great. Sorry. It's cute. That last question. Okay. Thanks. Thank you. Uh um So you Yeah. Um, she Well, there's something you said that you Here. Let me let me put her to bed. One second story. Like to, um, Take your time. Take totally take your time. I'll keep you on the phone. I will take two seconds. But even if she cries.

John Um hockey NHL Latif Aiken Canada Morgan football
"latif" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"It. I think most closing some plugs. You have a lock on your closet? No, we don't even have door handles that are. Well, I'm saying, why would you need a lot of closet? But like my parents have a lot of their closet. Maybe my parents were into something I don't know. I don't know. Maybe of learning things they don't want to know. Move on. I wanna go to Brooke's parents house. Now. Stop. Don't Next message A Keisha, This is From the other night. Uh, we were hanging out and you were telling me that you know, you would like to maybe hang out again, just the two of us, and that sounds great to me. I just I need to postpone it for, like, Just a couple of weeks. Um Have some surgery coming up, and I'm actually really excited about it. I'm I'm actually getting butt implants and e just I You know, I haven't been really happy with my with my glutes for a while. And pain. The way technology is, you can honestly make your butt look like just about anything you want. So I told my doctor that I want me but you look like a small pumpkin. It's hard to explain, but like a petite pumpkin, and I would really like to show you. I mean, when way. Hang out. I would really like to show you my pumpkin, But And maybe when you see it you you could say it's Gord. Just you know, like a like a Gord. You know, gorgeous pumpkin family, So I think next working Wow. Oh, my God. My favorite dude. Thank you by the girl, The pumpkin booty. I'm sold. I'll marry you pick like something sexier than pumpkin shaped like a melon. Or is there another like Latif? Thank you. Yeah, um, Acorn squash. Are.

Latif Brooke
"latif" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"40 live everywhere on the I heart radio app on this Tuesday, September 15th bottom of the hour. Of course, we've got some swamp watch to get to have heard something today. I don't think I've ever heard of before. It's a caucus, a bipartisan congressional caucus. Called the problem solvers Caucus thes lawmakers air so unsatisfied with what Congress already does their caucuses designed to seek common solutions to issues. Which, for some reason, seems a little Bit redundant, and we'll talk about that. And what Nancy Pelosi says about staying in session until they come up with another another relief bill for covert 19 still feel like the problem solvers air like when the teacher separates the first graders into different groups, toe work on different skills, and one group is the problem solvers. Very ah, Juvenile. To me. It is very true. But then again, it's Congress. Yeah. What else is going on Time for what's happening? Big deal out of Washington, D C. We'll talk more about it in Swamp watch, but Israel has signed deals to normalize ties with United Arab Emirates. And with Bahrain in this deal that was brokered by President Trump, in what has been described as a diplomatic breakthrough there called the Abraham Accords signed by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Iraqi Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed al Neon and Bob Rainy, Foreign minister Oh, boy. Ah! Ah! Do Latif honey. At this ceremony at the White House today, We're learning more about the deputies who were ambushed Saturday night by that monster that is still on the loose The manhunt very much alive in L, a county. Claudia was the female deputy is the female deputy's name, and she apparently was a librarian before she applied to join the county Sheriff's Department three years ago. She's the 31 year old mother of a six year old boy, her partner, not married, but has a girlfriend and, of course, family. Video. I saw an even longer version of it. Today. The video taken from a surveillance camera, where you can see her tending to her partner's injuries, while her head is on a swivel. You can imagine the terror of If this Rando is going to come up and shoot at us who else is waiting to its well, and he's gone, or is he coming back? He gone? Yeah, um, the the length by the way, share being aware of what was on with Conway last night. It was a pretty lengthy, pretty good interview that that he and Steve Gregory put together so you could go on Conway's page on the website at CAF. I am 6 40 dot com. And here that interview The Bobcat fire continues to be a massive problem. Yesterday we were at 6% containment Will. That thing grew overnight, So the containment was knocked down to 3% Mount Wilson Observatory, which was also threatened by the station fire back in 2009. Is the recent concern and, of course, the broadcast towers there that are valued at about a billion dollars a swell well. Briana Taylor's family has finally settled a lawsuit with the city of Louisville $12. Million Brown. A Taylor was a 26 year old Mt who was shot when Louisville Metro Police Department officer served a no knock narcotics warrant on her home back in the middle of March. Lanie to Baker is an attorney for Brianna's family and said, it's important to know here. A financial settlement was non negotiable without police reform justice for Brianna's multi layered What we were able to accomplish is tremendous, but only a portion Of that layer. Now, some of the things that they have changed department wise Include that presidents of paramedics whenever a warrant is executed like that, the night of the shooting. The ambulance left Brianna's Taylor's apartment before the officers got through the her doorway, and she didn't receive immediate TMS treatment. She eventually bled to death from the floor of her apartment. There will be early action warning system to identify officers with red flags. Retention of records related to internal office complaints and investigations. I mean, there is a laundry list of things that the Louisville Police Department is going to be changing as a result of this lawsuit. Looks like there is a reward out to find the killer of a 10 year old boy who was shot while riding in a car with his family in La Puente. This happened back in May. I was riding in the car with his family about 9 15. PM May 17th he was in the back seat family was heading home from the uncle's house. And He was shot. According to investigators, a black sedan with its headlights off pulled alongside the family's car. Someone inside the sedan fired one shot striking little Enrique. And they don't have I mean they've been working on since May. So now at $40,000 reward up in the case, big news in the tech world and the money world, Apple is going to launch a new remote fitness service, their first venture into online workout videos. It's called Apple Fitness. Plus, we'll launch before the end of the year about 9 99 a month. By the way, the timing of this could not have been better with more and more people not allowed to go to gym. So, yeah, trying to do stuff in their own garage or On their palates on or whatever, but speaking appellate, Tom, by the way. Shares in pellets on fell 5%. As a result of this news, you know what I'm thinking about? That is the fact that pellet on one of the benefits of Pel is on one of the big selling. Points of pellet on and you don't know what until you've you've used one are the instructors. The instructors are really the best part. They're like therapy and Apple's going to have to compete with personalities because that's really kind of what makes it addictive is the personalities. So you know you can't just have some Joe Shmoe on their doing? Dead lifts and and you know, curls and squats. You're gonna have to bring the personalities with that thing, too, with that service, And maybe there's a plan to and maybe they'll compete with telethon for trainers and things like that. If they can pay, they can pay for the best ones. But that'll be interesting. Also talking about having AH, bundling some of their subscriptions together. So an apple one plan, but they're calling it would let you have apple music. Apple TV plus Apple Arcade 50 gigs of iCloud storage for 14 99 a month a family plan would be 20 bucks a month. And then there's a premiere plan, which would also include Apple News, plus Apple Fitness. Plus and all that sort of stuff, so they're getting. I mean, talk about the apple ecosystem. It's just expanding even more. Are you excited about the man? DeLorean Season? Two. I didn't know that I'm excited.

Apple Louisville Police Department Congress Swamp watch partner Nancy Pelosi Conway Briana Taylor Brianna Apple News White House Mount Wilson Observatory Steve Gregory La Puente Bahrain Louisville United Arab Emirates Washington Latif
"latif" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"latif" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"I finished graduate school, and then I basically became a science journalist which is sort of again like something I didn't really know any listing I knew was my sister who like by that point was Yes. She was a news reporter. Like neither of US really knew anybody in the field like we sort of I think kind of made it up as we're going along and we're lucky enough to have like a few mentors here and there to kind of help us piece it together. But Yeah. But it's so science journalism I was like, okay. I'll just gonNA take what I know from play writing and I'm GonNa take what I know from the history of science and I'm just GonNa and what I know from like you know talking to people at at at. A dinner party or whatever, and just like tell people telling people stories, I'm going to try to. Put that in a blender and and see if I could make a career out of that, which is what whatever doing. My son and I have also been listening to your. PODCAST I think it was earlier this year really to write the other. Let's move. Yeah this. This. Year. Yes. Looking you you go new podcast new, you Netflix show The question I. I think the next episode, I'M GONNA listen to its Afghanistan. The question I have is. At times in the podcast feel like. The story is about you. In your relationship with your face young. I'm curious because you sort of. Relate yourself to the other Latif and. The choices he made and the environment that he was in that sort of directive to where it is that he added up versus you and the choices you made and sort of the environment that you grew up that is taking you to where you are today I'm curious about that. You know I don't know whether it's did you learn anything about you? Did you learn anything about your faith in your relationship to it? I think I think it. was quite a shock. It was quite a shock i. think there were a few things that happened sort of around the same time when I started working when I found the existence of this guy the other if this guy with my name who was a detainee at Guantanamo Bay who had not had a trial or even charges pressed against him for almost twenty years when I learned about that Guy It was also around the time that I had my first. Kid. And it was also around the time when president trump was elected and the Muslim ban and there were a bunch of other things that happened and I think before then. Like I I wouldn't necessarily self identify as a Muslim I feel like I'm very proud of my like the culture that I was raised and I like I'm I'm not I'm not a practicing Muslim but I felt like it was like a part of my cultural identity, but it wasn't one that I would sort of proudly. Like where in a way like I was like I'm a science reporter I don't really care about any of the rest of the stuff like this is just what I do and and that was how it was raised but it doesn't matter and and and I, think now I feel much more like. Oh, this is a part of me like this is a part of me and who I am and it's I influence my kind of Spirituality in different. Ways but but but even more importantly like my my day to day reality, the values that I have the the the way that I see the world and. And my politics too I mean. So so for me, I was like it was a it was those three things like the trump administration this story that I was working on about this particular guy, and the fact that I had a kid all of a sudden I had this kind of moment where I was like Oh. Wow. I really need to do some I feel like I have a sort of undigested. On on chewed. Part of myself that I need to like really kind of look at scrutinized and. And address because it's like this thing that I just sort of put on pause like that I I grew up with and then I was like I'll figure that out later and it was like, oh no, now's the time. Now's the time because in a way it feels like the the. I don't know t to do this man's story justice in a way kind of the only justice ever he ever has gotten. I. Like I felt like it was necessary for me to. Kinda Kinda be a be a guide for the listener to like help help them imagine this guy you know. For, sure, let's get to some. Questions. Cure that people have free. So the first one. Is from. Hasina. Great. So she's in a bunch of questions. To, ask him 'cause they're all related. So number one is, what is the most beautiful thing of discovered about connections? With. The scariest thing. You've discovered. and. How did you know the directions of the connective threads in your stories with the right directions? To. Explore. Yeah Okay I'll take the last question I because it's the easiest on for me like I really imagined all of these I tried to scope them from the beginning. So I I would often start with A. Sometimes I would start with an end actually. So shape that I really fell in love with like in the cloud episode, not to spoil it for you with clouds episode. It starts with the cloud and ends with a cloud, a real cloud, and really to be even more technical starts with a storm and ends with a storm. So it starts storm clouds the ends of the storm cloud in a way. And I had that idea that it's like Oh that's beautiful. Let's do that and then go all over the world and then we'll go to another class. There's a kind of a pretty shape there. For. Digits it's like let's start with a kind of mundane thing which is your you know this this library book and then your taxes. And then let's go bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger. You know since it until it's like the biggest possible thing. So. Each of them has kind of shape like that like a like a and and whether it's something that you pick on a pick up on is if you are not I I don't know but but I sort of I built it with a shape that way. So so the connections they are like. Their structural it's like it's like we talked about it like like each absence kind of a roller coaster. Building a roller coaster each part you need each part to get you to the next part to get you enough momentum to through that loop or to to to get you around that curve you know so. We built them very carefully actually and hopefully it feels like on a roller coaster it's just like you're zipping along, but actually like it was. Really. Careful. Yeah like like. Dynamics going into each one. Really Cool. Yes. I feel like you've pulled up other mushrooms I try to answer those other two if you want. But yeah. Yeah. So beautiful as she is asking about the most beautiful thing and sort of the scariest thing about connections yeah I think this. I mean to be honest with you. I don't think there was anything in the show. There were scary things I found in the show about. Your apps spying on you about. There's a bunch of things. I don't think I could have even thought while I was making this. That something like corona virus could have happened like A. Sense of it like I. I'm a historian of I studied the history medicine I wrote my my dissertation on an epidemic you know I I. B- While I was in Grad school I learned about nineteen eighteen. Still I, don't think I could have anticipated or seen the level of like global disruption and scariness that this pandemic kind of showed us all and this isn't even the worst could get it could it could have been worse than it could still be worse. Yes. Let me see this Based on what you've studied. Are we what similarities are you seeing?.

reporter US Guantanamo Bay Netflix Grad school Latif trump Cure Hasina president Afghanistan
Washington DC - Prince William County Votes to Rename Stonewall Schools After Black Community Members

Larry O'Connor

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Washington DC - Prince William County Votes to Rename Stonewall Schools After Black Community Members

"William Public schools After a unanimous vote last night by the school board, the Prince William's School board had already been considering a name change for both the middle and high school name for Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. I think the George Floyd Death of George Floyd in the black lives matter of discussions have accelerated these movements. Prince William's School board chair, Barber, Latif tells w e mails mornings on them all. It's important to look at intent. What was the original intent? And what is it currently doing now? What is the posture of that symbol now? Is it intimidating folks? The names will be changed to Unity, Braxton Middle School and Unity, read High school, Barbara Brit W E Mail and

Prince William's School Braxton Middle School George Floyd High School Prince William William Public Schools Stonewall Jackson Barbara Brit Latif Barber
Queen Latifah weighs in on Gone With the Wind controversy: ‘Let it be gone'

Donna and Steve

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Queen Latifah weighs in on Gone With the Wind controversy: ‘Let it be gone'

"A queenly teva she thinks that the gone with the wind bringing it back campaign she says let's gone with the wind to be gone with the wind now there's some controversy here because Hattie McDaniel was the first black person to win an Oscar and she won it for playing mammy in gone with the wind so in Queen Latif a plate had the on the Netflix show Hollywood she wants to speak out about this and she just thinks that the that it's not something that we need to have a cell phone okay you know I mean that they have a disclaimer now that they play before it on HBO Max they have to get rid of a lot of movies yeah you know like I I think if you if they do put a disclaimer on a lot of these movies just saying that this three different times she also wanted people to know that they didn't even let Hattie McDaniel in the theater at the Oscars until right before she got that award some came outside and brought her into the auditorium

Oscar Queen Latif Hollywood Hattie Mcdaniel Netflix HBO
"latif" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:14 min | 2 years ago

"latif" Discussed on AP News

"A popular singer actress says she is no fan of gone with the wind when H. B. O. Max decided to pull the plug on gone with the wind it said it would return it to the streaming service along with material to help put the movie in proper perspective but as far as Queen Latif is concerned gone with the wind yet let down with them when we go all the way as for those who say spiking the movie for good somehow would tarnish the legacy of Hattie McDaniel the first black woman to win an Oscar queen the teeth isn't buying that they didn't even let her in the theater until right before she got that award someone came outside and and and and brought her into the auditorium she wasn't even allowed to sit in there besides Queen Latifah says even after winning her Oscar McDaniel ended up being cast only in other roles as a domestic I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

H. B. O. Max Queen Latif Hattie McDaniel Queen Latifah Oscar McDaniel Oscar Oscar wells Gabriel
Queen Latifah: Let ‘Gone with the Wind’ be gone forever

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Queen Latifah: Let ‘Gone with the Wind’ be gone forever

"A popular singer actress says she is no fan of gone with the wind when H. B. O. Max decided to pull the plug on gone with the wind it said it would return it to the streaming service along with material to help put the movie in proper perspective but as far as Queen Latif is concerned gone with the wind yet let down with them when we go all the way as for those who say spiking the movie for good somehow would tarnish the legacy of Hattie McDaniel the first black woman to win an Oscar queen the teeth isn't buying that they didn't even let her in the theater until right before she got that award someone came outside and and and and brought her into the auditorium she wasn't even allowed to sit in there besides Queen Latifah says even after winning her Oscar McDaniel ended up being cast only in other roles as a domestic I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

H. B. O. Max Queen Latif Hattie Mcdaniel Queen Latifah Oscar Mcdaniel Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
"latif" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"latif" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We can do the baby boomer generation spends a lot of money on fine wine. But as baby boomers retire that three hundred dollar bottle doesn't look so appealing on a fixed income. Tif hasten is enough valley realtor who specializes in selling vineyards in multi-million dollar states. So Latif you said, you might think about retiring in a few years, and you're worried about what you're going to drink. What tell tell me about your palate. I'm telling you that I have a very expensive pallet, because I have been drinking so many fantastic ones for so long. And it's not that I know a lot about wines. I know a lot about vineyards, but I know what I like what I don't like and apparently I like very expensive wines. So even when I go into a restaurant on buying loss of wine, I always taste it. And if I don't like any of the wines, I just have a MARTINI or something like that. So I think that when I'm retired I will probably. Drink maybe more important wines, or I need to find some really great valued Napa, and Sonoma wines, and other than that are probably just stick with Budka 'cause you won't be able to afford the Napa wines. I think I mean, not at two hundred fifty dollars a bottle, one hundred fifty. That's what I you know, I buy all that now because my clients, you know, that's what they make. And they support my business and I support business, and so who can afford to do that. Unless there with many, many tens of millions of dollars, you know, really, it's a pretty expensive exercise luxury properties in vineyards. So you're in the business of not the how important is the wine industry to nap. I mean is that is that all it is, if not all that, it is? But it's huge. I mean, this is a five billion dollar industry, you buying in corporate America. Really, it's a big business here, and the wine industry is very integral to the lifestyle here..

Napa Latif America Budka two hundred fifty dollars three hundred dollar five billion dollar million dollar
Christchurch shooting: what we know

Ethan Bearman

10:17 min | 3 years ago

Christchurch shooting: what we know

"Listen. There are a lot of things that changed since Friday or a lot of additional information that came in. So I thought I we would just sort of talk about what we now know about the terror attack that took place at the two New Zealand mosques one man Abdul Aziz was in the mosque. He was praying with his four sons he was in the Lynnwood mosque when he heard gunshots rather than run from the noise he ran toward it. And he grabbed the first thing he could find which was a credit card machine. And he flung it at the attacker. He hit him and the man the terrorist dropped his shotgun. Mr. picked it up. He said I pull the trigger. And there was nothing. In the meantime, the gunman ran to his car where he had other weapons and Mr. Z's followed throwing the shotgun at the vehicle and shattering a window. Mr aziza's. Actions, which and others described and interviews might just have prompted the gunman to speed away rather than return to kill more people. And it was only minutes later that two police officers from another town who were in the area ram the suspect's car into a curb and took him into custody. That's how the worst mass murderer in New Zealand's modern history came to an end the officers apprehended, the suspect only thirty six minutes after receiving the very first emergency call but interviews with dozens of survivors in an analysis of video that was recorded by the attacker as well as one that was made of his arrest by a bystander who was there suggests that the violence ended after a near miss by police at the first mosque and acts of Kerr bridge during and after the attack on the second if not for the two police officers, and they've not yet been publicly identified and Mr. Z's who had by the way, he fled Afghanistan. A quarter century ago that slaughter might have just gone on the suspect had two other guns in his car. According to police as well as two homemade explosives that. So those explosives that we were talking about on Friday, which we had reports that they were in two separate cars. And that they may those cars were then connected to a couple of the people who had also been taken into custody. Apparently. That's not true. It looks as if the two homemade explosives were actually in the primary suspects car the terrorist himself, the prime minister said it's abs- it absolutely was his attention to continue with his attack. This guy was a personal trainer. I'm not saying his name haven't said his name not going to say his name, but he was a former personal trainer from Australia. And he distributed a manifesto of white extremists hatred. Just minutes before he went on that rampage. The police said forty two. People were killed at Christ church's, Al Norma and then seven at the Lynnwood mosque. And a lot of people are saying that the reason there were only seven killed and seven is way too many, of course, but there were seven compared to forty two was because of Mr. Aziz his decision to confront the gunman. There was another victim who died at the hospital. So now there are fifty dead. And I believe forty eight injured I I'll have to check that. But it's in the high forties. The police they said they received the first call for help and officers arrived within six minutes the video recorded by the gunman which was live streamed on Facebook. Which is something we need to talk about showed a man trying to tackle him inside the first mosque. But that man was shot and killed. It was six minutes after firing his first shot that he drove away three minutes later, a siren can be heard on the video as he's Dr. To the second mosque the siren gets louder than it fades suggesting police in the gunman may have just missed each other with officers and medical personnel racing toward the second mosque as he was pulling away. The nearest police station was a little more than a mile. Although responding officers may have been farther away than that. And by the way, the frontline officers in in New Zealand. They're not armed. They're not armed and for. They have a protection the kind of protection that they wear. They wear stab proof vests, not bulletproof vests. So those responding to the shootings would have to have had to pull over and retrieve weapons that would be there a pistol, a Glock or a semiautomatic m for rifle, and then they'd also have to get ballistic armor from the trunks of their cars. The police that a special armed tactical unit also arrived at Al nor Maas, but that was four minutes at the first officers instill, it was only ten minutes after the initial emergency call it was pretty amazing. The response time one of the paramedics who entered the building with a police escort said there was a river of blood coming out of the mosque. It was literally flowing off terra cotta tiles. The authorities have. Instead an awful lot about what happened next. It's not clear when the ambulances arrived Christ's church hospital reported receiving several wounded victims in cars that were driven by relatives. I not by the ambulances initially. But the speed of the response everybody is saying the speed of the response definitely saved lives. And then as they're trying to deal with that massacre. The gunman attacked the Lynnwood mosque the imam who was leading prayers at Lynnwood Latif, a lobby said, he heard a voice outside, and he stopped and looked out a window. He saw a man in military gear wearing a helmet and holding a gun. He. Saw two bodies on the ground. He shouted to the congregation there were about eighty people there. He shouted to the congregation to get down. The gunman turned and fired through a window and just kept firing. And then Mr. ran toward him through that credit card machine. That's like the size of a small of a large rock, not a small rock a large rock. Both of them were similarly built ozzy's and the terrorist. And Z said he took five or six shots at me. He said I dove between the cars, and then he followed the guy. I mean, he not only through this thing. Adam and disarmed him. He went after he followed him the guy dropped the shotgun. Because the the machine at in him. He dropped the shotgun and picked it up and tried to fire it at him. But as he pulled the trigger it was empty apparently all the rounds had been spent and Z said his children were screaming for him to come back. And the gunman seemed really agitated he was swearing, and he was talking about killing you all when he was at the other mosque, by the way because we're talking about Lynnwood now. But when he was at L, nor he had gone back to his car. He had started the massacre left. The mosque went back to the car and picked up another weapon in went back inside and resumed his killing but not at Lynnwood after as these through the shotgun at the vehicle, and he said, he threw it like an arrow. The attacker drove away Z said it was like my mind wasn't working. It was automatic reaction. Like anybody? I was prepared to give my life to save another life. God bless you, Mr.. Because that's not like anybody. I'd like to think it was like anybody. That's like you. The officers arrived at the mosque soon afterward. And a thorns began locking down the neighborhood in searching for the gunman, but they got him quickly. They haven't talked yet about how they found him and managed to capture him without without some sort of assistance. But they were able to do just that eight hundred eighty eight ten is the telephone number eighty eighty eight ten. Yeah. So there's that. And then I want to mention one other thing, and I want to take your phone calls on this as we're still processing what happened, and let's keep in mind too that Lucille and is moving immediately to change their gun laws as restrictive as they are. And they're pretty restrictive they're going to do more. And it may involve an outright ban of certain weapons, also social media. The fact that this guy live streamed what he was doing live streamed. It it hits so many places so quickly. You know, this is dangerous to us all. Free speech is one thing. This kind of speech. I don't think should be protected speech, and how do you? But how do you stop it? What do you do? You've got the technology. What do you do? But before we do anything else. I wanna tell you about one of the victims. His name was Maud Imber him. He was wearing little White Sox the type with grips on the bottom. So that toddlers don't slip his shoes were still at the entrance where they had been removed when he entered the mosque at the time his body was carried out. He was three. He was born to Somalia family who had fled fighting in their home country more than twenty years ago. When the terrorist stormed into the mosque about ten minutes into the sermon and started spraying bullets indiscriminately around the men's section little wad appeared to think it was a scene from a video game. Like the kind that is older brothers like to play. And he ran to the gunman. This little three year old boy ran to the gunman. Who killed? Amid the chaos his father and brother ran in different directions. I'm telling you the morning is almost incomprehensible. New Zealand has very little gun violence last year. Twenty five people were killed with guns that was doubled with this one incident. It was enormous from New Zealand given the population on that island on a per capita basis this terrorist attack equates to our nine eleven. It has shocked the conscious of the

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